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Companies invested in shale region

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Energy exporting effort


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June 2014 Edition

Table of Contents

ADVERTISING DIRECTORS Rhonda Geer Northern Zone Sales Southern Zone Sales Wooster & Holmes, Ohio Offices RGeer@dixcom.com 330-287-1653 Harry Newman Northern Zone Sales Kent, Ohio Offices HNewman@dixcom.com 330-298-2002 Kim Brenning Southern Zone Sales Cambridge, Ohio Office KBrenning@dixcom.com 740-439-3531 Jeff Kaplan Southern Zone Sales Alliance & Minerva, Ohio Office JKaplan@dixcom.com 330-821-1200 Janice Wyatt National Major Accounts Sales Manager JWyatt@dixcom.com 330-541-9450 Jeff Pezzano VP Advertising Sales & Marketing Kent Ohio Office JPezzano@dixcom.com 330-541-9455

ART DIRECTOR

5

Ohio Could Resolve Crisis in Ukraine

6

Women in Energy

11

Wayne County CNG

12

Embracing the Culture of Shale

15

Trailer Company Doubles Sales

16

‘Angie’ Howard Inducted into OOGA HOF

19

CNG Fueling Station Opens in Dayton

20

Energy Briefs

23

Royalty Owners Like What They See

24

Company Invests in Nuts and Bolts

27

Keystone Pipeline Falling Short

28

Companies Invest in Shale Region

Amadeus Smith / Dix Communications

Laurie Huffman / Dix Communications Bobby Warren / Dix Communications

Shawn Bennett / Energy in Depth - Ohio Abby Armbruster / Dix Communications Parker Perry / Dix Communications

Judie Perkowski / Dix Communications

Kimberly Lewis / Dix Communications

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WYANDOT DIN

RD FO AW R C

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Ohio could play a big role in resolving the

crisis in Ukraine

Amadeus Smith Dix Communications

O

hio could play a big role in resolving the crisis in Ukraine. U.S. Rep. Bill Johnson, representing the sixth district of Ohio, said the U.S. could loosen the economic stronghold Russia has on Ukraine and several European nations by getting into the oil exports game. And Ohio would most likely provide much of the oil. “Many experts believe Marcellus and Utica to be the largest reservoirs of oil and gas in the world,” said Johnson, who sits on the U.S. House’s Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade Subcommittee. Michael Grossman, an associate professor of political science and international studies at the University of Mount Union, said 80 percent of Russia’s oil lines run through Ukraine. Bulgaria and Romania get about half of their gas and oil from Russia. And Italy and Germany depend on Russia for about a third of their gas and oil. But it’s not just a need for oil that’s keeping countries tied to Russia through the crisis. Several oil companies from countries such as Italy, Austria and even the U.S. have partnerships with Russia’s top oil companies. Exxon Mobil, for instance, has worked with Rosneft, one of Russia’s leading oil companies, on drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. Grossman said such companies have been opposed to the push for sanctions against Russia. “If we slap too many sanctions on them, then we’ll get cut out of the market,” he said. “And the Chinese are more than happy to come in and take our place.” Johnson said President Barack Obama could avoid military action or imposing sanctions if the U.S. could export gas to Ukraine and other European countries. “There are members of the President’s own party that are opposed to the export of oil and gas and coal,” Johnson said.

Legislation that would expedite the U.S. Department of Energy’s approval process for liquified natural-gas exports has a strong Republican backing but little support from Democrats. The legislation passed the House Energy and Commerce Committee in late April. Proponents of the bill are awaiting further action. Johnson said there are about two dozen gas export applications “sitting and languishing in the Department of Energy.”

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Northern Zone Edition

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

20

Women in

Energy

14

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN Laurie Huffman Dix Communications

M

AHONING Co. -- Local manufacturing is picking up as it is benefitting from oil- and gas-related products making materials cheaper and easier to get, according to a panel discussion on opportunities for women in skilled trades. The talk took place at a recent Women in Energy Summit in Mahoning County organized by Congressman Bill Johnson. The panel was comprised of Nancy Hanlan, of the Local 18 Operating Engineers union; Kim Stearn, of Local 396 Plumbers and Pipefitters union; and Dale Forester, of Starr Manufacturing. Hanlan talked about apprenticeship programs with the Local 18 Operating Engineers union. The apprenticeships pay anywhere from $16 to $25 an hour to start, and she is an engineer who went through the program who now earns $35 an hour. These are four-year programs with 1,000 hours needed per year to graduate, and both classroom and hands-on experience on equipment are included. Apprentices also earn college credits in case they decided to go on and earn a degree. Hanlon earned a two-year associate degree at Stark Technical College, and the work she did through the program landed her a job operating heavy equipment. This suited her just fine, as she knew she didn’t want a traditional office job. “If you have an interest, look and see what it’s all about, because it can be the most rewarding thing you will do,” she said. She worked for Beaver Excavating, and enjoyed the job, but took an opportunity with the union when it came her way. “The sky is the limit. You can make $70,000 and up a year,” said Hanlan, who

reported she has earned $90,000 annually at times, only working eight months out of the year. Stearn said she received an apprenticeship with the Local 396 Plumbers and Pipefitters union, where she learned to weld. Once she began her apprenticeship, she said her career began to blossom. “I took it serious, and applied myself, and I passed the test. Then, several more opportunities presented themselves, and in 2001, I was trained to do other jobs and to go into management. It’s been a challenge and a blessing.” Forester said manufacturing needs women now because there are so many baby boomers that are thinking of retiring and they hold a lot of knowledge. So, between that, and the fact that manufacturing is growing in the region, 1,100 new people could be hired in the area now, if they had the skills. “Now is the time to flood the market and get the skills. Manufacturing used to be loud, dirty, and dangerous. But, today, more advanced technology has replaced labor intensive work,” said Forester. She further reported manufacturing is one of the top industries in our area, and 11 percent, or 40,000 people work in the field, with salaries ranging from $35,000 to $70,000 for experienced workers, with non-gender skills. “In the past, manufacturing was a male-dominated field, and it still is. But, women who possess the skills can be used on the job. And, the work is extremely diverse. You can start one place and move around. Welders can go into management or into the office, and then return to the plant,” she closed. It was noted most jobs and apprenticeships are now obtained through the Internet. So, women were advised to visit websites, gain information, and start applying online.


