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®

Spring 2017 $9.95

SPECIAL EDITION

Inside this issue: in STEM Awards BREAKING BARRIERS IN STEM


Leadership is inclusive. We believe diverse talents, experiences, and backgrounds are essential to success.

At KPMG, we are proud that, at every level of our firm, our professionals take ownership for creating an inclusive culture. Learn more at kpmgcareers.com KPMG congratulates Miriam Hernandez-Kakol on being named one of Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 2017 Women Worth Watching in STEM.

Anticipate tomorrow. Deliver today.

©2017 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Some of the services or offerings provided by KPMG LLP are not permissible for its audit clients or affiliates. NDPPS 657274


PUBLISHER'S COLUMN

Since 1999

®

BREAKING NEW

GROUND INSPIRING FUTURE

GENERATIONS IN STEM It is with much gratitude and excitement that we reach a milestone with this inaugural edition of Women Worth Watching in STEM®. Inside we bring you dozens of brilliant women who are inspiring, educating and mentoring future generations in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. It takes intentional, bold action to accelerate meaningful change and throughout this edition, we share perspectives of a widespread group of leaders who are doing just that. Their combination of expertise and leadership is courageously breaking new ground for women across STEM fields. They share the work they are doing and what needs done to attract, retain and promote women in STEM. They talk about STEM being viewed through a much wider lens and encompassing a growing range of skills, experiences and perspectives. There is growing consensus that diversity is vital for generating new ideas and strategies, which in turn impacts the bottom line. Companies have a long way to go to achieve diversity in their executive ranks, progress is slow and most boardrooms don’t look anything like the clients, customers or stakeholders they represent. For years, women and minorities have only experienced slight gains in leadership, especially in STEM fields. STEM is everywhere, affects everything and tightening the gender gap in STEM fields is vital for the future. These leaders are unlocking the power for women in STEM and substantiating the business case for diversity and inclusion along the way. Increasing women’s leadership across all sectors is mandatory for realizing greater economic success and equality for women across the board. A landmark McKinsey Global Institute report finds that $12 trillion could be added to the global GDP by 2025 if the gender gap is narrowed. The STEM edition is our newest development evolving from our popular Women Worth Watching® leadership awards. It emerged from overwhelming interest in STEM from our audience and the sheer volume of STEM nominations we receive for our flagship awards edition. This summer will mark 16 years of growth and success for our annual Women Worth Watching® leadership awards. We hope you enjoy this edition as Profiles in Diversity Journal showcases these amazing women with lifelong passions for innovation, education and mentorship. They are among the brightest scientific and technological minds in their fields. They’re intelligent. They’re honorable and they are valuable. Congratulations to the 2017 Women Worth Watching in STEM! James R. Rector, Publisher and Founder profiles@diversityjournal.com

FOUNDER/CEO/PUBLISHER

James R. Rector EDITOR

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HUMAN RESOURCES

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REPRINTS: profiles@diversityjournal.com EDITORIAL: ruthhawk@diversityjournal.com PHOTOS & ARTWORK: art@diversityjournal.com FOLLOW US AT:

twitter.com/diversityjrnl scribd.com/diversityjournal facebook.com/diversityjournal linkedin.com/diversity-journal Profiles in Diversity Journal® is a quarterly magazine dedicated to promoting and advancing diversity and inclusion in the corporate, government, nonprofit, higher education, and military sectors. For more than 19 years, we have helped to stimulate organizational change by showcasing the visionary leadership, innovative programs, and committed individuals who are making it happen.

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IN THIS ISSUE

Since 1999

®

03 | 08 | 09 | 69 |

PUBLISHER’S COLUMN CELEBRATING WOMEN MAKING A DIFFERENCE LEADERS OF CHANGE CORPORATE INDEX

TABLEOF CONTENTS 4

SPECIAL SECTION:

10-58 | BREAKING BARRIERS IN STEM WOMEN WORTH WATCHING IN STEM AWARDS 58

| WOMEN HAVE THE POWER

60

| ADVANCING WOMEN IN BUSINESS

62

| BOARD DIVERSITY TRENDS

64

| CEO CHAMPIONS FOR CHANGE

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

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# hellowork


Congratulations AT&T Brooks McCorde Page 15

Arrow Electronics Noel Marshall Page 13 ADP, LLC Miriam Soza Page 11

Akerman LLP Gail Gottehrer Page 12 Booz Allen Hamilton Carmen Cateriano Page 20

ADP, LLC Isabel Espina-Carvajal Page 10 Axinn Stacie Ropka Page 18

AT&T Teresa Ostepower Page 16

Burns & Levinson Ronda Moore Page 21

6 AT&T Jenifer Robertson Page 17

Burns & Levinson Janine Susan Page 22

Cooper Standard Brigit Anthony Page 24

Fidelity Investments Teena Piccione Page 27

Computer Sciences Corporation Lesley Sigall Page 23

Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Cindy Langston Page 26

EA Farah Ali Page 25 GEI Consultants, Inc. Francine Dunn Page 32

Fish & Richardson Susan Morrison Page 31

Fish & Richardson Betty Chen Page 28

Fish & Richardson Lauren Degnan Page 29

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Fish & Richardson Anita Meiklejohn Page 30

GEI Consultants, Inc. Gillian Gregory Page 33


to the 2017 Women Worth WatchingÂŽ in STEM and the companies, agencies, and organizations backing them!

Great Basin Scientific, Inc. Suzette Chance Page 34

Humacyte Heather Prichard Page 40

HARMAN Rashmi Rao Page 36 HP Inc. Lihua Zhao Page 39

IAC Applications Julie-Anne Selvey Page 41

HP Inc. Mirjana Spasojevic Page 37

iRobot Lisa Freed Page 43

KPMG LLP Miriam Hernandez-Kakol Page 44

Legg Mason Global Asset Management Janet Oren Page 45

Meritor, Inc. Lucille Gartman Page 46

Interpublic Group Patricia Hinerman Page 42

Meritor, Inc. Linda Taliaferro Page 47

New York Power Authority Kaela Mainsah Page 51 NetApp Anna Schlegel Page 50

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation Marcia Kayath Page 52

MKF Meera Kaul Page 48 Mount Saint Vincent University Tamara Franz-Odendaal Page 49

Squire Patton Boggs Tamara Fraizer Page 56

Tata Consultancy Services Chandrika Shrinivasan Page 57

Shell Downstream Inc. Jeannie M Gardner Page 55 Sandia National Laboratories Carol Adkins Page 53

Sandia National Laboratories Justine Johannes Page 54

Wells Fargo Ligia Vilela Page 58

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CELEBRATING

WOMEN Making a Difference PAGE

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10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 37 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58

ADP, LLC - Isabel Espina-Carvajal, Vice President - Enterprise Architecture ADP, LLC - Miriam Soza, Vice President, Client & Associate Engagement Technologies Akerman LLP - Gail Gottehrer, Partner Arrow Electronics - Noel Marshall, Senior Applications Engineer AT&T - Brooks McCorcle, President, AT&T Partner Solutions AT&T - Teresa Ostapower, Chief Digital Officer AT&T - Jenifer Robertson, Senior Vice President Tech Strategy & Portfolio Implementation Axinn - Stacie Ropka, Partner Booz Allen Hamilton - Carmen Cateriano, Principal, Technology Leader Burns & Levinson - Ronda Moore, Partner Burns & Levinson - Janine Susan, Partner Computer Sciences Corporation - Lesley Sigall, Vice President, GIS Business Operations & Finance Cooper Standard - Brigit Anthony, Vice President, Engineering and Technology, North America EA - Farah Ali, Sr. Director, Player Reliability Engineering, EADP Player Reliability Engineering Excellus BlueCross BlueShield - Cindy Langston, VP, Enterprise Portfolio Management Fidelity Investments - Teena Piccione, SVP Information Technology Fish & Richardson - Betty Chen, Principal Fish & Richardson - Lauren Degnan, Principal Fish & Richardson - Anita Meiklejohn, Principal Fish & Richardson - Susan Morrison, Managing Principal GEI Consultants, Inc. - Francine Dunn, Vice President GEI Consultants, Inc.- Gillian Gregory, Vice President Great Basin Scientific, Inc. - Suzette Chance, Senior Director of Clinical Affairs HARMAN - Rashmi Rao, Senior Director, Advanced Systems and User Experience HP Inc. - Mirjana Spasojevic - VP and Head of Immersive Experiences in HP Labs HP Inc. - Lihua Zhao, HP Labs Director and Principal Investigator Humacyte - Heather Prichard, Senior Vice-President, Product Development IAC Applications - Julie-Anne Selvey, VP Brand and CSR Interpublic Group - Patricia Hinerman, IPG Corporate CIO iRobot - Lisa Freed, STEM Program Manager KPMG LLP - Miriam Hernandez-Kakol, US Service Line Leader Customer & Operations - Advisory Legg Mason Global Asset Management - Janet Oren, Chief Information Security Officer Meritor, Inc. - Lucille Gartman, Site Manager Meritor, Inc. - Linda Taliaferro, Vice President, Global Quality MKF - Meera Kaul, President Mount Saint Vincent University - Tamara Franz-Odendaal, Professor of Biology and NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering NetApp - Anna Schlegel, Senior Director of Engineering New York Power Authority - Kaela Mainsah, Manager, Environmental Justice Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation - Marcia Kayath, Vice President and Head, US Clinical Development and Medical Affairs Sandia National Laboratories - Carol Adkins, Director of Energy Technologies and System Solutions Sandia National Laboratories - Justine Johannes, Director of Research & Development Science & Engineering Shell Downstream Inc. - Jeannie M Gardner, Global Pricing Lead Squire Patton Boggs - Tamara Fraizer, Principal Tata Consultancy Services - Chandrika Shrinivasan, Client Partner Wells Fargo - Ligia Vilela, SVP, CTO-CAO Digital Channels Technology

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL


LEADERS OF CHANGE

UNLOCKING THE POWER BREAKING BARRIERS FOR WOMEN IN STEM

W

omen in STEM are solving some of the toughest challenges of tomorrow in the most innovative ways and developing cutting-edge technologies, yet women are scarce in scientific research, technology and engineering. While STEM’s love of facts and figures creates an even playing field for success, there’s still much work to be done for unlocking the power for closing the gender gap in STEM fields. Among the top global technology companies, only about 11 percent of executive committee members are women. With STEM fields powering the exciting innovation that is creating new business, and introducing new technologies and products that are an essential part of building a strong economy, women are significantly underrepresented and there are barriers to attracting and retaining them. On the following pages, 45 leaders in STEM share their pathways and unveil the obstacles getting in the way for others. These leaders of change all stress the importance of mentoring fiercely, educating fully, and motivating consistently for boosting competitiveness and creating the best workforce possible. These women are an inspiration to other women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, as well as those for future generations to come. They are intelligent, driven, focused, exciting and care deeply. Our heartfelt thanks to each of them for their brilliance and determination, the extended hours they put in mentoring and volunteering, and the barriers they are breaking through! The United States has been a leader in science and technology for the past half century, accounting for about 40 percent of worldwide research and development investment and employing about a third of

the world’s engineers and scientists. STEM is a crucial driver for long-term sustainable economic growth and women are an essential part of the equation, not only in STEM but across all sectors. Catalyst’s 2017 Women CEO’s of the S&P 500 reveals of the S&P 500 only 5.8 percent of CEO’s are women, they hold only19.9 percent of the board seats, only about 9.5 percent of women are top earners, 25.1 percent are executive senior-level officials and managers, and 36.4 are mid-level official managers. The statistics for women in specific STEM fields are much more dismal. With only 11 percent of working engineers worldwide being women, of those who earned engineering degrees over 38 percent quit or never even entered the profession. Throughout this inaugural STEM edition, we showcase leaders of change and what they are doing to break through the barriers for women in STEM. The women profiled are the award recipients of Profiles in Diversity Journal’s top 45 in STEM. They are unlocking the power for increasing women’s STEM leadership opportunities that is mandatory for realizing greater economic success and equality for women across the board. On the following pages, we celebrate them while enhancing the visibility and reputations of the companies empowering, supporting, and employing these amazing women. These women were nominated by their employers or colleagues for creating value for other women, companies, organizations and agencies. They are women to watch in STEM. Ruth Hawk Editor ruthhawk@diversityjournal.com Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Industry Technology Employees 56,000 Headquarters Roseland, New Jersey Website adp.com/connect-with-adp.aspx

Isabel Espina-Carvajal Vice President - Enterprise Architecture

INSPIRING WOMEN IN

TECHNOLOGY 10

As vice president of ADP’s Enterprise Architecture Center of Excellence, Isabel Espina-Carvajal is responsible for defining the standards around technology, data, processes, security, and infrastructure for the Global Product and Technology ADP organization. She has spent the past six years as chief data architect of ADP’s Innovation Lab. It serves as an incubator for automated, intelligent and predictive human capital management solutions and places emphasis on analytics, search, mobile, social media and user experience. In that role, Espina-Carvajal led the creation of ADP’s first standard interface for a seamless mobile application experience.

"ALWAYS BE CURIOUS AND EXCITED TO LEARN SOMETHING NEW. EMBRACE CHANGE. ALWAYS TRY TO FIND THE POSITIVE FROM EVERYTHING THAT LIFE THROWS YOUR WAY. THERE IS NOTHING YOU CAN’T DO AS LONG AS YOU ARE WILLING TO INVEST IN LEARNING AND PUTTING THE TIME IN." ~ ISABEL ESPINA-CARVAJAL

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

The technology contextualizes content in any geopolitical environment. The concept was transformational for the company, allowing ADP to expose and integrate its data in the market, launching the ADP Marketplace. Her passion for seeing diversity growth in the technology industry has inspired her to mentor others. She knows how it feels to be the only girl in the room and felt isolated back in the years when she was studying electrical engineering and computer science. That certainly didn’t deter her from pursuing a career in technology and channeling those feelings into giving back.

part of all programs in public and private education from an early age. It needs to be a culture shift. Educating parents on how they can make it fun for kids, encouraging kids to be creative without following traditional gender lines. Educating parents how these skills can provide a lot of opportunities for kids, in the future in a non-tech way but more in a how you can change the world.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “STEM still has an image that most girls don’t identify with. Peer pressure to fit in for adolescents drives girls away from daring to be different.”

What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Presenting STEM as beyond coding. STEM enables people Where do you see women in STEM in to think of coming up with tangible five years? “We are at a turning point for solutions to problems. Women do STEM. There are programs being rolled that every day. Enabling a solution out in schools, there is more awareness in with STEM requires the entire process the world, tech is pervasive in everyone’s concept, ideation, incubation, execution, life. Companies understand that they have evangelizing, selling. If we can better a huge need to fill tech jobs and we have a articulate to people in general that a huge untapped population.” team can come up with a great idea and create a solution it may encourage How can the world increase diversity more involvement.” PDJ in STEM fields? “Insuring that STEM is In the words of Isabel Espina-Carvajal:


Industry Technology Employees 56,000 Headquarters Roseland, New Jersey Website adp.com/connect-with-adp.aspx

"DON'T BE AFRAID TO STEP OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE, TAKE STRETCH ASSIGNMENTS. NEVER STOP LEARNING." ~ MIRIAM SOZA

Miriam Soza Vice President Client & Associate Engagement Technologies

STRATEGIC VISION ROADMAP FOR TRANSFORMATION With a distinguished 35-year career in STEM, Miriam Soza had ventured into technology at a time when few women were pursing an engineering career. Early in her career, she was the minority and had to prove herself to gain respect. Over the years, she’s witnessed a significant change in how women are becoming more respected in her field. Soza started her career as a software developer for the financial markets then evolved into management in the late 1980's, where she encouraged, coached, and developed women in technology. Her first major role in technology was as a software developer at EF Hutton. There she worked with former United States Attorney General Judge Griffin Bell to develop an application for monitoring check kiting practices. This created an opportunity for her to join a capital venture to develop a market data application for Wall Street brokers and account executives. As a founder of ILX Systems, she was instrumental in building

an application that distinguished ILX Systems as a market leader in the equity space. She subsequently went on to head Merrill Lynch’s Architecture for Market Data and within five years was appointed the global head of market data. She was the first female to hold that position. She went on to join ADP as its vice president of Global Network Services Operations, where she transformed the organization to the ITIL framework to better align infrastructure with business needs. She was promoted to the vice president for Distributed Data and now is the vice president of Client & Associate Engagement Technologies. Here she has established the strategic vision and roadmap to transform the service organization to a full digital experience. She is a member of the Women in Technology and Hispanic IT Executive Council. In the words of Miriam Soza: What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “We need to remove

the gender stereotype and promote STEM at an early age.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Today, STEM is more respected. It is foundational and core of everything we do. STEM is a vital part of the world day today and enables innovation and advances.” How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Those of us in this field need to promote STEM and share our experiences through forums and outreach programs in the elementary grades.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Gender-bias and stereo type - the lack of coaching women into the STEM field in schools and universities.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Due to the recent emphasis on promoting women in STEM, I expect more women in this in leadership.” PDJ

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Gail Gottehrer Partner

Industry Legal Employees 600+ Headquarters New York, New York Website akerman.com

LAWYER DEDICATED TO INCREASING WOMEN IN STEM 12

As a partner at Akerman LLP in New York, Gail Gottehrer is a member of the firms’ Data Law Practice, focusing on privacy and technology related litigation, management-side labor and employment litigation, and class action defense. She advises businesses on the legal implications of existing and emerging technologies, including autonomous vehicles, drones, biometrics, cybersecurity, breach response strategies and employee education. Her dedication to increasing the number of women in STEM and to encouraging girls to consider STEM careers is evidenced by the groups she has founded and runs. Among them are Women in Cyber, the Monica Bay STEM Leadership Committee, the National Association of Women Lawyers' Intellectual Property and Technology Affinity Group, and Women in eDiscovery. She is a strong voice in support of the need to increase the number of women in STEM careers and to ensure that women in STEM careers can advance and succeed and the importance of educating grade school and middle school girls about the opportunities available to them in STEM. She also does a significant amount of pro bono work. PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

In the words of Gail Gottehrer: Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I'm optimistic that we will have made progress and that there will be more girl-focused STEM programs in schools and more investment in womenowned or directed technology projects. I expect to see more women in powerful, and visible, positions in STEM-related companies worldwide.”

