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Wayne & Holmes Counties

FREE

BACK

TO

SCHOOL

Without Busting Your Budget

Transitioning to College Life Wonderfully Made Children’s Ministry

July 2017


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Editor’s

Note

Wayne & Holmes Counties

I

t is that time of year again. Time to let go. Our kids are getting older, moving on and moving up and we are the ones that somehow end up feeling left behind.

July 2017

The act of letting go, gives our Wayne & Holmes Counties Family Today is the property of Spectrum Publications children a choice. It’s very difficult to pick up a ball and carry it with you, when someone is still Office holding onto it. You might be able to go a short Spectrum Publications distance, but you won’t get very far. In letting go, we allow our kids to take that ball and run! This issue of Family Today brings you valuable resources, tips and information to keep your family running and feeling happy and healthy as you start back to school. At Family Today, we feel that allowing your kids to see the good and great things in you will help them to see the same in themselves and in others – that is what this issue is all about. As parents prepare for the back to school pandemonium, we want to help you plan ahead. Sit down with your college age kids and talk about things like credit cards as they take control of their own finances, find out about area after school programs and learn how a children’s ministry for students with special needs is making a positive impact on our community. (Don’t forget to invest in yourself this fall – your family will thank you).

212 E. Liberty St. • Wooster, OH 44691 330-264-1125 editor@spectrumpubs.com A Division of GateHouse Media, LLC ©Copyright Spectrum Publications 2017 Group Publisher • Bill Albrecht Advertising Director • Kelly Gearhart Ad Coordinator • Amanda Nixon Content Coordinator • Emily Rumes Layout Designer • Kassandra Walter

“Parents rarely let go of their children, so children let go of them. They move on. It is not until much later...that children understand; their stories, and all their accomplishments, sit atop the stories of their mothers and fathers, stones upon stones, beneath the waters of their lives.” ~Mitch Albom~

From: The Five People You Meet In Heaven Family Today

1


A Look

Inside Feature

3

20

Tech & Gadgets The Right Classroom Tech for 2017

Special Feature Wonderfully Made Children’s Ministry

8

Useful Tips Back To School In Style

10

Family Life 5 Easy Steps For Your Morning Routine

11

Recipe To Go Peanut Butter & Jelly Breakfast Muffin

26

After School After School at the Y

Departments

6, 14, 18 Health & Wellness

28

Check List Back-To-School

Planning Ahead for A Healthy Family Getting Ready for School: Physical Exam Tips Wooster Orthopaedic, Direct Access to the Muskuloskeletal Experts

12

Calendar of Events Things to Do in Our Area

16

Discover Downtown Wooster

22

Family Finance

4

Learn & Grow

Taking Their First Steps, Again

Establish Your Household Budget

24

Safe & Secure How to Identify Cyberbullying

2

Family Today


Tech &

The Right

Gadgets

Classroom Tech echnology is absolutely essential in the daily lives of students. Whether kids are learning their ABC’s or graduate students are pursuing advanced degrees, technology has transformed the way lessons are taught and learned. Statistics support the notion that technology in the classroom is irreplaceable. According to data from the tutoring resource PracTutor, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and various colleges, 98 percent of schools have one or more computers in the classroom. In addition, 77 percent of teachers use the internet for instruction, while 40 percent of teachers report students use computers during instructional time in the classroom. Many instructors now assign homework that must be completed online. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development looked at computer usage among 15-yearolds across 31 nations and regions. Many students in highperforming nations reported spending between one and two hours a day on a computer outside of school. Because computers are so necessary in and out of the classroom, families and students may want to revisit their options before buying new devices. Desktop computer Desktop computers used to be the go-to for families and students, and there are still many reasons why desktops make sense. In addition to their relatively inexpensive sticker price, desktop computers allow students to customize their packages according to their needs and get a powerful operating system in the process. New and advanced processing speeds also mean that many desktop computers can be relied on for educational purposes while also being fast enough to handle recreational gaming. One of the main disadvantages of desktop computers is their lack of portability. Desktops are not easily moved, and if repairs are necessary, it can be a hassle to have them fixed. Laptop computers Over the last decade, laptop computers have become more popular than desktop computers, largely because of their portability. Laptops are designed to be taken from place to place, so students can use them for note-taking in the classroom and then studying at home. Although laptop processors have just about caught up to desktop processors, they may be lacking the processing pop

unless consumers are willing to pay more for laptops with high performance. Another shortcoming of laptops is that they generally have smaller screens than desktop computers, which can make working on fine details more challenging. Tablets Tablets offer the most in terms of portability. They’re lightweight and small and offer a wealth of access in a compact package. Today’s tablets offer much more than the first such devices to hit the market. Some can run apps and equivalent programs that were once exclusive to desktop and laptop computers. Tablets also tend to be less expensive than desktops or laptops. Where tablets may fall short is in the peripherals. It’s difficult to connect backup drives and other accessories to tablets. However, with advancements in cloud-based storage, this may not be an issue. Also, note-taking on virtual keyboards may be more challenging, and working on tablets’ small screens can be tiresome over time. Convertible tablet/laptops are now emerging to bridge these gaps. Shopping for a new computer can be complicated, but basing purchases on need rather than want can help guide the process.

Buckeye Family Healthcare! Scott Hannan, M.D., Lisa Malys, D.O., and Mark Stutzman, D.O. are accepting

NEW PATIENTS! Hours: Mon-Fri, 9-5 | Early or late appointments avaiable upon request

BUCKEYE FAMILY HEALTHCARE WO-10542057

T

For 2017

Scott Hannan, M.D., Lisa Malys, D.O., Mark Stutzman, D.O. 3477 Commerce Parkway, Suite A, Wooster buckeyefamilyhealthcare.com • 330-601-0999

Family Today

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Learn &

Taking Their First Steps,

Grow

Again

Making The Transition To College Life

Parents who want to help their kids make a smooth transition can take steps during their children’s senior year of high school to help them adjust to their new surroundings and responsibilities more easily. 4

Family Today

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ccording to an Experian College Graduate Survey conducted in 2016, 58 percent of soon-to-be graduates acknowledged they had a credit card, and 30 percent admitted they had credit card debt. The average debt of the respondents was more than $2,500, a substantial sum considering that much of it is likely consumer debt, and not the so-called “good debt” like car loans or mortgage payments that can help young people establish their credit histories. A report from the Institute of College Access and Success indicated that the average member of the college class of 2015 graduated with $30,100 in student loan debt. Student loans are often repaid over many years,

with some repayment schedules extending more than a decade. In addition, as long as students make their payments on time and in full, the amount of interest they will pay if their loans come with fixed rates will remain the same. Credit card debt is not the same. Students who can only afford to pay the minimum payments each month will see the amount of interest they’re paying grow considerably until the balance is completely paid off. That’s one reason why students must learn the difference between consumer debt and student loan debt and how accumulating the former is far more detrimental to their financial future than accruing the latter. College is the first taste of true independence many young


freshmen, but those who understand the importance of healthy diets are more likely to buy nutritious meals than junk food. • Emphasize time management. Today’s high schoolers are busier than ever before, so many may already be prepared for the juggling act that is college life. But college students have more free time than their high school counterparts, so parents can emphasize the importance of managing that free time wisely as opposed to spending it lounging on the couch or napping. The transition from high school to college can be both exciting and difficult. But parents can get a head start on that transition by encouraging their youngsters to be more independent during their final year of high school.

“You’re off to great places! Today is your day! Your mountain is waiting so...get on your way!” -Dr. Seuss, “Oh, The Places You’ll Go!”

UA WAYNE COLLEGE

BEGIN YOUR

JOURNEY WITH US! The University of Akron Wayne College offers a wide range of classes to keep your educational goals moving forward. Schedule a personal campus tour by calling 330-684-8900. Learn more about our campus, academic programs, financial aid and the admissions process. If you’re seeking a close-to-home, low cost, high quality education visit us online at wayne.uakron.edu.