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INDUSTRY CHANGING 20 THE FUTURE FOR BOTH WOMEN AND MEN

June 2014 Edition

Women in

Energy

7

14

Laurie Huffman Dix Communications

“T

his is not our grandfather’s industry. The gas and oil industry has jobs available for both men and women,” said U.S. Representative Bill Johnson, who recently presented a Women in Energy Summit at the Mahoning County Career & Technical Center. He also pointed out there are jobs for women in the industry, whether they attend college or not, which is why he invited professionals to talk on opportunities both for those with degrees, those with vocational training, and those who apply for apprenticeships. When asked what the obstacles are, he said primarily that the women don’t know these opportunities exist. The first speaker, Christina Polesovsky, vice president of the Ohio Petroleum Council and former chief of staff to Mary Taylor, Ohio lieutenant governor, told the audience the production of oil and gas in the state is increasing pretty significantly. “We’re making huge strides forward, and by 2015, the U.S. will surpass Russia and become the world’s largest oil producer,” she said. Forester reported the oil production increased in this country by 8 percent over last quarter, and natural gas jumped up by an impressive 28 percent. “This is changing the vision of our energy future,” she said. According to a report in March, Polesovsky said the employment outlook for females and African Americans and Hispanics in upstream, midstream, and downstream sectors of the oil and gas and petrochemical industries are looking up due to the energy revolution. These jobs include positions such as business and financial management, professional, service, sales, office and administrative support, plus skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled blue collar jobs. The average wage for these jobs is $75,000 a year, which is more than $25,000 higher than the average wage in other industries. There are currently 226,000, or 19 percent, female workers in oil and gas, compared to 973,000 male. Polesovsky noted the petrochemical and downstream activity in oil and gas will bring the most opportunities for women. Overall, 955,000 new jobs will be available by 2020, and nearly 1.3 million by 2030, with 63 percent of those being blue collar,

and 23 percent in scientific and management positions. About 185,000 of those new jobs are expected to be available for women, and 1,080,000 by men. To get these jobs, women and men must have a high school education, plus some additional post-high school vocational training, which will increase competitiveness. “Job opportunities will increase by almost 70,000 from 2010 to 2030, with women representing a critically vital and available talent pool to help meet the demands and project growth,” said Polesovsky. “the oil and gas industry will continue to be a job creation leader for years to come. We must make a collective effort to get prepared for the industry growth.”

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Gas & Oil

Northern Zone Edition

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

SCHOLARSHIPS, TRAINING AVAILABLE IN GAS/OIL INDUSTRY

20

Wom en En in

ergy

14

Rhonda Reda

Laurie Huffman Dix Communications

R

honda Reda, of Ohio Oil & Gas Education Program, was invited to speak at a Women in Energy Summit recently held in Mahoning County. Reda told the audience the state is pushing four-year degrees as a pathway to oil and gas opportunities, but since only 21 percent of high school graduates go all the way through college, there are also great opportunities in vocational schools that should not be overlooked. When Reda began in the oil and gas industry 27 years ago, she was outnumbered by the men in the field, and was often the only woman in the room. Over the years, she said she has earned the respect of the men in the field. And, now, there are a lot of opportunities for women. She pointed out one oil and gas company can work with as many as 1,000 vendors across the state. So, you don’t have to be in the Utica or Marcellus shale corridors to find work. “So much of our society is used to pressing a button to get results. But, oil and gas is not just about computer application. You need skills, and most jobs in the industry are going to be hands-on,” Reda said. “My favorite applications are a hard hat and a pipe wrench. And, these jobs don’t change because of your location. They are the same across the state.” Reda said her organization works with schools across the state, advising the students if they want these jobs, they will have to be drug-free. She reported out of 100 applicants who

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recently applied for a job, 62 failed the drug test. On an average, 20 to 80 percent fail. She also advises students to load up on math and science courses because the industry is deep in technology and engineering, and at this time, the U.S. ranks 52nd across the world in these two core subjects. She further encourages young people not to listen to organizations that tell then if you take a two month training course they can get a job. “You cannot get a job in oil and gas with that amount of training. We call this two men in a truck training, and it’s not valid. We’re trying to shut these outfits down. If our employees are well trained, there won’t have to be injuries or environmental issues in the oil and gas industry.”


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ENERGY CAREERS ABOUNDING FOR MEN AND WOMEN

June 2014 Edition

20

Wom en i n En

ergy

9

14

Laurie Huffman Dix Communications

A

panel discussion on opportunities for women in energy careers was held as part of a Women in Energy Summit recently held in Mahoning County. The panel consisted of Callie Zazzi, of EnerVest; Elena Guevara, of Marathon Petroleum Corporation; and Donna VanDeman, of UEO Buckeye. The women have all had interesting careers in energy, and talked about what is available and how they got started. Zazzi said she had always dreamed of going to college on the East Coast, but once this was being realized and she learned she would be $100,000 in debt when she finished school, she took a hard look at her goals.She enrolled in an engineering program because she knew the pay would be enough to meet her debt. “I was good at science, but I didn’t know if I would be good at engineering. So, it was a hard decision to make. But, I took a leap of faith, and it worked out,” said Zazzi, who has worked for BP in Colorado and Houston, before moving to EnerVest. “It’s been a wonderful ride,” she admitted. One thing Zazzi loves about the job is that is allows her time to be with her six-month-old son. She also likes the diversity. “We explore the earth, design and manage wells we drill. And, we have the opportunity to help make America energy independent.” Zazzi said the course of study also provides those who graduate an opportunity to find a full-time job. “Well over 90 percent get jobs, and the average starting salary is $96,200. And, even though women make up 50 percent of the nation, there are still only 12 percent of women in the industry. I encourage women to explore the many opportunities the oil and gas industry provides.” Guevara earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in civil engineering, and she now works for Marathon Petroleum, which is something she never expected to do. “I never imagined myself in the oil and gas industry. But, I chose civil engineering and I just gravitated to the field,” she said. She explained her work involves design of equipment and output separation. She admitted she has found many job opportunities in the industry in Ohio, which is why she has remained in the state. “We all use petroleum products, every day. And, there are many career opportunities,” she closed.

