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 September/October 2011

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Featuring: 128 Leadership Essays from Senior Women Executives  27 Hispanic / LATINO leaders

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LET’S BUILD A BETTER ENERGY FUTURE.

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The 2012 Company And Executive Award Winners Are... www. d i v e r si ty j o u r n a l . co m


Diversity & Inclusion at Waste ManageMent

OUR FUTURE, DRIVEN BY YOU.

Valuable resources are all around us.

AT CHRYSLER, OUR COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY ACTUALLY MEANS SOMETHING.

At Waste Management, we know how to spot a valuable resource. And, we find tremendous value in diversity of experiences, ideas, and FOR DIVERSITY®. B E C A U S E W Hprinciples. O Y O U ItAis R diversity E I S J U SofTthought A S I M that P O Rkeeps TA N T A S Management Waste W H A T Y O U ’ V E D O N E . Y O U R Tat H the I N Kforefront I N G A Nof D innovation Y O U R L Eand A Dsustainability. ERSHIP MAKE A THAT’S WHY WE ’ VE BEEN AWARDED THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES

D I F F E R E N C E . S O D O E S T H E F A C T T H A T Y O U A R E D I F F E R E N T.

Find out why we’re North America’s leading provider of integrated environmental solutions. Apply today at wmcareers.com.

J O I N I N G O U R T E A M J U S T S T A R T S W I T H A V I S I T. W W W.C H R Y S L E R C A R E E R S .C O M

Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, Mopar and the Pentastar logo are registered trademarks of Chrysler Group LLC. FIAT is a registered trademark of Fiat Group Marketing & Corporate Communication S.p.A., used under license by Chrysler Group LLC.


OUR FUTURE, DRIVEN BY YOU.

AT CHRYSLER, OUR COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY ACTUALLY MEANS SOMETHING. THAT’S WHY WE’VE BEEN AWARDED THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES FOR DIVERSITY®. B E C A U S E W H O Y O U A R E I S J U S T A S I M P O R T A N T A S W H AT YO U ’ V E D O N E . YO U R T H I N K I N G A N D YO U R L E A D E R S H I P M A K E A D I F F E R E N C E . S O D O E S T H E F A C T T H A T Y O U A R E D I F F E R E N T. J O I N I N G O U R T E A M J U S T S T A R T S W I T H A V I S I T. W W W.C H R Y S L E R C A R E E R S .C O M

Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, Mopar and the Pentastar logo are registered trademarks of Chrysler Group LLC. FIAT is a registered trademark of Fiat Group Marketing & Corporate Communication S.p.A., used under license by Chrysler Group LLC.


publisher

point of view A Special Issue Through and Through...

I

have to admit that this issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal – our exciting Women Worth Watching issue – makes me feel proud every year in which we publish it. That’s because no other publication has been the advocate for women that we have been. Irene Lang, Catalyst’s president and CEO, notes in her fine introduction to this year’s issue that we’ve profiled nearly a thousand women in the past ten years. We’ve come to know so many of them – talented, hard-working, and always eager to help others climb the corporate ladder of success. But while I’m proud of the women we profile, I’m equally proud of the hundreds of companies that employ them. These companies get it. They know talent when they see it and they’ve made a commitment to grow those individuals who have, on too many occasions, had their options limited by small-mindedness, apathy, or even outright discrimination. We want to promote companies that create opportunities for women. Someone has to give these companies the recognition and respect they deserve. For too long women have languished in a corporate culture that stifles their creativity and stunts their contributions to success. I hope more young women will take note of which companies are leading the way to full career development. And I hope that the successful executives featured in this year’s issue will continue to promote the companies they work for to the next generation of workers. As Ms. Lang notes in her column, we simply cannot tolerate the slow pace of progress when it comes to women in the boardroom. We’d like to extend our most sincere congratulations to all of the women who are being recognized and honored as this year’s Women Worth Watching. We are also very proud to honor Hispanic/Latino Heritage Month (HLHM), which runs from September 15 to October 15. More than two dozen Hispanic/ Latino leaders have shared their views on leadership with us, and we think you’ll enjoy getting to know them by getting a glimpse into their backgrounds. The theme for this year’s observance of HLHM is “Many Backgrounds, Many Stories...One American Spirit.” What could be more appropriate than for us to bring our contributors’ stories to the attention of our readers? In fact, such storytelling is at the very core of our mission. From early in childhood, we learn from stories. As adults, we are engaged by stories. Isn’t it time we told yours? We hope you will enjoy this special issue!

James R. Rector

PUBLISHER/CEO

John Murphy

MANAGING EDITOR

Damian Johnson

Vice President, Editorial Services and Client Partnerships

Paul Malanij

ART DIRECTOR

James Gorman IT DIRECTOR

Matt Hoffman

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Laurel L. Fumic

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Carlton Yearwood C onsultant

Elena Rector

E x ecutive assistant

Alina Dunaeva

O verseas C orrespondent

Grace Austin

E ditorial S ervices C ontributing W riters

Ilene H. Lang LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Commentaries or questions should be

addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. DISPLAY ADVERTISING

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Pro f i le s in D iver sit y Journal

Editorial:

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11


issue

table of contents [ f e a t u r e s ]

SEPTEMBER/ OCTOBER 2011 Volume 13 • Number 5 www.diversityjournal.com

[special features] 12 If not now, when? Ilene Lang, President & CEO of Catalyst, discusses the gender gap in the boardroom and how companies can combat these disparities.

15 WomenWorthwatching Take a look at this year’s class of influential women. A corporate profile and personal profile accompany each woman’s mentoring essay.

204

hispanic/Latino heritage month

The rich culture, shared values, and strong work ethic of Hispanic people should be celebrated with great appreciation throughout the country. The individuals profiled in this section provide an interesting perspective.

[ r e g u l a r s ] 10 Catalyst

An Assessment of Talent Management Systems.

221 MOMENTUM

Diversity Who, What, Where and When.

FOLLOW US AT:

199 extra

226 corporate index

twitter.com/diversityjrnl

By the Numbers.

facebook.com/diversityjournal

Names and Websites of Participating Companies & Advertisers.

203 editorial Calendar 2012 Participation Opportunities.

scribd.com/diversityjournal twitter.com/mentorings

[10th annual womenworthwatching in 2012] 16

Trish Adams

17

Leticia Aguilar

18

19

Eileen Gallagher Akerson Rebecca Allen Nokia

20

Maria G. Arias

22

Lisa Ashby

4

Comcast Corporation Cardinal Health Pro f i le s i n D ive r sit y J ournal

Lisa M. Atherton

24

Claire Babineaux-Fontenot

Union Bank, N.A. KBR, Inc.

23

Target

26

Textron Defense Systems Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

M. Renée Baker

Rochester Institute of Technology

27

Mary T. Barra

The General Motors Company

30

Dr. LaSharnda Beckwith Army & Air Force Exchange Service

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

31

Renee Bergeron

32

Jill B. Berkeley

Ingram Micro, Inc.

Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP

33

Janet Beronio

34

Lorraine Bolsinger

Caesars Entertainment Corporation

General Electric Aviation Systems


YOUR INDIVIDUALITY

>

YOU KNOW

UNLEASH YOUR IDEAS, AND MAKE YOUR MARK. At UnitedHealth Group, diversity isn’t just a corporate buzzword. It’s the way we work, and it comes through in everything we do. From the high-performing people we hire, to the health care services we provide, we advocate the possibilities of unique thinking. Our mission is to help people live healthier lives and every day, our efforts bring the advantages of the largest single proprietary network of physicians, hospitals, health facilities and caregivers in the United States to millions worldwide. Our employees have diverse cultural backgrounds, beliefs, perspectives, and lifestyles but they all have one thing in common - their ability to excel. UnitedHealth Group is a diversified health and well-being company whose 80,000 + employees are helping to heal the healthcare system every day with a greater dedication to Integrity, Compassion, Relationships, Innovation & Performance. A goal with this kind of magnitude requires the brightest, most forward-thinking minds around. We have them here. And they’re making a difference. Make your mark of distinction at greaterthancareers.com or from your mobile phone at workatuhg.com.

Connect with us: facebook.com/uhgcareers

twitter.com/uhgcareers

bitly.com/uhglinked

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V.UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment.© 2010 UnitedHealth Group. All rights reserved.

youtube.com/uhgcareers


[10th annual womenworthwatching in 2012] 35

Brenda Boultwood

Constellation Energy

36

Wanda Brackins

RBC Wealth Management

38

Linda A. Brandl

40

41

44

45

46

University of the Rockies Lincoln Financial Group

Robin L. Bugni Highmark Inc.

50

52

Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P.

Susan Elizabeth Byrd

91

Natalie Lorenz Givans

Teach For America

66

Lisa Davis

92

Ellen D. Gonda

Hilton Worldwide

67

Paula Davis

94

Jill M. Granat

Alcoa Inc.

68

Dr. Shirley A. Davis

96

Andrea Greene

97

Françoise Gri

Royal Dutch Shell

Society for Human Resource Management

72

Martha Delehanty

Verizon Communications Inc.

73

Kimberly A. Disandis

74

Michelle DiTondo

75

Clydie Douglass

76

Mary Jo Eaton

Gibbons P.C.

Susan Certoma

Ann Cathcart Chaplin

Aimee Eubanks Davis

Arrow Electronics

MGM Resorts International

Kim M. Catullo

53

65

Ford Motor Company

Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc.

Medco Health Solutions

Trinity Health

CSC

Marla R. Butler

Linda Cash

Lisa M. Buckingham

48

Mary Daschner

Parker Hannifin Corporation

64

UPMC Insurance Services Division

Janet H. Brugger

Debra A. Canales

Sharon Czyzewski

Union Pacific Railroad

47

62

CB Richard Ellis Group, Inc.

77

Sheila Ellis

Fish & Richardson

3M

Terex Corporation

89

90

Joan Hogan Gillman Time Warner Cable

Siki Giunta

Booz Allen Hamilton

Burger King Corporation

Network Hardware Resale

ManpowerGroup

100 Dr. Junqi “Jean” Hang

Brooks Kushman P.C.