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students experience. Whereas mom and dad were always around to make sure kids were out the door on time and homework was done, that safety blanket is no longer there once kids move into their dorm rooms. The transition to college life can be exciting. But while students typically welcome that transition with open arms, parents often worry about how their children will handle their suddenly more independent life. Parents who want to help their kids make a smooth transition can take steps during their children’s senior year of high school to help them adjust to their new surroundings and responsibilities more easily. • Let kids fly solo on school day mornings. New college students have to make many adjustments upon moving into their dorms, and getting themselves out of bed each morning and off to class on time is one such change. Parents worried that their students will sleep in when mom and dad aren’t around to remind them to wake up can start letting kids fly solo on school day mornings during their final year of high school. Let kids set their alarms, prepare their own breakfasts and get out the door on time all on their own. By the time their freshman year of college arrives, kids will know how to handle their mornings by themselves. • Teach kids how to develop budgets. Another problem many first-year college students encounter is an inability to effectively manage their money. Whether you plan to give kids an allowance while they are in school or intend for them to work part-time for their spending money, use senior year of high school as an opportunity to show kids how to budget their money. If they don’t have accounts already, open bank accounts in your youngster’s name, and insist that he or she start paying for his or her expenses via these accounts. Resist the urge to give high school kids gas money or money for shopping trips if they have already spent their allowances so they can learn how to effectively manage money between paydays. In addition, teach kids about the right and wrong ways to use credit cards, including the importance of paying balances in full and on time. • Let kids handle more standard responsibilities. Adults tend to take more mundane responsibilities like making doctor’s appointments or grocery shopping for granted. But kids likely have no idea how to handle such tasks. Parents can encourage their high school seniors to make their own medical appointments. In addition, take kids along on grocery shopping trips, explaining how to find sale items and which foods to buy and which to avoid. Nutrition is not always foremost on the minds of college

Family Today

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Health &

Wellness

Planning Ahead For A Healthy Family

By Lydia Capela Living Well CEO

T

he rat race has begun! School is in session and it seems almost impossible to get the family to eat together, let alone have it be something healthy! How in the world are we able to navigate this and keep ourselves and our family healthy? PLANNING. There’s a quote that states, “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” Though it may sound cliché, I’m not sure I have ever seen any saying become more true day in and day out in my life. So, how do we even start? There are a few basic steps along the way that can really make a world of difference. In order to get something healthy on the table or even if it’s on the go, you MUST meal plan. You may be able to wing a meal here or there, but in order to make for a healthy family for the long term this is simply a must. Instead of having the, “What’s for dinner?” panic, your mind can rest at ease. And not only that, you’ll be amazed at how much healthier you’ll eat as a family, as well as how it will help the waistline! I know it may sound old school and completely unrealistic, but I can promise you, it will make a world of difference for you and your entire family. There’s just something good that happens when you sit around a table and talk about your day, listen to your kids chatter (and sometimes spat), and just simply have everyone in the same place at the same time. So make time. You’ll thank yourself now and years down the road. It’s simply not healthy for you or your kids to be going 24/7. You need to have some good ol’ down time. I’m not sure what you can make happen in your family’s life, but a goal would be to have 2 days a week where you don’t have any THING on the schedule. Right now this could seem like an impossibility, but work for it. We can help teach you how to make this happen. You may need to revisit what the real priorities are in your life. Is it being your kid’s chauffeur or having a family that loves each other and stays together?

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Family Today

As much as everyone around you can demand your attention (sometimes around the clock) you HAVE to find time for yourself. If you don’t refill when you’re on empty you’ll have nothing left to give anyone else. Find out what refuels you. We can show you ways to make this happen. Again, this OFTEN takes a back seat in many peoples’ lives. Trust me, been there done that, many a time. However, I can always tell a huge difference in all areas of my life when I make this a priority on a regular basis. Start small. It doesn’t have to be hours of working out. It could simply be taking a stroll after dinner by yourself or with a family member. It could be a fast 14 minute Burst Training that gets you burning calories for the next 24-48 hours, or anything that simply gets you moving for a while each day. Start today. At Living Well, LLC, we can help get you on the path to reach your weight loss goals and attain your full health potential. We’ll show you how to make a few small changes that you can actually stick with and build from there. I’ve seen so many people bite off more than they can chew, then give up altogether. Small changes make a HUGE difference over time and also make it possible to follow through. We have years of experience under our belt with thousands of clients. We hope you’ll step into our office and experience the difference! Our mission is to follow God’s calling by gently leading individuals and families to complete health in body, mind and spirit. We restore hope and give insight and ability to attain this health with excellent service, integrity, love, education, and compassion. Our services include wellness, supplementation, and fast, healthy weight loss programs, as wells as life coaching. We also host free workshops each month on all of these topics and more. Schedule a consultation with us online at www.4livingwell.com or call (330) 967-0605. We are excited to hear from you! Follow us on Facebook to find out about upcoming workshops, free healthy lifestyle tips, and program and product savings! We want to see you LIVING WELL.


Because you care feed play work

LOVE

nurture serve help teach... It's TIME

YOU INVEST for to

in

YOU.

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I'm looking forward to serving YOU!Â

~Lydia Family Today

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Useful

Tips

P

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Family Today

arents often note that kids seem to grow like weeds. Pants that once reached down to the tops of a youngster’s feet quickly begin to shorten day by day, while once-loose shirts soon start to look a little snug. Many parents find themselves regularly in children’s clothing departments just trying to stay stocked up on the basics, which can put quite a dent in already stretched-thin budgets. Although children’s wardrobes are added to at various times of the year, the bulk of shopping occurs during backto-school time. Clothing can be expensive, especially if it’s an entire wardrobe, but families can stick to their budgets by shopping smart and concentrating on fashion staples to make their money stretch. • Spread out purchases. Shopping early allows parents to make the most of sales. Warm weather clothing generally goes on sale in July to make room for new fall lines. Considering the first few months of school still may be warm, short-sleeved shirts will still have utility and are generally less expensive than sweaters and sweatshirts. Staggering purchases also enables parents to develop a clothing allowance each and every month instead of having one large bill at a certain point in the year. Parents can even add to their children’s wardrobes during the holiday season, when clothes tend to get reduced again for holiday sales. • Don’t turn down hand-me-downs. It’s trendy to recycle clothing and be environmentally conscious by putting items to good use again and again. Aside from you


and your wallet, no one will know if your child is wearing a secondhand pair of pants or a brand new pair, as long as the fabric is in good condition. Many school moms are anxious to swap clothing with others to lessen their own financial burdens with children’s clothing. Start a clothing swap with a group of friends, and you may find you have more than you need in the way of clothes for the kids. • Take stock of what you already have – this is so important. How many times have you run out to the grocery store for a missing ingredient only to find that very item buried at the back of the pantry? The same thing happens with kids’ clothes. Before going shopping, take inventory of their closets and dresser drawers. Have little ones try on clothes to see which items still fit and which can be donated or handed down. Make a set list of the items you need before you go to help cut down on impulse spending at the store. • Invest in the right high-quality pieces. Spending a fortune for a trendy pair of pants that may end up getting ruined on the playground is not the best way to shop for kids’ clothing. However, investing in a quality pair of shoes that will last much of the year is a good investment. Know

when to splurge and when it’s okay to shop at the discount store. • Stock up on staples. A straight-leg cut of jeans, some solid colored polo shirts and an A-line dress or skirt are some classic foundation pieces for children’s wardrobes. Such items tend to last longer than trendy items that may only last a few months before the next trend arrives. • Learn to layer. Layering items can make pieces look like new by putting them together in different combinations. Layering a summer T-shirt under a fall hoodie gets use out of two different season’s worth of clothes. It also enables kids to be comfortable during unpredictable weather. • Finally, leave it to the kids when you can. Parents often worry about what other parents will think of their own children’s clothing. Children do not typically worry about such things until their preteen or teenage years. You may spend less money on clothing simply because your child has a few favorite shirts and pants he or she wears over and over.

