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JOURNAL: ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO AIR UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE 2012 (391261) DAVID FITZWILLIAM

SOURCE: ALGORITHMIC.NET


EOI ARCHITECTURAL ARCHITECTURAL DISCOURSE

PERSONAL: DAVID FITZWILLIAM (BOATHOUSE) STATE OF THE ART: TREE OF KNOWLEDGE (BARCALDINE QLD) PARKITEERS MKII


PERSONAL (BOATHOUSE) The style and ideals that encompass my contribution to architecture is the notion of blending. Understanding and acknowledging environment as a primary aspect to design, allows for architecture to express its sense of belonging and easiness to sit within its neighborhood.

STATE OF THE ART (TREE OF KNOWLEDGE) This piece of architecture advances historical significance. The tree is marked as a starting point of a political movement (1891) and was used a meeting place of a labour rebellion. The structure that covers it expresses the growth that this place had envisioned (the labour party) and draws back each section of the structure to the tree beneath. It relates back the modern ideals and beliefs to a single point in history.

MAIN and ABOVE SOURCED FROM ARCHITECTURE AUSTALIA MAR/APR 10 p 58,61 LEFT SOURCED FROM ARCHITECTURE AUSTRALIA NOV/DEC 10 p35 BOATHOUSE SOURCED FROM D. FITZWILLIAM

STATE OF THE ART (PARKITEERS MKII) The architecture above advances in sustainability. The above image shows the winning design for new form of bicycle storage at Melbourne’s train stations. It excelled in sustainability by using construction that is prefabricated and off the shelf components. It communicates the sustainability of its users by displaying (on LED screens) the carbon savings that the cyclist makes to others that use the station. These measures are designed to encourage use by others and can easily be expanded.


INNOVATION THROUGH COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN CARDBOARD COLUMNS These columns which physical exist and prefabricated are the work of Michael Hansmeyer whom employed the use of computer aided design and a subdivision algorithm (involving geometry) that can produce between 8 and 16 million differing facets. The columns are so incredibly detailed that they seeming appear to be a 3D computer model, however this is not the case. These columns use a fairly simplistic way on construction that does not include a 3D printer. A laser cutter and thousands on cross-sections, which are then stacked on top of one another, fabricate them. His process is far quicker than a 3D printer and far cheaper, each column only costing about $1500. This form of design could be integrated into the design process for the gateway project by demonstrating that an incredible complex and interesting design could be produced and fabricated within the restrictive budget.

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2 IMAGES 1/2 SOURCED FROM: http://inhabitat.com/super-intricate-cardboard-columns-16-million-facets/michael-hansmeyer-cardboardcolumns/?extend=1


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Heydar Aliyev Cultural Centre This building (Baku, Azerbaijan) has been designed (Zaha Hadid) with the use of a space frame to create one of the most complex single continuous spanning roofs in the world. It has no columns supporting the roof from within the internal volume of the building and twists in all 3 dimensions. It works by using a interlocking triangular lattice that spreads the load of the building through cylindrical beams running through the lattice structure. The lattice and thus the roof shape were designed using computational design techniques to produce a frame that would stand up without extra support. This building could assist with the gateway project by providing a model in which a structure could cover the vast distance over the freeway without the need to place columns that would destroy the function of the road by blocking it. The gateway site is also oddly shaped and this method of design could assist in producing a design that uses the site to its advantage. 2

3 IMAGE 1 SOURCED FROM: http://urbanlabglobalcities.blogspot.com.au/2011/03/under-construction-heydar-aliyev.html IMAGES 2/3 SOURCED FROM: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=856424


CONTEMPORARY PROGRAMMING CULTURES

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2 ALGORITHMIC HOUSING (2007 HOUSING COMPETITION) MARCIN PILSNIAK The aim of this project was to create a housing solution to the various problems that are generated by a rapidly changing city. This project took the focus of Shanghai and how housing can be produced for the population on the lower end of the socio-economic scale. The project used various algorithms to program the housing instead of directly designing from an idea. The program automatically generates self-organising urban structure that is driven by outside and surrounding influences. The remarkable part is that these variables can be changed in accordance to the urban environment to create new complex urban structure. The images displayed show the different variables that were used (space, residential density and height, commercial activity, transport/communication and boundaries). If any change occurs in these variable the structure generated will change to create the most efficient and communicate urban fabric with the new parameters.

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I find that this method of computational design is one of rational and clear thought as means to approaching design problems. It takes to heart the idea that architecture is more than the aesthetics appearance of a building or structure but that architecture is a notion of collaboration of design, human requirement/ experience and of urban context/ culture. This process of designing is a means to cater for the individual site and take into account its various inputs to produce an urban form that for fills the needs and attributes of site and people.