101 Pat Hemingway Hall

Health Care Service Corporation

102 Crystal C. Hardie

Vanguard

103 Kerry Frank Hester

US Airways

104 Joyce Ibardolasa

Pacific Gas and Electric Company

106 Deborah James

78

Elizabeth L. Elting TransPerfect

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)

108 Rita Johnson-Mills

54

Apalla U. Chopra

55

Denise Coll

80

Andrea M. Farley

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide

82

Maria Feeley

83

Johanna Flower

86

Cristy Gallo-Aquino

Ryder System, Inc.

87

Cindy Gentry

114 Pam Kehaly

88

Kathleen Gibson

58

59

60

61

6

O'Melveny & Myers LLP

Lori Cornmesser Juniper Networks

Grace Cowan Waste Management, Inc.

Donna Owens Cox MWV

Pamela Culpepper PepsiCo

Pro f i le s i n D ive r sit y J ournal

Troutman Sanders LLP Pepper Hamilton LLP Websense

Mercer Citi

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

UnitedHealth Group

109 Julie B. Kampf

JBK Associates, Inc.

110 Laura Shapira Karet

Giant Eagle, Inc.

111 Margaret Keane

Dewey LeBoeuf LLP WellPoint, Inc.

115 Doe Kittay

W.W. Grainger, Inc.


succeed. Cisco congratulates all Women Worth Watching award recipients along with our own Shari Slate. Cisco is hiring in the areas of Sales, Services, Finance, Engineering and Development! Find out more at www.cisco.com Together we are the human network. www.cisco.com/go/diversity


[10th annual womenworthwatching in 2012] 116 Barbara G. Koster

Prudential Financial, Inc.

117 Elizabeth Krauss

Sandia National Laboratories

118 Angie Kyle

120 Maryanne R. Lavan

Perkins Coie LLP

Honeywell

124 Dr. Punam Malik

174 Karen Sledge

146 Nilde V. Passanesi

175 Laura J. Soave

147 Alison Kenney Paul

176 Regina Y. Speed-Bost

148 Anabel M. Perez

178 Gilda Spencer

150 M. Marnette Perry

152 Alison Quirk

123 Anne T. Madden

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Cisco Systems, Inc.

145 Jackie W. Parker

122 Selena J. Linde

173 Darlene R. Slaughter

Lockheed Martin Corporation

AXA Equitable

172 Shari Slate

144 Ann M. Oglesby

New York Life

143 Andrea Nitzan

ConocoPhillips

Newell Rubbermaid Eastman Kodak Company Deloitte LLP Catalyst Kroger

State Street

Fannie Mae

Harris Corporation Chrysler Group LLC Schiff Hardin, LLP

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company

180 Carin Stutz

Brinker International

181 Paulette Thabault

MinuteClinic

125 Cathy G. Mann

153 Nina Ramsey

128 Lynn C. Martin

156 Sonu Ratra

130 Martha May

157 Marcy L. Reed

131 Margery Mayer

158 Rena Hozore Reiss

186 Kimberly Waller

132 Terri McClements

159 LeAnn Ridgeway

187 Wenli Wang

133 Laura Mildenberger

160 Saskia W. Korink Romani

Halliburton

NYSE Euronext Bell Helicopter

Scholastic

PwC

DaVita

Kelly Services Akraya, Inc. National Grid Hyatt Hotels Corporation Rockwell Collins Cargill, Incorporated

184 Dana Tribula

Applied Materials, Inc.

185 Dr. Adis Maria Vila

United States Air Force Academy Aon Corporation Moss Adams LLP

188 Tammy Weinbaum

American Express

189 Katy Wells

134 Nadine Mirchandani

162 Sharon Rossi

135 Tracy Mooney

164 Robin Russell

136 Lynn A. Mortensen

165 Jackie Scanlan

192 Karen A. Williams

138 Jennifer W. Murphy

166 Alexandra L. Schwartz

Ernst & Young LLP Freddie Mac

Raytheon Company Legg Mason Global Asset Management

139 Nishi Narula

Optimal Solutions and Technologies

142 Laura M. Newinski

KPMG LLP

Pro f i le s i n D ive r sit y J ournal

Andrews Kurth LLP Campbell Soup Company DreamWorks Animation SKG

167 Virginia Seggerman

CDW LLC

170 Marie-Hélène Sicard

Sodexo

171 Nikki Lewis Simon

8

Unilever

Greenberg Traurig

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)

190 Sue Werstak

Thompson Coburn LLP Northrop Grumman Information Systems

194 Susan Wolak

BDO USA, LLP

196 Jill Wyant

Ecolab Inc

198 Carrie S. Young

Salt River Project


Inclusion.

Empowerment.

Community Development at Citi is dedicated

to

expanding

financial

inclusion and economic empowerment for families and communities. Across our global organization, in partnership with

community

support

organizations,

neighborhood

we

revitalization,

small business success, asset building and college access.

Š 2011 Citigroup Inc. All rights reserved. Arc Design, Citi and Arc Design are trademarks and service marks of Citigroup Inc., used and registered throughout the world.


catalyst

www.catalyst.org The Root

By Catalyst, The following is an excerpt from Catalyst President and CEO Ilene H. Lang’s speech at the Catalyst Awards Dinner held on March 29, 2011.

F

or years you’ve heard me talk about the Catalyst Census and the persistent gender leadership gap. Women comprise roughly 50% of the workforce in developed economies and just over 50% of managerial and professional positions. Yet women’s rise into positions of corporate leadership, as senior executives and on corporate boards, has leveled off at about 15%. Across the globe, women are valued less than men. This is a problem. • In industrialized countries, women working full-time earn, on average, 82 cents to every dollar earned by men working full-time. • Paying women less reduces GDP: In the U.S. by 9%, in the Euro-zone by 13%, in Japan by 16%. • A college-educated woman in the U.S. earns $1.2 million less over her lifetime compared to her male peers. Women are also worth less than men across society. Here are a couple of examples from our own back yard: • In New York City there are 150 statues of people: 145 are of men and 5 are of women. • Not a single U.S. national holiday is named after a woman! • And when a U.S. Supreme Court Justice says that the U.S. Constitution doesn’t prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, this is a problem. What do we call this problem? Sexism. Now I know the word “sexism” carries baggage. But no matter what you call it – gender bias, systemic inequity, inequality, or discrimination – the belief that a woman is not as capable as a man simply because she is a woman is at the root of the challenges we face. When the societal perception is that women are worth less, it’s hard to make 10

Pro f iles in D iv e rsi ty J our na l

progress in the workplace. Two weeks ago, I was stricken with full-blown laryngitis. Under doctor’s orders, I had to stop talking. For many days, I literally had no voice. This was a new experience for me; I’m not used to not being heard. I wrote notes, typed, IM’ed through “conversations” and meetings. The situation amused my Mother – for the first time in our lives, I couldn’t talk back to her, and I couldn’t interrupt! Can you imagine the president of Catalyst, a spokeswoman for women, with no voice? Enter an “Aha! moment.” The literal became metaphorical. I realized that voice is a privilege, and with that privilege comes the responsibility to speak up for those whose voices we don’t hear because – due to sexism – they are thought to be worth less. So, tonight, I urge each of you to use your voice when you see sexism. When you see sexism, say something. And then, walk the talk: Do something. Say something when you see men advance more quickly than equally qualified women. Anne Mulcahy suggested that to root out gender bias, companies should “take the resumés of the last 100 people hired, remove the names, do an assessment of where the hires should be positioned and compare that with where they were placed.” And when you find a disparity, fix it! Say something when you are asked to appear on a panel or board or participate in an event where there are no or few women. Make it a condition of

your participation that women be wellrepresented. Become a resource and recommend women for inclusion. Say something when a well-meaning teacher or guidance counselor tries to channel your daughter away from math or science just because she’s a girl. Introduce them to programs that channel girls into math and science, such as those sponsored by Catalyst member companies to help girls excel in STEM studies. Say something when people tell you, “But there weren’t any qualified women to fill a seat on our Board of Directors.” Contact Catalyst and our partners – DirectWomen, the Alliance for Board Diversity, Women Corporate Directors, ION – for recommendations. Become part of the solution: Make it your personal priority to meet and get to know at least 10 women whom you would enthusiastically sponsor for corporate Board service. Take personal responsibility for setting the tone. Commit to anti-sexism as a way of life, in all of your spheres of influence. Our sons need to see women leaders in order to experience and embrace a culture where everyone is valued. And if our daughters see and hear only men in leadership, what do they learn about themselves and their value in the world? Your voices and your actions can take women from being worth less to being worth more, to being valued in workplaces and society. And I guarantee you this: Your voice will multiply. It will inspire others. It will build momentum. It will change workplaces and change lives. PDJ

Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization expanding opportunities for women and business. With offices in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and more than 400 preeminent corporations as members, Catalyst is the trusted resource for research, information, and advice about women at work. Visit www.catalyst.org to learn more about our work and download Catalyst reports.

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11


FRESH

PERSPECTIVES, CREATED

DAILY. © 2010 Lockheed Martin Corporation

THIS IS HOW Diversity is more than a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, every idea counts. Every viewpoint matters. That’s why, at Lockheed Martin, we not only believe in diversity. We embrace it. Because diversity is the “how” that delivers the most innovative solutions to some of the most complex problems imaginable.

lockheedmartin.com/how


If Not

1 0 t h a n n u a l C O M PAN Y AN D E X E C U T I V E W ome n W ort h W atc h i n g ® i n 2 0 1 2

Now, When?