"DREAM BIG AND BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. IGNORE YOUR DETRACTORS AND BE INNOVATIVE. THE FACT THAT SOMETHING HASN'T BEEN DONE BEFORE SHOULDN'T BE A DETERRENT OR A REASON NOT TO TRY – IT'S PRECISELY THE REASON TO PUSH FORWARD AND CREATE SOMETHING NEW. " ~ Gail Gottehrer What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “The barriers include the lack of a well-established career path leading to the C-suite for women, concerns about the limited

amount of mentorship and sponsorship of women, and wariness about breaking into traditionally male dominated industries.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “There is an increased awareness about the gender imbalance in STEM, which has led to more conversations about this problem and the need to address it. We are seeing more groups, like Girls Who Code, being formed to get more girls involved in STEM, and the emergence of more women as thought leaders in STEM fields, such as automotive technology, robotics, and cybersecurity.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Successful corporate programs can move women forward in STEM. More attention can be given to the studies that show including women in STEM fields increases the productivity and profits of the companies in which they work. Educating girls and young women about the advantages of careers in STEM, increasing recruitment of women for jobs in STEM-related fields, and increasing the number of women who are promoted to senior positions in companies in those fields will also help to address the current gender gap.” PDJ


Company Arrow Electronics Industry Electronics/Technology Employees 18,700 Headquarters Centennial, Colorado Website fiveyearsout.com

"It’s a great time to be a woman involved in STEM. I feel valued by my coworkers for my ideas and unique perspectives. For young women interested in pursuing STEM careers, I would encourage them to do the things that you are afraid of and expect great things from yourself. " ~ Noel Marshall

Noel Marshall Senior Applications Engineer

TRANSFORMING TECHNOLOGIES - CHANGING LIVES OPENING OPPORTUNITY FOR DRIVERS WITH DISABILITIES

Noel Marshall is the lead engineer for Arrow’s award-winning SemiAutonomous Motorcar (SAM Car) project that attracted worldwide attention. It utilized off-the-shelf technology to modify a corvette and enable a quadriplegic driver (former IndyCar Racing Driver Sam Schmidt) to drive using only his breath and head motions. Marshall was the first SAM Car team member to bring both a mechanical and electrical engineering background to the project. Her experience and dedication have been critical in bringing Arrow’s SAM Car project to fruition over these past four years. Her innovative thinking and ability to tackle complex engineering challenges and guide complicated technical projects forward have significantly contributed to the SAM Car’s notable technical successes. Using the technology, Schmidt has successfully completed demo laps on the iconic Indy 500 oval, tackled the twists and turns of the Pikes Peak International

Hill Climb and was granted the nation’s first autonomous vehicle driver’s license. The SAM Car project has generated over 1.7 billion media impressions for Arrow and helped elevate its brand profile in the crowded technology industry. The objective of the semi-autonomous motorcar is to enable drivers with physical disabilities to experience the mobility and independence of driving again by leveraging the power of technology. In the words of Noel Marshall:

How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Early identification of exceptional female and minority candidates by educators is the key to increasing diversity within STEM. Those with the aptitude and interest need to be freed from the societal stereotyping that can push them away from an interest in STEM.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “I have been fortunate to have had extremely

supportive male colleagues throughout my entire career, but I am aware of the stereotyping that our culture applies to young women in regards to STEM and how it can dissuade some young women from pursuing an interest in science.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Right now, diversity is driving innovation forward. Diverse perspectives and ideas are becoming increasingly more valued by those looking for a competitive edge.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “It’s critical that young women are nurtured from an early age to understand the opportunities available to them in a STEM career.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I am heartened to see women in STEM leadership positions within my own company and expect to see that trend expand even further over the next five years.” PDJ

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Industry Telecommunications Employees 237,733 Headquarters Dallas, Texas Website att.com

Brooks McCorcle

"WE JUST CAN'T UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF SHARING OUR STORIES WITH EACH OTHER, ADVOCATING FOR EACH OTHER AND REACHING OUT ONE ON ONE TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER. IT'S A HUGE WAY WE AS WOMEN CAN LEAD IN TECHNOLOGY. THE SKY'S THE LIMIT." ~ Brooks McCorcle

President - AT&T Partner Solutions

BUILDING THE NEXT GROUP OF WOMEN LEADERS

As a respected leader in her field with over 25 years of industry experience, Brooks McCorcle has laid the foundation for innovative solutions that help drive value to AT&T. As President of AT&T Partner Solutions, McCorcle leads the majority of the Fortune 10 company’s indirect distribution channels. She runs a business unit with $6 billion in annualized revenues. She’s responsible for extending the reach of AT&T’s products and services through the more than 2,500 service and solution providers around the world that are supported by her organization. McCorcle and her team are constantly exploring new ways to help their customers – service and solution providers – find success today and in the future. They’re committed to making the forward-thinking, bold moves needed to deliver the innovation and agility customers crave – asking what it would take, not if it is possible.

In the words of Brooks McCorcle: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Diversity in the workplace matters, not just because it’s the right thing to do, but because it makes good business sense. Mix of backgrounds, variance in thoughts and approaches to problem-solving makes us stronger, more resilient to marketplace changes and shifts in demand.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “The one thing I see as a barrier for many women is that we feel like we need to be perfect. We have to have all the right skill sets going into something, and we're afraid to raise our hand unless we feel like we have all of that.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “STEM education is changing the way we think about the world around us. In a world that’s becoming increasingly complex, it’s more important than ever for young people to be equipped with

the knowledge and skills to solve tough problems, gather and evaluate evidence and make sense of information.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “First, always be yourself. Embrace your unique strengths, background and point of view. Forcing yourself to be someone you’re not is unsustainable. Take your strengths and drive toward value creation – results matter and don’t be afraid to point them out! Second, have the courage to say ‘yes’ to big challenges. Surround yourself with talented allies – male and female, and use their strengths to complement your own.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Diversity is so ingrained in everyday business that we don’t think of it as an initiative. But, we can’t keep it out of our sights. I expect that we will continue seeing a shift in our mindset from diversity to inclusion, where diversity is embedded automatically and the focus turns more toward inclusion.” PDJ Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Industry Telecommunications Employees 237,733 Headquarters Dallas, Texas Website att.com

Teresa Ostapower Chief Digital Officer

EMBRACING CHANGE 16

DRIVING DIVERSITY FOR WOMEN IN TECHNOLOGY

As AT&T’s first Chief Digital Officer, Teresa Ostapower encourages the recruitment, development, advancement, and retention of women in STEM fields. She has spent 30 years steadily rising through historically male-dominated roles, with most of her career in the technology space. Her leadership abilities have helped her adapt to a constantly changing field of work and enabled her to lead a team of nearly 3,000 in supporting some of the most important processes AT&T relies on to do business. Carrying the same strengths over in her mentoring and STEM advocacy roles, she engages and guides women of all ages as they face the challenges associated with pursuing careers in technology. Today, she is leading one of the most significant pivots in AT&T’s history, the transformation from an analog company to a digital one. She is responsible for the company’s web properties and digital touchpoints. As part of her role, she heads PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

AT&T’s Digital First initiative, with focus on expanding and accelerating digital capabilities for customers as well as driving down costs for the business. In the words of Teresa Ostapower: What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Don’t let your title or your role define what you are. There has been great progress over the years since I first entered the technology field. There’s more acceptance than ever before.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Technology is at the forefront of nearly every business in the world today.” How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “It’s important to be active in ongoing training, coaching, and development. Helping these types of groups get out and inspire our students to embrace STEM goes a long way to helping drive the diversity we need." What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Rather than being intimidated or challenged by change,

embrace it. Find that dedication inside you to work hard every day, mentoring women of all ages – all while balancing your family’s needs and active participation in the community.” Words I live by: “I’ve relied on four guiding principles to help build a satisfying and fulfilling career: Be Bold. Be passionate, positive and prominent. Be worth more than youmake. Be balanced.” PDJ

"More doors will continue to open. By providing educational and networking opportunities, we can continually inspire women to develop their leadership capabilities, seize career growth opportunities and increase their knowledge in technology." ~ Teresa Ostapower


Industry Telecommunications Employees 237,733 Headquarters Dallas, Texas Website att.com

Jenifer Robertson Senior Vice President Tech Strategy & Portfolio Implementation

CLOSING THE GENDER GAP DEVELOPING FEMALE TALENT IN STEM

Jenifer Robertson is responsible for developing end-to-end strategy for technology development, managing highly integrated strategic programs, and aligning the $6 billion technology investment portfolio for AT&T Technology & Operations. She has lent her unique mix of STEM skills and leadership talent for AT&T’s evolution since joining the company back in 2000. Today, as senior vice president of technology strategy & portfolio implementation, she is helping orchestrate the workplace of the future and mentoring women in STEM along the way. In her role, Robertson leads AT&T’s movement to pivot their employee base to match the increasingly competitive tech industry. AT&T is rapidly changing its business model, and that requires a major shift in how work is done. She leads process integration and skills transformation of more than 150,000 employees to meet the needs of rapidly-changing technology. She is passionate about mentorship and authenticity in developing female talent. Robertson is also a board member of the National Center for Women & Information Technology, a non-profit community dedicated to increasing the meaningful

participation of all women in the influential field of computing. In the words of Jenifer Robertson: Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Women are creating a strong, supportive environment with the potential to foster success at a faster rate over the next five years. Our goal as women in STEM right now should be to plow the hard ground that enables future generations to follow in our footsteps and go deeper into STEM opportunities. Powerful women today will help to build the powerful women of the future, regardless of industry, background, or title.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “The world is changing because we have the technology and ecosystems of media and networking to create widespread support, thought leadership, and empowerment anywhere in the world. And we have a generation of powerful women willing to stand up on virtual (and physical) platforms to challenge social norms and make changes.” How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “A holistic approach is required to increase diversity in STEM,

whether on a local or global scale. We must create a virtuous cycle by exposing diverse groups to STEM, providing them with opportunities to learn and engage with the field, and then celebrating their successes. Education can lead to an expanding pool of STEM recruits, which puts the responsibility on businesses to match increased demand with a supply of STEM job openings.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “The single biggest requirement to closing the STEM gender gap is a strong, dual gender support system. Closing the gender gap does not happen if it’s led entirely by one gender.” PDJ

"TECHNOLOGY ITSELF IS HELPING DIVERSIFY THE STEM ENVIRONMENT. CONNECTIVITY AND DIGITIZATION OF CONTENT ENABLES MASSIVE SCALE WITH RESPECT TO AWARENESS, EDUCATION, OPPORTUNITIES, AND RECOGNITION." ~ Jenifer Robertson Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Industry Legal Employees 120 Headquarters New York, New York Website axinn.com

"WOMEN NEED MENTORS WHO WILL PROVIDE THEM WITH THE OPPORTUNITIES TO GAIN MEANINGFUL RESEARCH EXPERIENCES IN STEM FIELDS… NEVER BE AFRAID TO START OVER. NEVER STOP LEARNING." ~ Dr. Stacie Ropka

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AXINN COUNSEL HAS PERFECT MIX OF LAW AND SCIENCE Patent expert Dr. Stacie Ropka is a partner in Axinn’s Hartford office who holds a PhD in microbiology and immunology. Her law practice focuses on IP litigation, due diligence and client counseling in the life sciences, biologics and biologic-based pharmaceuticals sectors. Ropka began her career in biology and worked at both Northwestern University and SUNY Upstate Medical University as a research scientist in the fields of neurology, virology and immunology. She taught and engaged in original research primarily on the role of immunity in motor neuron disease. Presenting her research findings at numerous scientific conferences and in several peer-reviewed journals, she contributed significantly to the field of biology. She is published in numerous legal and scientific areas. After two decades working in biology, Ropka switched careers and went to Syracuse University College of Law, where she earned magna cum laude honors. She ultimately joined Axinn in 2007 and has served on the trial team for several highprofile patent lawsuits involving major pharmaceutical companies.

Dr. Stacie Ropka Partner

In the words of Dr. Stacie Ropka: Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “As more women head-up research departments I expect more women in entry-level positions to be given opportunities to fully engage in research, allowing them to develop expertise in their chosen STEM field.” How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “It starts in grade school – science must be presented with all the excitement and enthusiasm that is inherent in the STEM fields. Children must become engaged early through an inquiry-based curriculum and that engagement must be nurtured as students enter 7th and 8th grade and continue throughout high school. Then, women must be encouraged to study STEM in college, obtaining undergraduate degrees and often advanced degrees in their chosen STEM field. Finally, with the educational foundation in place, there must be meaningful opportunities available for solving problems and creating solutions in the STEM fields.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “While more and more women are obtaining advanced degrees in STEM it is less clear if they are obtaining meaningful experiences applying their education. Equal opportunities to become active and contribute to STEM fields will close the gender gap.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “The scientific community, which is global in nature, will continue to look for answers. Each discovery provides some answers but presents many new questions. Every scientist will need to stand on the shoulders of those who came before. Each answer we find brings us closer to understanding our world and, globally, there is a demand for answers.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Women need mentors who will provide them with the opportunities to gain meaningful research experiences in STEM fields.” PDJ

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL


CONGRATULATIONS TO

CARMEN CATERIANO 2017 WOMEN WORTH WATCHING IN STEM At Booz Allen, STEM is within the foundation of everything we do. From our commitment to hire and retain innovators and technology experts, to our daily work with clients to solve some of the world’s toughest technological challenges, to our employees’ volunteer efforts with non-profit groups, we demonstrate our belief in the importance of STEM education with engagement in a variety of initiatives.

BOOZALLEN.COM

CARMEN CATERIANO Principal Digital Leader


Industry Professional Services/Management Consulting Employees 22,600 Headquarters McLean, Virginia Website boozallen.com

Carmen Patricia Cateriano Principal – Technology Leader

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"DIVERSITY IN STEM MUST BE ENCOURAGED EARLY ON IN A STUDENT’S ACADEMIC LIFE - FROM THEIR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CLASSROOMS AND COLLEGE LABORATORIES, LEADING ALL THE WAY UP TO THEIR JOBS AND OCCUPATIONS THAT IMPROVE THE DAILY LIVES OF EVERYONE." ~ Carmen Patricia Cateriano

MOTIVATING WOMEN and LATIN AMERICANS TO JOIN THE WORKFORCE IN STEM Carmen Patricia Cateriano is an independent systems delivery leader who immigrated to this country from Peru. She is a STEM leader at Booz Allen Hamilton who distinguishes herself through innovations and technology, and through her efforts to develop future STEM professionals with a focus on women and Latin Americans. She plays a significant role at Booz Allen as a functional management leader with responsibility for driving skill development, recruiting, and collaboration for over 300 staff members. As a leader in the STEM field, she drives innovations in systems delivery with clients across three different agencies -Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, Office Personnel Management, and the Railroad Retirement Board. She drives recruiting and outreach efforts to further bring together the collective ingenuity that allows the company to showcase its STEM capabilities. She not only focuses on recruiting, but also on the development and onboarding of an increasingly diverse PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

pool of talent to further build minority and women leaders. In the words of Carmen Patricia Cateriano: How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Building early STEM education and company commitments to placing women in STEM-related fields are critically important in addressing and solving many of the world’s challenges. Motivating women to come up with bold ideas and to invent cool, innovative things is key for change. Unless we bring more women into technology and manufacturing to do just that, there will be a significant, negative economic impact.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Simple - getting more women into well-paying jobs, traditionally held by men! By having a better integration of women into these jobs, it will help close the gender gap, while also increasing the number of workers who can fill these high-demand positions.