Now “We simply set a Enrolling higher standard.” for Fall • Serving children age 6 weeks through 4th grade

• Preschool and Pre-K Programs

Educational Child Care Center

• Professionally trained teachers

5025 CLEVELAND ROAD WOOSTER, OH 44691

• Monday - Friday 6:30am-6:00pm

WO-10558567

(330) 345-2273 FAX (330) 345-3460 email: CARE4KIDS@sssnet.com

CHECK OUT OUR NEW WEBSITE

Award Recipient

• Weekly/Daily Preschool/ Pre-K only

www.care4kidswooster.com Family Today

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Family

Life

T

he rush is on to make it out the door on time each morning. Feeling like you are running behind is a recipe for added stress. Rushing through things is never the ideal way to start your day, and those feelings of uneasiness and disorganization can put a damper on all the events and activities that lay ahead. Try incorporating one (or all) of these strategies into your daily routine to help make your morning less hectic: Wake up slightly earlier. This may seem like a no brainer, but getting up earlier than normal, even if it’s just 15 to 20 minutes before you’re accustomed to getting out of bed, can help reduce morning stress. Resist the temptation to hit the snooze button over and over again. A few extra minutes each morning can make you feel more relaxed and make for a smooth start to the day. Get some work done the night before. Prepare lunches the night before and have them ready in the refrigerator. In addition, lay your clothes for the following day out each night. This saves time and takes a couple more things off your morning to-do list. Ease back into a routine. As a new school year dawns or a long vacation comes to an end, start bedtimes earlier and start waking up earlier as well (before school even starts get the kids back on a schedule). This can make the

1

2 3

ing Enrollw No

You Only Pay For Service You Use Infants 6 Weeks to School agers 12 years

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647 East Bowman St. Wooster, OH 44691

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330.264.1155 Family Today

5 Easy Steps To Help Your Morning Go From Chaos To Calm By Emily Rumes Family Today Writer

transition from carefree, cartoon mornings to busy, out the door mornings go a little more smoothly. Prep backpacks in the evening. Look through folders, sign paperwork, check assignments, and do whatever it is you need to do the night before to save your family from having to scramble in the morning. This ensures those permission slips get signed and items make it back into school bags. This is one of my personal goals for 2017 – to try and stay on top of the kids’ paperwork day to day. Have quick breakfast foods available. Smoothies, cereal bars, yogurts, oatmeal, and whole-grain cereals are all fast and nutritious ways to start the day. My kids usually end up eating breakfast partially at home and partially on the go to save time. My son likes to take his time with breakfast and I don’t want him to feel like he has to rush through each bite. Make breakfast portable so you can grab-n-go on the days when you’re running late. Mornings can be tricky when family members are getting ready for school and work at the same time. By practicing a few daily rituals, it’s possible to curb the rush and start the day happier and more relaxed.

4

5


B

Recipe

To Go

Pe a

n

ut

& Jel ly Brea kfa st Muffin r e utt

pe i c e R

Makes 36 mini muffins Prep time: 30 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes

Ingredients Nonstick cooking spray 2 ripe bananas 1/4 cup maple syrup 1/4 cup light brown sugar 1/2 cup non-fat Greek yogurt 1 egg 1/3 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk 1/2 cup peanut butter 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 3/4 cup white whole-wheat flour 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/3 cup chopped strawberries

3. In a separate larger bowl, whisk flour, cinnamon, baking soda, powder and salt. 4. Slowly pour half of wet mixture into dry mixture, stirring lightly. Add the rest of the wet mixture and stir until just combined. Do not over-stir. Fold in chopped strawberries. 5. Spoon batter into muffin tray, filling each cup until it is almost full. 6. Bake at 425°F for five minutes, then reduce temperature to 350°F and bake for another five to six minutes. Prick muffin with a toothpick and if clean, muffins are ready. Let cool in tray for five minutes. For more recipes from Emily, visit www.emsbytes.com

Preparation

Orrville Community Band THURS., AUGUST 3rd @ 7 p.m.

Located on the lawn behind Maple Terrace

Mark Your Calendars: Open House Sun., Oct. 8th @ 2:30pm to 4:30pm WO-10558027

1. Preheat oven to 425°F. Coat mini muffin trays with nonstick cooking spray. 2. In a medium bowl, mash bananas until smooth. Add maple syrup, brown sugar, yogurt, egg and milk and whisk until just combined. Stir in peanut butter and vanilla until well mixed.

Recipe By Emily Miller

Family Today

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Calendar of

Events

8/1

Kidron Firemen’s Chicken BBQ When: 5 p.m. Kidron Auction 330-857-3431

8/7-12

Holmes County Fair Where: Harvest Ridge Holmes County Fair in Millersburg. 4th Annual Paws in the Park 330-674-0869 Pawty holmescountyfair.com When: Noon - 4 p.m. Ohio Mennonite Relief Sale Where: Freedlander Park When: Fri 4 - 9 p.m. Whiz Bang! Science Show Registration starts at 11:30 Sat 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. When: 7 p.m. AM. BBQ chicken dinner/hot Where: Wayne County Fairgrounds Where: John Streeter Garden dogs/DJ/Vendors/Dog-themed Huge Quilt and Wood Auction Amphitheater, Secrest Arboret games/K9 blessings/professional which raises money for worldHave fun while learning about photographer and so much wide relief through the Mennonite science. Dr. Dave Lohnes, OARDC’s more. $25 per K9 & human/ Central Committee. Great food! popular Whiz-bang Scientist, will $5 per each additional K9 or 30-682-4843 encourage children to learn about human over 6 years of age. 2017 www.ohiomccreliefsale.org science and will enrich the natural dog license & current rabies world experience. Free family fun. tags should be on collar. Email 740-485-0129 pawsintheparkpawty@gmail. Rogues Hollow Festival http://secrest.osu.edu com for more information and to When: Fri 7 - 11 p.m., pre-register to save $5. Like us on Sat 8 a.m. - 11 p.m. Where: Downtown Doylestown Lincoln Highway “Buy-Way” Yard facebook. Streets are closed for vendors, Sales games, kiddie parade, classic car All across the state including Smithville Community Historical show, live bands, vintage baseball Wayne County! Along the Lincoln Society Open House, Antique game & fireworks. 330-658-2480 Highway www.historicbyway.com Market & Vintage Baseball Dalton Village-Wide Garage Sale Game Held in When: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. conjunction Where: John Streeter Garden with the Lincoln Antique Market, with quality Highway antiques, on the front lawn of the “Buyway” Mishler Mill. Open House at the Yard Sales in Pioneer Village with craftsmen the Village of in the buildings. Only Mishler Dalton. Mill and Reception Center are handicapped accessible. Vintage baseball game Smithville Stars

8/4-5

8/13

8/10

8/4-5

8/10-12

8/19

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Family Today

VS The Mansfield Indepents. Smithville Historical Society & Mishler Mill. 330-669-9308 www.rootsweb.com/~ohschs/ index.html

9/9-14

168th Wayne County Fair $3 adult/senior, under 12 free, except Thu. Seniors free until 4pm. Wayne County Fairgrounds, 10 AM-10 PM-gates open at 8 AM 330-262-8001 www.waynecountyfairohio.com

9/16

Wooster Arts Jazz Fest When: 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Where: Downtown Wooster Jazz bands play while artisans offer their work at a fine art show. Gourmet food and kids’ activities too! Presented by Main Street Wooster, Wooster Rotary Club, Wooster City Schools, Boys & Girls Club of Wooster and Wayne Center for the Arts. 330-262-6222 www.woosterartsjazzfest.org

9/23

Apple Festival Days When: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Where: Bauman Orchards Enjoy wagon rides into the orchard to pick your own apples. Petting zoo and hay maze. 330-925-6861 www.baumanorchards.com