By Ilene H. Lang | President & CEO, Catalyst

A

s Catalyst’s president and CEO, it’s my job to expand opportunities for women and business. Catalyst works on behalf of women, but we do not work for women alone; what we do also benefits men, families, businesses, and communities. We strengthen organizations by empowering people of every gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation to achieve their full potential and demonstrate the value of inclusion. And we understand how vital women’s progress is to the global economy. When corporate leaders explain that women will surely advance if we just give it time, I ask the famous question: “If not now, when?” Because Catalyst’s latest statistics on women in business reveal that change hasn’t just been slow to come – it’s been practically nonexistent. According to our research, women held just 0.9 percent more board seats in 2010 than they did in 2007 (15.7% vs. 14.8%) and just 0.9 percent more executive officer positions in 2010 than in 2009 (14.4% vs. 13.5%). We cannot take even miniscule increases for granted; in several instances, women’s representation has remained the same or declined. Change this slow is in no one’s interest. In order to counter this discouraging data, Profiles in Diversity Journal continues to identify and promote companies that create opportunities for

12

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

women leaders. Catalyst research shows that, on average, companies with more women in senior executive positions tend to financially outperform those with fewer. What can smart companies do to ensure that talented women advance? Our research shows that traditional mentoring, including career advice and guidance, is not as effective as sponsorship. Sponsorship occurs when high-level executives advocate for specific high-performing women, often behind closed doors. According to Sponsoring Women to Success, the latest in Catalyst’s groundbreaking series of reports on women and sponsorship, effective sponsorship is crucial to accelerating a woman’s career, from getting her trusted by senior-level executives to being considered for her company’s top jobs. Organizations must create an environment where sponsorship thrives, educating senior executives about its importance to the leadership pipeline and to their own effectiveness as developers of talent. I commend Profiles in Diversity Journal for its ten years of advocacy on behalf of women leaders, and I’m thrilled to introduce you to the inspiring women featured in PDJ’s 10th Annual Women Worth Watching issue. Over the last decade, PDJ has featured nearly 1,000 women leaders in its influential pages. These women are leading the way to a brighter future – one in which every company recognizes the value of inclusion and every talented person is given equal opportunity to advance. As our global workforce expands and diversifies, smart business leaders have an unparalleled opportunity to tap into a fast-growing pool of talent: women like those featured here. I wholeheartedly encourage them to seize it.


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Mary T. Barra, General Motors Company • Claire Babineaux-Fontenot, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. • Lisa M. Atherton, Textron Defense Systems Eileen Gallagher Akerson, KBR, Inc. • Lisa Ashby, Cardinal Health • Rebecca Allen, Nokia • Trish Adams, Target M. Renée Baker, Rochester Institute of Technology • Maria G. Arias, Comcast Corporation • Leticia Aguilar, Union Bank, N.A.

10

th

annual

w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

15


Trish

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Adams

Target

You must be courageous. Put your ideas out there. Listen to feedback. Be open to learning.

“ E

veryone is on a journey. That journey will be different for every individual. Mine has been with the same great company for 28 years. Here are some personal truths that have helped me get to where I am today: Find your passion and make a career out of it. It’s become cliché, but it’s true. It’s hard to be successful in all aspects of your life if you don’t love what you do. I’ve always loved retail and fashion and knew at a young age that it’s what I wanted to do. I realize it’s not always that easy for everyone, but passion is absolutely worth pursuing. It makes life more fun and fulfilling. Be authentic. Authenticity builds trust and credibility, yet people often struggle to survive and thrive in a new culture and be true to themselves. I’ve been lucky enough to work for a company that celebrates differences. Find a company that does the same and have the courage to be you. Connect your values. Two years after moving to Minneapolis from the east coast, I was still in culture shock and wasn’t sure I wanted to stay. Soon after, I took on a leadership role and became much more connected to

16

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

Target’s vision. I quickly realized how important it was to work for a company whose vision and values aligned with my own. Here I am 28 years later. Do I agree with every little decision? No. But in the broader sense, I believe in Target’s vision, how it drives business and how it supports its team members and communities. It’s a big part of what’s kept me here. Learn not to take criticism personally. This is hard, especially when you’re passionate about your work and ideas. You must be courageous. Put your ideas out there. Listen to feedback. Be open to learning. Ideas become stronger when others are contributing. Don’t focus on being wrong. Focus on how things could be better. Resiliency is an important leadership trait. Find mentors and networks. Business is so complex, even more so for women. It’s important to have people who can help you see things you can’t, who have faced similar challenges, and who can guide you. At Target, we recently established the Women’s Business Council to do just that. Networks and mentorships are very important to help grow leaders and their careers.

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Merchandising, Apparel & Accessories EDUCATION: BS, Montclair University FIRST JOB: Working at Hallmark Cards & Gifts store in high school WHAT I’M READING: Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro MY PHILOSOPHY: Love what you do. FAMILY: Husband and two sons (20 and 16 years old) INTERESTS: Music, reading, the beach, wine FAVORITE CHARITies: American Cancer Society, St. Jude Children’s Hospital COMPANY: Target HEADQUARTERS: Minneapolis, Minnesota WEBSITE: www.target.com BUSINESS: Retail REVENUES: $65 billion EMPLOYEES: 355,000


Leticia

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Aguilar

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Regional Executive EDUCATION: University of Virginia, School of Retail Bank Management FIRST JOB: Clerk WHAT I’M READING: Margaret Thatcher in Her Own Words, by Margaret Thatcher; A Journey: My Political Life, by Former Prime Minister Tony Blair

Union Bank, N.A. “Risk more than others think is safe. Care more than others think is wise. Dream more than others think is practical. Expect more than others think is possible.” – Claude Bissell, Canadian Author and educator

L

eadership is a journey that starts with the realization that nothing worth achieving comes to those who are complacent or for those who give up too easily. Throughout my 30-year career in banking, I have been fortunate to have received the guidance and mentorship of two outstanding individuals. Both professionals are immensely different in their approach, but both always committed to teaching me, guiding me and helping me open my eyes to my own true potential. One of my mentors was my dear friend and colleague, Jeff Wright. He was my supervisor when I was beginning my career many years ago. He was very tough with me. He had very high expectations and

These two polar opposite approaches to mentoring shaped the person I have become. In standards for me. He my role at Union Bank, didn’t accept anything managing a team of nearless than perfection. Just ly 800 people, I always the other day he said apply the same level of to me, “I saw so much care and concern for my potential in you that I team. I believe that every had to push you harder human being has endless and expect more from potential, and it’s simyou than from anyone ply my responsibility to else. I always knew you help them uncover it for had the desire to sucthemselves. ceed.” For that I am My hope is that I may thankful to him. somehow be a positive My other dear friend influence, in particular and mentor in my career to young, Latina women is Lynn Pike, president at who may see insurmountCapital One. During my able challenges in their two years of working with lives and who may believe her, she was always kind, that their role in life has caring and nurturing. already been defined for Because her approach was them. Nothing, absolutepositive and supportive, ly nothing, is impossible I always felt a personal if you work harder than obligation to do my abso- everyone else and you lute best, to give more simply never – under any than 100 percent, to circumstance – give up. I push my limits of what I hope that in some way I knew I could accomplish may help shape the lives simply because I did not of other women in a posiwant to let her down. tive manner.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Dream big! Be positive about accomplishing your goals and challenges. FAMILY: The love and support of my family has been an important part of my professional success. INTERESTS: Spending time with family, traveling, interior and landscaping design FAVORITE CHARITies: TELACU (The East Los Angeles Community Union) and USC Latino Alumni Association COMPANY: Union Bank, N.A. HEADQUARTERS: San Francisco, California WEBSITE: www.unionbank.com BUSINESS: Commercial and Retail Banking REVENUES: $80.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 10,914

Nothing, absolutely nothing, is impossible if you work harder than everyone else...

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Eileen Gallagher

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Vice President, Business Development Oversight EDUCATION: BA, JD, Catholic University of America FIRST JOB: Waitress WHAT I’M READING: The Week MY PHILOSOPHY: Never say never. FAMILY: I am part of a very close-knit family that includes my parents, a twin sister, two brothers (also twins and only one year younger) and a younger sister. INTERESTS: Running, golf, skeet shooting FAVORITE CHARITies: Red Cross, Relay for Life, Homeless Pet Placement League COMPANY: KBR, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEBSITE: www.kbr.com BUSINESS: Global Engineering, Construction, and Services REVENUES: $10.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 35,000+

Akerson

KBR, Inc.

R

ecently, I participated in an educational speakers’ series on the power of negotiating at my company. In the days following my presentation, several women came up to me seeking advice on career advancement and communication skills. One woman in particular told me how proud she was of me for reaching my current position, having tracked my career since I first started at KBR almost 12 years ago. I have been fortunate throughout my career to have had extremely supportive managers who have afforded me the opportunity to develop professionally. This experience reminded me of my ongoing responsibility as a manager and a woman— to mentor aspiring professional women and empower them to believe they can achieve their goals. I started out my career in the legal profession as a paralegal. I decided to pur-

sue a law degree because I wanted a profession in which I would continuously be challenged. The difference for me, in terms of achieving my success, is that I’ve always had the support of family and friends throughout my career. From a young age, my parents instilled in me a strong work ethic, and my success can be attributed to the three rules I’ve followed along the course of my career. 1. Whatever you decide to do, do it well. 2. Maintain your sense of humor, your sense of self and your common sense. 3. Don’t confuse being liked for being respected, and strive for the respect of not only your peers, but also the people you manage. I’ve also realized that a good leader leads by example and treats everyone with respect regardless of their position within a company.

A former colleague and mentor who passed away a few years ago operated by the principle “say what you mean and mean what you say.” He was a straight-shooter and a great influence on me. I have always tried to interact with clients and colleagues on a transparent basis. I tell people what I believe they need to hear, not what I think they want to hear. As you can see, I’ve been fortunate to have received the advice of many who were interested in seeing me succeed. I’m proud of the path I’ve taken. So, I close with a last bit of advice to anyone looking to take the next big step in achieving their success. Ultimately you are responsible for your career. Always be on the lookout for your next opportunity. Remember, your fear of taking it will fade far sooner than the regret of not going for it. I still follow that advice.

...a good leader leads by example and treats everyone with respect...

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Rebecca

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Allen

Nokia

Strong leaders need to know how to find passion in themselves and how to bring it out it in others.