Ways to lessen these barriers: • Raising visibility, broadening networks, and expanding sponsorship opportunities. • Networks in-person or online where women can connect, gather information, and build relationships with people to support their ambitions. • Expose young girls to science and technology early in life so they can develop an interest and pursue these types of careers.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Companies need to start developing dedicated plans to shape programs for women in STEM within their organizations, as well as drive to hire more women STEM positions. By developing programs as such, it will significantly increase the representation of women in engineering, manufacturing, IT, and product management roles - a strategy necessary to inject urgency into addressing ongoing gender imbalance in technical fields and fully transform into a digital industrial company.” PDJ


Industry Intellectual Property Law Employees 125 Headquarters Boston, Massachusetts Website burnslev.com

“BELIEVE IN YOURSELF, AND STAY FOCUSED ON YOUR GOALS" ~ Dr. Ronda P. Moore Dr. Ronda Moore has had a multifaceted STEM career across two different professions, and continues to break new ground every day. With two impressive careers in STEM – first as a veterinarian and now as a patent lawyer – she has achieved some of the highest levels of accomplishment and accolades across each profession. Using her experience as a veterinarian and scientist, and background in pathology, she works as an IP lawyer advising inventors and senior management of pharmaceutical, biologic, medical device, and medical diagnostic companies, start-ups and emerging companies, venture capital, and universities on a wide range of intellectual property issues. Prior to entering the legal field, Moore practiced veterinary medicine at the Angell Memorial Animal Hospital in Boston. She also was a Resident in Pathology and a Research Fellow in Comparative Pathology at the N.E. Regional Primate Center, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathology, Emeritus. She was an associate professor of Pathology at Tufts University Schools of Veterinary Medicine, Dental Medicine, and Medicine. While at Tufts University, she served for over a decade as the principal investigator on multiple National Institute of Health (NIH) sponsored medical research grants. In the words of Dr. Ronda Moore: Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Five years is not a lot of time for things to change in a big way. I think it will take more time - perhaps a whole

Dr. Ronda P. Moore Partner

IMPRESSIVE STEM CAREER ACROSS TWO PROFESSIONS EMPHASIS ON EDUCATION AND FEMALE ROLE MODELS generation - for women to make significant the overarching barrier being the low progress in STEM careers and for attitudes priority placed on closing the gender to change about women in STEM.” gap in STEM. This results in a lack of education, lack of resources, and a What can be done to move women continuing lack of role models. Women forward in STEM? “Education, education, in STEM are struggling with the time education and female role models. Without commitment to advance in their career education and female role models, women versus meeting family obligations, and will not advance in STEM.” there is a lack of women interested in or How can the world increase diversity able to support other women in STEM. in STEM fields? “By providing more This allows the current environment education and training opportunities, of negative attitudes about women in specifically tailored for girls, ideally at a STEM and anemic support from men to young age before they have begun to pick continue.” up on all the negative messages out there How is the world changing with respect to about what girls can and can’t do.” STEM? “The only change I have seen is What barriers are in the way to closing that women in STEM is being discussed, the gender gap in STEM? “Unfortunately, which is excellent.” PDJ there are still numerous barriers, with Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Industry Intellectual Property Law Employees 125 Headquarters Boston, Massachusetts Website burnslev.com

Dr. Janine M. Susan Partner

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CLOSING THE GENDER GAP IN STEM Dr. Janine Susan has had two interesting sciences, gene therapy, vaccines, antibody, STEM careers - first as a scientist and now small chemical molecules, and universities. as a lawyer. She’s striving to pay it forward In the words of Dr. Janine Susan: for the colleagues, mentors, and advisors who listened to her concerns, gave her great What can be done to move women advice, and pointed her in the right direction. forward in STEM? “Providing and ensuring access to invested mentors, be Susan went to college intending to major they women or men, who show a genuine in nuclear medicine, but fell in love with interest in women students’ development biochemistry, which she says made biology and growth in STEM fields could help to more interesting and gave organic chemistry maintain women on a successful path to a a reason to exist. With a doctorate in career in STEM. Gender inequities need to biochemistry and molecular biology and 12 be addressed. Women in STEM need to be years at the lab bench, it became clear what promoted to decision-making committees, she really liked about science was learning boards and speaking engagements so about it, talking about it with others, and that their ideas and points of view can be attending fellow researchers’ seminars. She considered, and so that they may serve as enrolled at law school and took the patent role models for the next generation of agent exam after her first year. girls in STEM.” At Burns & Levinson, she found her How can the world increase diversity in perfect match - constantly learning about STEM fields? “I am a firm believer in the cutting edge innovations coming down adage that certain things need to be done the pipeline, working with a wide range early and often. To increase diversity in of scientists and inventors, helping them STEM fields, education should start at a protect the value of their inventions and very early age, and any naturally displayed bring those inventions to market. She has curiosity, excitement or interest should be filed patents for clients around the world in nurtured and developed.” industries including chemical, biotech, life PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “The world is becoming a smaller place as a result of advancements in the STEM fields. Technology is disrupting almost every industry in every country around the world. Even our day-to-day activities are impacted by developments and innovations in STEM areas. The food we eat, the way we sleep and exercise, how we travel, how we work, and how we play have all changed and will continue to change due to advancements in STEM.” PDJ

“I HOPE THAT EACH INITIATIVE PROMOTING DIVERSITY IN STEM FIELDS INCHES US TOWARD A STEM POPULATION IN THE FUTURE THAT IS MORE REPRESENTATIVE OF OUR GLOBAL DIVERSITY.” ~ Dr. Janine Susan


Industry Technology Employees 66,000 Headquarters Tysons Corner, Virginia Website csc.com

Lesley Sigall Vice President, GIS Business Operations & Finance

NAVIGATING THE OBSTACLES FOR ELIMINATING UNCONSCIOUS BIAS Lesley Sigall oversees the business operations and finance functions of Computer Sciences Corporations’ Global Infrastructure Services unit. With an impressive career trajectory and a passion for diversity and inclusion, Sigall is recognized as an outstanding leader with excellent global collaboration skills. She brings together cross-country and cross-disciplinary teams to solve difficult problems and deliver results. Before joining the global IT services innovations leader last year, she spent nine years at Credit Suisse, serving in a variety of IT management positions that culminated as managing director and COO for the company’s Technology Infrastructure and Corporate Real Estate & Services. She spent the 13 previous years at Marsh & McLennan, rising through the ranks of IT Finance, with her final position there as IT CFO. Sigall uses her vast experience mentoring young women and driving awareness of D&I. While at Credit Suisse, she was the sponsor for the Diversity & Inclusion Committee for IT Americas, helping shape D&I programs and collaborate with other committees across the bank. Within a year at CSC,

she leads business operations for the combined Global Delivery & Operations function for the combined CSC and HP ES organizations and she is active in global webinars on unconscious bias and diversity initiatives. In the words of Lesley Sigall: Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “In five years, I see women in STEM continuing to progress, but still facing many of the same barriers and issues that they face today. I believe that corporations will continue to sharpen their focus on diversity, as they recognize that their bottom lines are negatively impacted by a lack of diversity.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “First and foremost, the unconscious bias that leads to self-selection out of STEM and suboptimal hiring decisions. There are, however, other societal biases that erect barriers to closing the gender gap. Structural barriers exist in terms of household work. Women are still expected to shoulder a greater proportion of household work and penalized for it at work, as people judge women to be less committed to their careers when they ask

for flexible time or need to be out for child care. The lack of women at higher levels of management in STEM also presents a barrier to increased diversity. This deficit can cause women to be overlooked during hiring or promotion discussions.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “In the short-term, women must be represented on hiring and promotion panels, and these panels need training to root out unconscious bias. In the long-term, companies should continue to sponsor events in schools to help girls maintain interest in STEM and believe in themselves.” PDJ

“WOMEN SHOULD GO OUT OF THEIR WAY TO MENTOR AND SPONSOR MORE JUNIOR WOMEN IN THEIR ORGANIZATIONS, HELPING THEM NAVIGATE THE OBSTACLES THAT CAN ARISE AND ENCOURAGING THEM NOT TO GIVE UP AFTER A PERCEIVED CAREER SETBACK.” ~ Lesley Sigall

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Industry Engineering - Technology Employees 30,000 Headquarters Novi, Michigan Website cooperstandard.com

EXECUTIVE IN AUTO INDUSTRY

Brigit Anthony

FOSTERING NEXT GENERATION OF FEMALE LEADERS

Vice President, Engineering and Technology, North America

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As a leading female executive in the auto industry with a strong commitment to mentoring, Brigit Anthony is dedicated to fostering the next generation of female leaders. Anthony is vice president, engineering and technology, North America at Cooper Standard, where she leads a team of over 300 engineers, scientists and technicians in engineering, laboratories, prototype facilities and technical centers. She is the North American champion for Cooper Standard’s STEM Affinity Group, and instrumental in growing its STEM programs. The group trains and coordinates Cooper Standard’s STEM Accelerator employee volunteers, and offers tutoring, science demonstrations and career information to metro-Detroit children as part of the company’s education program. As the technical lead, Anthony has been at the forefront of inspiring and engaging the next generation of students to pursue STEM jobs, a key component for technological innovation, manufacturing sustainability and global competitiveness. Over the past year, she has also created and led the company’s Global Engineering Council, which sets policy and direction to achieve world-class engineering. The team develops key initiatives to establish best PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

practices in creating, standardizing and reusing product designs and increasing global technical competency. Among her other numerous endeavors, she is the coexecutive lead of the company’s internal mentoring group called WISE (Women, Inspire, Support, Enrich).

What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Professional women in STEM careers are role models but are also busy mothers with little time to give back and volunteer. More opportunities to volunteer during work hours can provide a reasonable opportunity to promote STEM at female events.”

“IT IS MUCH MORE COMMON TO HEAR ABOUT STEM COMMITTEES AND ACTIVITIES IN WOMEN ASSOCIATIONS. THEREFORE, I EXPECT STEM PROGRAMS AND VOLUNTEERS TO GROW SIGNIFICANTLY IN THE NEXT FIVE YEARS.” ~ Brigit Anthony

How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Education in many methods; special events, science projects, competitions, demonstrations to generate interest to learn more and understand that anyone can find an interesting career in STEM fields.”

In the words of Brigit Anthony: How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Nearly every profession relies on STEM education, including computer technology, safety, security and manufacturing. STEM programs provide an avenue for students to learn about career paths in these fields, education levels and many opportunities that would not have been realized.”

What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Sharing programs, ideas and successes. Women care about young girls’ education and want to give back. Help make it easy and fun for women in STEM careers to participate, lead or create STEM programs. Give them access to a template of ideas, programs, how to get started kit.” Words I live by: “Don’t make career plans because of being afraid or not knowing enough. Learn, question and then make an educated decision even if that is not STEM.” PDJ


Industry CTO Employees 9,000 Headquarters Redwood City, California Website ea.com

Farah Ali Senior Director, Player Reliability Engineering, EADP Player Reliability Engineering

LEADING CAREER PATHS IN TECH

AT A COMPANY INSPIRING THE WORLD THROUGH PLAY As senior director of engineering at Electronic Arts, Farah Ali is a woman tech leader who is passionate about building innovative products and committed to leading women in STEM careers. As founder of the company’s employee resource group Women of CTO, as well as a board member of its Women’s ERG, she passionately embraces and leads diversity and inclusion initiatives throughout the company. Today, she is breaking barriers as one of the most senior women in a tech role at EA. She empowers other women across the company to step into leadership roles and shows them anything is possible with commitment and dedication. Ali is a respected leader on her EA Digital Platform (EADP) team who inspires collaboration and innovation in the team’s work. Its members work “behind the scenes” in a critical role that supports EA’s game play. EADP is a platform on which games are built via reusable capabilities that can be easily integrated into games. Ali and her team are working on how this new platform changes the way players play games in the digital space and with one another across the globe.

Her career path includes senior engineering roles at Microsoft and eBay. She also cofounded a non-profit called One Good Act that serves to beat the cycle of poverty in developing parts of the world. In the words of Farah Ali: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “This is not a straightforward issue. There is a pipeline problem which means not as many women are majoring in STEM subjects. Then there is the problem of women dropping out after a certain level because they are not getting the personal and professional support that they need. Both have to be addressed.”

“IT’S IMPORTANT TO HAVE A CENTRAL FIGURE IN YOUR LIFE WHO BELIEVES IN YOU AND YOUR ABILITIES AND NURTURES THEM. THIS CAN GIVE YOU THE CONFIDENCE TO TAKE ON THINGS YOU NEVER DREAMED POSSIBLE.” ~ Farah Ali

What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “It starts from how we treat and encourage girls in elementary school to build their curiosity about how the world works and have teachers that teach science and math in a relatable way. Parents have the biggest responsibility here to make sure they provide their children with a diverse set of learning tools so they can see the fun and adventure in STEM subjects.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “I see a movement in the U.S. where coding is now being considered as important as teaching the English language. Lots of great companies are trying to introduce computer science in the curriculum in K-12.” Words I live by: “I like what Marie Curie said and sort of sums up my approach to life and learning: Be less curious about people and more curious about ideas." PDJ

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Industry Health Insurance Employees 3,293 Headquarters Rochester, New York Website excellusbcbs.com

“I AM PROUD OF THE THINGS I HAVE ACCOMPLISHED IN MY CAREER AND LOOK FOR EVERY OPPORTUNITY I CAN TO HELP OTHERS ACHIEVE THEIR DREAMS.” ~ Cindy Langston

Cindy Langston Vice President, Enterprise Portfolio Management

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MENTOR CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR MOVING WOMEN FORWARD IN STEM

Cindy Langston has traveled the world forging positive relationships and focusing on diversification. Her ability to take a technical solution and translate it into business solutions and results has successfully made her a sought-after leader in the health insurance industry. As vice president of the EPMO, Data Platform & Integration and Architecture at Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, she oversees three key divisions within Information Technology that reach about 1.2 million of the health plans members. As a key advisor to the chief information officer, she provides direction, technical advisement and authorization to carry out major changes to IT processes or procedures. She also oversees a portfolio of over 90 active projects, working collaboratively with business partners to ensure cost-effective, high-quality implementation of enterprisewide projects. Throughout her career, Langston has proven to be a collaborative, approachable manager who generates peak levels of PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

performance from staff members through individualization, creating a common vision, forging positive relationships and focusing on diversification. She has extensive experience in manufacturing and spent a decade as an international consultant, where she led large, global IT implementations in Sydney, Tokyo, London, Singapore, Scotland and Seoul. In the words of Cindy Langston: What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “STEM is different from other disciplines in that it often is comprised of an informal technocracy. That is, those with the strongest ideas and those willing to back them up with facts move forward and up the ranks. Women need to understand and believe that being outspoken and assertive about technical issues is how women will move forward in STEM fields.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Stereotypes about women’s abilities and their role in

the family are still barriers often keeping women from pursuing math and science careers. The world is changing. More and more men are staying at home, being more flexible, helping with household work, and taking on a greater role in child rearing.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “For people of color, engaging and keeping them in STEM is only getting worse. Schools are more racially and economically segregated today than they were 35 years ago.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Too many people see diversity today as a politically correct concept. But a diversity of ideas, backgrounds and experience is what has made our country so rich with ideas. Women have been making progress in STEM, even with the slower growth for some groups. If women who’ve been fortunate enough to move forward in STEM continue to mentor young women and provide them leadership, then I see STEM opportunities for all women continuing to grow.” PDJ


Teena Piccione Senior Vice President, Information Technology

Industry Financial Services Employees 45,000+ Headquarters Boston, Massachusetts Website fidelity.com

“WE ONLY HAVE 86,400 SECONDS EACH DAY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF OTHERS. I AM DETERMINED TO USE EACH SECOND I HAVE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE AND ENSURE THE WOMEN AFTER ME WILL HAVE AN EASIER PATH TO WALK.” ~ Teena Piccione

BREAKING THROUGH BARRIERS FOR WOMEN IN STEM FIELDS

As a senior female executive in a male-dominated industry, Teena Piccione understands the barriers that exist for women in STEM fields. She works tirelessly helping bring down those barriers, dedicating over 500 hours each year toward STEM efforts in schools, hosting hackathons, girl geek events and initiatives at colleges across the country. She is a visionary in the field of technology who seeks out change rather than letting change come to her. Throughout her career, she has encouraged others to do the same. Her career path crossed from telecommunications to financial services, where she’s senior vice president of information technology at Fidelity Investments. She gives back to the community to inspire girls to step into a STEM role. Piccione is a firm believer that it is an exciting world where we are only bound by our imagination, and she encourages others in having a similar approach

through one-on-one mentoring and her leadership in numerous STEM programs. She believes to have diverse thoughtleadership you must put diversity in the room to make the decisions. In the words of Teena Piccione: How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “The world sees there is a greater need for STEM yet the world is not focusing on how to address the gap in talent. There are connected devices added daily, apps added in seconds and technology continually changing in all fields. With technology changing daily, we need to train the next generation to understand it and be passionate about being involved in STEM.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “We have to think differently and act differently to move women forward in STEM. We have to start earlier reaching women in middle school and continue to inspire women

throughout high school and into college. Together we can pave a path for a woman to excel in STEM.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I hope that in five years more women are attending technical conferences. I would love for an equal number of men and women in boardrooms and executive leadership positions. I would love to see corporations and individuals invest in women so that in five years they are surrounded by the best in the industry.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “We have to make this field exciting to girls and encourage them to excel in it. Together, we have to make this a priority to show the unlimited opportunities and possibilities. Students have passion and we need to show them possibilities and STEM opportunities that outline a path to an exciting career. We have to invest in our future!” PDJ Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Betty Chen Principal

Industry Intellectual Property Law Employees 1,100 Headquarters National Website fr.com

“WE CAN BROADEN THE PIPELINE AND PATH FOR INDIVIDUALS IN STEM FIELDS BY EDUCATING STUDENTS EARLY ON ABOUT THE VALUE OF STEM FIELDS AND HOW THEY CAN MESH WITH OTHER DISCIPLINES.” ~ Betty Chen

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SILICON VALLEY LAWYER CREATING VALUE FOR WOMEN IN STEM

Betty Chen, a principal in Fish & Richardson’s Silicon Valley office, has an extensive practice spanning all areas of intellectual property and complex commercial litigation. Fortune 100 and startup companies turn to Chen for the defense and protection of a multitude of groundbreaking technologies in the computer science, computer hardware, medical device, and consumer product fields. A driving force in national and international patent law, Chen is a tireless mentor, litigator and leader who serves as an inspiration to women and minorities. She is a STEM role model at the firm, serves as its global hiring principal, is the group leader of its Silicon Valley Litigation Practice, co-leader of its Women’s Initiative, and is instrumental in Fish’s firm-wide Diversity Initiative. In a recent patent litigation showdown, Chen represented Apple in a complex web of disputes involving patents and lawsuits across multiple jurisdictions. Last year, she secured a victory for a global leader in PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

dialysis treatment in claims brought by a former research and development employee. Another success for Chen and her colleagues was effectively defending Adobe Systems Incorporated against patent infringement claims involving the company’s imaging and editing software, Photoshop.

the pipeline and path for individuals in STEM fields by educating students early on about the value of STEM fields and how they can mesh with other disciplines. In short, we need to make sure we are fostering retention - not just recruitment of diversity in STEM fields.”

Through her work on Fish’s international Diversity Initiative, she links attorneys from the firms' offices throughout the U.S. and in Munich, Germany, to aid in the outreach, recruitment, retention and professional development of a diverse legal workforce. As co-leader of Fish’s Redwood City Women’s Initiative, she helps provide tools and resources to help Fish’s female staff achieve personal and professional success.