9/30

When: 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Where: The Wilderness Center The Library Roll Poor little Bat! No one can come When: 7:30 a.m. to his party. They are all too busy! Where: Holmes County Trail A great day of bicycling for all ages But what are his friends Tree Frog, Opossum, Caterpillar, Flying and abilities. All proceeds benefit Squirrel and Raccoon doing? the all-volunteer Fredericksburg Families will be escorted along Community Library. 330-695pumpkin-lit trails to meet these 2693 www.fredlib.org friendly nocturnal characters as they sing songs, tell jokes and share the story of their life in the Customer Appreciation Sale nighttime woodlands. Groups Join Schlabach Furniture for this depart at 6:30, 7:00, 7:30 & 8:00. sale. Brownies and Ice Cream $6 members / $8 non-members available Friday and Saturday. *Pre-registration is required. Schlabach Furniture Store Hours Reservations call 330.359.5235 or 330-695-2249 visit wildernesscenter.org

10/6-7

10/13-14

August 4 August 16 August 17 August 21 September 23 September 25 October 5 October 14 October 23

Pint Size Polkas Kids Explore Eclipses Outback Ray Solar Eclipse Party Touch a Truck Author Jack Gantos Storyteller Joanie Calem Sci Fi Saturday Matinee Jim Kleefield , Magical Entertainer

August 5 August 10 September 26 September 28 October 10 October 12

Outback Ray – West Salem Jungle Terry – Doylestown Jungle Safari Puppet Show -- Dalton Oddball Ohio Revisited -- Creston Realm of the Reptile – Rittman Balloon Twisting --- Shreve

Branch Locations

WO-10559041

Enchanted Forest

August - October 2017 Highlighted Children’s Events Main Library (Wooster)

Family Today

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Health &

Wellness

Getting Ready For School Physical Exam Tips

Prepare for school by getting your students’ medical information in order during the summer.

S

chool time requires having all of the necessary supplies, clothing and gear ready for the year and the list of items to shop for can be overwhelming, espeically if it’s your first time sending them off. One item on your list when preparing for a new school year won’t involve a trip to the store, but may involve scheduling a visit to your family doctor to update physical health information for the school. The requirements for health screenings and reporting may vary between school districts. Some physical examinations need to be conducted annually, while others may only need updating at certain intervals, when kids transition from elementary school to middle school or middle school to high school. Updated physical forms also may be required at the start of a sports season. Health screenings are intended to detect problems that may interfere with learning. Physical exams may indicate issues that can hamper progress or shed light on undiagnosed problems that may require further assessment and necessitate customized learning plans to help students succeed. Physical exams are also a way to ensure students’ immunizations are up to date. Physical exams typically must be turned in to the school by students’ primary care providers. Some districts may offer free or low-cost health assessments through the school. Students who will be traveling for school may be required to meet the health requirements of their destination country. For example, medical students admitted to a Canadian

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Family Today

university may be required to get a medical exam, according to the Government of Canada. To make the process go smoothly, consider these exam tips: • Work with physicians who have access to electronic health records. EHRs are secure technology that provides easy access to vaccination records, health history, appointment reminders, and even prescription information. Some providers even make it possible for patients to directly access their health information through a secure login, helping save time. • For physical exams done during the year, make appointments during school hours. After-school appointments are peak times for pediatric offices and medical clinics. • Don’t forget your forms. Bring the right paperwork so that the staff can fill out what is necessary for the school, camp or sports league. • Know your insurance guidelines. Physical exams may be part of routine well visits. Insurance companies institute their own policies regarding how frequently physicals can be conducted (usually annually). Be sure to schedule the appointment accordingly. Once the back to school commercials start playing on TV, think of the shopping list, but don’t put off checking up on your school’s requirements for health screenings. Get another year of growing and learning off to the right start whether it’s hearing, vision or a health screening, you’ll be glad you did!


You’d go to the ends of the earth to keep them happy. We’ll make sure you don’t have to. General Pediatrics Wooster 128 E. Milltown Road, Suite 209 330-345-1100 Ashland 2212 Mifflin Ave., Suite 235 419-281-3077 Ontario 2003 W. 4th St. 419-529-6285 Akron Children’s Special Care Nursery at Wooster Community Hospital 1761 Beall St. 330-263-8100

From general pediatrics to rehabilitative and specialty services. The less time you spend driving to appointments, the more time you have for moments that matter. Learn more at akronchildrens.org/locations. Questions about services or locations? Call Ask Children’s™ at 330-543-2000.

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Subspecialty Care Building at Wooster Community Hospital 546 Winter St. Maternal Fetal Medicine 330-543-4500 Heart Center 330-543-8521 Mansfield Specialty Care and Urgent Care 371 Cline Ave. Specialty Care 419-521-2900 Urgent Care 419-521-2950 Rehabilitative Services 330-543-8257 Pediatrics 419-522-3341

ach13701-01_Wooster Ad_WstrDailyRecrd_v03AR_20170626.indd 1

Family Today 15 6/26/17 4:47 PM


Disc ove r

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1-800-421-5834 Visit us on the web

Offering A Full Menu of Italian and American Dinners

330-262-8986

WO-10555982

Motts

RAY CROW

CLEANERS

oils & more

FEATURING

150 North Grant St., Wooster, Ohio

50 varieties of Extra Virgin Olive Oils and Balsamic Vinegars.

330-262-5010

Now a Second Location at Buehler’s Milltown

Stop In & Taste!

WO-10556092

137 W. Liberty St. Downtown Wooster 330.601.1645 • mottsombf.com

11 a.m.-6 p.m. Presented by Main Street Wooster, Inc, Rotary Club of Wooster, Wayne Center for the Arts and Wooster City Schools with Boys & Girls Club of Wooster

SEPTEMBER 29&30 WoosterFest Fri., Sept. 29th Noon-11 p.m.

11

99

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

Two Pizza SPecial! Any Two Large Pizzas

Visitor’s Bureau Authentic Chicago 5:30Medium p.m.-8:30 p.m. 330-567-3278 330-6 Style 3-Item Pizza and The330-698-0555 Daily Apple Creek Shreve Orrvill Sponsored by acS 3-iTem Pizza! 690 W. Main St. 275 N. Market 304 W. High Record 330-698-0555Wooster 330-567-3278 330-682-8 Pallotta Ford Rittman Ashton Little, Rittman Wooster $ 99 Lincoln N. Main St. 801 W. Old Lincoln Way 94 N. MainAgent St. 9 80194W. Old Lincoln Way Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

9

$

99

Medium Authentic Chicago Style 3-Item Pizza

330-925-3278

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

NOVEMBER 17 Window Wonderland 7-9:30 p.m. Sponsored by United Titanium, Wayne Savings Community Bank, The Daily Record

330-264-3278 330-925-3278

330-264-3278

223 West Liberty Street

(Across from Library) Downtown Wooster

330-262-2012

Donations Always Needed • Estates Accepted

135 W. Liberty St. • Wooster • 330.262.2253 330.345.2453 146 W. South Street • Wooster, OH 44691 www.rideeonwooster.com

IN DOWNTOWN WOOSTER FOR OVER

4146 Burbank Rd. • Wooster • 330.345.5005

Fine Ladies Clothing & Accessories, Gently Used Furniture & Antiques, Artwork • Mirrors • China & Glassware Gift Certificates Available All profits go to Life Care Hospice Greater Wayne County to provide an ongoing source of revenue for patient care in Wayne County

116 N. Main St. • Orrville • 330.683.2253

SMETZER’S TIRE CENTERS

YEARS! WELCOME TO

• Impressive Craft Beer Selection

115 South Market St. Wooster, Ohio 44691

Tues-Fri: 11a-11p

* Call for details!

Sat: 3p-Midnight 3 5 9 W. L i b e r t y S t . • Wo o s t e r

330-264-6263

WO-10556062

Family Owned & Operated www.smetzertire.com

Catering & Delivery Available

www.spoon-market.com E-Mail: thefolks@spoon-market.com

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

236 S. Martket • Wooster, OH 44691 330-601-0233 www.ashtonismyagent.com

GRAND G! OPENIN

Custom Cakes • Cookies • Treats • Weddings • Birthdays • Celebrations

WO-10556058

WO-10556055

We Service ALL Makes & Models with Service In Hours NOT DAYS!!!