“ W

TITLE: Director of Nokia Research Center, Hollywood/Cambridge EDUCATION: BFA, Rhode Island School of Design; MS, MIT FIRST JOB: Graphic Designer in Detroit while in high school WHAT I’M READING: The Creative Habit, by Twyla Tharp MY PHILOSOPHY: Make the most of every day as if it were your last. FAMILY: My husband, David INTERESTS: Hiking, travelling, movies, art, interesting conferences FAVORITE CHARITY: Sojourn Women’s Shelter COMPANY: Nokia HEADQUARTERS: Sunnyvale, California WEBSITE: www.nokia.com BUSINESS: Telecommunications REVENUES: €42.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 132,427

hen thinking about advice for aspiring women leaders, I reflect on the trajectory of my own career. As an undergraduate student in art school, I wanted to explore new creative tools. It was the 1970s, and I realized that digital technology could become the tool to create new forms of expression. Computers would not only be number crunchers but could help us create, learn and communicate in completely new ways. It was then that I decided to dedicate my career to creative applications of new technology, believing that the artistic and feminine perspective could add an important dimension to a technological development that could affect all parts of society. This became my passion and is what still inspires me today. To add to my challenge, I was stubbornly determined to not only enter the mostly male field of media technology research, but to take on a leadership role as an artist, director and visionary. With a few exceptions, the emerging world of digital computers was not yet an established field, and I believed that my hybrid role as an artist working in technology research might allow me to slip through barriers and make a mark. Passion for your work is certainly key and is usually what makes it fun.

Strong leaders need to know how to find passion in themselves and how to bring it out it in others. A highly motivated team is a key ingredient for success. But you also need to start with the right vision and a welldesigned plan combined with strong determination and perseverance to see the job through. Sometimes career success can be uncomfortable. It can bring more responsibilities, more pressure, more attention and scrutiny, and a need to set the bar even higher. With each step up you may give up some of the handson work that served you well in order to focus on the big picture. For some women, it can feel awkward to succeed in a career and move up the ladder. But a successful career can bring tremendous joy and a sense of fulfillment. The key is to find work that inspires and challenges, and find the right balance between work and life. And know that your inspiration and balance may shift and evolve, just to make it more complicated. To sustain success in work and life, you need to keep learning and growing. Understand what it takes to maintain your self-confidence and try to be true to your vision. I haven’t yet achieved this but I know that failure is part of success and I like to keep trying.

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Maria G.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Executive Director, Diversity & Inclusion EDUCATION: BA, DePaul University; JD, Northwestern University School of Law FIRST JOB: Associate, McDermott, Will & Emery, Chicago, IL WHAT I’M READING: The Alchemist, by Paulo Coelho MY PHILOSOPHY: Strong family ties should extend to friends, colleagues and your community. Treat everyone with respect. Have faith – it grounds you through challenges, and can be a constant source of strength no matter what life brings. FAMILY: My witty husband and amazing five children INTERESTS: Outdoor recreational activities, music, travel FAVORITE CHARITY: Children’s International Fund COMPANY: Comcast Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania WEBSITE: www.comcast.com BUSINESS: Cable, Programming and Telecommunications REVENUES: $37.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 102,000

Arias

Comcast Corporation

M

y American dream began south of the border, took form in Chicago, marched out West to Denver, and continues today in America’s birthplace, Philadelphia. Early in my childhood, my family moved from a small rural town in Mexico to South Chicago. We risked everything for the dream of building a better life. Growing up in a nondiverse neighborhood, I experienced discrimination in grammar and high school because I did not fit in. My English was solid and I did not have an accent, but I looked different and spoke Spanish. The worst experience was when the garage at our home was torched; not once, but twice. Despite feeling ostracized, I found solace and strength in my family, my studies, and my jobs. Work provided a sense of accomplishment and financial independence. By seventh grade, tenaciousness gripped my spirit. During college and later in my professional career, I overcame additional obstacles related to being female and an ethnic minority. But I did not allow these experiences to breed hate or cloud my focus. I accepted the challenge of disproving my naysayers, and I was determined to use the negative to fuel my dreams and eventually, to help oth-

ers. This fighting spirit helped me stay focused, and I also was fortunate to encounter people who took the risk of hiring or mentoring someone who did not mirror their own image. I succeeded in every professional role (as counsel for Adelphia and AT&T, and as a senior leader and vice president at Comcast), and I provided pivotal insights on the female and Hispanic markets. This combination of assets inclined many colleagues against judgment or doubt, and toward the benefits of diverse talent. With my hard work and the efforts of many colleagues, we are transforming the diversity risk factor into a smart business tactic for better understanding and valuing all aspects of an employee and client base. My work and tenacity in overcoming personal obstacles has instilled in me some key leadership tenets – to learn from adversity, to inspire others to exceed expectations and to champion those who are committed to excellence. In my newest role, I act upon these principles every day by ensuring that our workforce, procurement, governance, programming and community investments reflect the diverse make-up of the consumers we serve. My mission is simple: Diversity wins.

I was determined to use the negative to fuel my dreams and eventually, to help others.

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DIVERSITY POWERS DREAMS. We power dreams in our communities. By embracing diversity of thought, philosophy and experience, we are changing the way people think about entertainment, information and communication. By embracing the diversity of each of the communities we serve, we are an employer of choice. Comcast congratulates Maria Arias, profiled as a Women Worth Watching速. We celebrate her passion, commitment and leadership in promoting diversity and for encouraging others to dream big.

To learn more about our commitment to diversity, visit http://www.comcast.com/diversity.


Lisa

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Ashby

Cardinal Health

...those who aspire to be tomorrow’s leaders should find something they are passionate about.

“ I

have been fortunate to work in and support an industry that I am passionate about – healthcare. I believe one of the keys to success is finding what drives you and gives you energy, and those who aspire to be tomorrow’s leaders should find something they are passionate about. Ultimately that passion will strengthen and sustain you, and provide energy and leadership to your organization. When you want something and believe in something, borrowing a phrase from one of my favorite books, The Alchemist, “All the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.” I think that’s been true of my life, and I trust it can hold true for others. Seeking, learning, and sharing have all been a part of my career. When choosing my first job out of college, an executive told me to first focus on the industry that interests 22

you, and for me that was healthcare. My grandfather’s advice at that same time was that one should find a job that allows you to understand the business and the people who support the business before you aspire to run a business. By first being a student and a learner in the business, you build intuition and knowledge which allows you to make better and faster decisions in the future. While it’s important to find roles that make you a quick study of your business, it’s equally as important to be flexible about where your path may lead. I never sat back and said I have to have that job at this point in time. I have had a lot of fortunate experiences where I was asked to figure out a new strategy or build something new, and I found that you never know what might spark a new idea, a new business or a new role to consider.

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As I talk to women about career ladders, I encourage them to not think of them only in terms of going up. On the path to a leadership position, women shouldn’t be afraid to consider lateral moves or a variety of individual contributor and leadership roles. And when they find it necessary for personal reasons, they should not be afraid to say, “This is what’s right for me, right now.” I have found that people will support and respect those women who have the courage to declare those intentions. Having that courage to choose what is right for you at any given point in your life and career can be liberating, and allows you to define success on your own terms. That courage, passion and understanding of people is what will give you the opportunity and privilege to lead.

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TITLE: President, Category Management EDUCATION: BA, Duke University FIRST JOB: Swim Coach and Hospital Supply sales for Baxter WHAT I’M READING: The Art of Racing in the Rain, by Garth Stein; Born to Run, by Christopher McDougall MY PHILOSOPHY: Seek, learn, share, and support. FAMILY: Brothers, sister, nieces, nephews, parents, cousins. I love them all. INTERESTS: Fitness, food, wine, reading, the beach, classical music FAVORITE CHARITies: American Heart Association, Executive ChairWoman of the Go Red for Women Campaign COMPANY: Cardinal Health HEADQUARTERS: Dublin, Ohio WEBSITE: www.Cardinalhealth.com BUSINESS: Health care services REVENUES: $103 billion EMPLOYEES: 30,000+


Lisa M.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Atherton

L

EDUCATION: BS, U.S. Air Force Academy; MBA, College of William and Mary FIRST JOB: Server at a local BBQ restaurant WHAT I’M READING: The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, by Michael Lewis

Textron Defense Systems ike most career women, I had timelines in mind for achieving certain milestones, accomplishments and academic degrees. However, my personal life choices often altered these timelines—for the better. I was drawn to the opportunities offered by the U.S. Air Force Academy and served as a contracting officer. After choosing to leave the service when I got married, I continued to support the Air Force in a civilian role. There, I connected with an experienced mentor, who took time to teach me about the job and managing a career. After graduate school, a stint as a small business owner and raising four children, I moved to Textron Defense Systems, where that same mentor offered me a promising new career opportunity. I continue to seek out mentors today, both professionally and personally.

TITLE: Vice President, Area Attack Systems

Mentoring opportunities are often informal – asking questions of subject matter experts, or networking with peers to seek best practices. I believe learning must be a priority for people looking to advance their careers. Formal education is important, but so are those informal learning opportunities you find in your daily job. I’m also an avid reader as a way to expand my horizons, learn from history, and grow both personally and as a leader. The best leaders I’ve seen are invested in their employees’ success. Knowing my boss cares about my success has always inspired me to go that extra mile. Likewise, communicating your expectations is critical to success, ensuring that everyone is striving toward the same goal. The result is a win-win for both individuals and the business.

Timely decision making is undoubtedly the most difficult challenge I’ve experienced as a leader. There are times when you need to make a call, often without all the necessary information. In other circumstances, it’s about collaboration or knowing when to wait. Either way, it’s about coming to the best conclusion at the appropriate time. Throughout my career, I often had to take on tasks that no one else wanted – thankless, tedious jobs that were usually in addition to an already full workload. Even if it wasn’t noticed, I tried to go above and beyond what was expected. Take pride in every task that has your name assigned to it and be accountable for the outcome, good or bad. In my experience, that attitude gets noticed – and when you want to take the next step in your career, you’ll get that chance.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Treat everyone and every task with the same care and respect. FAMILY: Husband Jim and children Hayden, Melissa, Mathew and Brian INTERESTS: Reading, gardening, golfing, church choir FAVORITE CHARITY: Bread of Compassion COMPANY: Textron Defense Systems HEADQUARTERS: Wilmington, Massachusetts WEBSITE: www.textrondefense.com BUSINESS: Defense and Aerospace EMPLOYEES: 650

The best leaders I’ve seen are invested in their employees’ success.

