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d. Divina

Jones

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO Interior Architecture Dunn & Dalton Architects Architecture

2002-2006 2006-2007 2007-2010


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internship

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study abroad: China

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architecture

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interior architecture

May 2006 – Aug. 2006/ Jan. 2007 – May 2007

[construction document production, site visits, photoshop renderings]

summer 2009

[sketches and watercolor images, photographs, Shanghai case study]

Aug. 2007 - May 2010

[Comprehensive project: iron workshop, thesis: the found object]

Aug. 2002 - Dec. 2006

[moveable bench, thesis: physical therapy clinic]

Featured

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Work

TABLE OF CONTENTS


[daily sketches]

The Influence of Housing

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Dunn

&

d.

Dalton

Architects

ARCHITECTURAL INTERNSHIP 4


Internship

Dunn & Dalton Architects

Kinston, NC Projects:

[Little Bank renovation] Rocky Mount, NC

Truth Tabernacle: visited site, took measurements, created initial plans, sections, and elevations Little Bank: visited site, took measurements, drew up plans, and worked on drawings for addition Atlantic Beverage Company: worked on CAD drawings based on file and information sent from the company Ellington Springs Apts.: Renderings, showing depth through shadows C.C. Healthcare: Worked on markups, door tags, door schedules, room tags, cabinet details, bathroom details and made copies Grocery Store renovation: visited site, took measurements/ drew up plans, worked on renovation drawings

Atlantic Beverage Company Little Bank Renovation Jacksonville, NC I was given the opportunity to join an architect from the firm in taking existing measurements of a local bank. I then worked with the architect to draft the existing and renovation drawings for the project.

Based on information and drawings received from the Beverage Company, I drafted the existing and renovation plans for this project. I also worked to set up the construction documents for the project.

La Grange Baptist Renovation: visited site, took measurements, and created initial drawings of floor plans, sections, and elevations renderings: medical office/ restaurant other duties: worked on markups, put together door schedules, created/ edited cabinet and bathroom details, and made copies

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Internship

Dunn & Dalton Architects:

Ellington Springs Apartments - Elevation A

Ellington Springs Apartments - Elevation B

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Photoshop renderings


Internship

Dunn & Dalton Architects

Kinston, NC

[Truth Tabernacle renovation] Rocky Mount, NC

existing north elevation

existing first floor plan

During my time in this internship, I was able to visit a site in Rocky Mount, NC with a senior designer to take the existing measurements of a local church. I then helped to set up the drawings using the measurements that were taken. This project provided a great opportunity to work out in the field under existing conditions. My in-office work consisted of drafting plans, elevations and sections, and correcting mark-ups regularly. I generated several door schedules, set up construction documents, and rendered plans and elevations of other projects for clients to view, which are displayed on the next page.

existing second floor plan

existing third floor plan

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Internship

medical office rendering

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restaurant rendering

Dunn & Dalton Architects:

Photoshop renderings


d.

Architecture

Abroad

CHINA: SUMMER 2 2009 009 9


Sketch outside of a temple in Shangri-La, China

This journey across China brought our group of 15 to 9 different cities, including Beijing, Xi’an, Dali, Lijiang, Shangri-La, Yuanyan, Shanghai, Suzhou, and Hong Kong. This summer program through China was a 5 week investigation dedicated to the study of architectural culture in China. This experience focused not only on traditional buildings, but also contemporary forms. Various levels of study were undertaken throughout the trip as we traveled to different areas, which unveiled levels of diversity within the architectural traditions.

China: summer 2009 ARCHITECTURE 10

Sketch of the Great Wall Beijing, China


Beijing, China - Temple of Heaven

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Shanghai Case Study

Urban Context - Cite Bourgogne

Site Plan - built space vs. circulation

Cite Bourgogne - Entrance

Adjacent homes - sharing a public path

Entrance - stone gate entry

This was a case study that was completed with 4 other architecture students in Shanghai, China. The site, originally named Cite Bourgogne by the French, was built in 1930. It has become locally known as Bu-Gao-Li Lane. Cite Bourgogne is located at the corner of South Shan Xi Road and Middle Jian Guo Road. It was originally built to accommodate 78 families, but now has been overcrowded by 450 different households. The design of the laneway house dwelling can be viewed as a blend of European and Chinese styles. Fitting with the layout and the design, lilong housing means “laneway neighborhood.� This laneway housing provides an interesting conjunction of public and private spaces. There is limited private space within this community due to all of the incoming families. Many families may share a single kitchen. Within each kitchen, a family will have an alloted space and a specific water spout. The government has introduced alterations in the recent years, which include the installation of toilets. The block and brick that are currently seen are original features to the site. Today, the door to house #21 is the best preserved door on the site.