How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “I believe that we should focus additional efforts on the treatment of diverse individuals in STEM fields. We need diversity in STEM fields, of course, but we also need to cultivate, respect, and utilize the different ideas that grow out of that diversity.”

Outside the office, Chen serves on the Board of Directors for the Asian Law Alliance and takes on pro bono cases for Kids in Need of Defense. In the words of Betty Chen: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “I believe we can broaden

Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I see women in STEM to be more prevalent and relevant. I also hope that women will be more comfortable taking maternity leave because there will be better support structures in place at the workplace.” Words I live by: “Nothing will work unless you do.” PDJ


Industry Intellectual Property Law Employees 1,100 Headquarters National Website fr.com

“ORGANIZATIONS STAND TO BENEFIT MORE FULLY FROM DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE WHEN THEY FOSTER A COMMUNITY OF WOMEN WHO CAN SERVE AS ROLE MODELS, PEERS, AND MENTORS FOR ONE ANOTHER.” ~ lauren Degnan

Lauren Degnan Principal

EMPOWERING WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE

PATENT LAWYER STANDS OUT FROM THE CROWD In a male dominated world of patent litigation, Lauren Degnan stands out from the crowd. She has built an impressive reputation as a go-to litigator for leading high tech companies that need to protect and enforce their intellectual property assets. As a principal with Fish & Richardson, she has experience litigating in district and federal court, at the ITC, and before the PTAB. She is also deeply committed to supporting women in their careers. Degnan is a member of the Washington, D.C. Advisory Board for the Women in Law Empowerment Forum, a national organization dedicated to helping women in law achieve their career goals. She is also an active member in Chiefs in Intellectual Property, a nonprofit dedicated to advancing women at the confluence of law, technology, and regulatory policy. She has represented many leading hightech companies - including Microsoft, Arista Networks, Thomas Swan & Co., Intel, SIRIUS XM Radio, TomTom, and Samsung – involved in high-stakes, high-

risk litigation where hundreds of millions of dollars, and often entire businesses, are on the line. In the words of Lauren Degnan: What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “STEM jobs are hard work. Women in STEM positions are smart, driven, accomplished, and generally all-around awesome. Women in STEM need to feel valued and supported, and see a clear path for advancement. Otherwise, they will opt out, especially if they have family commitments, given the societal pressures on women to be primary caregivers.” How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “First, work to ensure a consistent pipeline of qualified women who want to work in STEM by encouraging girls from a young age and through high school and college to have an interest in math and science and giving them the opportunity to succeed and have fun in the field. Second, work to keep women engaged in a STEM career after

they are bitten by the technology bug by providing meaningful support during all phases of their careers. Such support, which should be tailored to the needs of each individual, includes coaching, mentorship, sponsorship, and a support network.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “First, coach people on how to counteract any unconscious biases. Second, establish policies requiring organizations, teams, and managers to make sure the pool of people considered for projects, assignments and promotion always include women. Third, avoid tokenism – for example, the tendency to stop trying to promote women once the organization already has one, or a few, in key positions.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I think that, as a culture, we are on the right track.” Words I live by: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” PDJ

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Industry Intellectual Property Law Employees 1,100 Headquarters National Website fr.com

Dr. Anita Meiklejohn

“WOMEN IN STEM HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO BE VISIBLE AND ADVOCATE FOR THE IMPORTANCE OF SCIENCE, NOT JUST WITHIN THEIR PROFESSION, BUT ALSO IN THE LARGER COMMUNITY.” ~ Dr. Anita Meiklejohn

Principal

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LAWYER COMBINES SCIENCE AND THE LAW

Dr. Anita Meiklejohn has always been interested in science. For the past 15 years, she has been a powerful force behind the scenes in the multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical and biotech industry.

transcription factors, immunoassays, cytokines, nucleic acid probes, AIDS therapies, molecular design and modeling of drugs, rational drug design, and the use of combinatorial techniques in drug screening.

As a patent attorney, her scientific knowledge and business savvy enables her to advise clients on whether they can move ahead with their plans, such as developing a new drug, without infringing the patents of other inventors or companies. Meiklejohn brings to the table the right mix of experience and confidence to assist her clients with sound decisions in longterm, high-stakes processes.

What she finds most gratifying and exciting about her work at Fish & Richardson is helping a client develop a sound and secure IP portfolio and then seeing those patented drugs or therapies being used to profoundly improve the quality of, or even help save, individual’s lives.

She has prosecuted patent applications in all areas of molecular biology and biochemistry including genomics, proteomics, polymorphism identification and analysis, recombinant nucleic acid and protein products, immunology including engineered monoclonal antibodies, transgenic animals, virology and vaccines. Key among her areas of expertise are inventions involving cell surface receptors, PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

In the words of Dr. Anita Meiklejohn: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Encouraging an interest in science at a very young age is vital. Schools are doing this, but parents are important.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “There is a real ebb and flow. For the last 15 years, science and technology have increasingly been seen as a hip profession. More recently there has been a bit of dismissal of science in the

political realm. Fortunately, in reaction to this, scientists are starting a find their voice in the public realm and I think this is an important development.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Women in STEM have a responsibility to be visible and advocate for the importance of science, not just within their profession, but also in the larger community. Get out. Get involved in things you care about and be proud. Within your profession take the time to help the most junior women.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I see women moving far in the next few years. The women coming out of school now are energized and less weighed down by outdated gender-based expectations. Women tend to second guess their abilities and chances for success. Maybe it is better not to overthink the challenges.” Words I live by: “Death before decaf.” PDJ


Industry Intellectual Property Law Employees 1,100 Headquarters National Website fr.com

“WOMEN AND MEN COMMUNICATE DIFFERENTLY IN THE WORKPLACE. UNDERSTANDING AND EMBRACING THOSE DIFFERENCES, ESPECIALLY IN STEM FIELDS TRADITIONALLY DOMINATED BY MEN, WILL GO A LONG WAY TOWARD CLOSING THE GENDER GAP.” ~ Susan Morrison

Susan Morrison Managing Principal

PATENT LAWYER AND SCIENTIST INSPIRING WOMEN IN STEM Susan Morrison comes from a long line of scientists and doctors - including her father, grandfather, and great grandfather. She started her career in STEM as a bench scientist in an academic lab, but quickly realized a traditional STEM career was not for her. She went on to law school, and now spends her days working with scientists and inventors to protect and defend their inventions. It is not uncommon for her to be the only woman in a meeting or a deposition, or the only woman to speak during a week-long trial. Morrison works on intellectual property and patent litigation cases across a full range of technologies at Fish & Richardson. Her STEM background has been especially relevant to her work in Hatch-Waxman litigation, a very complex type of patent case that involves disputes between patented and generic pharmaceutical manufacturers. Her professional accomplishments and leadership in the male-dominated field of patent law are an inspiration to other

women in STEM. Last year, the 37-yearold was selected to serve as the managing principal of the firms' Wilmington, Delaware office. In the words of Susan Morrison: What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Women and men communicate differently in the workplace. Understanding and embracing those differences, especially in STEM fields traditionally dominated by men, will go a long way toward closing the gender gap.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Policies like paid maternity leave, flexible work schedules, and job sharing can go a long way toward preventing women from leaving STEM fields. Keeping women on track and in their careers is the simplest and most effective way to move women forward.”

women to enter science once they are in high school or college. Only then will we see them choosing STEM majors in college and as they enter their careers.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I hope that in the next five years, we’ll see an increase in women in STEM fields. I think we also need to redefine what we consider STEM fields to embrace a larger group of people.” Words I live by: “The best advice I have for young attorneys starting out is to be themselves. While I learn something from every attorney I work with, I never try to exactly emulate another attorney’s style. Trying to be someone else never goes well, and ends up looking fake to whatever audience you’re in front of - a client, a jury, or a judge.” PDJ

How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Increasing diversity in STEM fields has to start with children – we cannot expect that we can simply start encouraging Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Industry Environmental Consulting Employees 800 Headquarters Woburn, Massachusetts Website geiconsultants.com

Francine Dunn

“MORE WOMEN ARE ELECTING STEM CAREERS AND MORE ORGANIZATIONS ARE REALIZING THE DIRECT CORRELATION WITH DIVERSE TEAMS AND SUCCESS.” ~ Francine Dunn

Vice President

CHARISMATIC LEADER

BREAKING THROUGH LIMITED BELIEFS INSPIRING WOMEN IN A MALE-DOMINATED PROFESSION Francine Dunn is known for providing

32 technical leadership while mentoring and

empowering women to grow their careers in science and engineering. As a vice president at GEI Consultants, Inc. Dunn has led successful business acquisitions and project executions across a variety of key markets. As part of her work, she prepares and manages environmental studies to satisfy California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements. In 29 years of consulting, she has managed hundreds of compliance documents spanning various sectors. She has directed NEPA compliance for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Departments of the Army and Air Force, the California State Military Department; various military installations, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Forest Service. She has also managed planto-completion route siting and feasibility studies, environmental compliance, permitting, as well as construction mitigation and monitoring for more than 7,000 miles of telecommunications cable.

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Dunn has an eye for identifying new and creative methods of attracting accomplished women to the consulting organization. During candidate interviews she makes it a point to show the organization’s commitment to hiring and growing dynamic women of all backgrounds. Dunn was co-creator of an affinity group focused on women in consulting that created an open forum for women and men to discuss perceptions and beliefs impacting career progression for women. In the words of Francine Dunn: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Historically, women in STEM have been under-represented. Through mentoring and education, I believe we can encourage women to see the vast amount of opportunity in building and enhancing the communities all over the world. Furthermore, supporting women in being more visible is essential.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Beliefs and perceptions. Through familiarity, comfort, trust, and true partnership, we can narrow the gap. It is also critical to understand

biases and how they affect not only women, but others as well.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “More women are electing STEM careers and more organizations are realizing the direct correlation with diverse teams and success. Many companies have programs and or diversity goals and are cognizant of gender and diversity gaps.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Increased awareness of educational, growth, and career advancement. Continue programs and identify mentorship opportunities to help them become successful. Teaching women how to recognize their value and breaking through limiting beliefs.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I see more women being considered for senior positions as a result of more women entering the field.” Words I live by: “The woman who falls and gets up is so much stronger than the one that never fell.” PDJ


Industry Environmental Consulting Employees 800 Headquarters Woburn, Massachusetts Website geiconsultants.com

Dr. Gillian Gregory Vice President (Geotechnical Engineering) Board of Directors

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER BLAZING A TRAIL FO R WO M EN

In her illustrious technical career, Dr. Gillian Gregory has served as a role model and a mentor to many engineers, including women who have entered and flourished within a male-dominated profession. As a geotechnical engineering leader with GEI Consultants Inc., Gregory is a trailblazer with the company. She was named its first woman Chairman of the Board in 2015, and her core objectives included succession planning, workforce diversity, and increasing opportunities for staff and future leaders. Under her tenure, the board formed a Diversity and Inclusion Committee that includes staff from a variety of backgrounds, technical disciplines, and experience levels within the firm and includes men and women. Gregory has built a solid reputation as a strong leader committed to excellence in engineering, corporate governance, and diversity. In her work, she has completed regulatory engineering safety inspections and performance monitoring studies at over 100 dams throughout North America. She is revered at GEI for her technical and leadership accomplishments as well as her ability to balance her career and family. After working full-time for GEI for years, Gregory had reduced her hours to focus on raising her family, all the

while still maintaining a focus on her professional work and achieving several professional accomplishments. After her children were grown, she returned to GEI full-time and without missing a beat, she continued to climb through the leadership ranks. In the words of Dr. Gillian Gregory: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “There are several ways improvements in diversity could be achieved world-wide: • If governments value economic progress they should provide better educational opportunities for all their citizens, regardless of gender, religion, disability, etc. • Corporations can take the lead in promoting equality in the workplace, providing flexible work schedules and a supportive work environment, and actively campaigning against discrimination. • Cultural shifts will be needed so that families value education, particularly for girls in developing nations, and minorities are not discriminated against for jobs. • Women can support one another by mentoring others, standing up for one another and promoting leadership opportunities.”

Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I think there will a big increase in the number of senior women leaders in STEM fields in a few years. Although there are still barriers to raising a family and progressing up the ladder in the workplace, I see many more women in mid-career making it work and more spouses helping to make that happen by sharing in family responsibilities. In five to 10 years these women will be in a position to run their companies and be mentors and role models to those young women coming up behind them. Companies are also realizing that diversity in the workplace leads to better business outcomes. This will mean more opportunities for women to advance to positions of leadership.” PDJ

“COMPANIES ARE REALIZING THAT DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE LEADS TO BETTER BUSINESS OUTCOMES. THIS WILL MEAN MORE OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN TO ADVANCE TO POSITIONS OF LEADERSHIP.” ~ Dr. Gillian Gregory

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Industry Healthcare, medical devices, medical diagnostics Employees 140 Headquarters Salt Lake City, Utah Website gbscience.com

Dr. Suzette Chance Senior Director of Clinical Affairs

SCIENTIST GUIDING PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT BRINGS IMMEASURABLE IMPACT ON INNOVATION An accomplished leader in the diagnostics

34 space, Dr. Suzette Chance brings advanced

technical judgment, superior problem solving capabilities and strong decision making skills to her role overseeing clinical trial operations at Great Basin Scientific. Chance is senior director of clinical affairs at the molecular diagnostics company focused on infectious disease, where she leads the clinical trial strategy and execution for its products. With more than 20 years of experience in the in vitro diagnostics industry, Chance is a successful leader with a proven track record of guiding product development from a conceptual stage to commercialization. She has extensive experience navigating U.S. Food & Drug Administration clearance procedures, having guided the clearance of 22 products through the regulatory process. As an experienced scientist and healthcare professional, she is helping expand the availability of rapid and accurate molecular diagnostic tests, as the company introduces new products and reaches new markets. Her contribution toward the development of Great Basin’s product pipeline has a tangible impact on the company’s success, and her scientific contributions are enabling the commercialization of diagnostic products

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

used by healthcare workers to promptly detect and diagnose infectious diseases. In the words of Dr. Suzette Chance: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Driving diversity across all STEM industries will prove beneficial in bringing to light differentiated perspectives and approaches. This message is one that needs to be heard, acknowledged and accepted. The contributions of diverse people in STEM has, and will continue to have an immense and immeasurable impact on innovation and advancement. As businesses across the world see the results first-hand, positive change will be created across labs, hospitals, research institutions, companies and board rooms, where decisions about both strategic hiring and diversity are made. We also need to continue educating our youth about the benefits of pursuing careers in STEM.”

other women to enter the workforce. Many schools are also making progress in better informing female students about STEMrelated career choices and piquing their interest. These factors should lead to an improvement in the gender parity issue within STEM.” Words I live by: “If you want to know what you will be like in the future, just look at the choices you are making today.” PDJ

“THE ADVICE I’D LIKE TO GIVE TO YOUNG WOMEN ENTERING THE STEM WORKFORCE IS: BE WILLING TO LEARN, BE CONFIDENT IN THEIR ABILITIES, ADAPT FROM CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK AND KEEP WORKING TOWARD THEIR PROFESSIONAL OBJECTIVES. THE STEM INDUSTRY TRULY Where do you see women in STEM in HAS MANY ADVANTAGES TO five years? “I see a positive momentum, and OFFER, WE SIMPLY HAVE TO think more women will enter the industry REACH OUT AND GRAB EVERY and continue to rise through the ranks to take OPPORTUNITY AVAILABLE.” on strategic and leadership roles in STEM fields. Women currently working in the ~ Dr. Suzette Chance industry will also help educate and encourage


RUN WITH THE WOMEN WHO RUN THE FUTURE. MERITOR SALUTES

Linda Taliaferro & Lucille Gartman

Run with excellence. Run with innovation. Run with the company fortunate enough to have Linda Taliaferro and Lucille Gartman, two 2017 Women Worth Watching award recipients, who contribute to Meritor’s success.

We understand the importance of attracting, retaining and developing diverse talent like the award-winning women we celebrate today. As a leading global supplier of drivetrain, mobility, braking and aftermarket solutions for commercial vehicle and industrial markets, we rely on the unique contributions of 8,000 employees in 18 countries. The result is not only accomplishments for our business, but tremendous personal and professional growth for our people.

Run with the company committed to exceptional people, outstanding opportunity, and ongoing success for our employees and our customers. Learn more about career opportunities at Meritor at meritor.com.

Š2017 Meritor, Inc.


Industry Technology Employees 26,000 + Headquarters Stamford, Connecticut Website harman.com

Rashmi Rao Senior Director, Advanced Systems and User Experience

ENGINEER DRIVING DIVERSITY FOR WOMEN IN STEM 36

Rashmi Rao is responsible for defining HARMAN’s technology strategy and roadmap to drive breakthrough user experiences in next-gen connected cars. As senior director of advanced systems and user experience, she oversees the direction and management of the advanced engineering organization. Her illustrious career spans positions of growing responsibility within large, reputable technology companies, working on applications that millions of consumers interact with every day. With the emergence and push toward autonomous vehicles, future vehicles will participate in diverse ecosystems for frictionless transition of content and control between home, vehicle and personal devices to create an integrated experience. Rashmi keeps the vision of the connected car at the top of her mind, and incorporates design concepts for HARMAN’s intuitive data displays that offer consumers a personalized, contextual interaction. She is an advocate of STEM education and actively lobbies for diversity in technology work places. She rose through the ranks at companies including Apple and Qualcomm. While at Apple, she played a pivotal role in the strategy and technology of the iPhone. While at Qualcomm, she PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

founded QWISE: Qualcomm Women in Science and Engineering - a grass roots group focused on professional and personal development of women in technology. This group expanded to more than 12 countries during Rashmi’s time at the company. In the words of Rashmi Rao: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Driving diversity across all STEM industries is a conversation that must continue to increase, be heard, and be acknowledged. Companies that have a gender balance in senior management positions have already seen the great benefits first hand, as contributions of diverse people have an immense impact on technological advancement. Business, government and academia must continue to promote the importance of women in STEM and the great benefits that come along with having female leadership.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “In society, we must always remember that it doesn’t matter where a good idea comes from. We are a gender and racially diverse society, where people from all walks of life contribute valuable viewpoints to solve complex problems.”

Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “As women currently remain underrepresented in the science and engineering workforce, I am optimistic and believe in the next five years to a decade - more women will enter the industry and continue to rise and excel through leadership in STEM roles.” Words I live by: “True progress happens when you shift focus away from what you want and get deeply, intensely curious about what the world wants and needs.” PDJ

“WOMEN LEADERS IN STEM MUST WORK HARDER TO HAVE CONVERSATIONS AROUND IMPROVING THE CURRENT GENDER DISPARITY AND FIND WAYS TO ENGAGE WITH WOMEN WHO ARE POTENTIALLY INTERESTED IN THE INDUSTRY TO ENCOURAGE THEM ON A PERSONAL LEVEL.” ~ Rashmi Rao


Industry Technology Employees 50,000 Headquarters Palo Alto, California Website hp.com

“DIVERSITY IS ONE OF THE KEY PILLARS OF NEW IDEAS. TO INCREASE DIVERSITY IN STEM WE NEED FOCUSED EFFORTS AND PARTNERSHIPS AMONG ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS, GOVERNMENTS AND CORPORATIONS.” ~ Mirjana Spasojevic

Mirjana Spasojevic VP and Head of Immersive Experiences in HP Labs

EXCELLENCE IN TECHNOLOGY HP EXECUTIVE LOOKING TO THE FUTURE Mirjana Spasojevic leads a diverse, passionate, entrepreneurial team of allstar researchers driven to anticipate and study the way people will engage with technologies that don’t yet exist. This team of designers, researchers, prototypers, and free thinkers are trained to look years ahead and design interactions and experiences that people will want to have with new technologies. As vice president and head of the Immersive Experience Lab at HP Inc., Spasojevic is a driving force behind groundbreaking contributions to technology. At the heart of the lab are forays into the future, where Spasojevic is guiding innovation in products and technologies for years to come in the areas of blended reality, UI/UX, new devices, applications and services. Her team understands and fulfills the promise of valuable, delightful experiences through data-driven, and user-focused solutions with a focus on PEOPLE. Spasojevic has over 20 years of experience in mobile, web, file and

distributed systems and is a recognized expert in Human-Computer Interaction and Ubicomp fields with work cited over 2,000 times. During her career, she co-founded educational startup Kindoma, and served as director of exploratory research at the Nokia Research Center in Silicon Valley. She has also led research activities and technical teams at HP, Yahoo and Transarc and served as an assistant professor at Washington State University. In the words of Mirjana Spasojevic: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “This is a significant issue that ultimately affects us all since new breakthroughs in the STEM field are needed to improve the conditions of all people everywhere on this planet. Diversity is one of the key pillars of new ideas. To increase diversity in STEM we need focused efforts and partnerships among academic institutions, governments and corporations.”

How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “There are changes, but they are slow and not easy to notice. For example, the uptick on the number of women in the CS majors is encouraging. Girls Who Code and similar organizations are removing some of the stigma from the cliché of these areas being boy’s domain." What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “I believe that the future of technology advancement and solving big problems will require multidisciplinary team efforts. This is something I work hard in my own team when I hire and set up teams with goals and projects.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “This is really hard to predict. I am truly hoping that the global numbers will improve. More importantly, I hope that the leadership positions in STEM fields will be more occupied by women. PDJ

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Industry Technology Employees 50,000 Headquarters Palo Alto, California Website hp.com

Dr. Lihua Zhao HP Labs Director and Principal Investigator

“THE MORE YOU ARE CONFIDENT ABOUT YOUR ABILITY IN STEM, THE MORE SUPPORT AND SPONSORSHIP YOU WILL BE GETTING AND YOU CAN GIVE.” ~ Dr. Lihua Zhao

Dr. Lihua Zhao leads an elite research team to advance technology for future industry revolution, while continuing her own technical contributions in inventing and innovating materials, processes and hardware for HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology for 3D printing. As a senior research project manager and scientist, Zhao successfully balances business drivers with multi-milliondollar research to guide decisions. Her colleagues say she stands out both for her extraordinary depth and more importantly her ability to explain the science in business terms and business impact. In her groundbreaking contributions to technology, Zhao is driving the future of materials/processes direction as integrated solutions and advancing HP’s technologies and strategies that impact the manufacturing industry. With a career dedicated to science and chemistry, her applications include flexible electronics, displays, security ink, energetic materials; and polymeric materials formulation as well as process research for 3D printing. Zhao is a wellpublished and sought after expert who

Groundbreaking Contributions to Technology is active with mentoring and developing young scientists and engineers, especially women. She is a member of the American Chemistry Society, Material Research Society, Sigma Xi and Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers. In the words of Dr. Lihua Zhao: Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “There is still a long way to really close the gender gap in STEM, but with more awareness from all entities, I see women have a unique opportunity to shine in many areas, such as big data and analytics, additive manufacturing, technology integration, etc.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “STEM is always the basic elements to advance people’s life and the world productivity. More and more sophisticated machines and smart devices are entering the world, affecting how things are made, distributed and used, and impacting how people live, interact and work like never before. STEM advancement among countries in the world becomes a big factor to their economic achievement and national security.”

What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Mindset, mindset, and mindset; leadership position; society sponsorship; family responsibility; and pay equality.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Promote women based on not only their current performance and achievement, but also their potential. Women leaders in STEM participate in more role-modeling, mentoring, sponsoring and inspiring young women adults and grade-school students. Educate women to put away our own unconscious bias on ourselves and embrace our ability to be excellent in the STEM field. Develop better society support to encourage growth mindset to both men and women to free our mind from many stereotype family duties, and encourage companies to be more inclusive and considerate.” Words I live by: “Be strong and independent. Aim high and put action in place. Learning is an everyday thing.” PDJ

Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Industry Biotechnology, Healthcare Employees 70+ Headquarters Research Triangle Park, North Carolina Website humacyte.com

Dr. Heather L. Prichard Senior Vice-President, Product Development

ADVANCING SCIENCE AND MEDICINE ACCOMPLISHED SCIENTIST IMPROVING MEDICAL OUTCOMES

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Dr. Heather Prichard works to develop technologies for improving medical treatment for a variety of diseases. As a scientist with the privately held research and regenerative medicine company Humacyte, Prichard leads the research, pre-clinical, and product development for HUMACYL™, the company’s innovative bioengineered blood vessel.

In the words of Dr. Heather Prichard:

Prichard is an accomplished scientific leader with a track record of guiding product development from concept to commercialization. Under her leadership, Humacyte has successfully developed technology leading to clinical trials on HUMACYL, working toward efforts to make bioengineered human organs a reality. The seminal Phase II trial results to test HUMACYL as a bypass graft in patients with peripheral arterial disease were published in 2015 and Phase III trials are currently enrolling in clinical sites in the U.S., Europe, and Israel.

How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Driving diversity across STEM industries is a message that needs to be voiced and accepted. Businesses must acknowledge that organizations that have gender balance at the senior managementlevel perform better financially. The world needs to build momentum and create chatter and awareness for diversity in the space, and there are small steps that organizations can take to ensure the movement progresses. Businesses must ensure that women have a seat at the senior leadership table and have a chance to seize more opportunities, encourage male allies to support their fellow women scientists and technologists, and educate their organizations on unconscious bias in the workplace through revisions in their hiring practices and the creation of policies that support a diverse pool of male and female workers.”

Prichard’s work is helping to expand the availability of Humacyte’s biomedical products with the potential to be lifechanging technologies today for patients who undergo hemodialysis, and in the future for thousands who face bypass surgery. Her scientific contributions are making an impact in the world of science and medicine, that goes far beyond current applications.

What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Stronger and more robust conversations around the importance of STEM need to happen throughout all industries. Professors and educators must remain a figure of support to professional and collegiate women in technical careers to increase the number of women in STEM.”

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Words I live by: “There are many ideas I try to embrace in both my personal life and career. Some of the most prominent are to embrace one’s own strengths and find a small way every day to make yourself and someone around you better.” PDJ

“THE WORLD RECOGNIZES THAT ADVANCES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CONTINUE TO DOMINATE MUCH OF OUR DAILY LIVES, BUT AN OBVIOUS QUESTION THAT PEOPLE HAVE ASKED FOR YEARS IS: ‘WHERE ARE THE FEMALES?’ THE STEM FIELDS HAVE ALWAYS HAD A SHORTAGE OF WOMEN, WHERE MEN TEND TO DOMINATE, AND FOR THE WOMEN, THE NUMBERS AREN’T GROWING.” ~ Dr. Heather Prichard


Industry Technology Employees 396 Headquarters Yonkers, New York Website iacapps.com

“BE RELENTLESS. RELENTLESS TO SET YOUR OWN PATH IN LIFE. RELENTLESS IN YOUR BELIEFS. RELENTLESS IN YOUR DRIVE TO PURSUE AND ACHIEVE YOUR GOALS.” ~ Julie-Anne Selvey

Julie-Anne Selvey Vice President, Brand and CSR

MENTORING THE NEXT GENERATION OF TECHNOLOGY LEADERS Julie-Anne Selvey works to empower the next generation of tech leaders and is making an impact with empowering women and underserved communities in New York communities through STEM education programs. Selvey has worked in the technology and biotechnology industries for the past decade. At the software company IAC Applications, she drives communication strategy for business units, products, and corporate initiatives. She also advises on internal and external branding and leads a diverse team tasked with meeting the company's business objectives. Beyond her achievements in the technology industry, she crafted a corporate social responsibility strategy aligning business objectives with promoting STEM education and sustainability. As part of this, she spearheads programs teaching coding in schools to give students the opportunity to interact with IAC’s team to talk about STEM careers. The company invites

students to its offices for career days to ensure they have an actual vision in their mind of what a career in STEM could look like and ensure they know STEM careers are available in their own communities. She works with students in the Yonkers community and has cultivated partnerships within various schools and groups, including one with Riverside High School, a magnet high school focused on engineering and computer science. In the words of Julie-Anne Selvey: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “By focusing on the ‘pipeline’. We need more up and coming female and minority computer scientists, engineers and mathematicians. We need to encourage and promote these interests and career paths with children in K-12.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Access and Exposure. Young women need to know that there are career paths that can satisfy their every interest. They should have the

opportunity to explore their interests in a non-judgmental, nurturing learning environment.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “In the tech industry – it is wonderful that more and more companies are investing time and resources in their local, national and international communities to provide and support STEM programs. There is real strength in these partnerships and I think these will bring positive results for years to come.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Going beyond mentoring and teaching – to become champions to help up and coming women in STEM move forward in their careers.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Five years is a short amount of time - but I am hopeful that we will begin to see more women (and minorities) in executive teams and board rooms leveraging cognitive diversity for innovation and growth.” PDJ Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Industry Advertising and Marketing Employees 50,100 Headquarters New York, New York Website interpublic.com

Patricia Hinerman IPG Corporate CIO

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“ALTHOUGH THEY MAY HAVE NOT SIGNED-UP FOR IT, DIVERSE LEADERS WHO HAVE BROKEN THROUGH, NEED TO OWN DESENSITIZING PEERS - BREAK THEM IN - TO OPEN THE MINDS OF ‘MAJORITIES’ TO NOT ONLY THE FACT THAT THOSE FROM MINORITY GROUPS ARE QUALIFIED, BUT THAT INCREASING DIVERSITY IS ACTUALLY A COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE.” ~ Patricia Hinerman

EMPOWERING WOMEN IN STEM FOR CREATING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

As CIO at Interpublic Group, Patricia Hinerman is active in the diversity and inclusion initiatives for the advertising holding company that operates in over 130 countries and has about 800 subsidiary agencies. Hinerman initially launched her career at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center doing epidemiology research. The success of a program she helped run integrating systems into a single user interface, and gathering data to define probabilities of disease outcomes, fed her desire to expand her knowledge of information technology. At IPG she manages an extremely diverse set of applications and fills a chief of staff role for IT. She is a valued leader who plays an integral role in helping IPG to evolve and attain its diversity and inclusion vision. As a mentor, she empowers women in STEM roles and is the founder of IPG’s Women in IT program, that develops annual programs for corporate and agency IT staff, interns, and girls considering the workforce. PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

In the words of Patricia Hinerman: How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Advancements in technology, medicine, applied engineering, etc., have changed the way we all live and communicate. The terms STEM and STEAM have penetrated our everyday lives and there are expectations that the next tranche of innovations that will grow our economy are going to be raised from STEM disciplines. How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? "Early exposure and breaking through economic barriers – in my formative years, I wasn’t exposed to technology. I took an early route through interest in biology. Neuroscience was my bridge to IT networks and data relationship concepts. However, millennials have been exposed to technology for essentially their whole lives.

Demystifying and abstracting concepts – breaking complex concepts down into simpler, more digestible parts, to foster a more approachable atmosphere for those who may have interest in exploring STEM, but might be intimidated. Engaged Role Models - Although they may have not signed-up for it, diverse leaders who have broken through, need to own desensitizing peers ‘break them in’ to open the minds of ‘majorities’ to not only the fact that those from minority groups are qualified, but that increasing diversity is actually a competitive advantage.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? I do not see any significant barriers to entry for young women who are interested in STEM. However, I do still see barriers for young women who want to break through past middle management, who feel as if they need to make a choice between advancing their career and having time for caretaker roles.” PDJ


Industry Robotics/Engineering Employees 607 Headquarters Bedford, Massachusetts Website iRobot.com

“COURAGEOUS AND TENACIOUS. THEY GO TOGETHER. GO BOLDLY, GO STRONGLY AND STICK TO IT.” ~ Lisa Freed

Lisa Freed STEM Program Manager

INSPIRING STEM STUDENTS THROUGH ENGINEERING PROGRAMS Lisa Freed is an engineer who spearheads iRobot’s STEM education program that provides opportunities for students and serves as a model program for other companies looking to inspire future generations in STEM. Each year, iRobot’s STEM program reaches over 50,000 students from preschool through college with a vision into an engineering career and encouragement to stay in the field. iRobot is also the founder and lead organizer for National Robotics Week. Under her direction, the company brings robots to the younger students so they see first-hand the excitement of STEM and engineering. She also coordinates job shadows, mentoring and other ways of directly impacting students at the high school and postsecondary levels. This year, the company is implementing a new panel of female engineers to visit college seniors and is doing the same at the freshman level. Prior to her arrival at iRobot, she volunteered with several STEM outreach

efforts, including the National Engineers Week Future City Competition. She also founded the first engineering outreach program with the Boston Society of Civil Engineers, an initiative that inspired outreach programs for the American Society of Civil Engineers. In the words of Lisa Freed: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “The only way to increase diversity in STEM is for us to discontinue our self-imposed barriers. The most encouraging experience I have had recently is sitting at a Women in STEM event with a local high school. Those girls do not see any reason they can’t be engineers, or scientists, or doctors. They cannot imagine a barrier. So, once these women get to college and out in the working world, we need to prevent any older misconceptions from stopping them. As role models, we can mentor the younger engineers, we can encourage them, but mostly, we can stop thinking anything is out of the ordinary when a woman is in a STEM field. It’s not. And the younger women don’t think so!”

What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Women need role models. They need to see that their passion, their love for robotics, their enjoyment of STEM fields is completely the norm. So, we need to continue to encourage our young girls and women to follow their passions and dreams.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “I see women working equally alongside men in engineering and other STEM fields. I think the women coming into the field now are strong, and they want to achieve great things. I also believe the men they work alongside no longer stereotype roles. I am excited to see a normalization in the office environment continuing the trend I see now with our young students. The workplace is a much better place, and we need to encourage our women, and men, to keep that trajectory.” PDJ

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Industry Technology & Telecom Employees 30,000+ Headquarters New York, New York Website kpmg.com/us

“ACCOMPLISHMENT IS FUELED BY STRENGTH AND COMPASSION. SUCCESS IS POSSIBLE WHEN OTHERS AROUND YOU ARE BETTER THAN YOU. HAPPINESS IS KNOWING THIS ABOUT YOURSELF.” ~ Miriam Hernandez-Kakol

Miriam Hernandez-Kakol U.S. Service Line leader for Customer & Operations, Advisory

INSTILLING CONFIDENCE 44

IN EMERGING FEMALE LEADERS

Miriam Hernandez-Kakol has consulted with some of the largest technology, communications and media companies in the Americas, rolling out large, transformational programs and advising clients as they make operational and system changes. At KPMG, she has helped build the Management Consulting business from its inception and previously led the company’s U.S. Technology Enablement practice. She is committed to having a positive impact on the people and businesses she touches – whether that is by helping clients solve business challenges, growing teams or developing the next generation of STEM leaders. Hernandez-Kakol instills confidence in emerging female leaders and encourages them to let their passions be their guide. She does this by providing career growth opportunities and “stretch” assignments meant to show that they have her confidence, trust and guidance. She is a member of KPMG’s Women’s Advisory Board, served on the leadership team for KPMG’s Network of Women, PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

and belongs to the New Jersey Women “Network to Network” organization. She also actively serves on the National Academy Foundation’s STEM Committee and the New Jersey Junior Achievement Board. In the words of Miriam Hernandez-Kakol: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Creating an inclusive, supportive environment will help to retain diverse individuals in STEM careers. Starting early with the pipeline of students interested in a STEM field of study, through university and into their first jobs, diverse individuals need to see that their skills and experiences will be a positive catalyst in their careers. More programs need to be developed to help retain diverse individuals pursuing STEM-related degrees and already working in related careers. This is where mentorship and sponsorship can play a critical role - connecting these individuals with senior leaders who can help them grow, develop and realize their career ambitions.”