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Claire Babineaux-

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Fontenot

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

I have learned that we often get out of relationships what we earn.

“ A

s leaders, we wear many hats – chief among them are mentor and mentee. Although many factors have impacted the effectiveness of my mentor-mentee relationships, I have found the most critical elements to be authenticity and intentionality.

and she needed affirmation that it was okay to define success differently. She is now a very successful mother, raising a well-rounded and incredibly smart child. She has her dream job; I have mine.

Be Intentional One of the most profound lessons Seek Authenticity… Be Authentic that I have learned as a mentee is to be Authenticity begins with removing intentional in not only driving value, assumptions. The biggest mistake I have but also in knowing what to value. made as a mentor is to assume I know Soon after taking a new role, I found what my mentee needs. For example, myself struggling with my new supervia female colleague I was mentoring at sor. I couldn’t get past the differences a law firm once asked me why I was so in our leadership styles, and I was conhappy. I responded, “I’m doing what vinced that he was the problem. My I’m built to do.” mentor told me that my problem was She started to cry. She had graduated “misplaced energy,” challenging me to at the top of her class in law school, first understand my leader, then to learn was on the fast-track to making partner, how we could drive value together. and then she had a beautiful baby. Her My mentor’s advice changed my relawhole world had changed. tionship with my leader and my team. Through tears she asked me, “What’s Now that I’ve learned to focus on my wrong with me? I don’t think I want to team’s natural talents and strengths, our be a high-powered lawyer anymore.” I productivity and morale have improved. asked her, “Would you paint this room I have learned that we often get out with a hammer?” She shook her head. of relationships what we earn. We “Does that mean there is something insult our own and others’ unique conwrong with the hammer?” For the first struction around us when we attempt time in a while I saw her smile. to use mentoring as a vehicle to fundaOur mentoring topics shifted from mentally change ourselves or others. I what I thought she should pursue as believe we find much more satisfying career goals, to what she wanted. She results when we use mentoring as a tool had discovered what she was built for to unlock our true purpose. 24

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TITLE: Senior Vice President and Chief Tax Officer EDUCATION: BS, University of Louisiana; LLM, Southern Methodist University School of Law; JD, Southern University Law Center FIRST JOB: Library Assistant at University of Louisiana at Lafayette WHAT I’M READING: Love and Friendship, by Jane Austen MY PHILOSOPHY: Service is a singular vocation. FAMILY: Married (Barry); son (Barry Jr.), daughter (Sydney) INTERESTS: Travel, history, reading FAVORITE CHARITY: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) COMPANY: Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Bentonville, Arkansas WEBSITE: www.walmartstores.com BUSINESS: Retail REVENUES: $421.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 2.1 million worldwide


CONGRATULATIONS

EMPOWERING

WOMEN. INSPIRING

INNOVATION. Raytheon applauds this year’s “Women Worth Watching” for their leadership, success and commitment to diversity in the workplace. As one of the world’s foremost technology leaders, we rely on the vision and dedication provided by the women on our teams to meet today’s toughest challenges. Here’s to the positive change and empowerment you inspire.

www.raytheon.com Follow us on: © 2011 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. “Customer Success Is Our Mission” is a registered trademark of Raytheon Company.


M. Renée

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Baker

Rochester Institute of Technology

To whom much is given, much is expected.

A

s a first-generation college student who grew up in North Carolina, I was the first of eight siblings to finish high school and attend college, although I was the third oldest child. Over the years I have often questioned the driving force that led me to obtain a college degree and pursue a professional career. Reflecting back on my childhood, it was clearly my illiterate maternal grandmother and my undereducated parents. In the early years, my dad earned a living as an auto mechanic and my mom worked as a maid and tobacco factory worker. Their assets were their wisdom, sensibility, and strong faith. My grandmother lived with us and served as caretaker of the house and my siblings. She often relied on me to read to her and write her letters. It was during those intimate moments that she would talk to me about education as the great equalizer. Always reminded of the vestiges of slavery, she kept repeating, “whatever you put in your head, no one can ever take from you.” My parents echoed a similar message about the importance and necessity of gaining a good education. These messages incentivized me to attend college and receive undergraduate and graduate degrees, but I still lacked confidence in my managerial 26

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capabilities when I observed my counterparts. Interestingly enough I have had a number of informal personal mentors in my life. I did not view them as mentors at the time. I perfected a habit of always surrounding myself with a network of people who exhibited the qualities which I lacked or I needed to improve upon. I refer to this network as my sphere of positive influence since these mentoring relationships started at home with my parents and grandmother. They have continued with my friendships and other external relationships and have always inspired me to reach for the top and go the distance. Addressing others’ needs is the price we pay for being able to access the network, and this usually comes at an inopportune time. On such occasions, I must remember to take a deep breath, place what I am working on aside and focus on the issue at hand. This often requires my making and taking the time, interest and concern to contribute to the success of others at the time they most need my guidance and input. This is the time to become cheerfully selfless and redeposit in the bank what has been provided to me. Let it be a reminder to all of us the reciprocal nature of mentoring relationships; in other words, “To whom much is given, much is expected.”

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TITLE: Executive Director, Faculty Recruitment and Retention EDUCATION: MPA, Maxwell School, Syracuse University FIRST JOB: Tobacco worker WHAT I’M READING: The Help, by Kathryn Stockett; The Money Class, by Suze Orman MY PHILOSOPHY: Treat others as you would like to be treated. FAMILY: Daughters, De Anna and Toshiana; Son-in-law, Kyle; Granddaughters, Imani and Jaydin INTERESTS: Singing, biking, interior and fashion design, meeting great people FAVORITE CHARITY: Feed the Children COMPANY: Rochester Institute of Technology HEADQUARTERS: Rochester, New York WEBSITE: www.rit.edu BUSINESS: University REVENUES: $400.9 million EMPLOYEES: 3,245


Mary T.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: GM Senior Vice President, Global Product Development EDUCATION: BS, degree in electrical engineering from General Motors Institute (Kettering University); MBA, the Stanford Graduate School of Business FIRST JOB: Acting Superintendent, Maintenance & Tooling/Senior Plant Engineer with General Motors WHAT I’M READING: Everything I can find about gluten-free diets, as well as car magazines and books on leadership MY PHILOSOPHY: High integrity is the foundation for everything. FAMILY: Married with two children: a son age 14 and a daughter age 12 INTERESTS: Attending my kids’ soccer games and their various other activities FAVORITE CHARITies: I support many organizations that are trying to find a cure for Cancer COMPANY: The General Motors Company HEADQUARTERS: Detroit, Michigan WEBSITE: www.gm.com BUSINESS: Automaker EMPLOYEES: 202,000

Barra

The General Motors Company

T

o begin with, I’d like to say “thank you” to Profiles in Diversity Journal for this prestigious award. This is very meaningful to me because it reminds me of what my parents used to tell me and my brother: “Work hard, treat people the way you want to be treated and it will all work out.” It’s been a great philosophy to live by in both my personal and professional life. Two other big markers for me are integrity and character. These are qualities I expect of myself and look for in others. This means always doing the right thing even when no one is watching, even when it is hard. With integrity and character as a foundation, you and your teams can accomplish great things. I’m often asked how I was able to survive in a male-dominated industry like automo-

tive. While that may be a fair assessment of the business, it’s not how I have approached what has been a fascinating journey. I always tried to learn as much as possible from those I worked with and for, while also contributing as much as possible on my own. I never expected to be given anything except an opportunity. After that, it was up to me to prove my value. I also always focused on the job at hand and didn’t worry about what was next, remembering the advice my parents gave me. Today I have the privilege of leading GM’s Global Product Development team of more than 30,000 designers and engineers who are responsible for developing cars, trucks and crossovers for customers in over 130 countries. To make sure that my team and I are doing all we can to bring cus-

tomers the highest quality and value vehicles, I encourage open dialogue, high engagement and true teamwork. I want everyone feeling like their voice can and will be heard, whether you’re a designer in Detroit or an engineer in Shanghai. Diversity of thought and experience is a competitive advantage. And once we decide on a course of action, we move forward together and get the job done quickly and efficiently. I take special interest in young professionals trying to break new ground within GM and the auto industry. There were many men and women who helped me along my way. This is my way of giving back. I hope those who read this essay may in some small way be inspired to pursue a career, automotive or otherwise, that will take them to places they never dreamed of before.

All ideas are welcome; the best ideas win.

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CONGRATULATIONS. Constellation Energy is proud to support the achievements and success of leading women executives such as Brenda Boultwood, chief risk officer and senior vice president, Constellation Energy. We recognize that through the diverse perspectives and strong focus and commitment of our women executives and employees, we are able to achieve success and strengthen our position as a leading competitive supplier of power, natural gas and energy services for homes and businesses across the continental United States.

constellation.com


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Renee Bergeron, Ingram Micro, Inc. • Jill B. Berkeley, Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP • Wanda Brackins, RBC Wealth Management Lorraine Bolsinger, GE Aviation Systems • Lisa M. Buckingham, Lincoln Financial Group • Linda A. Brandl, Union Pacific Railroad • Brenda Boultwood, Constellation Energy Janet Beronio, Caesars Entertainment Corporation • Janet H. Brugger, University of the Rockies • Dr. LaSharnda Beckwith, Army & Air Force Exchange Service

10

th

annual

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Dr. LaSharnda

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Beckwith

Army & Air Force Exchange Service

...as a leader, my focus is to give it some attention and to attack it with a single-minded determination.