VanDeman talked about the new gas processing plant built in Kensington. “Eight months ago, that was still a corn field. Now, there is a major storage area there, and the product can be trucked or shipped on a railcar or sent to our customers through a pipeline,” said VanDeman. She also discussed a plant processing plant under construction now in Leesville, which she said should be open in 8-to-10 months. “The industry moves quickly. There will be 500 contractors with the help of local trades and skilled trades to move the earth around. Lots of opportunities there also,” she said. VanDeman said the apprenticeship programs in the industry are phenomenal. “I work out in the field, but my job is mainly in the office. I started as an operator and now I am in safety. Opportunities present themselves. Research and talk to people, and make good decisions. Thirty years down the road we will no longer be carrying a pipe wrench around. We will be using our brains. The field provides lots of opportunities, and there are so many different aspects to be explored.”

Key Findings for Women, Minorities

In a new report by IHS, a media based in Colorado that serves several industries, including energy, the following information was revealed related to minority and female employment in the oil and gas and petrochemical industries. • More than 955,000 job opportunities will exist by 2020 and nearly 1.3 million job opportunities will be available by 2030 in the oil and natural gas and petrochemical industries under pro-energy development policies. • Employment gains of almost 408,000, or 32 percent of the total, are projected for African American and Hispanic workers through 2030. (Just over 100,000 for African Americans and 307,000 for Hispanic workers.) • Female employment in the oil and gas and petrochemical industries is projected to account for 185,000 of the total job opportunities through 2030. • Opportunities will exist for female petroleum engineers, managers, and other professionals, with the number of job opportunities projected for women in these areas growing by almost 70,000 from 2010 to 2030. • Much of the job growth is projected to occur in blue collar professions, and there is significant potential for female blue collar employment if interest and training were dedicated toward women to increase female participation in those areas.


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Northern Zone Edition

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

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Wayne County

CNG Bobby Warren Dix Communications

W

OOSTER — Wayne County’s engineer said the money spent converting a Ford F450 truck to run on compressed natural gas has been worth it, and he is evaluating whether it will be beneficial to convert the entire fleet. Engineer Roger Terrill’s office spent about $30,000 on the truck and another $30,000 to convert it so it can run on CNG. “It was worth it,” he said. “We’re saving about $10,000$12,000 a year,” Terrill said, adding the conversion will pay for itself in less than three years. The savings have come from fuel costs. Instead of paying about $3.89 per gallon for fuel, the Engineer’s Office is paying about $1.95 per gallon, according to Jeff Metcalf, who drives the truck. He does not see much difference in performance, and it might get about 1 mpg less than a conventional truck. Terrill decided to designate the vehicle as “the sign truck” because of the miles it travels. In a given day, the truck might log 50-175 miles, Metcalf said. “You never know where a sign has been knocked down,” he said. Because the sign truck constantly travels around the county, it usually travels through Orrville, where Metcalf and Brock Yoder can fill it up at CNG station operated by Smith’s Dairy. The conversion has made sense for the sign truck, and Terrill recently hired a consultant to do a preliminary study to determine whether it will be beneficial to convert the rest of the fleet and garage. In order to add more CNG-powered trucks, the garage area will need to be converted, Terrill said. Unlike diesel fuel and gasoline, which drops on the ground when there are leaks, natural gas will rise to the ceiling. Lights will have to be sealed,

a new ventilation system will be needed and there can be no heaters that might cause sparks. To convert the garage might cost upward of $650,000, and this is why Terrill is looking for grants that could pay for it or help defray the cost. The sign truck is stored in an area that is a “garage within a garage,” Terrill said. While the investment has been worth it, Terrill said he is not sure if it will pay off to convert dump trucks. They don’t travel as much, so it will be harder to recoup the conversion costs. However, Terrill said his office is looking at a variety of options for powering the fleet, including CNG, methanol, ethanol and diesel. Above: Brock Yoder (left) and Jeff Metcalf of the Wayne County Engineer’s Office travel between 50-175 miles a day erecting and fixing signs. They use a Ford F450 that has been converted to run on compressed natural gas. It has been a good investment, as the fuel costs $1.95 per gallon equivalent compared to nearly $4 per gallon for conventional fuels.

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12

Gas & Oil

Northern Zone Edition

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

Embracing the culture

of shale

Shawn Bennett Energy in Depth - Ohio

A

s we have seen Utica Shale development ramp up in eastern Ohio, many areas have benefitted from companies moving into and becoming part of their communities. Guernsey County has seen this first hand and is appreciative of the industry’s involvement. In an effort to give back, the Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce has taken it upon itself to help educate the local community about the increased oil and gas production taking place in the county. “What we’ve seen over the past three years is an increase in the number of oil and gas companies coming in and getting involved, wanting to get engaged in the community. They’re coming in and wanting to join the chamber, they’re wanting to offer sponsorships for our events, they’re wanting to be involved and engaged in the community and what’s going on here. And they have really done a good job at being good community partners and stewards of the community. It’s been really rewarding for us because they don’t just do it and walk away. They want to get to know you and be your friends and they’re really part of the community. It’s been wonderful.”- Jo Sexton, President of the Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce The Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce has taken these interactions and put them to good use. Since 2011, the Chamber has been actively educating its members and the general public through a partnership called the “Guernsey County Energy Coalition.” The coalition has held over 34 monthly meetings to keep the public informed on what is happening in the region thanks to Utica Shale development. The coalition began as an informational series for chamber members, but as interest continued to grow, so did the outreach efforts. “We started the coalition meetings three years ago. We’ve had 34 meetings. We’ve had industry experts come, people from ODNR and OOGEEP and lots of people like that coming to talk about the industry and educating. And they’re recorded for television, each one of these sessions and it’s replayed on the local channel so that the general public gets the information too.”- Jo Sexton, President of the Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce

Thanks to this and other educational efforts, Cambridge has been able to embrace shale development as an economic game changer – but that doesn’t mean the education stops. The Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce hosted what they dubbed “Shale-a-bration,” a friends and family festival to honor the development of the Utica Shale in not only Guernsey County, but across eastern Ohio. The Shale-a-bration was held Saturday, May 10th from 9am7pm at the Guernsey County Fairgrounds in Old Washington. The event featured educational booths from operators, suppliers and OOGEEP, who provided the facts regarding oil and gas development as well as family friendly events like a fishing expo, dock dogs and a Johnny Cash tribute. Thanks to donations from organizations and companies, this event was free to the public. Good things happen when communities work together. What the Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce is doing with the Energy Coalition and the Shale-a-bration is a testament to precisely that.

Above: The Guernsey CountyFairgrounds was the site of the area’s first ever “Shale-abration” Friends and Familly Fest on Saturday, May 10. One of the events was Dockdogs, the world’s premier canine aquatics competition. Pictured here, Adrian Kaszuba, r, with his field bred chocolate lab, Kai as he goes after a throw toy in a “Big Air” competition.