Deli & Catering 144 W. Liberty St. 330-262-0880

Murr Printing and Graphics

WO-10555990

WO-10555987

WO-10555988

Family Today

verticalrunnerwooster.com

WOOSTER 330-264-2040 ASHLAND 419-289-8457

330.264.ARTS (2787) Fax 330.264.9314 237 S. Walnut St. Wooster, Oh 44691

www.omahomabobsbbq.com

• Imported & Local Cheeses

Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 12-5pm

WO-10556082

Ph: 330-262-9871 Email: omahomaBobs128@gmail.com

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

• Boar’s Head Meats & Cheeses

M - F 10:00 - 8:00 Sat 10:00 - 6:00 Sun 12:00 - 5:00

4

$

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

Large 3-Item Pizza

• Specialty Market

201 N. Buckeye St., Wooster, OH 44691 330-264-2223 • 800-562-8004 Fax 330-262-1628 Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30-5:30; Saturday 9:30-12 noon www.murrprinting.com

Taco Salad & 20oz Pepsi

Presented by Main OCTOBER 12 GREAT DEALS Street Wooster, www.wayneartscenter.org Catering • Bob Workman •$Eat in or Carry 99Out Main Street 19 Inc, Wooster just for you! GRAND ! PENING O Wooster Area Chamber large 3-iTem Pizza! of Commerc, WC Creek Beer & Wine Apple Shreve Or acS 3-iTem Pizza! Convention & $ 99 690 W. Main St. 304 W Tasting 11275 N. Market

Schmid’s

Service in Hours Not Days! tm

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

+ Tax

128 S. Market St. Suite 100 Wooster, OH 44691

Saturday

Hours: Tue-Fri 10-5; Sat 10-3 • Visa & Mastercard Welcome

WO-10555986

WO-10555983

7-8 p.m.

www.woosterglass.com

WO-10555984

WO-10555980

330-262-7136

Since 1947 419 S. Market St. Wooster

SEPTEMBER 7 The College of Wooster Pipe Band and Highland Dancers

$

4

$ 99

352 W. Liberty, Wooster • PH. 264-9901

238 N. Hillcrest, Wooster • PH. 264-1055

WO-10556069

WOOSTER GLASS CO.

SEPTEMBER 16 The 14th Annual Wooster Arts Jazz Fest

4

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

6” Italian Sub & A 20oz Pepsi

WO-10540839

Lunch & Dinner Mon. - Sat.

244 S. Market Street, Wooster www.thehenrystation.com Full 330.264.2226 Bar

7-9:30 p.m. “GL Band” Sponsored by D+S Distribution and Long, Cook & Samsa, CPAs

Sat., Sept. 30th and Cutler Real 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Estate Sponsored by large 3-iTem Pizza! Wooster Area NOVEMBER 25 Chamber ofLarge 3-Item PizzaSmall Business Commerce

+ Tax

WO-10556074

243 E. Liberty St., Suite 2 Downtown Wooster PH. 330-601-1250

WO-10555979

WO-10556089

German, Hungarian, & American Favorites

Sponsored by Main Street Wooster, Inc and The College of Wooster

$ 99

330-264-7119

WO-10556066

AUGUST 18 Concert & Cruise-In

**NEW LOCATION** Jodi’s Closet & Ana’s Alterations

16

LUNCH TIME SPECIALS!

Any Flash Pizza, Two Small Pieces Of Cheese Bread & A 20oz Pepsi

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

WO-10558330

OH License # 12031 WO-10555975

WO-10556086

www.hometownhardware.doitbest.com Email: hometown1775@hometownhdw.com

Any Two Large Pizzas

WO-10556091

M-F 8am to 5:30pm •Sat. 8am-5pm Closed Sunday & Holidays

w n o t n w o GREAT DEAL D$1999Wooster just for you! Two Pizza SPecial!

WO-10556056

160 S. Columbus Rd. • Wooster, OH 44691 Phone: 330-262-8821 • Fax: 330-262-9772

Monday thru Friday: 9:30 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:30 am to 5:00 pm Sunday (Apr.-Dec.) 12 noon to 5:00 pm

www.everythingrubbermaidstore.com

Family Today

17


Disc ove r

Open 5 p.m. Closed Tuesdays Sunday Pizza Carry Out Only

1-800-421-5834 Visit us on the web

Offering A Full Menu of Italian and American Dinners

330-262-8986

WO-10555982

Motts

RAY CROW

CLEANERS

oils & more

FEATURING

150 North Grant St., Wooster, Ohio

50 varieties of Extra Virgin Olive Oils and Balsamic Vinegars.

330-262-5010

Now a Second Location at Buehler’s Milltown

Stop In & Taste!

WO-10556092

137 W. Liberty St. Downtown Wooster 330.601.1645 • mottsombf.com

11 a.m.-6 p.m. Presented by Main Street Wooster, Inc, Rotary Club of Wooster, Wayne Center for the Arts and Wooster City Schools with Boys & Girls Club of Wooster

SEPTEMBER 29&30 WoosterFest Fri., Sept. 29th Noon-11 p.m.

11

99

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

Two Pizza SPecial! Any Two Large Pizzas

Visitor’s Bureau Authentic Chicago 5:30Medium p.m.-8:30 p.m. 330-567-3278 330-6 Style 3-Item Pizza and The330-698-0555 Daily Apple Creek Shreve Orrvill Sponsored by acS 3-iTem Pizza! 690 W. Main St. 275 N. Market 304 W. High Record 330-698-0555Wooster 330-567-3278 330-682-8 Pallotta Ford Rittman Ashton Little, Rittman Wooster $ 99 Lincoln N. Main St. 801 W. Old Lincoln Way 94 N. MainAgent St. 9 80194W. Old Lincoln Way Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

9

$

99

Medium Authentic Chicago Style 3-Item Pizza

330-925-3278

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

NOVEMBER 17 Window Wonderland 7-9:30 p.m. Sponsored by United Titanium, Wayne Savings Community Bank, The Daily Record

330-264-3278 330-925-3278

330-264-3278

223 West Liberty Street

(Across from Library) Downtown Wooster

330-262-2012

Donations Always Needed • Estates Accepted

135 W. Liberty St. • Wooster • 330.262.2253 330.345.2453 146 W. South Street • Wooster, OH 44691 www.rideeonwooster.com

IN DOWNTOWN WOOSTER FOR OVER

4146 Burbank Rd. • Wooster • 330.345.5005

Fine Ladies Clothing & Accessories, Gently Used Furniture & Antiques, Artwork • Mirrors • China & Glassware Gift Certificates Available All profits go to Life Care Hospice Greater Wayne County to provide an ongoing source of revenue for patient care in Wayne County

116 N. Main St. • Orrville • 330.683.2253

SMETZER’S TIRE CENTERS

YEARS! WELCOME TO

• Impressive Craft Beer Selection

115 South Market St. Wooster, Ohio 44691

Tues-Fri: 11a-11p

* Call for details!

Sat: 3p-Midnight 3 5 9 W. L i b e r t y S t . • Wo o s t e r

330-264-6263

WO-10556062

Family Owned & Operated www.smetzertire.com

Catering & Delivery Available

www.spoon-market.com E-Mail: thefolks@spoon-market.com

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

236 S. Martket • Wooster, OH 44691 330-601-0233 www.ashtonismyagent.com

GRAND G! OPENIN

Custom Cakes • Cookies • Treats • Weddings • Birthdays • Celebrations

WO-10556058

WO-10556055

We Service ALL Makes & Models with Service In Hours NOT DAYS!!!