L TITLE: Vice President, Eastern Region Operations EDUCATION: BA, Barry University; MA, Webster University; MBA, Embry Riddle University; PhD, Capella University FIRST JOB: Army & Air Force Exchange College Trainee WHAT I’M READING: When You’re Happy With You, by Dr. LaSharnda Beckwith; No More Regrets, by Dr. Marc Muchnick MY PHILOSOPHY: Every person should live a happy, prosperous life. Each person is a unique and special individual with a plan and purpose for their life. FAMILY: Husband, Daryl; Son, Brandon; Grandson, Jaden INTERESTS: Enabling, encouraging, empowering and energizing others! FAVORITE CHARITY: Professional Christian Women in Service COMPANY: Army & Air Force Exchange Service HEADQUARTERS: Dallas, Texas WEBSITE: www.shopmyexchange.com BUSINESS: Military Resale/Retail Operation REVENUES: $10 billion EMPLOYEES: 43,000

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eaders must be radical. That means that they are counted on to take extremes to change from the accepted or traditional. As a leader, I have the responsibility to see a problem that needs to be fixed or a goal that needs to be achieved. It may be something that no one else sees or simply something that no one else wants to tackle. Whatever it is, as a leader, my focus is to give it some attention and to attack it with a single-minded determination. As a leader I must demonstrate a passion for an idea, have an inner sense of drive and commitment. I must have the inner strength to move my vision forward despite all the obstacles, despite all the people saying it can’t be done, it’s too costly, we tried that before, or a dozen other excuses. A true leader perseveres and moves forward. Leaders must have the following characteristics to be successful in the long term: Integrity. People have to believe that I am pursuing a dream because it’s the right thing to do, not just because I am ego driven. Be a people person. It is important to me to embrace differences, to seek to understand what makes others

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unique and I need to be able to use the individual skills of the collective to achieve the goal. Positive Encourager. I am a leader who is great at encouraging others to overcome those things that hold them back. That is my responsibility. I need to be about encouraging, enabling, empowering and energizing others. That can not be done without an enthusiastic and positive person at the helm. Authentic and Transparent. I embrace Authentic Leadership Institute’s Bill George and Nick Craig’s philosophy of being a leader that is true to oneself. A leader that is not authentic cannot motivate people toward a common goal. Effective Communication. A leader’s communication must move people to work toward the goal the leader has chosen. Motivation. A leader has to be able to motivate everyone to contribute. As a leader, I have to think big, dream big dreams and motivate others to action. I refuse to let anyone or anything get in the way of achieving my dreams. I am realistic, but I am unrelenting. I am polite, but insistent. I persevere while constantly and consistently driving forward toward the goal.


Renee

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Bergeron

Ingram Micro, Inc.

...to thrive as a leader you have to take on new and different opportunities and embrace change.

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orn in Sherbrooke, Canada, I’ve spent my entire career in the technology industry. From my university days, to my early work as a mainframe programmer analyst, and now, as an executive for the world’s largest technology distributor, I’ve had the privilege and honor to work with and learn from many innovative minds, seasoned executives and successful entrepreneurs. Without a doubt, the technology industry offers one of the most dynamic and innovative career environments. Over the years, I’ve discovered that diversity is what drives the ongoing growth and evolution of this global business – diversity of cultures, people and products. The most successful organizations and executives know

how to use that to their advantage. When I look at what defines and differentiates a successful IT executive, three underlying attributes come to mind. The first is having the ability to work outside of your comfort zone. It’s easy to stay with what you know, but to grow as an executive and thrive as a leader you have to take on new and different opportunities and embrace change. You can’t wait for the opportunity to present itself; you have to go find it. The second is a desire to raise the bar – even during difficult times. The technology industry is fiercely competitive, so to achieve success you must always be at the top of your game. Don’t be afraid to challenge the status quo and find new and better ways to

deliver greater value. The third is to master the art of setting and managing expectations. The last thing anyone wants to do is set themselves up to fail. Understand the obstacles that lie ahead and identify how you will overcome them. Set realistic goals, develop a plan and share with your team and other stakeholders what success will look like. Then, it’s a matter of executing and exceeding these goals. For anyone looking for a career rich with opportunity, diversity and challenge, I highly recommend the technology industry. In a world that’s constantly changing, there’s one thing my experiences in this dynamic business have taught me – the best is always yet to come.

w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

TITLE: Vice President, Managed Services and Cloud Computing EDUCATION: BS, Computer Science, Université de Sherbrookes; MBA, International Business, McGill University FIRST JOB: Mainframe Programmer Analyst WHAT I’M READING: The Confession, by John Grisham MY PHILOSOPHY: Under-promise and over-deliver. FAMILY: A daughter INTERESTS: Health, fitness (running, beach volleyball, etc.), family and friends FAVORITE CHARITY: Susan G. Komen for the Cure COMPANY: Ingram Micro, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Santa Ana, California WEBSITE: www.ingrammicro.com BUSINESS: Technology REVENUES: $34.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 15,650

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Jill B.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Berkeley

Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP

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aving the courage to make the choices that I feel are right for me rather than what others want has been key to the freedom that allowed me to follow my non-traditional career path, one where I left the law partnership track and returned ten years later to a leadership position at a major law firm. This courage enabled me to confront wrongs I encountered and to be open to unexpected opportunities that presented themselves. When I was a summer associate, a senior partner took all my male colleagues to lunch and excluded me as the lunch was at a club that prohibited women. Rather than accept my exclusion, I challenged the discrimination, and even packed my bags. The firm amended their ways, and I gained respect both within and outside the firm for challenging the inexcusable conduct. An unexpected opportunity came when I was practicing on a reduced schedule in a small law firm, struggling to balance single parenthood with partner and client demands. The widow of a legal publisher whom I had met through my involvement in the local legal community, reached out to me for help. While this was an unusual proposition which would take me off the partnership track, it felt right. I accepted the challenge and reaped the huge benefit of learning how

to run a publishing company and developing an expertise in insurance law. Being my own boss, I crafted a flexible schedule that worked for me and my son. And as a business owner and the editor of the CGL Reporter, I enhanced my reputation in my practice area. After I sold my publishing company and returned to practice part-time at a medium-size firm, another unexpected opportunity showed up, this time on the soccer field. Two dads who knew me as a soccer coach and mom learned that I was an insurance coverage lawyer, recognized as an expert in the field. They were co-chairing their large law firm’s selection committee which happened to be looking for a new chair for their insurance practice group. Having seen me lead and negotiate on the field, they thought I would be perfect for the position. I accepted the challenge knowing that my experience running my own company would be a valuable asset to clients and colleagues. Almost 20 years later, as practice group leader of our firm’s Insurance Policyholder practice, I enjoy leading younger attorneys navigating family and work issues. I hope that my example and advice give them the courage and freedom to make the right choices for them and accept the opportunities that come their way.

I enjoy leading younger attorneys navigating family and work issues.

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TITLE: Partner and Practice Group Chair, Insurance Policyholder Practice EDUCATION: BA, University of Michigan, JD, Northwestern University School of Law FIRST JOB: Summer camp counselor with the Ethical Culture Society WHAT I’M READING: Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë; To the End of the Land, by David Grossman; The Wise Man’s Fear, by Patrick Rothfuss MY PHILOSOPHY: Take every new task as a challenge, and do your best. FAMILY: Husband and two adult sons INTERESTS: Reading, music, the outdoors FAVORITE CHARITY: Leelanau Conservancy COMPANY: Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEBSITE: www.ngelaw.com BUSINESS: Law firm EMPLOYEES: 360


Janet

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Beronio

Caesars Entertainment Corporation

We all have something to contribute.

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s I pondered what advice I might pass on to young women beginning their careers, I kept coming back to how you define success. I have concluded that your success can only be defined by you. It is very difficult to not be influenced by societal norms which suggest that success is achieved by climbing the corporate ladder, holding a particular title or being deemed successful by others. Instead, I have become very comfortable defining success in my own terms. My view on this was influenced by two events when I was told I wasn’t capable of doing something. The first occurred when I was applying to college. My high school guidance counselor told me not to waste my time applying to a particular university as I would never get in. I guess one could interpret that as sage advice (I didn’t apply and it was a very expensive school), or a challenge that propelled me to prove that I could do whatever I set my mind to. The second event occurred when I decided to transition from practicing law to managing a business. At that time a superior of mine told me I would fail because I was moving from a discipline that was black and white (i.e., the law) into one that operated more in the gray. Despite this lack of

confidence in my ability to succeed, I was not deterred. There are certainly colleagues and superiors who can comment on whether or not they see me as successful, but it would be their definition of success, not mine. I have taken the path of reaching out and learning to benefit my growth whenever I can. I have not been offered every role I thought I would enjoy and be successful at, but neither have I always accepted opportunities that have been offered to me. I have made career decisions that have allowed me to balance my family and work life, live where I want to live, and work with people that I can learn from and who inspire me. My success has been defined by accomplishing the goals I set for myself, taking on challenges that interest me, and seeing those who work with me grow in their careers. I have always tried to lead by example, and I am aware of the fact that I am setting an example in everything that I do. Learning from others and valuing everyone’s contributions are leadership qualities I try to demonstrate every day. We all have something to contribute. Be comfortable with who you are. Define success for yourself. Be true to yourself and have fun along the way.

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TITLE: Senior Vice President and General Manager of Harrah’s Rincon EDUCATION: BA, University of Maryland; JD, University of San Diego FIRST JOBs: Babysitter, waitress, piano teacher WHAT I’M READING: Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand MY PHILOSOPHY: Chart your own course. FAMILY: Married, two children INTERESTS: Tennis, reading, traveling FAVORITE CHARITY: The Angel’s Depot COMPANY: Caesars Entertainment Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Las Vegas, Nevada WEBSITE: www.Caesars.com BUSINESS: Casino Entertainment REVENUES: $8.9 billion for Caesars Entertainment EMPLOYEES: 70,000

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Lorraine

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Bolsinger

General Electric Aviation Systems

Sometimes you get really lucky and find all these qualities rolled into one person…what a find!

