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At just nineteen years old, Raury speaks for a generation who shun narrow-mindedness and embrace everything. Debut album ‘All We Need’ is a mission statement for this Georgia-born “wildcard”, and he’s not anywhere near finished. Words: Jamie Milton. Photos: Mike Massaro.

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aury stands out because he shouts louder. Aged 19, he’s been making bold statements for years. Give the Georgia-born prodigy a platform on the top of Mount Everest to declare his love for the universe, and he’d still use a megaphone. Any big topic, any divisive issue - he has an opinion. His biggest moment so far arrived on Stephen Colbert’s The Late Show, back in September. Performing ‘Devil’s Whisper’, Raury wore a Mexico football shirt with the name ‘TRUMP’ crossed out on the back. It was enough to make the Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump quake in his boots from the other side of the television studio. “He’s talking about building a wall, so much money on building a fucking wall,” Raury states a couple of months on. “There’s a general consensus amongst the youth and the people who live morally - somebody like that is not what’s up. The guy has a very old way of thinking, a stagnant way of thinking. “You wanna know one story that I’ve never really included when talking about where I grew up, and where I come from?” he starts. “Stone Mountain is really close to Clarkston, Georgia. Clarkston is the most diverse city in Georgia. Damn near top three in the nation. They fly in refugees into HartsfieldJackson, and that’s pretty much where everybody goes. I went to high school with this girl who had a story about how she walked cross country and on a boat, all to get to this high school. More often than not, somebody’s from a different country in that high school. It’s there for refugees to get on their feet. Stuff like that is right around the corner from me. I’ve always seen it - people can live together. And as far as homelessness and all that goes, I feel like there’s enough for everybody. A country is judged on how they treat their poor.” When it comes to big statements, there’s a lot more where that came from. Debut full-length ‘All We Need’ is crammed full of messages designed to sway opinion and change headspaces. And despite on the surface being more simmered down than last year’s erratic ‘Indigo Child’ mixtape, it finds Raury using his voice more than ever. The album “relates to this state that society’s in right now,” he says. Despite the bright eyed optimism of this teen - in person, he has a habit of jumping up and down at random, high-fiving strangers and looking around at the world in wonder - he speaks about the present day with negativity. “It’s becoming a dark society,” he claims, citing the themes around TV shows and movies as examples. “This is what we’re into - Narcos; the darker shit, the pessimistic shit… A lot of us are finding a home in that darkness Evenand Kurtthey’re was getting exasperated by the and negativity, choosing not to fuck popularity of the ‘Lorde or Kurt Vile’ meme. 61

Profile for DIY Magazine

DIY, November 2015  

Featuring artists doing it their way - Hinds, Run The Jewels, Father John Misty, Shamir and more. Plus on tour with Wolf Alice and Drenge, a...

DIY, November 2015  

Featuring artists doing it their way - Hinds, Run The Jewels, Father John Misty, Shamir and more. Plus on tour with Wolf Alice and Drenge, a...