Deli & Catering 144 W. Liberty St. 330-262-0880

Murr Printing and Graphics

WO-10555990

WO-10555987

WO-10555988

Family Today

verticalrunnerwooster.com

WOOSTER 330-264-2040 ASHLAND 419-289-8457

330.264.ARTS (2787) Fax 330.264.9314 237 S. Walnut St. Wooster, Oh 44691

www.omahomabobsbbq.com

• Imported & Local Cheeses

Mon-Sat 10am-8pm Sun 12-5pm

WO-10556082

Ph: 330-262-9871 Email: omahomaBobs128@gmail.com

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

• Boar’s Head Meats & Cheeses

M - F 10:00 - 8:00 Sat 10:00 - 6:00 Sun 12:00 - 5:00

4

$

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

Large 3-Item Pizza

• Specialty Market

201 N. Buckeye St., Wooster, OH 44691 330-264-2223 • 800-562-8004 Fax 330-262-1628 Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30-5:30; Saturday 9:30-12 noon www.murrprinting.com

Taco Salad & 20oz Pepsi

Presented by Main OCTOBER 12 GREAT DEALS Street Wooster, www.wayneartscenter.org Catering • Bob Workman •$Eat in or Carry 99Out Main Street 19 Inc, Wooster just for you! GRAND ! PENING O Wooster Area Chamber large 3-iTem Pizza! of Commerc, WC Creek Beer & Wine Apple Shreve Or acS 3-iTem Pizza! Convention & $ 99 690 W. Main St. 304 W Tasting 11275 N. Market

Schmid’s

Service in Hours Not Days! tm

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

+ Tax

128 S. Market St. Suite 100 Wooster, OH 44691

Saturday

Hours: Tue-Fri 10-5; Sat 10-3 • Visa & Mastercard Welcome

WO-10555986

WO-10555983

7-8 p.m.

www.woosterglass.com

WO-10555984

WO-10555980

330-262-7136

Since 1947 419 S. Market St. Wooster

SEPTEMBER 7 The College of Wooster Pipe Band and Highland Dancers

$

4

$ 99

352 W. Liberty, Wooster • PH. 264-9901

238 N. Hillcrest, Wooster • PH. 264-1055

WO-10556069

WOOSTER GLASS CO.

SEPTEMBER 16 The 14th Annual Wooster Arts Jazz Fest

4

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

6” Italian Sub & A 20oz Pepsi

WO-10540839

Lunch & Dinner Mon. - Sat.

244 S. Market Street, Wooster www.thehenrystation.com Full 330.264.2226 Bar

7-9:30 p.m. “GL Band” Sponsored by D+S Distribution and Long, Cook & Samsa, CPAs

Sat., Sept. 30th and Cutler Real 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Estate Sponsored by large 3-iTem Pizza! Wooster Area NOVEMBER 25 Chamber ofLarge 3-Item PizzaSmall Business Commerce

+ Tax

WO-10556074

243 E. Liberty St., Suite 2 Downtown Wooster PH. 330-601-1250

WO-10555979

WO-10556089

German, Hungarian, & American Favorites

Sponsored by Main Street Wooster, Inc and The College of Wooster

$ 99

330-264-7119

WO-10556066

AUGUST 18 Concert & Cruise-In

**NEW LOCATION** Jodi’s Closet & Ana’s Alterations

16

LUNCH TIME SPECIALS!

Any Flash Pizza, Two Small Pieces Of Cheese Bread & A 20oz Pepsi

Excludes extra cheese. Delivery charges &/or minimum order may apply. “Loaded Crust” extra charge. With coupon, not valid with any other offers, valid at participating locations only, expires 11/30/12.

WO-10558330

OH License # 12031 WO-10555975

WO-10556086

www.hometownhardware.doitbest.com Email: hometown1775@hometownhdw.com

Any Two Large Pizzas

WO-10556091

M-F 8am to 5:30pm •Sat. 8am-5pm Closed Sunday & Holidays

w n o t n w o GREAT DEAL D$1999Wooster just for you! Two Pizza SPecial!

WO-10556056

160 S. Columbus Rd. • Wooster, OH 44691 Phone: 330-262-8821 • Fax: 330-262-9772

Monday thru Friday: 9:30 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:30 am to 5:00 pm Sunday (Apr.-Dec.) 12 noon to 5:00 pm

www.everythingrubbermaidstore.com

Family Today

17


Health &

Wellness

Wooster Orthopaedic

Provides Direct Access to the Musculoskeletal Experts By Dr. James Gesler, MD Wooster Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center

I

n the year 2010-11, eighteen percent of all health care visits in the US, including outpatient and hospital care involved the evaluation and management of medical or traumatic conditions of the musculoskeletal system (see graph). The national trend is that this percentage of musculoskeletal visits continues to increase. Thus there is a growing need for the availability and access to these services—ideally directly from the doctors who are best qualified to treat these musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. Board certified Orthopaedic surgeons are the physician specialists who are generally considered the musculoskeletal experts. Following medical school, orthopaedic surgeons train for five years to learn to evaluate and treat a wide variety of musculoskeletal conditions. These include conditions, diseases and trauma that affect the spine, skeleton and extremities which involve the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, discs and nerves of the body.

18

Family Today

Following completion of this accredited orthopaedic residency training program, and, a comprehensive case review of their first two years in practice, orthopaedic surgeons can become Board Certified upon successful completion of a rigorous written and oral orthopaedic examination and supporting references from their peers. Thus for the growing number of patients needing care for musculoskeletal conditions, they need more direct access to orthopaedic surgeons--the musculoskeletal experts. The time and cost of family health care decisions have become increasingly more significant! Every day patients face challenging health care questions about issues for which they may have only limited knowledge. “Do I have a medical condition that will get better on its own? What if I just ignore the problem? Will it get worse? Do I really need to see the doctor? If I do, which doctor should I see? Can my regular doctor treat me, or, do I need to see a specialist?� With these questions and with access to medical care seemingly limited, how can patients efficiently navigate the health care maze to obtain the most appropriate, timeefficient and cost effective care?


WO-10558270

With higher deductible insurance plans patients need to be their own advocate to better control the ever increasing health care costs. Ideally, patients should be able to contact directly the doctor whose training and expertise best match the specific medical condition for which the patient is seeking care. But will it cost more to see a specialist directly? There is a common perception that the fees of specialists are significantly higher than those fees charged by primary care physicians. However, both specialists and primary care doctors use the same evaluation and management billing codes. For doctors located in the same geographic area their fees for federal insurance programs such as Medicare or Medicaid are identical for similar services regardless of their training or specialty. In addition, patients have many indirect costs associated with their visit to the doctor which are often overlooked in the overall cost of medical care. Time off work, travel time and expense, and added child care are just a few of these additional indirect costs. Minimizing these costs can often result in a significant saving for patients when they consider the total overall cost associated with their medical care. In our orthopaedic office, our trained musculoskeletal staff helps streamline and focus the medical evaluation process saving our patients time and expense. Our Physician Assistants, orthopaedic clinical assistants, physical therapists and trainers, and our specialized staff are available in-house to promptly answer scheduling, clinical and insurance questions making the patient experience more time efficient. X-ray and MRI imaging located in our office reduce patient delay, travel, and inconvenience for orthopaedic diagnostic tests that are not otherwise available in many medical offices. Our in-house therapy staff work directly

and communicate directly with our surgeons to develop and carry out a rehabilitation program tailored to each individual patient. Our physical therapists and trainers continue to monitor each patient’s progress and maintain communication regularly with the surgeon. If you have a painful or stiff joint, difficulty walking, inability or weakness trying to use an arm or a leg, a new onset of back or neck pain, an extremity lump, bump, or pain, or, an obvious new deformity or pain after a fall or injury, you may contact our office directly. You do not need a referral to see one of our musculoskeletal experts – the Board Certified orthopaedic surgeons at Wooster Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center – to receive a thorough, time efficient evaluation, and, to establish a cost effective personalized treatment and rehabilitation plan.

