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DANIELGREGORY ARCHITECTURE

PORTFOLIO

University of Kansas | 2014


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CURRICULUMVITAE DANIEL J. GREGORY

WORK EXPERIENCE

816-617-5307

KU Endowment Association

djgregory91@yahoo.com 1431 West 19th Street Lawrence, KS 66046

Student Development Associate 2012-current Utilized communications and sales skills to successfully secure over $25,000 in donations; Professionally represented the University of Kansas to the public and alumni; Part of a 1.2 billion dollar campaign

Suddath Relocation Systems

INTERESTS

ProMover Summer 2012 Packing, loading, and unloading of household goods and furniture; Cleaning and organizing the warehouse at end of day; Inventoried customers’ items when moving

All-Safe Self Storage

Traveling

Leasing Agent 2006-2010

Hiking

7 Countries, 28 States Ouchita National Forest, Rocky Mountains

Skiing

Copper Mountain, Winter Park, Solvista

Cooking

Experimental

Building

Experimenting with various materials

Running

Half marathons, Tough mudder

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Riverside Self Storage

Leasing Agent 2008-2010 Managed over 1,200 storage units distributed between three locations; Used communications and sales skills to lease units to a wide range of customers; Responsible for solving any issues or problems that occured with our customers; Kept track of the financial books making deposits when needed

Olive Garden

Busser 2009-2012 Was part of a service oriented and customer focused team to provide a genuine dining experience; Worked as a team to meet the needs of the guests; Cleaned tables for the servers in order to keep the tables filled, maximizing revenue; Assisted the servers with any of their needs; The restaurant emphasized teamwork so we were encouraged to work as a team and encourage each other


SKILLS Design Thinking Freehand Drawing Sketching Soldering Project Management Time Management Leadership Communication Sales

SOFTWARE

ACTIVITIES | HONORS

Adobe Photoshop Adobe In Design Adobe Illustrator SketchUp KeyShot Vray for Sketchup Autodesk Revit Autodesk AutoCAD Rhinoceros 3D Grasshopper 3D Lumion 2.5 Microsoft Office Suite

Caddy Stack’s Volunteer Navigators Leader (J-Team) Member of the AIAS Member of the NSCS Member of the NSHSS Elisha’s Prophets STUCO Intramural Flag Football Intramural Basketball Kappa Sigma Fraternity Member Pledge Class President Academic Honor Roll (3.52 gpa) KU Hawk Week Leader Southwest Junior High Basketball Coach

REFERENCES Paola Sanguinetti

Department Chair and Associate Professor, Architecture

paolas@ku.edu

785-864-3862

Kapila Silva

Assistant Professor, Architecture

kapilads@ku.edu

785-864-1150

Professor, Architecture

sgrabow@ku.edu

785-864-3186

Stephen Grabow

University of Kansas |


C ONTENTS MUSEUM STUDY

DALLAS TECHNICAL MUSEUM

Fall 2012

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LAWRENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY

Spring 2012

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PARAMETRICS

KINETIC PARAMETRIC FACADE

Spring 2013

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HYPERDENSITY

CROSSROADS TRANSIT STATION

Fall 2013

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SELECTED WORKS

FREEHAND DRAWINGS

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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M U S E U M

D a l l a s T e c h n i c a l M u s e u m Fall 2012

My Junior year started with a project to design a museum to go in the Dallas Arts District, in the lot adjacent to the Nasher Sculpture Center by Renzo Piano. Looking at the surrounding buildings as well as visiting other museums was helpful to understand the context of the sight and how I could best integrate my building within the fabric of the city. As students, we were allowed to choose what media would be displayed in the museum. I chose to design a museum that shows how mechanical objects are assembled and how they work. The design of the building reflects the media being showed. Exposing how the building is constructed and expressing materiality mimics what is on display inside. In this design, I also felt there needed to be a separation between public and private spaces. The large curved wall creates an axis that serves as the boundary between public and private spaces, as well as a service corridor for circulation throughout the building. The radius of the curve and the location of the building on the site was determined by examining the surrounding buildings’ curves and focusing on the sculpture located in the north lawn of the Meyerson Symphony Center. 6 | Daniel J. Gregory


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South Elevation

Section AA

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Every building has layers to it, and that is something that I wanted people to see as they walk through the building. Thus, the viewing galleries are constructed out of a large box truss system, with a perforated screen layer, as well as an exterior aluminum skin. The layers are visible from within the galleries as well as from the exterior of the building and portray the construction and materiality of the building. These galleries are supported off the ground to create a lower level of galleries and a courtyard space that appears to be uninterrupted. Each gallery is oriented perpendicular to the defining curve of the building and point toward the pendulum sculpture in the North lawn of the Meyerson Symphony center.