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June 2014 Edition

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Above: Jerry Knickerbocker, r, provides information to visitors in the MEET-U mobile Drake Well museum Saturday afternoon at the Guernsey County Fairgrounds. The exhibit was part of the first ever Shaleabration Friends and Family Fest.

Above: Sarah Tipka, Dan Alfaro and Ann Croce, of the Ohio Oil and Gas Energy Education Program, an Education sponsor, speak with each other during Saturday’s first Shaleabration Friends and Family Fest at the Guernsey County Fairgrounds.

Above: Mark Pagni, of AXA Advisors from Fairlawn, Ohio, paints the face of Zanesville resident Kolvin Riggle, 3, during Saturday’s first ever Shaleabration Friends and Family Fest at the Guernsey County Fairgrounds.

Above: John Sims, Austin Beeler and Kyle Burris, of OKKI Energy, a Gold sponsor, pose for a photo at the Shale-abration.

Above: John Cogar and Keith Fuller, of American Energy Partners, one of three of the Platinum sponsors pose for a photo during the Shaleabration Friends and Family Fest.

Above: World champion whip cracker, “The Whip Guy,” Chris Camp, performed several tricks with his son, Benjamin, at Saturday’s Shale-abration. In addition to his son, Camp’s daughters, Lillian and Gabriella, and mother, Laura, are also in the act. The family traveled to Guernsey County from Springfield, Ill.


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Gas & Oil

Northern Zone Edition

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

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Trailer company doubles sales Abby Armbruster Dix Communications

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PPLE CREEK — A father-son duo are keeping a business alive in J&R Trailer Sales, Ltd., and have already doubled the yearly business since purchasing the company in 2010. Dave and Brandon Borntreger now sell over 300 trailers a year, up from about 100-150 trailers sold in their first year of ownership. Before the Borntregers came along, the business had its’ own 20 year success, but Brandon Borntreger is thinking beyond the longtime location of the facility at 10828 Dover Road in Apple Creek. “One thing we strive for is to carry the best of the best trailers out there,” Borntreger said. “We carry as close to 100-percent American-made trailers as we can.” Currently, the company has a wide array of trailers on site from stock trailers, ATV trailers, aluminum and steel models, but companies can also custom-order trailers with a quick turn-around of three-five weeks. “We strive to get smaller companies that focus more on quality than focus on quantity,” Brandon Borntreger said. Most of the trailers are brought in from Indiana, but soon J&R Trailer will feature trailers made and manufactured in Texas. Many of the models that the Texan company provides include unique options to fit the needs of gas and oil companies for hauling equipment. “That’s going to really open the doors wide open for the gas and oil (companies),” Borntreger said. Borntreger said he sees a new trend in stock trailers and aluminum trailers, with also an increased sale in ATV trailers from people as far away as Pennsylvania and West Virginia. “The aluminum trailers are kind of pioneering the way for the future. We focus a lot on aluminum trailers, and we’ve sold

a lot over the years,” Brandon Borntreger said. “You don’t have to paint them. The upkeep on them is minimal compared to what a steel trailer would be. ...They’re lighter-weight, they have a better fuel economy on your vehicle.” While Brandon Borntreger handles the sales and customer service of J&R Trailer, his father Dave does repairs of all needs on site. “We do focus heavily on repairs and service. That’s one of our strong points — we have a strong service team,” Brandon Borntreger said. Most repairs, service checks or upgrades can be done within a few hours, Brandon Borntreger said. “We hate to say no to our customers,” Brandon Borntreger said. “We try to accommodate everyone 100 percent.” In the near future, Brandon Borntreger said the dream is to move the storefront to a different location where he could offer a selection of $350,000-400,000 worth of trailers on site for customers to browse. While the store could move, he wants to stay in the Apple Creek area. “Amish Country is the biggest attraction for us,” Borntreger said. “I get West Virginia guys coming up here who say, ‘we love to come to Amish Country.’” J&R Trailer Sales, Ltd., is open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 8 a.m. until noon. For more information, call 330-698-1555 or visit JRTrailerSales.com. aarmbruster@the-daily-record.com. Above: J&R Trailer’s head of sales and customer service, Brandon Borntreger, stands with a selection of the trailers sold at the company’s Apple Creek location. From stock trailers to ATV needs to horse trailers, J&R Trailer runs the gambit. Borntreger and his father Dave purchased the company from family friends in 2010.


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Gas & Oil

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

Northern Zone Edition

‘Angie’ Howard inducted into OOGA Hall of Fame Parker Perry Dix Communications

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OLUMBUS -- The Ohio Oil & Gas Association is a must if you are in the industry. That’s according to Angela “Angie” Howard, who was inducted into the OOGA Hall of Fame over the winter. It’s a recognition that she never dreamed of achieving. “When I answered the phone, and received the news [of the induction], I thought it was a joke,” she said. Howard, who was born in Dover, Ohio and raised in nearby New Philadelphia, never considered herself a “big dog” of the gas and oil field. During her time with the OOGA, she considered herself a runner. She was someone that the organization could rely on to do anything that it needed. She followed Executive Vice President Thomas Stewart’s advice that there was not anything more important for the Ohio industry than staying united through the Ohio Oil Gas Association. “When I was asking people if they had joined the Association yet, people would tell me that they could not afford it,” Howard said. “I told them back ‘You cannot afford not to do it,’” Howard, who now resides in Canton, was a member for 30 years and volunteered for the association for 12. She was an important part of running the registry for much of that time. She was often seen greeting members who had come into to town for conventions or meetings. “It was important to me that people who were either interested in joining the association or had joined received the proper information and felt welcomed at our events,” She said. “I felt that what we did was so important to so many people I wanted to see it succeed,” Howard spent the majority of her career in Ohio. For 12 years she worked for Belton and Blake. She worked as a land

administrator where she over saw companies wishing to receive leases and titles and other things needed to purchase and put oil related entities on property. However, after the company was bought-out by EnerVest, she was forced to relocate to North Carolina. Though currently she is retired and does not hold a position or volunteers for the OOGA, Howard said that she was willing to come back and help with whatever would be needed. She continues to feel today that the things that are done at OOGA are as important as ever. Ohio Oil & Gas Association Executive Vice President Tom Stewart calls Howard the face of the organization, as she welcomed every member to every event. She was a vital part if the organization during a time when it was struggling. “I am willing to do anything that is asked of me. If there is a need I will be there to try to help fill it.” Howard said. Above: Sarah Tipka, l, presenting Angela Howard with her Hall of Fame trophy.