How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Disruption is occurring across every industry as a result of STEM-related developments. Organizations realize and the research validates that having diversity of thought, experiences and backgrounds will enable innovation and differentiation in this fast-changing marketplace.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “We need to help instill confidence in women and let them know they have what it takes to succeed. We need visible role models who are taking the time to coach, mentor and sponsor women in STEM. And we need to proactively identify high-performing and high-potential women in STEM fields and provide them with growth opportunities to build skills and advance.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “If we aggressively pursue the type of programs and sponsorship that we are discussing here, women (in many more numbers) will be among the leaders in major technical innovation and running significant organizations impacting our economy, our well-being, and our planet.” PDJ


Industry Asset Management/Financial Services Employees 3,000 Headquarters Baltimore, Maryland Website leggmason.com

“WOMEN MUST MENTOR OTHER WOMEN. THE WOMEN THAT I HAVE ENCOURAGED OVER THE YEARS ARE MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT. WE ALL NEED SUPPORT FROM TIME TO TIME AND WHEN WOMEN GET THAT SUPPORT, THEY ARE MORE LIKELY TO STAY IN A STEM CAREER.” ~ Dr. Janet Oren

Dr. Janet Oren Chief Information Security Officer

CYBERSECURITY EXPERT HELPING SHAPE THE STEM FIELDS

Highly regarded by her colleagues, Dr. Janet Oren believes in the power of diverse perspectives and teams and employs her wisdom, insights, and role to effect change and continue the momentum in STEM. With a 35-year extraordinary career in STEM, Oren leads global cybersecurity initiatives at Legg Mason Global Asset Management. Her career path includes 32 years at the National Security Agency (NSA) where she was responsible for the protection of classified information and other cybersecurity standards. She served as the senior security engineer on large weapon systems; wrote national encryption policy; and was the senior cybersecurity representative in the NSA’s 24-hour watch center. In between NSA and Legg Mason, she was a managing director at PricewaterhouseCoopers. Passionate about learning and her field, Oren holds five degrees and is the first person internationally to hold the Information Systems Security

Engineering Profession credential from the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium ((ISC)2). She coauthored National Institute of Standards and Technology Special Publication 800-160, Systems Security Engineering. Having started her career in the early 1980s, she has seen the STEM field evolve, and has helped to shape it – leading the way with her knowledge, drive, results, and commitment to mentoring. She says the women she has encouraged over the years are her greatest achievement. In the words of Dr. Janet Oren: How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “In my experience and observations, a diverse STEM workforce delivers better results. We all think differently and we bring our own perspectives to a challenge. I have found that my soft skills are different than those of my male STEM coworkers and that

helps me to be more effective at times. The bottom line is that an inclusive culture brings together a variety of perspectives and experiences that benefits everyone.” How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “As I meet young people in my community and look at the diversity in our local STEM programs, I feel we are on a good path, but we need to do more to encourage all students, particularly females.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “We simply need to talk and share our experiences. Providing mentoring at all ages that is encouraging and ‘real’ is very important.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Definitely gaining ground, hopefully by large margins. I think the demand for more STEM personnel and the financial aspects of that will drive more women to these careers. Of course, more women in the engineering and computer science fields mean more mentors/role models for the future.” PDJ Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM

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Industry Commercial vehicles systems and components Employees 8,000 Headquarters Troy, Michigan Website meritor.com

Lucille Gartman Site Manager

WOMEN ARE PERSISTENT ADVANCING IN STEM CAREERS

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Lucille Gartman is responsible for profit and loss of a manufacturing facility that uses proprietary technology in the manufacture of X30 Steelite™ brake drums for Class 8 tractors and trailers. The products offer a lightweight alternative to a traditional brake drum. As a STEM professional trained in critical thinking, Gartman manages roadblocks at Meritor’s Franklin, Kentucky, facility and oversees the plant’s resources to ensure success. She is a key driver within teams that recently introduced advanced processes, including a new $4.2 million spin form cell and $1.6 million balancing system. Meritor has facilities, engineering centers, joint ventures, distribution centers and offices in 18 countries. Gartman has excelled through various STEM-related positions. She launched her career as the first female employee in a lab at a tire company. After managing the lab, she joined Meritor back in 2000, moving up in STEM-related roles at multiple locations. Her teams at plants in Asheville and Forest City, North Carolina, took a disciplined, problem-solving approach to prevent safety, production and thru-put issues during the industrialization phases PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

of new product launches. Preventing these types of issues as early as possible has been important throughout the lifetimes of the products and has contributed to Meritor’s competitive edge in the marketplace.

“MORE WOMEN ARE PERSISTENT IN THEIR CAREERS - AND THEY ARE SUCCEEDING.” ~ Lucille Gartman In the words of Lucille Gartman: What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “I think we often create our own boundaries, and girls need to move ahead with in their career choices fearlessly. Is it risky? Yes, because girls often face parents and teachers who are not supportive due to stereotyping. Young girls do face gender biases, but in the professional world, there are no barriers to what they can achieve.”

How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Parents and teachers must do a better job of encouraging girls to engage with STEM by making it real, rewarding and fun. Ultimately, we need to increase the aspirations among girls toward these fields so they fully understand the possibilities.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Today, the boundaries aren’t as limiting. More women are persistent in their careers - and they are succeeding.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Girls and young women need a high level of exposure to female leaders. Introducing them to STEM careers is inspirational. We have to show them what is possible so they can come away and say, ‘I can do this, too.’ We have to impart the message that there are always bumps in the road and to never give up.” Words I live by: “Never stop growing. When you grow, you stretch yourself, and stretching can be uncomfortable. If you are not a little uncomfortable, you are not growing.” PDJ


Industry Commercial vehicles systems and components Employees 8,000 Headquarters Troy, Michigan Website meritor.com

“WOMEN ARE BEGINNING TO MAKE A PHENOMENAL IMPACT IN STEM FIELDS. GROWING NUMBERS OF WOMEN ARE ENTERING THESE CAREERS AND ADVANCING UPWARD IN VIRTUALLY EVERY INDUSTRY.” ~ Linda Taliaferro

Linda Taliaferro Vice President, Brand and CSR

BRIDGING THE GAPS

EXPLORING THE FASCINATION WITH STEM CAREERS With three decades of experience working with statistical data as a problem-solver and strategist focusing on quality management and operational excellence, STEM has been foundational to Linda Taliaferro’s career. She utilizes STEM knowledge and experience to establish a no-defects culture at Meritor by developing a robust program with a prevention focus and investing in no-fault controls. As a result, the company’s defect rate as measured in parts per million has declined significantly in recent years. Her STEM education has been instrumental to impactful leadership on quality, supply chain development and environmental, health and safety excellence for leading manufacturers. As an executive, an advocate and a mentor, Taliaferro urges others to look beyond the limits and see what is possible. Her commitment to a STEM career and drive to help young people explore all options is exemplary of her desire to “give back” and make a difference to individuals

as well as the broader industry, that benefits from a more diverse base of talent. In the words of Linda Taliaferro: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “We need to do a better job of reaching girls early. The idea of not introducing girls to science and math at an early age is detrimental to advancing STEM-related careers among women. Parents and teachers have to start at elementary school when they see a child with an interest in STEM or is just curious.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Too often, STEM fields are thought of as men’s professions that are either too tough or challenging for women. Others believe STEM just doesn’t interest women. But the fact is, women do get motivated by numbers and taking on challenges. It’s really a mindset built up over generations, but we are seeing changes with more women becoming CEOs of large corporations and leading technological firms.”

Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “More women will be working in STEM careers because the women in these fields today are advocates. Many are engaging girls and young women to move the needle. People have access to so much information that it’s easier to learn about STEM fields and map out a career path.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “When I visit schools or mentor young women, I hear some say that STEM is boring. But I tell them to think about the possibilities: One of you could cure cancer or put an astronaut on Mars. We must do more to instill how fascinating it is to be in a STEM career so we bridge these gaps in understanding what people in these fields actually do.” Words I live by: “Treat others as you wish to be treated.” PDJ

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JOINING FORCES TO BREAK BARRIERS FOR WOMEN Meera Kaul is an example of a woman who has come into her own on her own. Her journey as a woman in STEM is opening a path of possibilities for women and her perseverance as a force for women’s self-realization and success in all their capacities. Meera Kaul Foundation Kaul’s first startup on content curation was created during her freshman year as Industry Non Profit Employees 5 an undergraduate in 1990, distinguishing Headquarters Redwood City, California her as a pioneer before the dotcom era. She Website meerakaul.org sold that startup to fund law school and

48 Meera Kaul President

then taught herself coding while studying law in Delhi and creating another startup that would build interactive platforms for global media giants, including National Geographic. As a postgraduate at Thomas Jefferson School of Law, she built a wealth management startup that used technology to enhance processes and was purchased by Charles Schwab in 1999. Today, Kaul is on the board of and advising tech startups as part of her own growth process and steadfast contribution to ensuring women learn and stay in science and technology. She is the founder of the largest global Women in STEM program, and serves as a model of dedication and perseverance. She is also the founder of the Women Inclusive Network(WIN), that uses technology to safeguard women rights and is building the product in conjunction with Silicon Valley veterans to disrupt the dependence of women rights on government grants. In the words of Meera Kaul: Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “As long as we remain steadfast in prioritizing and investing in women’s programs and compelling girls and women to be proponents of growth in our economies, I am convinced that women will take the lead in STEM.”

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Gender equality and the barriers to it are multidimensional assuming economic, cultural and social dimensions. The complexity of the gender gap in STEM does not lie with women but with men. Stereotypically, women have been anticipated to perform most of the work in the home, irrespective of which partner is most suited to the task. Indeed, the greatest obstacles regarding girls and women’s involvement in STEM are socioeconomic.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “In order for women to move forward in STEM a number of policy and socioeconomic changes should transpire. Government policies should amalgamate with that of the private sectors, especially on issues such as pay parity, anti-discrimination initiatives, and corporate board and management diversity. Further elements that need to work in tandem to promote women’s engagement in STEM include a transformation in perceptions and attitudes at home, in the media and in our education systems. When we are successful, one of the main aspects to bear in mind is that it is not merely about getting women involved in STEM fields – it is about nurturing them, honing their skills and keeping them intrinsically interested and invested – therein lies a main challenge.” PDJ

“EVERYTHING IS POSSIBLE. THE ONLY TIME ANYONE FAILS IS WHEN THEY GIVE UP.” ~ Meera Kaul


Industry Academia Employees 1,000 Headquarters Halifax, NS Canada Website msvu.ca and WISEatlantic.ca

“THE VAST INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF STEM CAREERS MEANS THAT THERE IS A ‘FIT’ FOR ANY TYPE OF PERSONALITY WITHIN STEM AND THAT STEM KNOWLEDGE IS BECOMING A BASIC REQUIREMENT FOR MOST PROFESSIONS.” ~ Dr. Tamara Franz-Odendaal

Dr. Tamara Franz-Odendaal Professor of Biology, NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering – Atlantic Region

PROFESSOR SHOWCASING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CHANGING THE STEREOTYPE IN CANADA

D

r. Tamara Franz-Odendaal runs a successful research lab in skeletal biology and is dedicated to advocating and supporting women in science and engineering while encouraging young girls to consider pursuing STEM careers. Among her numerous initiatives, Franz-Odendaal spearheaded the creation of the Atlantic ConnecTions Conference. The biennial conference provides an opportunity for women in Science, Engineering, Trades and Technology (SETT) from Atlantic Canada to share their experiences of studying and working in male-dominated fields, to network with others, and to develop action items with the goal of advancing women in SETT. She joined Mount Saint Vincent University in 2006 as a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) University Faculty award recipient and has since launched an active productive research program

in the field of skeletal biology. She is the NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering for the Atlantic Region (WISEatlantic), working to increase the participation of women in science and engineering in Canada. In the words of Dr. Tamara Franz-Odendaal: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “The best ways to do this are to do a better job educating teachers and parents about how STEM jobs have changed over the last 20 years and that innovative industries are seeking diversity in their workforce. Diversity leads to innovation.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “I think the biggest barrier to overcome is unconscious biases as these influence hiring and promotion. The second group of barriers relates to education: Girls enjoy math and science at school but de-select themselves from a STEM career for any of

the following reasons: they don’t consider these careers as helping society, they have a narrow view of STEM career opportunities, and they face a stereotype threat (having to challenge the strong male dominated STEM stereotype). We also need to educate boys that girls can enter the STEM workforce in similar ways to themselves. If we can change the STEM stereotype, then we will be able to widen the door for women’s participation in STEM.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “All hiring and promotion committees should have specific unconscious bias training. Teachers should be educated on the vast opportunities within STEM. The STEM stereotype held by the public needs to change to include and embrace diversity. Men need to be advocates for including women in STEM.” Words I live by: “Dream big. Follow your passion. Love what you do!” PDJ

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Industry Data storage hardware and software Employees 10,000 + Headquarters Sunnyvale, California Website netapp.com

“AS LONG AS WE REMAIN STEADFAST IN PRIORITIZING AND INVESTING IN WOMEN’S PROGRAMS AND COMPELLING GIRLS AND WOMEN TO BE PROPONENTS OF GROWTH IN OUR ECONOMIES, I AM CONVINCED THAT WOMEN WILL TAKE THE LEAD IN STEM.”

~ Anna Schlegel

Anna Schlegel Senior Director of Global Engineering

GLOBAL ENGINEER DRIVING CHANGE IN STEM

As a respected leader in the

50 globalization community and a senior

director at NetApp, Anna Schlegel leads a 180-member engineering team in nearly 20 countries. Schlegel has worked on globalization teams for two decades and presented the globalization engineering vision inside NetApp. She drives technology innovation and under her leadership, NetApp has products in multiple countries in their native language and untapped revenues via various programs she has envisioned. Among her numerous roles, Schlegel chairs the company’s 900-member Women in Technology group, where she is routinely tapped to mentor and participate in workgroups promoting women in STEM. She recently kicked off the company’s US2020 program, that is dedicated to supporting kids in STEM. She’s also active in the Council in the Silicon Valley to drive change in STEM. Schlegel is co-founder of two nonprofits, Kenya’s Imagine Educating Everyone that helps girls remain in the educational system and Women in Localization, that has about 3,000 members in 10 chapters around the world.

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

She is a sought-after keynote speaker on technology innovation and the author of a recently released book, Truly Global.

schools for underprivileged kids; more fun and inclusive; not just about coding; and better explained to parents.”

In the words of Anna Schlegel:

Describe your experiences as a woman in a STEM: “As a woman in STEM you need to be as competent as anyone else. If you are a mom, you need to prioritize and make choices. You can choose to not take calls at night a few nights a week. As a woman in STEM it is important to learn about WIT in your own organization and volunteer. You must bring the next generation in. You must pull the next leaders in. You need to practice balance. Eat well, sleep enough, choose a few things that give you joy. You want to stay connected to your industry and keep learning from your peers. You can start an organization, a lean in club. You can volunteer at your children's school. You can work with HR to put programs and goals together. Learn what is already being done and how you can contribute. But do not stand silent. This is an all hands-on deck situation. Our mothers dreamed of us having these jobs. We are it now. We need to deliver and leave it better than what we found.” PDJ

Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “As long as we remain steadfast in prioritizing and investing in women’s programs and compelling girls and women to be proponents of growth in our economies, I am convinced that women will take the lead in STEM.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Unconscious bias. Not having role models. The low percentage of women in technology having to work extra hard to stay in highly competitive environments. Train men to include and invite and sponsor women to sit at the table. Lack of CEO program of inclusion.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Pair sponsors with women. Train on unconscious bias, monitor performance plans, put retention plans in place, and consider women for succession planning.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “With more diversity; in more


Industry Utility Employees 1,800 Headquarters White Plains, New York Website nypa.gov

“I FEEL OPTIMISTIC THAT THERE IS A RECOGNITION THAT THE STEM WORKFORCE WILL FUEL THE GLOBALIZED ECONOMY. THIS FOCUS IS COLLIDING WITH INTERNATIONAL CONCERNS ABOUT GENDER EQUITY AND DIVERSITY IN THE WORKFORCE." ~ Kaela Mainsah

Kaela Mainsah Manager, Environmental Justice

EMPOWERING COMMUNITIES ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND STEM EDUCATION Engineer Kaela Mainsah works to improve the environment in undereducated communities for the largest state public electric utility in the country. As the environmental justice manager for New York Power Authority (NYPA), she develops energy education, energy efficiency, clean energy and electric transportation programs and projects that benefit disadvantaged communities. A key component of the environmental justice initiatives is closing the STEM achievement gap for underrepresented groups. NYPA’S STEM programs are free at state public schools near NYPA facilities. They address where and how electricity is created and transmitted, energy conservation and alternative energy concepts with the goal of educating children on STEM pathways. A native of Zambia, Mainsah has a passion for empowering communities through education and volunteers for literacy programs, and she has sponsored elementary school children in Africa

through a family educational trust. She is active with the company’s Women in Power employee resource group. It champions a diverse and inclusive workplace, supports professional and personal development, and provides opportunities for mentorship, networking and coaching. In the words of Kaela Mainsah: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Despite the fact that women have significantly improved their educational prospects, surpassing males in college degree attainment, these gains are accompanied by a persistent underrepresentation of women in STEM college majors. I believe the fractures in the STEM gender gap begin early, as little girls are shaped to play with dolls while little boys play with cars and bricks, these stereotypes are cemented as girls pursue the humanities in high school whilst boys are encouraged to pursue the sciences.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “I believe that

even more work needs to be done to encourage young girls to pursue careers in science and technology. While there are still too few identifiable role models, this will change in the years to come.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “In the international development field, there is an increased spotlight in the participation of girls in education. Global corporations compete to attract and retain a values focused workforce, and so I am confident that market forces will spur and increase the contribution of women in the STEM workforce.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “Because there will be many more women engineers in the workforce over the next five years, their contributions to STEM programs will increase commensurately.” Words I live by: “Give, and it will be given to you. Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For with the measure you use it will be measured back to you.” PDJ

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Industry Pharmaceuticals/Health Care Employees 7,600 Headquarters East Hanover, New Jersey Website novartis.com

“TECHNOLOGY AND GLOBALIZATION ARE RAPIDLY CHANGING MANY STEM FIELDS. AS WE PUSH THE LIMITS ON WHAT’S KNOWN AND WHAT’S POSSIBLE – WE ALL HAVE A ROLE TO PLAY TO ENSURE THAT ADVANCEMENTS IN STEM ARE DONE ETHICALLY AND RESPONSIBLY.” ~ Dr. Marcia Kayath

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Dr. Marcia Kayath Vice President and Head, US Clinical Development and Medical Affairs

MENTORING OTHERS FOR MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Dr. Marcia Kayath is a gifted, empathetic physician and an inspirational leader committed to serving patients through an impressive career path focused on making a difference for patients around the world. As head of U.S. Clinical Development and Medical Affairs at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, she oversees a team of nearly 600 and is responsible for the company’s U.S. Medical Affairs, U.S. Clinical Development and Regulatory Affairs for Advertising and Promotion. She’s known for going out of her way to develop, mentor and sponsor top talent around the globe, often using her commute to and from work for conversing with, providing guidance to, and mentoring people at all levels and in different time zones. At Novartis, she has held several leadership roles for multiple products in Oncology Global Medical Affairs. She’s a member of the U.S. Pharmaceuticals PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Executive Committee, the Global Development leadership team, and serves as executive sponsor for the Women in Science (WISE) Employee Resource Group. In the words of Dr. Marcia Kayath: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “We need to find ways for individuals and organizations to be open to, and accepting of, different experiences, communication styles and learning preferences. When many different voices are at the table – and different perspectives are heard and valued – change happens, and innovation flourishes.” What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Women who are early in their careers - or who are considering pursuing a future in STEM - must be nurtured and encouraged. They need to understand that they have the capacity to change the world; they just need to channel their passions to be the best they can.”