East Elevation

Section BB

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1. 1/2” Aluminum Cladding 2. Stainless Steel Custom Bracket 3. Perforated Screen 4. Laminated Double Skin Glazing 5. Steel Plate Encasement 6. I-Beam 7. Steal Plate Connector 8. Hex Nuts 9. Fire Proofing 10. Channel Glass 11. Horizontal Mullions 12. Double Skin Curtain Wall 13. Thermal Air Mass

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20. 2’ Tall Lightweight Steel Truss 21. Drop Ceiling Panel 22. Steel U-Channel 23. 1/2” Gypsum Board 24. Metal Stud 25. Floor Tile 26. Floor Trim Board 27. 8” Thick Fiberglass Insulated Concrete 28. Vapor Barrier 29. 6” Gravel

30. 2” Thick Aluminum Panels 31. Steel Rod Ties 32. Metal Grate 33. Steel L-Channel

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14. Acidic Gloss Stain 15. 4” Thick Lightweight Concrete 16. Exterior Limestone Floor Panel 17. Insulation/Thermal Barrier 18. Vapor Barrier 19. 4” Thick Metal Decking

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Basement

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Level 1


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Level 3

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S T U D Y L a w r e n c e P u b l i c L i b r a r y Spring 2012 Located in Lawrence, Kansas, this project was to design a branch library for the existing Lawrence Public Library. We first looked at the building site and examined the surrounding buildings and how the landmarks affected the site’s exposure to the sun. My design for the library started with building footprint studies, focusing on pedestrian circulation. Vertically extruding a conceptual footprint while pushing in and pulling out different volumes of the building resulted in the current form. The main focus of my design was to group the programaic spaces according to their function.

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The building’s entrance is in the south east side of the central courtyard. A cantilevered lounge for reading overhangs part of the entryway. Upon entering the building, a person immediately experiences the main atrium space which serves as an area for the circulation desk. The floor plan of the building is separated into different cores based on public and private areas. One end of the building contains the adult reading room, offices, the archives, and circulation desk. The other core of the library consists of the Children’s room, the Historical Exhibition Gallery, and a small coffee shop. The clear glass stair tower directs people up to the Historical Exhibition Gallery, as well as to the roof of the gallery which is an outdoor patio space/partial green roof.

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P A R A M E T R I C S Z

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a d e Spring 2013

Partnered with Zahner Metals in Kansas City, our studio was presented with the challenge to design a faรงade system that utilized Parametric Modeling as the driving design instrument. Zahner agreed to provide us with the materials, and the use of their equipment to manufacture the mock faรงade system. Split into three different groups, our studio presented three different designs to Zahner. Based on the ease of manufacturing, the design intent, and various other factors, Zahner chose to manufacture the faรงade design that was proposed by my group.

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My group’s design focus was to create a façade that provided necessary sun shading, while allowing natural light in spaces that need it. We also researched ways that a façade could harvest energy and decided to pursue a design that would allow for the harvesting of wind energy. Small wind turbines became a kinetic aspect to our design, and impacted the overall form of the façade. Using Vasari and Ecotect, wind and sun studies were performed on a study building in the Lawrence, Kansas climate. The data collected from these programs was put into Grasshopper which translated the data to affect the design of our façade. In the Grasshopper definition we created, the wind turbines became attractor points that affected both the perforations in the façade as well as the shape of the each vertical fin of the system. The placement of the wind turbines was determined based on the wind data of the desired building collected from Vasari. The width of the vertical fins was affected both by the placement of the wind turbines as well as the sunlight data collected from Ecotect. 22| Daniel J. Gregory

Wind Data from Vasari

Grasshopper Function

Result in Rhino


I was interested in designing an interactive lighting system that would be part of the faรงade. Using the Arduino Uno, a programmable microcontroller, I was able to come up with a lighting design that would react to people walking in front of the faรงade. LED light strips span the vertical height of each fin and shine through the perforations. As a person gets closer to the faรงade, the lights get brighter.

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Arduino UNO Power Supply

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Since this was a Design Build studio, we had a budget and were able to build a full scale model that displayed all of the various conditions of the system. With the help of Zahner Metals, we were able to show how with the use of technology and parametrics, a product that is very unique can be mass produced even though the components aren’t the same.

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The structure of the life scale display became an important aspect since we weren’t attaching the façade to an existing building. The display was free standing, so we had to solve that issue by creating a wooden framework to which the vertical metal fins could be attached. I was largely in charge of the group of people working on the structural component of the system. As a studio, we were asked to design an interactive feature for the full scale display model. We decided to create a bench system that contained some of the same attributes as the façade. Perforations were the biggest part of the bench design which allowed for the bending of solid wood panels to create the surfaces for the bench.