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TREMCAR U.S.A. SERVICE CENTER OFFERS REPAIR, INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION SERVICES - CONTACT JIM EVERETT FOR MORE DETAILS

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June 2014 Edition

19

CNG fueling station

opens in Dayton D

AYTON — CNG Fuel Inc. opened Dayton’s first public fast fill compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station in southwest Ohio. The new CNG Fuel Inc. CNG station will support CNG vehicles for fleets and for the general public. The new CNG station will be used by fleets including Paper Transport, Inc. and Precision Strip, both of which have deployed CNG fueled vehicles in their fleets among others. Speakers at the station opening included: Kris Kyler, CNG Fuel Inc.; Andrew Conley Program Director of Clean Fuels Ohio; Graham Bailey, Vectren; Harrison Township Board of Trustees Vice President, Ron Casey; Ohio State Representative, Fred Strahorn; Ohio State Representative, Jim Butler; and Dan Deppeler, Paper Transport. “We’re excited to see the opening of Dayton’s first public CNG station, which will help to diversify the fuels available to area fleets,” Clean Fuels Ohio Program Director Andrew Conley said. “We want to thank CNG Fuel Inc. for helping to bring publically accessible CNG fuel to this part of our state.” “CNG Fuel Inc. is excited to open its first Ohio CNG station in Dayton that is open to fleets and the public,” CNG Fuel Inc. President Kris Kyler said. “Our second station in Findlay, Ohio, will be open by the end of this year.” “Vectren is pleased to be involved with CNG Fuels Inc. as they bring the first public fast-fill CNG station to the Dayton region. Compressed Natural Gas will provide a safe, domestic, environmentally-friendly fuel for the Dayton area and will help to lower fuel costs for local businesses,” Vectren CNG Senior Account Manager, Graham Bailey said. “The Harrison Township Board of Trustees and our community wish to welcome CNG Fuel to the Harrison Township business family. We are thrilled CNG Fuel chose Harrison Township as the location of the region’s first compressed natural gas fueling station,” Harrison Township Board of Trustees Vice President, Ron Casey said. “We look forward to having CNG Fuel as a community and business partner for years to come and wish them the best of luck as they become a recognized regional entity in the very near future.” “Paper Transport, Inc. has been an industry leader in building demand for these stations, we are excited to continue our work with CNG Fuels as they supply station infrastructure for

us in key locations,” Paper Transport Director of Maintenance & Procurement Dan Deppeler said. The grand opening event featured a fueling demonstration, CNG vehicle showcase and network with vehicle providers, station developers and conversion companies. Smith Dairy Trucking Co. from Orrville was on-hand to showcase its CNG fleet vehicle and provided complimentary ice cream for attendees of the station opening. Clean Fuels Ohio strives to improve air quality and health, reduce environmental pollution and strengthen Ohio’s economy by increasing the use of cleaner, domestic fuels and energy-saving vehicles. Learn more at: www.CleanFuelsOhio.org CNG Fuel Inc. is committed to the development, operation and strategic placement of public compressed natural gas stations. Headquartered in Fort Wayne, Indiana, the firm is committed to developing the infrastructure for this affordable, abundant and American commodity. Vectren Corporation (NYSE: VVC) is an energy holding company headquartered in Evansville, Ind. Vectren’s energy delivery subsidiaries provide gas and/or electricity to more than 1 million customers in adjoining service territories that cover nearly two-thirds of Indiana and west central Ohio. Vectren’s nonutility subsidiaries and affiliates currently offer energy-related products and services to customers throughout the U.S. These include infrastructure services, energy services and coal mining. To learn more about Vectren, visit www.vectren.com. Space for Lease: Hannibal Professional Center, 52634 Main St. (SR536) Hannibal,OH 43931 Located within a hot spot of the Utica and Marcellus Shale Formations, the Hannibal Professional Center is located at 52634 Main St., Hannibal,OH 43931 on SR536 just 1/2 mile from SR7on the Ohio River in Monroe County, Ohio, less than 1 mile from the New Martinsville, WV Bridge. This location is 3 miles from the Hannibal Industrial Park which offers rail service and barge services. Approximately 5,800 SF available. Flexible space for office, retail or light manufacturing uses. Ample parking is available. Five large open rooms that could be built to suit. One Office suite consisting of 2 private offices (option for 3rd private office), reception area, restroom and walk-in fireproof wall safe ready to move-in. Outparcels available. High speed internet available. Beautiful views of the Ohio River. Banquet facilities available for conferences, training, etc., 24 hrs fitness center to open May-June 2014 on site. Lease Rates & terms are negotiable. Contract (740)213-3568

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Briefs

SMITHVILLE TO GET NATURAL GAS FROM CONSTELLATION MITHVILLE — The village council approved a contract Mayor Allen Snyder “tentatively” signed with Constellation Energy for natural gas. The village started receiving natural gas from Constellation Energy beginning April 1. Snyder said the contract is through March 31, 2017, 36 months in total, and is at a fixed rate of $5.14 per thousand cubic feet of natural gas. Formerly, the village was getting its natural gas services from Lakeshore Energy at a variable rate averaging at $5.16 per thousand cubic feet. Snyder said the contract ended April 1 and instead of renewing it, he decided to look for a fixed rate contract. Snyder said the reason was simple. “The rates are expected to continue to climb,” he said. “It could very well get higher.” Snyder said the trend of electric companies moving away from using coal for generators to using natural gas means there will be more competition in purchasing natural gas. “Even though people won’t say it is going to impact natural, too, as they convert more gas to generate electricity than coal ... I think you are not going to see gas prices go down the way we saw a couple of years ago where they went down $3 or $4,” he said. The mayor used prices from Dominion East Ohio to highlight the trend. Snyder said the rate actually increased 30 percent from 2012 to 2013 and he believes it is likely to increase over the next three years. BP SCRAPS PLANS FOR DRILLING IN NORTHEAST OHIO KRON, Ohio (AP) - BP will scrap plans for shale drilling in northeast Ohio because of disappointing results from test wells. The energy company said in a news release that “as a consequence of its appraisal results,” it was abandoning plans for drilling in the Utica shale and selling off leases in the region. The company has about 105,000 leased acres in northeast Ohio, mostly in Trumbull County near Warren. The company announced as part of its first-quarter financial results this week that it will write off more than $500 million it has spent there so far.