Family Today

19


Special

Feature

Wonderfully Made Children’s Ministry

I will praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Psalm 139:14

By Emily Rumes Family Today Writer

P

arents and teachers working together in children’s ministry have a common goal, to create the best possible environment for all their students. It takes time, experience and energy to be able to foster a supportive atmosphere that breaks down barriers and gives support for both teachers and students. According to data gathered in the National Health Interview Surveys from 1997 to 2008 and published by the journal Pediatrics,  developmental disabilities affect fifteen percent of American children. There is a continuing drive on the national level to increase awareness

20

Family Today

“For us it’s not about childcare for mom and dad, it is an opportunity for mom and dad and their children to have time with God.” Tim Boucher, Grace Kids Director

and support for children and families that face cognitive, physical and developmental challenges. Many children’s ministry classrooms now offer inclusive and flexible experiences, designed to be sensitive to different learning styles. Grace Church in Wooster, Ohio has created Wonderfully Made, a classroom during one of their services on Sunday mornings that comes alongside families and students with special needs, creating a supportive environment. “Students may be comfortable and learn well in the classroom with other students,” said Grace Kids Director, Tim Boucher. “No matter what we want to


WAYNE, HOLMES, ASHLAND COUNTIES

Leading experts in PEDIATRIC Speech, Occupational, and Physical Therapy services

SPECIALTY SERVICES INCLUDE: Language Development, Sensory Processing, Social Skills Groups, Sign Language, Fine Motor Skill Development, Core Strengthening, Balance Skills, Articulation, Aquatic Therapy, Handwriting, Keyboarding. Staff have specialized training and certification in many of these therapies. Call our office or check out the website:

330-262-4449 | ejtherapy.com 210 E. Milltown Rd, Suite A, Wooster

WO-10560152

make sure the lessons are being brought to them on their level. You need to minister to them as children and their parents also need to be able to have that time with the Lord.” Forming the Wonderfully Made classroom has been an organic process. Most of the families and children come to it by word of mouth, or as someone on the staff sees a need. Teachers Mary Flory and Cheryl Tankred are the two primary contacts for families and students. Flory has her Master’s Degree in Special Education and teaches at a preschool in Wooster during the school year. She was at a conference called the IF:Gathering in 2015 when she wrote the words “Wonderfully Made” on a stone. These words represented the calling she felt to create a class specifically for special needs students at Grace Church in Wooster. For Flory and the entire staff, it’s about showing God’s love to the students and their parents. “We want to walk beside the family and care for them in all cases,” added Boucher. “We are working to find the right match (class and teacher) for each child.” There is a more laid back atmosphere in Wonderfully Made. Sometimes they are part of the music and worship time with all the students, depending on their comfort level, and there is a story and a lesson for the class, which is open to all school ages up to 13 years. “We’ve learned to roll with the moods and needs of the students for that particular day,” added Flory. At their Easter Egg Drop this year, Grace Church Wooster had a sensory field. There was also a Wonderfully Made group at their Kids Camp over the summer. At the egg drop there were around 20 students that came to the sensory field. “The biggest thing we see is the students helping each other,” added Rachel Snyder, Communications Director for Grace Church Wooster. “To be a part of it, and see the parents on the field at the egg drop with their children, working together. It was so calm. Watching it was a moment of, ‘Wow God!’ for us.” There are normally 2-4 students that come to Wonderfully Made on a regular basis. In addition to volunteers Jody and Stuart Workman, there are also students from the junior and senior high classes at Grace that are able to help on Sundays. “For us it’s not about childcare for mom and dad, it is an opportunity for mom and dad and their children to have time with God,” said Boucher. Creating a welcoming place for students with special needs increases support and outreach, allowing families and communities to learn from each other and grow. Just like one stone tossed into the water can start a ripple effect, one positive action can build towards the same type of positive change.

Family Today

21


Family

Finance

H

e ho

lish You b a t r Es

s ou

ld Bud g e t

H After a couple of weeks of tracking your daily spending, you can start to see if there are any areas where you can save money.

22

Family Today

ousehold budgets can help families thrive and survive when unforeseen financial issues come up. Establishing a household budget is no small task. Numerous factors must be considered to come up with a plan that secures the family’s future without sacrificing too many things in your everyday life. Finances To develop a budget everyone in the household can live with, the heads of your household should first get a firm grasp of their finances as a whole. Determine how much money is coming in and how much money is in savings. Then make a list of the family’s financial obligations, including costs associated with housing, food, transportation,

utilities, and other monthly bills like student loan payments. Be thorough in this examination and get a clear picture of how you’re spending your money and where you can make any cuts if need be. Behaviors Heads of household should also make honest assessments of their behaviors with regard to money. Are you prone to impulse shopping? How closely do you track your daily spending? Can you cut back on certain daily expenses, such as morning cups of coffee from the coffee shop or restaurant lunches? While you might have little leeway with regard to large expenses like car and housing payments, you can likely save substantial amounts of money by cutting back on small,


daily expenses that can add up to substantial amounts of money over time. Track your behaviors with regard to “spending money,” jotting down each purchase you make, no matter how small it seems. After a couple of weeks of tracking your daily spending, you can start to see if there are any areas where you can save money. Determining Needs vs. Wants Once you see how you behave financially, you can then make a list of those daily and monthly expenses that qualify as a need and those that fall into the “want” category. For example, morning coffee might be a need, but why not brew that coffee at home and take it with you rather than buying a costly cup at the coffee shop near your office each day? You can keep some of the items that fall onto

Setting a household budget will help you save up for something you really want...

your want list as a daily or monthly reward, but try to eliminate those that are compromising your finances. Remember to include contributions to a savings account in your list of needs. Build Your Budget A firm grasp of income, bills and behaviors and the knowledge of what’s a need versus a want should put heads of household in position to develop their budgets. Stick to your budget for a month and then assess how you and your family adjusted. While the adjustment might prove difficult at first, by the end of the first month you might notice any financialrelated stress you had been feeling has begun to dissipate, and you might even make an effort to tighten the purse strings a little more as you look to save.

Beyond Veterinary Care Providing Quality Health Care for your pets at affordable prices for over 36 years! The Clinic

We offer a complete menu of services including:

WO-10538504

www.acvet.net 12545 Sheets Road Rittman, Ohio 44270 330-925-4910 249 High Street Wadsworth, Ohio 44281 330-334-1677

• General Medicine • Internal Medicine • Surgery • CT Scan • Ultrasound • Emergency Medical Services

• • • • • •

Laser Therapy Pain Management Diagnostics Laboratory Nutrition Consultations Digital Radiology Dentistry

The Lodge

All the comforts of home!

• Day Care • Caring, Trained Staff • Frequent Potty Breaks • Variety of Daily Activities • A Variety of Boarding Packages

Family Today

23


Safe &

Secure

Know the Signs: How to Identify Cyberbullying Children, adolescents and young adults can be the victims of a pervasive type of abuse called cyberbullying.

Wayne County Public Library 120th Anniversary Author Series

W o o ster

Wednesday, October 11 at 7 PM OARDC Fisher Auditorium

F

Mary Ellis

Tuesday, October 17 at 6:30 PM Dalton

WO-10555971

24

Saturday, October 21 at 12:30 PM Shreve

Wayne County Public Library 330-262-0916 | www.wcpl.info

Family Today

Jack Gantos Debbie Macomber

Saturday, October 7 at 4 PM OARDC Fisher Auditorium

ne County ay W

r ie

nds of the

Saturday, September 30 at 10 AM Wooster

blic Library Pu

Jessica Fellowes

Ron Holtman

Monday, September 25 at 6:30 PM Wooster

These programs are made possible because of generous donations from our community.

Lisa Amstutz

PL Gaus

Tuesday, August 8 at 6:30 PM Wooster

All events are free and open to the public, however some events will require registration.

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oday’s students have many new things to contend with as they navigate the school year. As a greater number of schools transition to providing lessons, homework and tests on digital devices, students spend much more time online. This connectivity can have many positive results. However, the same availability also opens up students of all ages to various dangers. One of these dangers is a more invasive form of bullying called “cyberbullying.” The global organization DoSomething.org says nearly half of kids have been bullied online, with one in four saying it has happened more than once. Cyberbullying has grown as access to mobile devices has increased. Bullying is now just as likely to occur online as it is on the playground. Cyberbullies may bully classmates through email, social media, instant messaging, and other social applications. Since cyberbullying tends to target emotions and mental well-being, and reaches beyond the school campus into a student’s home, its impact can be even more serious. According to the Megan Meier Foundation, which campaigns against bullying, peer victimization during adolescence is associated with higher rates of depression, suicide ideation and suicide attempts. In the United States, suicide is the second leading cause of death for individuals between the ages of 15 and 24, according to data compiled from the Centers for Disease Control and


Prevention, the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Cyberbullying occurs in many different forms. Here are some types of cyberbullying educators and parents can look for if they suspect their students or children are being bullied. • Flaming: This is a type of bullying that occurs in an online forum or group conversation. It’s achieved by sending angry or insulting messages directly to the person. Flaming is similar to harassment, but harassment usually involves privately sent messages. • Outing: This type of bullying is a sharing of personal and private information about a person publicly. When information has been disseminated throughout the internet, one has been “outed.” • Fraping: Fraping occurs when someone logs into another’s social media account and impersonates him or her. This could be a child or an adult impersonating the person and posting inappropriate content in his or her name. Sometimes this type of bullying is also called “posing” or “catfishing.”