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Interior - shared kitchen space


Shanghai Case Study

Block Elevation at Entrance - storefront below and housing above 1:200

Diagrams: intersecting paths, circulaion, and house vs. lane

Elevation at Back of Complex - stone gate entrances 1:200

Kitchen Side Lane Elevation - entrance at kitchen side, displays changes over time 1:200

Gate Side Lane Elevation - entrances at stone gate side 1:200

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Shanghai Case Study

Block Section - showing repetitive design layouts 1:200

Lane Section - showing repetitive housing layouts 1:200

(Second Floor) stairs connect to smaller rooms 1:50

(Typical Unit - First Floor) showing continual connection of rooms 1:50

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d.

UNC

Charlotte

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE 15


Diagrams

Exterior view of Iron Workshop

The link that exists between the McLeod Plantation and the ACBA is the goal of preservation. This project defines the space between historicism and modernism. The idea involves a duality between the integration and separation of spaces. This has been done by incorporating a continuous wall into the site that creates a division, but also develops a connection between two very distinct groups. The wall is broken at the gallery space of each building, which expresses the idea of integration through the development of a product. The building cantilevers through the wall only at the gallery in order to keep the overall integrity of the wall. The goal is not to separate the buildings, but to create a larger sense of community, which was a request made by the American College of the Building Arts.

[iron workshop] Charleston, SC

Comprehensive Project 16

hand-drafted site plan

originally drawn at 1/128” = 1’-0”

American College of the Building Arts


Comprehensive Project American College of the Building Arts

First Floor Plan

detail section A

North Elevation showing continuous wall running through the site

Second Floor Plan

detail section A

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Comprehensive Project American College of the Building Arts

Perspective towards iron workshop

West Elevation

Perspective towards gallery space

East Elevation

Perspective of entrance under gallery space Diagram of site layout and site influence

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Sketch of initial design idea


Comprehensive Project American College of the Building Arts

detail section A: through north boundary wall

originally at 3/4” = 1’-0”

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UNC

d.

Greensboro

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE 27


INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE [Group Design Build - Moveable Bench] Interior Architecture generally focuses on re-designing the interior space of an existing building, with a focus on structure, and the way in which a user would interact with space. However this project focused on developing a piece of furniture in which the user would interact with. The moveable bench was designed and constructed with a group of 8 other Interior Architecture students from UNC Greensboro. The design consists of 2 stabalizing floor elements, a central I-beam, and attached, yet moveable seating elements. The I-beam is supported at regular intervals to support not only the bench but also the user interacting with each seat. The seating elements interlock with one another, but are free to slide back and forth.

detail of interlocking seating elements

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side detail showing support from i-beam


INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE Undergraduate Thesis

[physical therapy clinic] 1511 Westover Terrace Greensboro, NC 27408 Site Location: Merritt Medical Plaza Square Footage: 32,000+ SF Initially, this project began with the choice of a facility type and site location. The size of the facility allowed for a large intervention and multi-purpose design.

exterior view showing alterations to exterior

The concept of this project focused on Structural Alignment: the re-alignment of the facility to focus the design on regaining personal independence from physical restrictions. This happens not only on the structural level of the facility, but also during the rehabilitation process for the patients.

first floor plan showing exam room and rehabilitation space

Original entrance into the facility Undergraduate Thesis INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

second floor plan showing cafe for families and track space

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The facility includes 10 personal treatment rooms where the rehabilitation process begins. There is an independent exercise space and a track that patients may utilize. The second floor contains a cafe for social involvement for the patients’ family members, creating a large, open design within the facility.

main entrance into facility

Although this facility mainly acts as a physical therapy clinic, it has the ability to provide other services. Being that the families of each patient will be greatly involved in the physical therapy, it was important to include other elements of activity, in order to respond to all of the individuals using the space.

first floor rehabilitation space

Site map

30 rehabilitation space showing track above 30

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References UNC Charlotte - College of Arts + Architecture

David J Thaddeus

Greg Snyder

AIA, NCARB Professor School of Architecture College of Arts + Architecture Thesis Advisor University of North Carolina at Charlotte (704) 687-0130 T thaddeus@uncc.edu

School of Architecture College of Arts + Architecture Thesis Advisor UNC Charlotte (704) 687-0128 T gsnyder@uncc.edu

Betsy West Associate Professor School of Architecture College of Arts + Architecture Thesis Advisor (704) 687-0133 T bcwest@uncc.edu

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Architecture Portfolio