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H Y P E R D E N S I T Y T

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This project started with a macro evaluation of the Crossroads District in Kansas City. Split into five groups, our studio looked at how cities with mass transit systems differed from cities without those systems. Looking at the population density, demographics, various modes of transportation, my group created a master plan of the Crossroads District to make it a more walkable and pedestrian friendly area. Increasing the population density to make it a hyper dense city would result in a necessity for a mass transit system such as the proposed light rail. Hypothetically, we decided the light rail would become a reality. I was responsible for designing a Multi-Modal Transit Station that would become a center for various modes of transit within the Crossroads District including the light rail system.

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Looking at the existing conditions of the Crossroads district, I collaborated with my group to determine a solution to make the Crossroads district an attraction, rather than a dead space between Downtown KC to the North and the Crown Center area to the South. Increasing population density by proposing multiple mixed use buildings was the first step in the process of creating a more attractive district. Being part of the arts district, it was important to maintain the unique character of the Crossroads by leaving some open spaces in the urban fabric to provide places for street vendors and performances. The master plan proposed changing the layout of the streets, increasing the width of sidewalks and installing bike lanes, reducing the amount of vehicular traffic flowing through the district. This would encourage people to experience the district more directly and engage in the various activities the district offers.

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The main concept behind my building was to create an iconic structure that was unique to the area and acted as a gateway to Kauffman Boulevard, the pedestrian walkway that was proposed in our master plan. The axes of 18th street and Kauffman Boulevard became important traffic corridors and impacted the design of my building. Studying how people would move across and through the site, it was essential to create an experience that was pleasurable and exciting.

The programmatic spaces of my building needed to include a residential portion that included various sizes of apartments, cafĂŠ, bike storage/rental station, micro-garage, and a waiting room for people using the light rail. I separated the residential portion of the building from the transit based areas to provide a buffer between private and public spaces. As a studio, we were urged to use wood construction techniques, specifically Cross Laminated Timber, for our designs.

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Level 1

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Level 2


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Levels 3 - 5

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Level 6

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East Elevation

Level 6 80’

Level 5 65’

Level 4 50’

Level 3 35’

Level 2 20’

South Elevation

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1. 12”x12“ exterior tile floor 2. 1/8” moisture barrier 3. 8” cross laminated timber (CLT) floor 4. 6” expanded polystyrene insulation 5. 2” aluminum mounting base 6. 2”x4” top plate

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7. l-bracket 8. 8” cross laminated timber wall plate 9. 4” rigid expanded polystyrene insulation 10. vapor barrier 11. air pocket 12. alucobond adonized aluminum panels 13. laminate hardwood flooring 14. 1/8” laminate 1. 12”x12“ exterior tileunderlayment floor 2. 1/8” moisture barrier 15. 8” CLT floor plate 3. 8” cross laminated timber (CLT) floor 4. 6” expanded polystyrene insulation 16. 8” expanded polystyrene insulation 5. 2” aluminum mounting base 6.

2”x4” top plate

17. 1” seamless steel pipe 7. l-bracket 8. 8” cross laminated timber wall plate 18. HVAC duct 9. 4” rigid expanded polystyrene insulation 10. vapor barrier 19. fire sprinkler head 11. air pocket 12. alucobond adonized aluminum panels 20. 2’ x 2’ drop ceiling 21. 6” recessed can light 13. laminate hardwood flooring 14. 15. 16.

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1/8” laminate underlayment 8” CLT floor plate 8” expanded polystyrene insulation

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22. 3” rigid foam insulation 17. moisture 1” seamless steel pipe 23. barrier 18. HVAC duct 19. 8” fire concrete sprinkler headslab on grade 24. 20. 2’ x 2’ drop ceiling 21. 2” 6” recessed canconcrete light 25. treated floor 26. 22. flashing 3” rigid foam insulation 23. moisture barrier 27. grate 24. aluminum 8” concrete slab on grade 25. 2” treated concrete floor 28. 26. french flashing grated drainage system 27. aluminum grate 29. corex drain pipe 28. 4” french grated drainage system 29. 4” corex drain pipe 30. vapor barrier 30. vapor barrier 31. 3” rigid foam insulation 31. 3” rigid foam insulation 32. 6” trench footing 32. 6” trench footing 33. 3’ x 3’ limestone pavers 34. 35.

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1/2” sand bedding 6” gravel

36. 3’ Concrete spread footingpavers 33. x 3’ limestone 34. 1/2” sand bedding 35. 6” gravel 36. Concrete spread footing

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Section AA

Section BB

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Path Path 1 1 68’ 68’

Floors 4 & 5

Path Path 2 2 49’ 49’ DN

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Path Path 3 3 70’ 70’

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Path Path 4 4 73’ 73’

Floors 2 & 3

Egress Diagam

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Structural Diagram

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S E L E C T E D F r e e h a n d

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D r a w i n g s

W O R K S


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S E L E C T E D P

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Architecture Portfolio  

by Daniel Gregory