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The company never disclosed what it paid landowners for five years of drilling leases, but published reports at the time estimated the amount at $4,000 per acre. Texas-based Halcon Resources in March had stopped its drilling in the area because of poor results. BP has drilled six experimental wells in northern Trumbull County within the last year, and four are now producing. Ohio’s quarterly results released last week by the state Department of Natural Resources, however, indicated poor results, according to the Warren Tribune Chronicle. The Akron Beacon Journal reported that the Utica shale in the region is rich with natural gas but is lacking liquids that are desired by drillers, especially with low prices being paid for natural gas. Mike Chadsey, spokesman for the industry group the Ohio Oil and Gas Association, noted that the recent links between hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, and seismic activity may also have been a factor. COMPANY CONSIDERING PLANT IN W.VA. SEEKS PERMITS ARKERSBURG, W.Va. (AP) - A company studying the feasibility of building an ethane cracker plant in Wood County has applied for two state permits. The Appalachian Shale Cracker Enterprise LLC is seeking an air quality permit and a permit to evaluate the site of the proposed plant under the state’s Voluntary Remediation Program. Company spokeswoman Denise Cruz tells The Parkersburg News & Sentinel (http://bit.ly/1mXNRKi ) that permitting is another administrative step in an ongoing feasibility study of the proposal. The company’s parent, Odebrecht, announced plans last fall to develop a cracker facility, three polyethylene plants and associated infrastructure for water treatment and energy cogeneration in Wood County. Cracker plants crack or convert ethane into ethylene, a widely used chemical compound. Ethane is a byproduct of natural gas drilling. COMPANIES EXPLORE UTICA SHALE IN W.VA. OUNDSVILLE, W.Va. (AP) - Oil and natural gas companies with Marcellus Shale operations in the Northern Panhandle are turning their attention to the Utica Shale. The Utica Shale underlies the Marcellus Shale in much of Marshall, Wetzel and Ohio counties. The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register (http://bit. ly/1sDI0sI ) reports that Gastar Exploration is drilling an exploratory well in both the Utica and Point Pleasant formations in Marshall County. Gastar president and CEO J. Russell Porter tells the newspaper that the company plans to move both its Marcellus and Utica drilling programs to Wetzel County later this year. Stone Energy Corp. operates mostly in Wetzel County and plans to drill a Utica exploratory well in June. Fossil Creek of Ohio also is exploring the Utica Shale in the panhandle.

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DRILLING UNDER PITTSBURGH-AREA PARK APPROVED ITTSBURGH (AP) - Council members in western Pennsylvania have approved a plan to drill for natural gas under a Pittsburgh-area park. On May 7, the Allegheny County Council voted 9-5 to allow energy companies Range Resources and Huntley & Huntley to extract natural gas from beneath 1,180-acre Deer Lakes Park from well sites on neighboring private properties. The proposal includes a $4.7 million bonus for the county, a $3 million donation to a park improvement fund and 18 percent royalties that county officials estimate would generate $3 million. Range Resources said the wells could produce natural gas for 30 to 40 years with about half the production occurring in the first eight years. The vote followed seven hours of testimony and debate. Afterward, some opponents shouted “Shame!” at council members. ONCE IMPORTER, NOW READY TO BE EXPORTER ASCAGOULA, Miss. (AP) - A Pascagoula shipping terminal opened in 2011 to import liquefied natural gas now is working to become an export terminal. The nationwide shale boom has cut imports by three-quarters since the $1.1 billion Gulf LNG terminal opened near the Bayou Casotte Ship Channel. More than 431 billion cubic feet of liquefied natural gas were imported in 2010 but the total has dropped steadily since, with fewer than 97 billion cubic feet imported last year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. And January imports fell by about one-third from last year to this year. Figures on the federal agency’s website show 8.5 billion cubic feet were imported in January, compared to 13.5 billion cubic feet in January 2012. Gulf LNG got U.S. Department of Energy approval in 2012 to export 11.5 million tons of LNG a year to countries approved under the Free Trade Agreement, including Australia, Canada and some in South and Cen tral America. More than two dozen projects have federal permission to export to FTA countries, but only seven have the more crucial approval to export to non-FTA countries, which include the hotter Asian markets, The Sun Herald newspaper reported. And only one, in Louisiana, has all the permits needed for construction to begin in 2015 to convert and export LNG. The Pascagoula terminal is seventh on the list for a permit to export to other countries, Kinder Morgan Inc. spokesman Richard Wheatley said. He said there’s no estimate on how long it would take to convert the terminal after getting such approval. DRILLING OK’D AT PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT upervisors in a western Pennsylvania township have approved permits for a company to drill for natural gas at Pittsburgh International Airport with almost two dozen conditions.

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Findley Township supervisors voted 2-1 to approve the conditional use permits but included noise and light disturbance limits, requirements for flaggers and safety vehicles at entrances to the site, a ban on injection wells and other caveats. A proposal to require one well pad to be moved further away from a residential development was rejected. The current plan calls for 47 Marcellus Shale wells to be drilled from six well pads on the surface. The Marcellus is a gas-rich formation thousands of feet underground. Consol Energy Inc. hopes to start drilling this year. Allegheny county officials say the deal could generate more than $500 million in royalties over the next few decades, and they’ve already received a $50 million signing bonus. The coun ty and the Federal Aviation Administration had previously approved the plan. After the vote, company president Nick DeIuliis vowed that the project would be a model of safe and responsible natural gas development. CHEVRON BEGINS DRILLING FOR SHALE GAS IN ROMANIA UCHAREST, Romania (AP) - U.S. oil company Chevron says it has begun drilling for shale gas at its exploration well site in northeastern Romania, a project that has drawn protests from local residents. The company said the drilling, which will probe to a depth of 4,000 meters (13,000 feet), started Tuesday after “safety and performance checks” had been completed and rock samples will be taken to determine if natural gas is present. There were no protests reported at the site in the village of Pungesti, 340 kilometers (210 miles) northeast of Bucharest. Environmentalists say that extracting shale gas - by pumping water and chemicals at high pressure into deep rock formations - could contaminate ground water supplies. Chevron says it will drill in an environmentally responsible manner.