What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Women in STEM need to work on being confident and self-assured – in both their abilities and their potential to add value. We also need to accept that we can be successful at both work and home – and that we really can do it all!” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “In time, I expect women to be leaders in many STEM fields - however, that may take more than five years. According to a recent Catalyst global study, women account for less than 30% of all individuals worldwide in scientific research and development. I view this statistic as an opportunity, and I feel that all women working in STEM careers today have a responsibility - in fact, an obligation - to mentor young women and encourage them to see what’s possible.” Words I live by: “Trust, service and transparency.” PDJ


Industry Government Employees 12,206 Headquarters Albuquerque, New Mexico Website sandia.gov

“YOUNG PEOPLE NEED TO LEARN WHAT ENGINEERS ARE AND, AS IMPORTANTLY, WHO THEY ARE AND THAT YOU CAN HAVE A MEANINGFUL AND ENJOYABLE CAREER THAT PRODUCES BENEFITS TO THE WORLD THAT HAVE VERY FAR-REACHING IMPACT.” ~ Dr. Carol Adkins

Dr. Carol Adkins Director of Energy Technologies and System Solutions

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION LEADER MOTIVATING WOMEN IN STEM

As a director at Sandia National Laboratories, Dr. Carol Adkins has distinguished herself as a science and technology innovator who pushes engineering to develop more efficient, practical, and robust solutions to some of the nation’s most difficult problems. For decades, Adkins has been a leader and motivator in many areas of STEM. Today, she leads a group of over 200 technical staff working toward making the electric infrastructure more reliable, more secure, and safer for the environment. She has distinguished herself by contributing to technical progress in medicine, the military, oil, environmentally conscious engineering, microelectronics, security, and renewable energy and infrastructure. She exemplifies the philosophy of continual learning through additional programs such as the Nuclear Weapons Leadership Program and the National Security Leadership Program. Adkins mentors CalTech graduates and encourages female STEM professionals to be active in schools and to make communities stronger by exposing young people to STEM and encouraging females to build resilience to real-life work pressures.

In the words of Dr. Carol Adkins: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Encourage and institutionalize giving back. It is important to be present in the schools to teach kids what can be done in the science and engineering fields and to show that a woman can do it. It is important to be a role model for young people to show how engineers and scientists help improve world conditions, not just economic wealth. It is also important to support women in the STEM workforce and give them the support they need to be resilient to the pressures of the professional world.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “The issues of implicit bias underlie many of the barriers to closing the gender gap in STEM, and it is important to understand the science of implicit bias and the ways we can address it. A revelation for many is that women can be a part of the problem in exhibiting just as much of an unconscious bias as do men! To address that, enabling the rules so women and girls are on truly level playing fields is critical. In addition, we need to push to have more visible STEM female heroes as part of our culture. “

How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “I fear that we take science and engineering for granted, and our complacency means we don’t help emphasize its importance for our younger generations. There were eras when scientists were celebrated as significant 'heroes' addressing world problems or pioneering exciting new breakthroughs. This needs to be renewed.” Describe your experiences as a woman in a STEM career. “I entered my technical profession very conscious of my unique position as a woman, and I learned to survive and thrive by behaving like the majority demographic, the white males with whom I worked. Constantly left out of the 'boys' club, I learned to make my own networks and support the women around me. As my professional success increased, I increased my sphere of influence within my institution and profession through organization and chairmanship of organizations to help raise awareness and take positive actions.” PDJ

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Industry Government Employees 12,206 Headquarters Albuquerque, New Mexico Website sandia.gov

Dr. Justine Johannes Director of Research & Development Science & Engineering

WEAPONS STOCKPILE DIRECTOR COMMITTED TO DIVERSITY 54

Dr. Justine Johannes is director of the Nuclear Weapons Stockpile and Weapon Product Realization Center at Sandia National Laboratory, where she manages Sandia’s Directed Stockpile Work with oversight of nearly a $1.4 billion budget. Over the years, she has held various leadership roles at Sandia, including oversight of an Engineering Sciences Center staff of 400 committed to supporting Sandia’s national security mission. Prior to that, she led seven departments responsible for providing solutions in solid mechanics and structural dynamics for national security sciences.

fields. One barrier is keeping girls engaged in math and sciences in K-12 education because it is hard for them to move into STEM fields if they don’t have a sufficient background to be successful. The other challenge is reaching a tipping point where young girls see themselves having peers and a community of women to engage in their jobs. This ‘critical mass’ of women in STEM is important in attracting more women.” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “The opportunity to change the world through automation and software development is growing. This change creates potential opportunities for young women because they can bring these skills to a large number of business sectors from health care to self-driving cars as a couple of examples. Often young women are motivated to choose a career where they can make a difference and the opportunities in these fields are growing and increasing the chance to make a difference.”

of opportunities provided in STEM careers. The next challenge is supporting women so they stay in STEM fields and thrive. I am a big believer in helping to create a sense of community amongst the women in an organization so they can help support each other.” Words I live by: “Be kind, and humble. Work hard to contribute to society, and give back to others.” PDJ

“THE NEXT FIVE YEARS COULD EXPERIENCE INCREASED PARTICIPATION IN SOME Johannes is a leader whose actions OF THE ENGINEERING demonstrate her commitment to diversity DISCIPLINES THAT HAVE and she’s known for providing a sense of community for women in the work place. HISTORICALLY STRUGGLED She sits on various education engineering FOR PARTICIPATION BECAUSE boards and is an active mentor and volunteer THEY ARE HAVING INCREASING for a volume of girls STEM programs. SOCIETAL IMPACTS. I BELIEVE In the words of THE OPPORTUNITY IS TO HELP What can be done to move women Dr. Justine Johannes: forward in STEM? “It is important to BRING THIS AWARENESS TO What barriers are in the way to closing provide tutoring and mentoring for young THE NEXT GENERATION.” the gender gap in STEM? “I think two women so they can be successful in school ~ Dr. Justine Johannes issues get in the way of women in STEM and they can have exposure to the breadth PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL


Company Shell Downstream Inc. Industry Energy/Oil and Gas Employees 93,000 Headquarters Houston, Texas Website shell.com/us

“INCREASING DIVERSITY IN STEM IS THE KEY TO UNLOCKING INNOVATION IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. PEOPLE WHO HAVE DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS AND PERSPECTIVES AND BRING DIFFERENT OPINIONS AND IDEAS ON HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS.” ~ Jeannie Gardner

Jeannie Gardner Global Pricing Lead

EMPOWERING WOMEN IN THE ENERGY INDUSTRY As a trailblazer for women in STEM, Jeannie Gardner understands the issues women face. She demonstrates this by turning her innovative ideas into reality and it’s making an enormous impact on women in STEM careers. Gardner is the global pricing lead at Shell Downstream Inc. and the national president of the Women’s Energy Network (WEN), a 4,000+ member organization with 13 chapters around the country. The network’s core pillars are educating women on technical aspects of the energy industry, developing skills and competencies to increase gender representation in the energy leadership pipeline, networking, connecting to build trust based relationships and empowering young girls to pursue careers in the energy industry. She was awarded the WEN Appalachia Chapter Trailblazer award last year, in recognition of a woman who has been a model of leadership and vision in the energy industry for more than fifteen years.

While blazing a trail through her passion and courage, she continues inspiring others while forming new opportunities for the future. She was instrumental in starting the executive women membership tier, providing a forum for executive women to network, exchange and develop new ideas and become visible role models. A driver of change, Gardner works to ensure women in STEM have a seat at the table. Her work with numerous organizations helps accomplish this by educating women on the technical aspects of the energy industry, developing skills and competencies to increase gender representation in the leadership pipeline and eradicate biases in the workplace. In the words of Jeannie Gardner: What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “Moving women forward in STEM will take active leadership and participation from everyone; parents, teachers, male leaders, STEM professionals, companies, organizations and the nonprofit

sector. Companies need to visibly support STEM programs and implement STEM internships to better expose women to careers in STEM. Diversity and inclusion programs need to be implemented at every company and delivered at every level, making everyone aware of their unconscious bias and stereotypes toward women who work in STEM to help bridge the gaps.” Describe your experiences as a woman in a STEM career. “Working as an engineer in STEM there have been many instances where I have been the only woman and/or person of color in the room or on the team. There are many biases and stereotypes that women have to face every day. Trying to demystify these can be very stressful and lead to poor performance. I try to live by three principles in my life. Be your authentic self, be confident in yourself and your abilities, and understand your value and constantly reinvent and rebrand yourself to add value.” PDJ

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Industry Legal Employees 1,600 Headquarters Washington D.C. Website squirepb.com

Tamara Fraizer Principal

LAWYER BLAZING A TRAIL 56

FOR WOMEN IN STEM

Based in the heart of Silicon Valley, Tamara Fraizer helps her clients assess intellectual property (IP) related issues, leverage and enforce IP rights, and defend against IP claims. Her legal experience spans a variety of industries including life sciences, medical device, electronics, pharmaceuticals, healthcare related consumer products, and software. The challenges and barriers for women to rise to the highest levels of the elite firms within the legal profession are well-documented. Not only has Fraizer overcome those obstacles, but her deep STEM background puts her in a small class of women in the industry. This experience and background make her an asset to clients and a mentor to young women seeking to blaze a trail in the industry. With expertise in patent litigation, she has litigated for and advised midsized private businesses as well as some of the largest public corporations. She also counsels entrepreneurs and startups. Fraizer is particularly interested in developing technologies in digital health, personalized medicine, and PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

bioinformatics, areas where she has advanced degrees. In the words of Tamara Fraizer: How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “We need to improve educational opportunities in STEM for children of all ages and all cultures. Then we need to harness that skill without any preconceived or subconscious bias. Education is empowering, and education in STEM all the more so given its importance in our modern world.” What barriers are in the way to closing the gender gap in STEM? “Cultural biases. We need to expect more of our girls, and then respect them for it. Many girls learn that being smart is not attractive, that being disciplined in their learning is not necessary, and that STEM is really for boys. We need to teach them being smart is being capable, that being disciplined in their learning is a responsibility, and that STEM girls and STEM women – just like STEM boys and STEM men – are awesome!” How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “STEM is elitist, and becoming

more so, as clearly indicated by the statistics for college degrees. In all areas of STEM, the percentage of women getting college degrees has decreased over the last 10 years in the United States. Minorities, especially Hispanics, continue to be less likely to earn a college degree than Caucasians, but for those who succeed in getting a degree, their success in STEM areas is not as skewed, compared to Caucasians, as when we compare women to men.” Words I live by: “Give yourself a chance. Be open to the possibility, and let yourself fall down a few times, but don’t give up before you try. Then give others a chance.” PDJ

“WE NEED TO EXPOSE OUR GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN TO STEM IN MEANINGFUL WAYS, WITH HANDS-ON EXPERIENCES, SOCIAL CONTEXT, AND APPROPRIATE ENCOURAGEMENT. WE ALSO NEED TO PROVIDE WOMEN WITH OPPORTUNITIES FOR ADVANCEMENT.” ~ Tamara Fraizer


Industry IT Services & Business Solutions Consulting Employees 33,387 Headquarters New York, New York Website tcs.com

“DARE TO DREAM AND NEVER LOSE HOPE.” ~ Chandrika Shrinivasan

Chandrika Shrinivasan Client Partner

TECHNOLOGY LEADER

GIVING BACK TO NEXT GENERATION OF TECH LEADERS Distinguished business and technology leader Chandrika Shrinivasan empowers students with opportunities in STEM and is helping the next generation of mentors find their voice. Shrinivasan started her career as a software programmer and advanced to an executive role managing multi-million dollar portfolios for Tata Consultancy Services. She provides thought leadership for clients on their business and technology roadmap and conceives, designs and delivers solutions to support growth in their businesses. Having experienced the power of an influential mentor early on in her career, she now serves as a mentor to middle and high school students and to corporate associates. She cites the mentorship she received early on by a colleague as an inflection point in her career. In a recent STEM talk to students, ‘Dare to dream and never lose hope,’ Chandrika talked about the importance of dreaming of a future that seems beyond reach today.

In the words of Chandrika Shrinivasan: How is the world changing with respect to STEM? “Every aspect of our lives is touched by STEM - from the cars we drive to the printing of a grocery bill. STEM careers themselves are evolving with the advent of more advanced smart phones, social media and artificial intelligence. I think we are looking at STEM pushing us to reinvent ourselves every few years.” How can the world increase diversity in STEM fields? “Diversity can be increased in the STEM fields by reaching students when they are young. Instilling a love of math and science early on and its application in day-to-day life is essential. One other area I believe will help increase diversity is in understanding how to circumnavigate roadblocks. As you move up the corporate ladder, there will be times when you must lead teams to overcome obstructions both business and self-imposed through determination and a positive outlook. “

What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “From my own experience, having a strong network of support is essential. This can happen on many levels from one-on-one mentoring to small support groups. And in addition to the confidence and support women can gain from each other, even something as simple as spreading the message that there is no such thing as a ‘super-woman’ and that asking for help is ‘OK’ can be a powerful motivator when obstacles seem insurmountable.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “The right strides are being made but we have a long way to go. I see a lot of women taking up challenging and leadership roles. I hope that each of these women sets an example for other aspiring young women to take up STEM jobs. Technology does provide an incredible platform for women to advance.” PDJ

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Industry Banking Employees 250,000 Headquarters San Francisco, California Website Wellsfargo.com

Ligia Vilela CTO-CAO Digital Channels Technology

DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE LEADERSHIP PAVING THE WAY FOR NEW TALENT Ligia Vilela is chief technology officer/

58 chief application officer and senior

vice president of Digital Channels Technology for Wells Fargo Bank. She has distinguished herself not only as a woman in technology but as a top technology professional in the banking industry. Through her distinguished 25-year career as a technology professional she has led by example. She leads a team of more than 500 with responsibilities to deliver online and mobile services for millions of Wells Fargo customers. She is respected for an inclusive leadership style that respects diversity and fosters a family-like environment. Through her support of team members and corporate diversity networks, she has been responsible for influencing professional advancement in others. At Wells Fargo, Vilela is co-chair of the Enterprise Information Technology and Operations Group Diversity & Inclusion Council and is also an active participant in the company’s Team Member Networks. Through her leadership and passion for mentoring and recruiting Latinas, as well as her commitment to hiring diverse candidates by creating an emerging talent recruiting program, she promotes a strong

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

and inclusive team member base. Her efforts have helped attract diverse talent to Wells Fargo, where she has serves as an example of what a woman in technology can achieve. In the words of Ligia Vilela: What can be done to move women forward in STEM? “We need to emphasize to our young girls that creative and analytical thinking are as important as a strong inclination towards math, science, engineering or technology. The new school programs that are teaching young girls to code, to build robots, to create art via 3D, to be exposed to women in senior roles as mentors create the path for additional women to explore career paths in STEM.” Where do you see women in STEM in five years? “If we continue to work on expanding young girls and women awareness in STEM, we will see more women entering universities wanting to pursue STEM careers. As a result, they will have better paying jobs and hopefully will enable them to participate in encouraging and inspiring the next generation of women towards STEM. Technology is a fertile field for women to explore as various branches of Artificial Intelligence are being

created requiring a new set of engineers that are able to transform their skills and integrate the various elements of emotional intelligence into their technical solutions. I believe that women have an edge on emotional intelligence that could make a career in technology more satisfying.” Words I live by: “Be respectful, helpful and good to others.” PDJ

“THE STEM FIELDS ARE BECOMING HIGHLY INTEGRATED DUE TO HUMAN NEEDS AND TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS. WE ARE SEEING THE BLENDING OF SOME OF THE MORE TRADITIONAL FIELDS THAT ARE CREATING NEW CAREERS AND ENRICHING THE STEM LANDSCAPE. THAT EXPANSION WILL OPEN THE DOORS FOR MORE PEOPLE TO PARTICIPATE IN NEW CAREERS CREATING GREATER DIVERSITY OF IDEAS AND SOLUTIONS.” ~ Ligia Vilela


Empowering women worldwide, so they can live better.

corporate.walmart.com/therealwalmart


WOMEN HAVE the P O W E R Learning to Lead in STEM By Dr. LaTrea Shine Lenovo Women in STEM face many career obstacles and often struggle to transition into leadership roles. Women and minorities have experienced only slight gains in the last six years, now holding only 14.4 percent of Fortune 500 board diversity.