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’ve always appreciated the value of a great team, but no more so than in the last three years when my team and I had the challenge of integrating an acquisition, growing the business, developing new product strategies, forming a Chinese joint venture, driving culture change, and adding $16 billion of new product orders. (PHEW!) Not many teams surmount so much challenge or change. In trying to share with you the special ingredients of this indomitable team, I found myself describing four ridiculously simple qualities that in grade school made the best kickball team: big, fast, smart and fun. Big. They’re accountable and committed. You know the “go to” person who always comes through. How

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do you know they will? Because they always have. They have a reputation for it. Others want to follow these leaders who get things done because everyone revels in the sense of accomplishment and purpose. Fast. You have to run to keep up with them. They set the pace, anticipate what’s coming, and figure out how to work around it, leverage it, or change it. They’re not afraid to make decisions and their energy is contagious and uplifting. Smart. They have a million ideas and they know the difference between good and bad ones. They are equally good at thinking heady, abstract thoughts and developing clever, pragmatic plans to get resources marshaled. They’re tough-minded,

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intellectually curious and they are not afraid to challenge you. Fun. People like being around them because they are exhilarating, spirited. They have a great sense of humor and a keen sense of self. They attract talent to the team because, well… they’re fun! Sometimes you get really lucky and find all these qualities rolled into one person…what a find! More often than not, you need to draft these diverse “all-stars” and then create an environment where everyone is valued for both their unique talents and their commitment to win as a team. It worked in grade school…still does. I hope you have a chance to coach a team like this as it will make you bigger, faster, smarter and a lot more fun.

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TITLE: President & CEO, GE Aviation Systems EDUCATION: BS, Biomechanical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania FIRST JOB: Clerk in family store WHAT I’M READING: Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy; Profiles in Courage, by John F. Kennedy MY PHILOSOPHY: With commitment, anything is possible. FAMILY: A wonderful husband, Brien, and two children, Kimberly and Christopher INTERESTS: Tennis, golf, skiing, surfing, cooking, reading FAVORITE CHARITies: March of Dimes, Midwestern Children’s Home COMPANY: General Electric Aviation Systems HEADQUARTERS: Fairfield, Connecticut WEBSITE: www.ge.com BUSINESS: Aviation REVENUES: $18 billion EMPLOYEES: 36,000


Brenda

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Boultwood

Constellation Energy

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ou have to find inspiration. It doesn’t come to you. Growing up in rural South Carolina, I never met college professors, scientists, CEOs, or artists. Although a supportive family and loyal friends surrounded me, not much was on the doorstep. I sought out challenges where I could in school, on the tennis court, volleyball court and track. I found inspiration in fiction, music and competition. I imagined a journey to surround myself with diverse people who had a similar thirst to learn, innovate and make a difference. I pushed myself to believe that this journey was in reality just another challenge that growing up I worked hard to prepare myself for. At the time, I was not sure where the journey would take me. There was always a destination, but I placed more emphasis on the path than the endpoint. I came to understand that smart, motivated people inspired me; I needed them all around me to help find the way. These people have shown me that one is never finished learning and that constant learning requires an open mind. Bringing people along on the journey required me to become a leader with a vision to inspire others. Role models were essential to imagining the destination. My first role model

was my father, who congratulated me on my successes along the way, but was able to push me to create something with my life. He inspired me to believe that my world could be larger than a South Carolina town if I was willing to work for it. A middle school tennis coach inspired me to think about a career, and that girls could be as tough and competitive as boys. Continuing my education became a necessity, rather than an option. The goal of continuing my education was not laid out and neither was the path taking me there. Instead, my academic degrees became an almost eight-year journey fueled by the motivated people around me and the opportunities ahead. This has continued in my career, where organizational level has never been as important as learning and the ability to influence. Albert Einstein said, “Learning is not the product of schooling but the lifelong attempt to acquire it.” But while I have been inspired by role models and the desire to learn, it is inspiring others that, ironically, has become a remarkable source of inspiration. Einstein also said, “Success is one percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.” It is no surprise that hard work propels the journey forward.

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Chief Risk Officer EDUCATION: PhD, City University of New York FIRST JOB: Salesgirl at a jewelry store WHAT I’M READING: Too Big to Fail, by Andrew Sorkin; The Big Short, by Michael Lewis; At Home, by Bill Bryson MY PHILOSOPHY: Dream big, work hard and be persistent. FAMILY: Two great daughters, Georgina and Caroline INTERESTS: Supporting the activities of my girls, running, reading, traveling FAVORITE CHARITY: Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure COMPANY: Constellation Energy HEADQUARTERS: Baltimore, Maryland WEBSITE: www.constellation.com BUSINESS: Power, Natural Gas, and Energy REVENUES: $14.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 10,300

There was always a destination, but I placed more emphasis on the path than the endpoint.

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Wanda

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Brackins

RBC Wealth Management

You can do anything that you set your mind on.

I TITLE: Head of Wealth Management Global Diversity EDUCATION: MM, University of Denver; BSM, University of Phoenix FIRST JOB: At the local ice cream shop during high school WHAT I’M READING: Working Naturally, by Richard J. Leider MY PHILOSOPHY: “If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.” – Maya Angelou FAMILY: Two awesome daughters, Kourtney and Kandace; nine siblings INTERESTS: Spending time with family, traveling, live theatre, power walking, working out at the gym FAVORITE CHARITies: Project for Pride in Living, People Serving People COMPANY: RBC Wealth Management HEADQUARTERS: Toronto, Canada WEBSITE: www.rbcwealthmanagement.com BUSINESS: Full-service investment, advisory and wealth management REVENUES: $4.025 billion EMPLOYEES: 11,000

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feel fortunate to have been raised in a home where my father set the bar high for me and my nine siblings. Throughout our school years, my father never allowed us to get comfortable receiving a grade less than a “B.” He said that a “C” meant “average,” and he didn’t raise “average” children. My father believed that each of his children had the ability to excel, and he expected us to do so. He motivated us with one sound piece of advice: “You can do anything that you set your mind on.” This continually inspires me to increase my internal drive, and has shaped my perspectives throughout my entire life. In addition to my father’s advice, my success is due to building my career with companies that understand the value and importance of a diverse, global workforce. RBC Wealth Management is a company that leverages the unique contributions of every employee to ensure long-term business growth and profitability. Specifically, increasing the representation of women and people of color in leadership and client-facing roles is integral to the firm’s business strategy as well as the day-to-day business operations. This culture of diversity is incorporated in initiatives, policies and practices throughout the organization.

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Most recently, an innovative program called “Create Connections” was launched, designed to support efforts to recruit female financial advisors. The program leverages the involvement of the RBC Wealth Management Women’s Association of Financial Advisors (WAFA), an employee resource group of more than 250 female advisors, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. As part of “Create Connections,” WAFA members serve as liaisons and resources to branch directors in the firm to recruit female advisors. Additionally, RBC Wealth Management launched “WAFA Together,” an internal networking website designed to better connect women advisors across the organization. My advice to emerging leaders is two-fold. First, pursue opportunities with an organization that embraces the contributions of women and values diversity. Second, take heed of good advice. Young professionals must not only prepare themselves for career development and advancement through education, training and acquired skills, but also realize that success is motivated from within. I have consistently followed my father’s advice that I can do anything I set my mind on, and it has made a significant difference in my career and my life.


Relationships matter Whether achieving your career goals as a female financial professional or accomplishing your investment goals as a woman, the people you choose to work with can play a key role in your success. At RBC Wealth Management, our culture values the contributions of women. And we actively encourage women to support one another through a variety of programs designed to help women create the futures they want. Both for themselves and those that they care about.

Congratulations, for being named one of the Women Worth Watching.

Wanda Brackins, Head of Wealth Management Global Diversity One of the many RBC Wealth Management women worth watching.

Š 2011 RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC.


Linda A.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Vice President & General Manager-Automotive EDUCATION: BS, Creighton University; MBA, Creighton University FIRST JOB: Mowing Crew WHAT I’M READING: The Lincoln Lawyer, by Michael Connelly MY PHILOSOPHY: Your career and your reputation belong to you! Embrace change and don’t be afraid to leave your comfort zone.

Brandl

Union Pacific Railroad

FAMILY: Husband Matt, and four children, Jessica, John, Joe and Jacob; Six sisters, five brothers, and the best parents in the world. INTERESTS: Reading, horseback riding, gardening FAVORITE CHARITY: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation COMPANY: Union Pacific Railroad HEADQUARTERS: Omaha, Nebraska WEBSITE: www.up.com BUSINESS: Freight transportation and logistics REVENUES: $17 billion EMPLOYEES: 43,000

I

am the eleventh of twelve children in my family and grew up on a cattle ranch on the edge of the Nebraska sand-hills. I started my career with Union Pacific Railroad in our marketing and sales department 23 years ago as a campus recruit. I loved it right off the bat, and it didn’t take me long to realize the lessons I was learning while growing up on the ranch also apply in a Fortune 200 company. Many of those lessons have helped me from a business perspective, but I’ll share the ones that have had the most impact on my career success. Reputation matters. Tell the truth, even when it’s a tough message. Where I grew up, business was done on a handshake. You own your reputation. Telling people what they want to hear when it is not the truth can result in significant damage. That said, you need to work on proper delivery. Learning how to deliver a tough message and maintain a relationship is a critical skill that is often overlooked. Everybody works. Pull your weight. Hard work alone won’t make you successful, but neither will pure talent. Performance, performance, performance is the ticket to being noticed for a new assignment, and a team member who is not focused on doing their part quickly becomes a detriment. Don’t watch the clock. Make hay while the sun shines. I don’t like to use the word “balance” in my vocabulary. Achieving harmony is a much more realistic goal when you think about managing all of the threads of your life. Sometimes work is at a peak and the other threads move into a valley, and vice versa. From both career and family perspectives, knowing when to work and when to play, and how to appropriately mix those things together, makes for a much more enjoyable overall experience for everyone. There will be tough years. Plan ahead. Anyone who works with agricultural markets knows the world can change on a dime. Whatever job you are in, think about where it could go and have recovery plans in place. Change will happen! You can be behind it trying to catch up, or thinking ahead carving a path. Be adaptable, be innovative, be ready! Do something you love. Having a passion for whatever you are doing makes all the difference.

Reputation matters. Tell the truth, even when it’s a tough message.

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An aggressive supplier diversity program. Not just the right thing to do — the smart thing to do.

At Halliburton, we’ve found that putting significant trust — and business — in the hands of minority and woman-owned businesses is a win-win proposition for us all. Vendors win by partnering with one of the world’s leading companies. Halliburton wins by receiving first-class service from these quality-driven firms, and our customers win by having the very best and most diverse suppliers devoted to making Halliburton the best oil and gas services supplier in the world. For more information, contact us at supplierdiversity@halliburton.com.