In relation to the gateway project this form of design could assist in helping to form a structure that represents and caters the demographic of the Werribee area. It potentially generates a perfect representation of what the City of Werribee is and that shape could be produced for the gateway project. It is a clear aspect of the project brief that this structure true represent Werribee.

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IMAGES 1/2/3/4 SOURCED FROM: http://www.evolo.us/ architecture/algorithmic-housing/


PARAMETRIC COMBINATIONS


CRITERIA The previous parametric combinations were chosen and produce on the basis that I wanted to see how far from the original surface I could adapt and change it. By using various combinations of inputs, associations and outputs, numerous results occurred, each of which was not the maximum change of parameters with the sliding number bars. I choose points at which the surface was at its most contrasting point to its original before in some cases it began returning towards the original. This commonly occurred with the rotational output combinations.

REFERENCE TO READINGS In terms of the Kalay reading I believe that I took a searching approach. In the reading Kalay refers to this as being a method where the final outcome cannot be known through analytical processes alone, that only trail and error is a means of solution. There is reference to searching being a two-stage process in which solution options must be found and the process of choosing the right option. Is relates back to the parametric combination of the previous pages because the selection of each input, association and output was done out of blind practice and adjustment to parameters produced options for myself to display. By focusing on certain criteria (as communicated above) making the right choice for display will be the key to success in demonstrating interesting and thoughtful outcomes.

INTENDED EFFECT LEFT - Less seperation RIGHT - Further seperation The dior facde design is made up of two identical patterns placed one behind the other with a given distance between them. This experiment focused on the difference i appearance that would occur when the distance between the two facades when they were close to each other or further apart. As can be seen the left image has a sharp line pattern where as the right image is less focused. this occurs due to the perspective of the overlapping pattern. As the panel behind moves further away the circles appear smaller and out of line withe circles above.


The images above are examples of what happens when the circles of one of the panels radius is decreased resulting in a non-matching pattern. The original pattern becomes less focused to the point where one pattern doesn’t over power the other, there is little hierarchy. The image to the left is the opposite to the images above where the circle radius of one of the patterns has been increased in size. The result is that the criss-crossing pattens becomes heavy and the dominant feature of the overall design. This method creates a stronger sense of depth and space.

The image below is an example where difference in colour of the two layers shows the pattern in a strong manner. The layer behind is dark and dense which allows for the red layer infront to easily to generate the parttern through contrast.


MATRIX INPUT 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. ASSOCIATION 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. OUTPUT EXTRUSION

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N/A refering to unsuccessful combination of components. NO# accross Association

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NO# down Input

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MATRIX INPUT 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. ASSOCIATION 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. OUTPUT ROTATION N/A refering to unsuccessful combination of components. NO# accross Association

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NO# down Input

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CUT PROJECT

The case study that I and my group members (Poh and Celvin) decided to fabricate for the CUT PROJECT was the Dior facade. The Dior building facade consisted of two clear layers the front a solid panel structure and the rear a silk screen. This case study related to parmetric design because of its use of an image smapler and attrator points to generate a pattern that used the varying radius size of circles to create the effect of structure. This pattern was repeated on the rear silk screen and as such generates a combination of effects including moire patterns, a sense of depth and light/ shadow combinations. For our fabrication we choose to produce one square of the design pattern and build that out of nine panels at a scale of 1:10.


The above image is an example of how the perspex panel creates lighting effects throught both the angle and the casting of the blue colour. I thought it was interesting that the bule light did not stretch very far compared with the light travelling throught the cut holes.

The process that as a group we took to fabricate the dior facade involved the combinding of clear perspex panels and spray painting them to give us an end effect that made the panels translucent. This process also created the rear layer representing the silk screen by placing tracing paper underneath. We now have this effect because of experimentation that we did when we did not get the desired outcome we had been looking for (the pattern created by the circles was not clear). The image on the left demonstrate the refective quality that we found the sprayed perspex had when tilted towards a light sorce. We thought that this could be somewhere to explore or exploit in the future design process.


The image below I found as a clear indecator for how applying strong colour to the panels creates a contrast between the cut holes and the solid panel itself. I also think that this image strongly shows how the pattern is created with the large and smaller circles side by side.


The above images are depicting the light patterns that are cast by the front layer as a light source travels from one side to the other, trying to represent the movement of the sun. It is noticable that not onlt does the light cast move progessively but that the shape of the cast changes aswell. It can be seen that in the beginning they are narrow ovals and as the light sourve moves across they become more circular antuil the point where the light reaches the other side and the shadow cast becomes short and almost consistant. I have used these images to demonstrate how taking into account movement of light and its relationship to the pattern cut into the panels as a way of creating interesting and changing effects on behind surfaces. This shadow casting could be used as a secondary design effect when appoarching the gateway project.


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