Dr. LaTrea Shine

Women who work for years without a promotion eventually lose hope for career advancement. Studies have shown that experiences of burnout, stress, and isolation are symptomatic of the imposter syndrome, where accomplished women remain fearful of being exposed as a fraud. These lead women to harbor feelings of inadequacy in male-dominated fields. Limitations imposed by glass ceilings and chilly climates decrease a sense of belonging. Women’s response to these negative socio-cultural behaviors ultimately determines their ability to succeed in STEM leadership roles. WOMEN HAVE POWER continued on page 61

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Exceptional people. Exceptional contributions.

When your goal is to provide exceptional service to the nation, you need exceptional people. That’s why Sandia National Laboratories seeks out team members whose principles, perspectives, and outlook can contribute to game-changing solutions. We value the qualities that make our people unique—and know that what makes each person different makes all of us stronger. Visit sandia.gov/careers to learn more about an exceptional career at Sandia and how you can add to our legacy of discovery, innovation, and achievement that has enhanced the well-being and security of people all over the world.

World-changing technologies. Life-changing careers.

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Exceptional service in the national interest

Equal opportunity employer/Disability/Vet/GLBT


continued from page 60 WOMEN HAVE POWER

Building leadership self-efficacy is an important attribute that women pursuing STEM leadership should make an investment. The MerriamWebster dictionary defines efficacy as the power to produce the desired result. Self-efficacy, refined by Bandura, reaches beyond having confidence in one’s ability, and puts into action a commitment and plan to tackle difficult challenges. The lack of action by women to embark on more challenging roles is an influential contributor to career stagnation, according to Milan researcher Dr. Zachary Estes. With a more positive shift in perception of women’s leadership capabilities they can find power to penetrate STEM barriers. Women should also seek stretch roles that enhance their selfefficacy DNA for problem-solving. Research on the confidence gap confirms that women shouldn’t wait to be 100 percent prepared, but allow the experience of each new opportunity to fill the missing gap over time. There is a striking similarity among CEO’s who began their careers at companies that they are now leading. Most embarked on steep climbs to influential executive positions since beginning their careers. Women shouldn’t be too quick to abandon their career goals, but should lean-in, according to Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg. Even if facing challenges in their current positions, they should allow obstacles encountered on the journey to shape them by taking on more strategic roles.

Within STEM environments, research suggests that learning styles impact leadership effectiveness, or the ability to meet job-related needs. Assessing learning styles through self-assessments like Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory (LSI) will help women identify their learning preference, that can influence how they lead. The most critical finding from prior research in learning is that women learn differently than men. Women prefer to connect with people, to learn through hands-on experiences and to use their intuition to make decisions. Structured environments that lack support for these types of learning interactions may not be conducive for women’s advancement. In a recent survey of learning styles of 94 information technology (IT) professionals, learning differences were further confirmed. Women IT professionals who preferred a diverging learning style demonstrated leadership through coaching and nurturing others, while men showed leadership through maintaining order and compliance. For greater success, women should take stock in how they learn, seeking to understand their learning preference in processing data, inputs and information to gain insights about characteristics that are driving certain leadership behaviors. Despite gender bias and work-family conflicts, women can use the above strategies to enhance their selfefficacy, crack the glass-ceiling and discover their own power in leadership.

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LEADING THE CHANGE FOR ADVANCING WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Catalyst celebrated International Women’s Day by honoring 3M, BMO Financial Group and Rockwell Automation with the 2017 Catalyst Award for their initiatives to accelerate progress for women in the workplace. For 30 years, these awards have recognized exceptional efforts that help advance women in business. “Intentional change requires bold leadership, which these companies embody. This is how diversity, inclusion and gender parity come to life in the workplace. It’s incredible to see these award-winning initiatives changing minds, changing behaviors and creating more opportunities for women,” Catalyst CEO Deborah Gillis said. “Business leaders have the power and a greater responsibility than ever before to make room for all employees to succeed. 3M, BMO and Rockwell Automation are to be commended for leading the change.”

THE 2017 CATALYST AWARD-WINNING INITIATIVES INCLUDE:

3M Accelerating Women’s Leadership • 3M’s global initiative, I’m in. Accelerating Women’s Leadership, comprises a variety of talent management and leadership development components, including networking, mentoring, talent development, work-life and workplace flexibility programs and external community efforts. More than 70 countries have embraced inclusiveness across their organizations through the I'm in campaign. From 2011 to 2016, 3M’s global initiative has accelerated progress for women throughout the company and across the world. Globally, women’s representation at the director level increased from 18.2 to 23.0 percent

CATALYST AWARDS continued on page 63

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— Lisa Freed, P.E., LEED AP STEM Program Manager

We’d like to congratulate our very own Lisa Freed on being recognized as one of this year’s Women Worth Watching. Her diligent work in STEM outreach, encouraging young girls and women to pursue STEM studies and careers, is a goal that has always aligned with Lisa’s passion. We are so proud to have Lisa as part of the iRobot family.

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WE LIKE YOUR DRIVE! HARMAN congratulates Rashmi Rao on being chosen as one of the Women Worth Watching by Profiles in Diversity Journal. Thank you for your expertise and energy that is fueling the connected car.

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continued from page 62 CATALYST AWARDS

and at the vice president and above levels from 16.7 to 24.2 percent. Women leaders have also made progress in traditionally underrepresented roles across regions, including an increase from 19.1 to 23.9 percent for technical and lab managers and from 11.4 to 17.4 percent for plant managers. BMO Financial Advancing D&I • BMO Financial Group’s initiative, Diversity and Inclusion Renewal for Sustainable Change, is a strategy to identify and remove barriers to advancing diversity and build an inclusive work environment across the organization. The initiative focuses on achieving equitable representation of women and men in senior leadership and building a robust pipeline of women to advance to senior leadership roles. The DIR initiative has helped BMO achieve important results. Between 2012 and 2016, the bank met its five-year goal of 40 percent women’s representation among senior leaders in the United States and Canada, with women in these roles

increasing from 33.0 to 40.1 percent and women of color and visible minority women increasing from 4.4 to 6.5 percent. Within the same time frame, women’s representation has increased from 7.7 to 31.3 percent among executive committee members and from 32.2 to 35.2 percent among senior managers and managers overall. Women’s representation on BMO’s Enterprise Board of Directors has increased from 30.8 percent to 36.4 percent.

vice presidents, from 14.7 to 23.2 percent among directors, and from 19.3 to 24.3 percent at the middle-manager level. At the most senior leadership levels, women’s representation doubled, increasing from 11.1 to 25.0 percent among the CEO’s direct reports and from 11.1 to 20.0 percent on the board of directors.

Rockwell Automation’s Culture Change • The Rockwell Automation Culture of Inclusion Journey is a culture-change initiative that comprises programs and strategies executed throughout the company’s businesses and functions. In the United States, the initiative has impacted more than 8,000 employees in 100 locations. Results demonstrate that this contributed to advancing women across businesses and functions at the company. Between 2008 and 2016, women’s representation in the United States has increased from 11.9 to 23.5 percent among Read more at DIVERSITYJOURNAL.COM


BOARD

DIVERSITY TRENDS Though Fortune 500 companies include numerous corporations outside of STEM fields, it is important to note the lack of diversity among the highest levels of leadership across all industries. Women and Minorities on Fortune 500 Boards "Shifting demographics in the United States have brought diversity to the forefront of issues on the minds of C-suite executives and corporate boards. As the population continues to diversify, companies may need to determine ways to gain more diversity of thought, experience, and background in both management as well as the boardroom." ~ Missing Pieces Report: The 2016 Board Diversity Census of Women and Minorities on Fortune 500 Boards, a multiyear study published by the Alliance for Board Diversity (ABD), collaborating with Deloitte.

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65 A multi-year study published by the Alliance for Board Diversity, in collaboration with Deloitte, provides powerful metrics on the slow change of diversity in the boardroom, and guides corporations and advocates toward future improvements in women and minority board participation. While the data shows overall gains in women and minorities in the boardroom, the pace at which Fortune 500 boards are becoming more diverse is sluggish. These boards and board members have an opportunity. Diversity is being viewed through a much wider lens to encompass a range of skills, experiences, and perspectives that could help safeguard an organization against new and emerging threats. It is also important for boards to be comprised of individuals who offer different perspectives to understand and better serve today’s diverse customer base. The fact that many companies are facing a growing number of competitive, regulatory, and technological issues is driving this broader view of diversity. WOMEN AND MINORITIES SEE LITTLE CHANGE IN REPRESENTATION Boardroom diversity in Fortune 100 and Fortune 500 companies has increased for women and certain minority groups, according the report. However, despite modest gains, women and minorities see little change in representation on Fortune 500 boards over the years. Women and minorities have experienced only slight gains in the last six years, since the ABD first started tracking Fortune 500 board diversity BOARD REPORT continued on page 66

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continued from page 65 BOARD REPORT

in 2010, up to 14.4 percent in 2016 from 12.8 percent in 2010. The study shows almost 70 percent of Fortune 500 board seats are held by white men. Collectively, women and minorities comprise an all-time high of 30.8 percent of board seats among Fortune 500 companies, up from 26.7 percent four years ago. While this is a small step in the right direction, it’s important to note the context in which the gains were made. A great deal of work remains for corporate board composition to keep pace with changing demographics. At the current rate of progress, “we won’t likely see the number of women and minorities increase to ABD’s target of 40 percent board representation until the year 2026,” according to Ronald C. Parker, ABD chair and CEO of The Executive Leadership Council.

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"Unfortunately, U.S. companies have a long way to go to achieve diversity in their boardrooms and their executive ranks. Progress is glacially slow and boardrooms don’t look anything like the customers and stakeholders they serve and represent. It takes intentional, bold action to accelerate meaningful change,” said Deborah Gillis, president and CEO, Catalyst. “We’ll continue to work with business leaders across the country to prioritize board diversity, build it into the fabric of their decision-making, and help them take advantage of an incredible talent pool they’re currently missing out on." The survey found that in 2016, fewer than 15 percent of all board seats in the Fortune 500 were held by minorities, including African Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Hispanics/Latino(a)s. Some progress has been made for African Americans in securing/holding Fortune 500 board seats, with the bulk of the African American male increases occurring within the Fortune 100. There has been an increase in the Fortune 500 of African American women board members by 18.4 percent, while the total number of African American male board members in the Fortune 500 had an increase of only 1.0 percent.

Asian/Pacific Islanders have shown continued growth in percentage representation on Fortune 500 boards. However, their starting baseline was small, with the overall representation of Asian/Pacific Islanders at only 3.1 percent, representing a total of 167 seats. Hispanic/ Latino men picked up a nominal gain of eight board seats, while there was a loss of two Fortune 500 board seats for Hispanic/Latina women since 2012. Overall, Hispanic/ Latino(a) men and women hold 188 total board seats, or 3.5 percent of the total. “Because the majority of new board members are still selected through relationships with other board members, it’s important to ask boards to consider board diversity based on gender, race/ethnicity, age and other perspectives as they look to fill positions, and to consider their extended networks both in business and in their communities,” says Deb DeHaas, vice chairman and national managing partner, Center for Board Effectiveness, and chief inclusion officer, Deloitte. The report includes data showing Fortune 100 companies lead the growth in boardroom diversity, outpacing the Fortune 500 with 35.9 percent of women and minorities holding board seats, compared with 30.8 percent in the Fortune 500. About 65 percent of Fortune 100 boards have greater than 30 percent board diversity, compared to just under 50 percent of Fortune 500 companies in the census. Since the ABD began conducting its census of Fortune 100 board directors in 2004, collective gains for women and minorities have been minimal. In 2016, women and minorities held 35.9 percent of board seats in the Fortune 100, compared to 30.1 percent in 2010 and 28.8 percent in 2004.

ABOUT THE ALLIANCE FOR BOARD DIVERSITY Founded in 2004, the Alliance for Board Diversity is a collaboration of four leadership organizations: Catalyst, The Executive Leadership Council Inc. (ELC), the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR), and Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics, Inc. (LEAP). Diversified Search, an executive search firm, is a founding partner of the alliance and serves as advisor and facilitator. The ABD’s mission is to enhance shareholder value in Fortune 500 companies by promoting inclusion of women and minorities on corporate boards.

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SOURCE: Alliance for Board Diversity

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Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

Congratulations to All of the 2017 Women Worth Watching in STEM Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation researches, develops, manufactures and markets innovative medicines aimed at improving patients’ lives. We offer a broad range of medicines for cancer, cardiovascular disease, endocrine disease, inflammatory disease, infectious disease, neurological disease, organ transplantation, respiratory disease, eye and ear care and skin conditions. Our mission is to discover new ways to improve and extend people’s lives. We are committed to embracing and leveraging diverse backgrounds, cultures and talents to create an inclusive, high-performing culture, to address the evolving needs of patients and customers, to support diverse suppliers, and to enrich the communities we serve. Please visit our website at: www.pharma.us.novartis.com

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CEO CHAMPIONS FOR CHANGE Supporting and Driving Diversity and Inclusion More than 40 high-profile CEOs and top industry leaders have pledged to continue to drive change for gender equality in the workplace through Catalyst’s transformational initiative Catalyst CEO Champions For Change. "We are incredibly proud to stand with these CEOs, leaders and companies. They are already outstanding champions of gender equality and inclusion. Now they are stepping up and inspiring all of us to do even more, together," said Deborah Gillis, President and CEO, Catalyst. "In a divided world, inclusion at work matters more than ever. These 40+ companies represent more than 9 million employees and more than $1.5 trillion dollars in revenue globally. The positive ripple effect will be tremendous in helping to build workplaces where everyone has a fair chance to succeed."

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Founding members include CEOs and top leaders from: 3M, ABB Ltd., Accenture, Aramark, Avon Products, Inc., BMO U.S., Campbell Soup Company, CH2M Hill Companies Ltd., Colgate-Palmolive Company, Cylon Capital, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, Dell Inc., Deloitte, DuPont, EY, Genpact, IBM Corporation, Kellogg Company, KeyCorp, KPMG International, McDonald's Corporation, Mondelēz International, Nationwide, Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP, PepsiCo, Inc., Pfizer Inc., Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, Pitney Bowes Inc., PricewaterhouseCoopers, Rockwell Automation, Royal DSM, Sealed Air Corporation, Sidley Austin LLP, Sodexo, Target Corporation, The Boston Consulting Group, The Coca-Cola Company, The Hartford Financial Services Group, The Procter &

Gamble Company, Unilever, UPS, Voya Financial, Walmart Stores, Inc., and Xerox Corporation. Although progress has been made, there is still much work to be done. Only 25 percent of S&P 500 executives and only about 20 percent of S&P 500 board directors are women. The Catalyst CEO Champions For Change are not only making bold organizational and personal commitments to continue to accelerate inclusion, but they will also transparently report on their companies' collective progress. About Catalyst Catalyst is the leading nonprofit organization accelerating progress for women through workplace inclusion. It has operations in the United States, Canada, Europe, India, Australia, and Japan, and more than 800 supporting organizations.


what makes us unique as individuals, makes us stronger together. At PNC, we believe our differences make the difference in who we are as individuals. And when you bring together individuals from different backgrounds, with unique interests and perspectives, you can do more. You can be more. And you can achieve more, together. Visit pnc.com/diversity Š2016 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved. PNC Bank, National Association. Member FDIC


CORPORATE INDEX

BOLD BLUE DENOTES ADVERTISER COMPANY PAGE ADP, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 6, 10, 11 Akerman LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 12 Alliance for Board Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64, 65 Arrow Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 13 AT&T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 14, 15, 16, 17 Axinn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 18 Bank of the West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Booz Allen Hamilton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 19, 20 Burns & Levinson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 21, 22 Catalyst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 54, 62, 66 Computer Sciences Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 23 Cooper Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 24, 71 CVS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover EA (Electronic Arts) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Excellus BlueCross BlueShield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 26 Fidelity Investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6, 27 Fish & Richardson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 28, 29, 30, 31 GEI Consultants, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 32, 33 Great Basin Scientific, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 34 HARMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 36, 63 HP Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 37, 39

Humacyte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 40 IAC Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 41 Interpublic Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 42 iRobot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 43, 62 KPMG LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2, 7, 44 Legg Mason Global Asset Management . . . . . . . . . .7, 45 Lenovo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 60, 61 Meritor, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 35, 46, 47 MKF – Meera Kaul Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 48 Mount Saint Vincent University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 49 NetApp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 50 New York Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 New York Power Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 51 Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation . . . . . . . .7, 52, 67 PNC Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Sandia National Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 53, 54, 60 Shell Downstream Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 55 Squire Patton Boggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 56 Tata Consultancy Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 57 Walmart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Wells Fargo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 58

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Thank you for being both a champion and a spokesperson for accelerating STEM

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We’re committed to helping people on their path to better health. To honor this commitment, CVS Health is building a workforce that is as diverse as the communities we serve. It’s simple: we believe that when we truly reflect our customers, we can better serve them. That’s why we’re inviting you to explore a world of careers in everything from pharmacy to retail where your unique skills, talents and abilities are welcome. Join us in helping people on their path to better health.

cvshealth.com/diversity

Diversity Journal - Spring 2017  

Women Worth Watching in STEM

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