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SWIFT ENERGY TO EXPAND EAGLE FORD OPERATIONS OUSTON (AP) - Swift Energy Co. and PT Saka Energi Indonesia have agreed to develop about 8,300 acres of Fasken field Eagle Ford shale properties in South Texas. The companies on Tuesday announced the $175 million deal, expected to close in late June, involving their subsidiaries and Swift Energy properties in Webb County. Saka will have a 36 percent interest in Swift Energy’s Fasken properties. Houston-based Swift Energy will continue to serve as the site operator. Swift Energy also announced an expanded agreement for natural gas gathering services in Webb County with Howard Energy Partners and its affiliates. Swift Energy expects to have up to 160 million cubic feet of gas per day of firm capacity for its Fasken area natural gas production. The updated capacity should be available early next year.

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Northern Zone Edition

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

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June 2014 Edition

23

ROYALTY OWNERS LIKE WHAT THEY SEE W

ith most U.S. oil and natural gas drilling occurring on privately-owned land, it’s the royalty owners who most directly experience the impact of drilling and fracking operations. As the people who have leased land to drilling companies, they monitor the drillers’ performance very carefully. Despite the stories of burning tap water and other exaggerations proffered by environmental groups with a political agenda, the vast majority of royalty owners are supportive of fracking and energy development. In a survey conducted among the 40,000 royalty-owner members of three websites — GoMarcellusShale.com, EagleFordForum.com, and GoHaynesvilleShale.com — 71 percent were satisfied or neutral with respect to operations on their land. More than 90 percent said they would lease their property again if given the opportunity. Furthermore, 75 percent of the respondents were satisfied or neutral over the timeliness and accuracy of their royalty payments from energy production companies. Many of the royalty owners have described how these payments made it possible for them to pay their bills, improve their standard-of-living, and achieve life-long dreams. For Paul and Meredith Steurnagel, for example, the monthly natural gas royalty checks were the answer to a prayer. The proceeds paid for completion of his college education and for the adoption of a baby boy for the couple. “We would not be the family we are without the royalty money,” she said. “That may sound dramatic to read but it’s the truth.” Royalty owners are a growing segment of U.S. landowners who are sharing in the nation’s “shale gale,” the term that refers

to the extraction of oil and natural gas from shale formations. The National Association of Royalty Owners estimates there are more than 8.6 million royalty owners in the United States who receive payments from oil and gas companies producing energy on their land. Natural gas exploration companies alone paid an estimated $21 billion in lease bonus and royalty payments in 2010, when the last analysis was conducted. Today, as America’s energy boom continues and more wells are drilled, the figure is likely far higher. Questions have arisen, however, regarding the details of some royalty payments. Royalty owners frequently ask, “Am I getting paid what I am owed?” or, “Why was this deduction subtracted from my payment, and why does it vary drastically from month-to-month?” This concern surfaced in the survey. Forty-eight percent of the respondents reported being dissatisfied or highly dissatisfied with post-production deductions from their royalty payments. As royalty owners can attest, oil and natural gas development is helping their families and increasing the nation’s prosperity during the otherwise lackluster economic recovery. The shale gale has created thousands of jobs, greatly increased U.S. energy supplies, and is improving U.S. energy security. And America’s shale gas production helped to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 12 percent between 2005 and 2012. Yet many environmental groups continue to criticize domestic oil and gas production while ignoring the benefits. As a nation, we should listen less to them and pay more attention to the royalty owners who witness first-hand the plusses and minuses of energy development every day. (By Keith Mauck, publisher of GoMarcellusShale.com, EagleFordForum.com, and GoHaynesvilleShale.com)


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Gas & Oil

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

Northern Zone Edition

Company Invests in nuts and bolts Judie Perkowski Dix Communications

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OLUMBUS — For a company that has only been around for little more than a decade, Aaron Moody of Industrial Torque Tools is ahead of the game. He has developed a common sense business acumen that has allowed Industrial Torque Tools to expand from its home base in Indianapolis, establish an office in Columbus in 2008, and now is setting its sites on the gas and oil industry in eastern Ohio. Moody says its marketing pamphlet says it all. “Ready to Bust Some Nuts? We are. At Industrial Torque Tools we are available 24/7 with superfast rentals, sales, service and delivery.” Don’t be fooled by Moody’s youthful appearance. He knows his stuff. He says he and some friends learned from others in the business at an early age. There are eight employees in the company, including the owners. “Basically, it’s all we ever knew and wanted to do,” he said. “Up until now, all of our marketing and advertising has been word of mouth, at job fairs and trade shows. I’d rather be faceto-face, on the job site to let everyone know we are available and ready to meet their immediate and/or long-term needs. We have hundreds of torque tools and all major brands in our rental fleet, and have a proven track record for products and customer service. We have a tool for every job. “We have planned well, we have all major brands and more. We don’t have to overnight something from New Jersey or Texas, we can grab it off the shelf, check to see if it has been tested and start driving. On occasion, an older company’s sales rep will try to sell us something new and improved, a flashy nice looking tool. These guys we are renting equipment to are not flashy, penny-loafer guys. It’s dirty, muddy, hot and we’ll jump in and make sure the right equipment is being used for the right application. “Various tools fit better than others, depending on the job. We ask questions that help determine what a customer needs.

We always tell our customers to lean on us to help determine the right tool for a particular job. It’s pointless to be in business if a customer asks for a certain tool that we know isn’t going to work. “Once we figured out what tools will work, when they or it will be delivered, we travel to the job site to make sure everyone involved knows how to operate the tools. This helps to keep our equipment in good shape and helps the worker with hands-on instructions. “It’s much better than customers getting five boxes from the UPS driver, then trying to figure out how everything works. It is our job to figure out the details so our customers don’t have to.” The Industrial Torque Tools product line includes pneumatic, and hydraulic torque tools, traditional systems, torque guns with no vibration, low sound and power drive limits when torque limits are met and patented Rad Guns. The company offers a wide array of advanced square drive, low profile torque tool brands and provides service above and beyond brand name only suppliers. Rent by the week or rent by the month. In addition to every tool for every job — the company carries more than two dozen brands — it stands by its on-site expert bolting service, safety training courses, and mobile units available for on-site technical assistance. “We carry most products used in the gas and oil industry and offer top-notch customer service, no matter the size of the order or where it’s at,” said Moody. “Some customers are brand loyal, but that does not always apply to the quality of the product. In spite of that most brands are pretty much interchangeable. Every brand we carry is tested in our shop ... Our market is primarily the gas and oil industry, but we also rent and sell to steel mills, power plants, any place where things are held together with nuts and bolts.” For more information about Industrial Torque Tools call (317-626-0213, or visit www.industrialtorquetools.com.