• Masquerading: Masquerading occurs when bullies create fake profiles so they can harass someone anonymously. The bully is likely someone the person being targeted knows well. • Exclusion: Sometimes direct targeting is not necessary. Students can be bullied simply by being deliberately left out, such as not being invited to parties or encouraged to participate online conversations. Securing privacy online is one way to prevent cyberbullying attacks. Students also can be selective about who they share personal information with or whose social media friendships they accept. Thinking before posting and paying attention to language and tone can help curb cyberbullying as well. Students should stick together and report instances of cyberbullying if it becomes an issue.

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• Women’s Apparel and Accessories • TOMS • Crocs • Jewelry • Gifts

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Open Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Family Today

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After

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After School at the Ignites the Spark in Every Child Contributed By The YMCA of Wooster

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new school year means a fresh start for kids—a chance to start new routines and habits, build new friendships and discover new possibilities and interests. As children transition from summer to fall, the YMCA of Wooster is offering programs to school-aged children throughout the community to keep youth active, busy and engaged during out-of-school time. Through a holistic approach to youth development, the Y’s programs offer activities in a caring and safe environment during the critical hours after school. Whether through sports, mentorship, or academic support, the Y’s after school program staff nurtures the potential of youth throughout the school year. At the end of the day when the school bell rings, 11.3 million kids head out the doors and are often left unsupervised from 3 to 6 p.m., according to the Afterschool Alliance, a nonprofit public awareness advocacy organization. In Ohio, 75 percent of children are left alone and responsible for taking care of themselves. With a new school year about to begin, the YMCA of Wooster encourages parents and caregivers to make sure that children are involved in safe, educational experiences after school. “Learning enrichment after school is essential to increasing children’s success,”said Laney Gilmore, Youth and Teen Director, of The YMCA of Wooster. “The opportunity to get additional learning and support, as well as participate in meaningful activities can inspire children’s motivations and abilities to succeed.” The Y is a leading nonprofit committed to nurturing the potential of every child and teen, supporting their socialemotional, cognitive and physical development from birth to career. In the YMCA of Wooster’s after school program

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youth receive help with homework/tutoring and can also explore arts, music and literacy. Financial assistance is available to those in need, to ensure every child and teen has the opportunity to learn and grow. Careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) are projected to grow 17 percent over the next few years, and the Y is helping youth develop strong problemsolving, planning, analysis and decision-making skills to succeed in the classroom and in high-demand careers. The Y-USA Afterschool Achievement Gap Signature Program seeks to serve children from low-income communities challenged with meeting math and literacy proficiency and important developmental milestones. The YMCA of Wooster is working to address this Achievement Gap in the community. The YMCA of Wooster is also adopting a set of Healthy Eating and Physical Activity standards in their after school programs, building a healthier future for children by providing healthy environments. For more information about the YMCA of Wooster’s after school program, please contact Laney Gilmore, Youth and Teen Director at 330-264-3131. About the Y The Y is one of the nation’s leading nonprofits strengthening communities through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. Across the U.S., 2,700 Ys engage 22 million men, women and children – regardless of age, income or background – to nurture the potential of children and teens, improve the nation’s health and well-being, and provide opportunities to give back and support neighbors. Anchored in more than 10,000 communities, the Y has the long-standing relationships and physical presence not just to promise, but to deliver, lasting personal and social change. ymca.net


SIGN UP NOW FOR 2017-2018 The SPOT Before & After School Achievers Club! The Spot Activities Club is a licensed program that will provide morning and afternoon childcare, serving all Wooster City Schools for children K-8th. The Club is being housed at the main YMCA on Woodland Avenue and transportation to and from school will be provided. The morning program opens at 6:30 a.m. and dismisses children to all schools at the appropriate time. The afternoon session, buses from WCS, and is available until 6:30 p.m. Some of the daily activities at The Spot Club will include but not be limited to: Tutoring, Sports and Fitness Activities, Science & Cooking Activities, Character Development, Beginners Spanish, Arts & Crafts, Gymnastics, Swimming, Community Service, Climbing Wall Activities, Computer Labs and more! A Healthy Snack will be provided in the afternoon! Come check out our youth center! COST OF THE PROGRAM *This year the YMCA will be using a sliding scale. If you are not on JFS and feel that you cannot afford this program, please fill out the scholarship application portion. Part Time: ONLY morning or ONLY afternoon Grades K-8th Members: $26.25 per week ($105 Monthly) *ODJFS ACCEPTED Nonmembers: $32.50 per week ($130 Monthly)

Full Time: BOTH Morning & Afterschool Members: $48 per week ($192 Monthly) Nonmembers: $55 per week ($220 monthly)

Now that Summer’s heading out and the kids are going back to school...

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TAKE TIME FOR YOURSELF

Free Babysitting for Members Monday – Friday 9am – 11:30am Monday – Thurs 5pm – 8pm

FITNESS CLASSES - FREE TO MEMBERS

Spinning Tabata Pilates Fitness Fusion

Stretch it out Battle Ropes Kettlebells Zumba

Werq Just 4 Kicks PIYO Silver Sneakers

Full Body Blast Super Fit

GYMNASTICS

YOUTH SPORTS NFL Flag Football Cheerleading Youth Basketball Youth Volleyball

Competitive Cheer – Starting Fall 2017 Gymnastics for all levels ages 1 – 18 Iron Boys YFIT Warriors

CONTACT US: 330.264.3131 • 680 WOODLAND AVE. • WoosterYMCA.org

Family Today

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Check

List

Don’t Forget! The Final Countdown for Back-To-School

• Sandwich bags and storage bags – these are perfect for wanted to do over the summer that you haven’t gotten a lunches, snacks and any messy projects that may need a chance to make time for. handy container in the car. • Get plenty of sleep in the week leading up to the first day • Tissues – most classrooms require students to bring at of class and make sure the kids are getting their rest too. least two or three boxes for the year. • New backpack and lunch box/bag – is the one they had last year still in good shape, or do you need to replace them pronto? • Gym shoes and socks – make sure your kids have shoes that will work well for gym day (not just the new pair of shoes that go with their back-to-school outfit). • For kids heading to college, make sure they have a supply of quarters for doing laundry (unless you plan on letting them bring their laundry home). • Make sure the basics are covered like a light jacket for the cooler days coming – plus here in Ohio, you might as well see if they have their winter wardrobe ready to go. If you like to get your shopping done ahead of time think Create about hats, gloves and boots while you’re out and if you your own see a good deal, jump on it! cake! • All the supplies on their classroom list are important, Order Online at but make sure you have the things they need at home for DQCakes.com! their homework assignments and projects. Set up a quiet place to read and study, have any paper and printers ready to go and assess what supplies you still have left over from last year that you can have them keep using again. 4771 Cleveland Road • Check the school calendar now to see what’s up ahead so there are no surprises. Wooster, Ohio 44691 • Enjoy the last few weeks of vacation – there might be 330-345-8307 one more family trip you’d like to take this summer before they’re back in class. Ask the kids if there’s anything they All trademarks owned by Am. D.Q. Corp. or O.J. of Am. ©2017.

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Family Today Magazine July 2017  

Family Today is a quarterly magazine geared toward helping families thrive in Wayne and Holmes Counties by offering a variety of content foc...

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