Dix Communications - Gas & Oil

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June 2014 Edition

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Gas & Oil

Northern Zone Edition

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

TOP COUNTIES WITH HORIZONTAL DRILLING ACTIVITY BY NUMBER OF SITES

1. Carroll County 401 2. Harrison County 227 3. Monroe County 113 4. Belmont County 109 5. Columbiana County 103 6. Guernsey County 99 7. Noble County 92 8. Jefferson County 42 9. Mahoning County 30 10. Tuscarawas County 16 11. Portage County 15 Trumbull County 15 12. Stark County 13 13. Washington County 10 14. Coshocton County 5 15. Holmes County 3 Morgan County 3 Muskingum County 3 16. Knox County 2 17. Ashland County 1 Astabula County 1 Geauga County 1 Medina County 1 Wayne County 1 WELL SITES IN VARIOUS STAGES: PERMITTED, DRILLING, DRILLED, COMPLETED, PRODUCING, PLUGGED SOURCE: OHIO DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES AS OF 05/10/14

25

50

75

100

125

150

400


Dix Communications - Gas & Oil

www.OhioGO.com

June 2014 Edition

27

Despite promotion, Keystone Pipeline falling short

W

ASHINGTON — American Petroleum Institute’s Downstream Operations Senior Manager, Refining and Oil Sands, Cindy Schild said after years of delays and excuses by the president, it’s now time for Congress to take the lead and approve the Keystone XL pipeline. “It’s time for members of the Senate to vote yes on KXL and take a stand for middle class Americans who desperately need and want the thousands of jobs Keystone XL would create,” said Schild. “The benefits of this vital energy infrastructure project have been held hostage for more than five years. The administration’s shameful politics of ‘process’ should not trump what is in the best interest of this nation’s energy and economic future.” API has launched new TV, radio and online ads in Colorado, Delaware, Minnesota, New Mexico and South Dakota urging Senators to approve the KXL pipeline. The message: it’s time to take action and put politics aside. “Americans overwhelmingly want KXL built and are telling their lawmakers in Washington. API’s grassroots army of more than 24 million American energy advocates is urging elected officials to support KXL legislation. “A vote for the bipartisan bill introduced by Senators Hoeven and Landrieu is a vote against Washington gridlock and game-playing. After five exhaustive studies confirming no sig-

nificant environmental impacts, the Obama administration’s announcement that it needs more time to make a decision is a joke.” API represents all segments of America’s oil and natural gas industry. Its more than 600 members produce, process, and distribute most of the nation’s energy. The industry also supports 9.8 million U.S. jobs and 8 percent of the U.S. economy. EDITOR’S NOTE: On Tuesday, May 13, U.S. Sen. Rob Portman issued a statement regarding the Senate’s failure to pass the bipartisan Energy Efficiency Bill. Portman released the following statement after the Senate failed to invoke cloture on his energy efficiency legislation, the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act (ESIC) The vote fell short of the 60 required yeas: “Today’s failure to move forward on a bipartisan energy efficiency bill is yet another disappointing example of Washington’s dysfunction. It’s a sad day in the U.S. Senate when more than 270 organizations- from business to environmental groups- can get behind a good, bipartisan effort, but we can’t get votes on a few amendments to pass it. “I will continue to work with Democrats and Republicans alike to try to find a way forward on this important element of a needed national, all-of-the-above energy strategy.”

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28

Gas & Oil

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

Northern Zone Edition

Companies invest in Shale Region Kimberly Lewis Dix Communications

M

inerva – Eric Mize, emergency preparedness and public awareness manager at Momentum, was quick to reassure the more than 100 in attendance at the Minerva Area Chamber of Commerce banquet recently that “these companies are here to stay. They’re not going anywhere.” Mize stressed that the oil-and-gas companies coming into the area are not here “just to make money,” and believe in keeping the community and the environment safe. Environmental accidents affect their bottom line, not only with fines, but the loss of production, Mize noted. He recounted how Utica East Ohio had an environmentalist on site at the Scio plant and how that man controlled where the crews worked and the methods they used. “There were 150 different wetlands identified and we did not impact any of those,” Mize explained. “We spent $2 million to build bridges to protect the creeks on our properties.” Working hand in hand with the community, companies like Momentum are using the latest technology to keep the plants functioning safely. As a retired firefighter, Mize knows the importance of educating local firefighters. “We had to educate the local fire departments. They can’t just run in there,” he explained. The firefighters are trained when to fight the fires and when to let the gas burn.” The most dangerous part is the start up and shut down of the plants, he noted. There are safety components in place throughout the working of the plants, because the companies “are protecting their investments and the communities.” Mize noted Homeland Security is in control of the sites, determining the need for fences and security systems. “It is important that everyone is aware that they need to be vigilant

for things and people who are out of place,” he said. “These companies have made a big investment to be here,” he said. “All the players (in total) have invested $7.2 billion in Carroll, Columbiana and Harrison counties. They are not gamblers, they are investors.” The Utica Shale “is going to develop and it’s going to get big,” he said. Companies, like Momentum, EV Energy Partners and Access Midstream who formed the partnership Utica East Ohio Midstream, are investing in the development of midstream plants. Built quickly and efficiently, UEO has facilities in Kensington, Leesville and Scio to prepare and store the natural gas and its components for market. “Natural gas from the ground is funky, stinky and not good to use,” Mize explained. “We turn it into a viable and usable product for consumers.” UEO has 321 local companies it sells to in Ohio. The products are shipped by pipeline, truck and rail. “What we make today, goes out tomorrow,” he said of their facilities. Mize described the Utica Shale as a “huge play” and is set to become one of the largest in the country. He commended villages like Minerva and Carrollton for “doing the right thing - by embracing the changes. I encourage you, the area youth and the community to embrace this.” Mize encouraged youth to look at careers in the oil-and-gas industry and noted many high schools and colleges are developing curriculums in related fields. The oil-and-gas industry is “not going anywhere and if they go no further into the play, there is enough oil and gas for 5060 years,” Mize said. How long this play lasts depends on “how rich the Earth is beneath us.”


Dix Communications - Gas & Oil

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June 2014 Edition

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Gas & Oil

Northern Zone Edition

June 2014 Edition - Dix Communications

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June 2014 Edition

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June 2014 Ohio Gas & Oil Magazine - Northern Edition