H e l p i n g b u i l d s u c c e s s t h r o u g h s u p p l i e r d i v e r s i t y. © 2011 Halliburton. All rights reserved.

HALLIBURTON


Janet H.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Brugger

University of the Rockies

...be honest and loyal, because without those traits you are doomed to fail.

M TITLE: Director of Student Affairs EDUCATION: BS, MS, University of Maryland; Currently pursuing EdD, Northeastern University FIRST JOB: An aide in a nursing home WHAT I’M READING: Ethics for the New Millennium, by The Dahli Lama MY PHILOSOPHY: “Human potential is the same for all. Your feeling, ‘I am of no value’, is wrong. Absolutely wrong. You are deceiving yourself. We all have the power of thought – so what are you lacking? If you have willpower, then you can change anything. It is usually said that you are your own master.” – The Dahli Lama FAMILY: My husband, Michael; daughter, Nicole; granddaughters, Camille and Avery; dog, Eli INTERESTS: Reading, exploring new places, the arts FAVORITE CHARITies: Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Wounded Warrior Project COMPANY: University of the Rockies HEADQUARTERS: Colorado Springs, Colorado WEBSITE: www.rockies.edu BUSINESS: University REVENUES: $713.2 million EMPLOYEES: 6,900

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y father was very wise. When I was young, there was never a time that I did not see him with a book. He read everything he could get his hands on. He had a kind and gentle spirit and could talk to anyone about any subject. He always had a unique way of putting things into perspective. He was befriended and consulted by lawyers, doctors, politicians, and other powerful people despite having only a seventh-grade education. As far back as I can remember I was told that I could be and do anything in life that I wanted as long as I believed in myself. My parents always told us to be true to who you are, be honest and loyal, because without those traits you are doomed to fail. That is the essence of leadership – believing in yourself, your team, and maintaining your

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values. One of my favorite books and one that I turn to quite frequently for inspiration on those bad days that we all have from time-to-time is The Servant, by James C. Hunter. Whenever I read the book and the characteristics of a good leader, I think of my dad. My philosophy of leadership comes from the way he lived his life. He was honest (he told you not what you wanted to hear, but what you needed to hear) and trustworthy, a good role model, caring, committed to whatever he set out to do, and a good listener. He taught my siblings and me that you don’t agree to something that you know you can’t do. Treat people with respect – you have to give it to get it. Encourage everyone to put forth their best effort and acknowledge it when they do whether the accomplishment is

large or small. As he did, I try to have a positive and enthusiastic attitude, even when I don’t truly feel that way. It can make a difference in the way your day goes. Finally, appreciate people for who they are, not for who you want them to be. Everyone has his or her own style and talents. Acknowledge them and celebrate them. The essence of true leadership is to lead by example. I had an excellent example for the greater part of my life, and I hope that I leave that legacy for my granddaughters. I will end this with a quote that really puts it all into perspective. “If you want to build a boat, do not drum up people to collect wood or assign them tasks or work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.” – Antoine de Saint Exupéry, author of The Little Prince.


Lisa M.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Chief Human Resources Officer EDUCATION: Bachelor’s Degree, Georgetown University FIRST JOB: Sales associate, Woodward & Lothrop WHAT I’M READING: A Yellow Raft in Blue Water, by Michael Dorris; The Employer Brand, by Simon Barrow and Richard Mosley MY PHILOSOPHY: Your words define you. FAMILY: Husband, Phil; son, Andrew INTERESTS: Horseback riding FAVORITE CHARITY: Alley Cat Allies (ASPCA) COMPANY: Lincoln Financial Group HEADQUARTERS: Radnor, Pennsylvania WEBSITE: www.LincolnFinancial.com BUSINESS: Insurance REVENUES: $10.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 8,000

Buckingham Lincoln Financial Group

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any companies embrace the theory of aligning human resources with the business. At Lincoln Financial Group, we’re putting it into practice. I joined the company in late 2008, in the heart of the market crisis, where things were as challenging for us as they were for other financial services firms. But it was the best career decision I could have made. While many companies focused on simple survival, we concentrated on reinvention, literally recreating the company to make human resources a true strategic partner by helping the organization acquire and retain the right talent, develop and motivate employees and focus resources. We implemented pay-for-performance, then provided people with development tools to maximize their achievements. To stimulate employees, we offer people opportunities to engage, do interesting work and feel a sense of accomplishment. As a result, the loyalty and love for this company is awesome today. But, it hasn’t been easy. We are grooming a workforce that follows new rules about career development: • It may seem obvious, but we want

people to understand the business they work for, its strategic direction and how they fit in. You’d be surprised how many employees nationwide don’t understand their companies. • We underscore that at every stage of your career, you are responsible to network – not to socialize, but to learn. That means learning from peers and colleagues. Identify people you admire, and then look for opportunities to spend time with them. • We seek people who work hard, deliver well, meet deadlines and maintain unwavering personal and professional practices. Integrity cannot be taught. • We consider promotions an opportunity to prove to superiors that they made the right decision. We want our employees to exceed expectations. I’ve always believed a career is a lifelong quest for knowledge. At Lincoln Financial Group, we facilitate that knowledge – of the company, the industry, the market – to empower employees to be real partners in our collective success and fuel their personal career development.

I’ve always believed a career is a lifelong quest for knowledge.

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Together, we can apply diverse talents to further innovative ideas. At Parker, our employees are empowered to work together in developing new ideas to improve results by taking responsibility and accepting accountability. As the global leader in motion and control technologies, we recognize the importance of an inclusive culture where all employees are respected for their contributions. We are proud to support Profiles in Diversity Journal and its annual Women Worth Watching edition. Special congratulations to Parker’s own Beth Byrd, General Manager at Hose Products Division, who has been recognized this year as a “Women Worth Watching.” Now in her 25th year at Parker, Byrd credits her success to treating others with respect, “walking the talk” or aligning key messages with appropriate actions, and promising only what you can deliver. Past Parker honorees of the “Women Worth Watching Award” include: Pamela J. Huggins, Vice President and Treasurer; Cynthia A. Little, General Manager; and Catherine A. Suever, Group Vice President and Controller.

www.parker.com


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Kim M. Catullo, Gibbons P.C. • Ann Cathcart Chaplin, Fish & Richardson • Marla R. Butler, Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P. Denise Coll, Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide • Linda Cash, Ford Motor Company • Robin L. Bugni, Highmark Inc. • Susan Elizabeth Byrd, Parker Hannifin Corporation Susan Certoma, Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc. • Debra A. Canales, Trinity Health • Apalla U. Chopra, O’Melveny & Myers LLP

10

th

annual

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Robin L.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Vice President, Business Innovation and Health Care Reform EDUCATION: BS, Penn State University FIRST JOB: CPA at KPMG Peat Marwick LLP WHAT I’M READING: The Innovator’s Way, by Peter J. Denning & Robert P. Dunham; Outlive Your Life, by Max Lucado MY PHILOSOPHY: Nothing ventured, nothing gained. FAMILY: Married with two children INTERESTS: Spinning, Zumba, Women’s Ministry FAVORITE CHARITY: World Vision COMPANY: Highmark Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania WEBSITE: www.highmark.com BUSINESS: Health Insurance REVENUES: $14.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 20,500

Bugni

Highmark Inc.

T

hroughout my professional career, one of my best attributes has been my willingness to take on new challenges. By remaining flexible, I have been able to adapt to different work environments while building upon valuable experiences throughout my career. During my seven years as a CPA with KPMG Peat Marwick LLP, I quickly developed a keen sense of my clients’ business and how to meet their needs. Little did I know at the time that one of my largest clients, Blue Cross of Western Pennsylvania, which later became Highmark Inc., would eventually become my employer. When I began my career at Blue Cross of Western Pennsylvania, I spent the first six years in director positions in finance and audit before moving on to product management and development as a director. This was a pivotal career change because I was leaving the finance and audit world where I trained to expand my professional experience. When I look back on that decision, I remember recognizing that I wanted to do something new. I wanted to be involved in the core business and develop new products. I spent 10 years in product management and development, which led to the opportunity to begin the Innovation Department at Highmark. A year later, I was asked to also head up Highmark’s

Office of Health Care Reform. Again, flexibility has played a key role in my ongoing career path. Each new opportunity in my career path has been very positive and fulfilling for me. Since Highmark is one of the largest Blue plans in the nation, I am challenged daily with providing our 4.8 million health plan members with innovative ways to stay healthy, to improve their health and to provide them with answers to the many questions surrounding health care reform. I enjoy knowing that I am making a positive impact in their lives as well as those of our employees. The ever-changing environment that I enjoy today did not come easily or through self-reliance. Along the way I’ve had many mentors to propel my career and sharpen my leadership skills. To this day, I find joy in mentoring those who are forging their own career paths and encourage others to step outside of their comfort zone in order to stretch their abilities, so they can continue to grow. The best advice I can offer to others looking for ways to continue their career growth is to volunteer to take on new responsibilities or learn new skills. I encourage employees to express their interests in working on other projects within the department and to be willing to take some risks that may lead to new career paths.

...I find joy in mentoring those who are forging their own career paths...

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Marla R.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Butler

Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P.

...if you are going to be in this profession for the long haul, you’d better have thick skin.

I

was having a conversation with Arin Reeves, president of Nextions LLC, about the unique issues that many women attorneys of color face – being mistaken for the court reporter when she arrives for a deposition; the subtle incidents of exclusion, the accumulation of which can take its toll on many; being asked to take on tasks that seem very (inappropriately) gender-specific. As I listed, in a matter-of-fact tone, many incidents that I’ve experienced myself or that others have experienced, Arin looked at me and said, “You don’t internalize much.” And she’s right. I don’t internalize much. It was a revelation for me personally, and a revelation for me in my efforts to help more women of color succeed in law firms. I have come to believe that the extent to which a woman of color internalizes the subtle and not-so-subtle innuendos, and the intentional and unintentional oversights, is a singular determining factor in how long she stays at her law firm or in the profession altogether. I recognize that this may be a harsh message for younger lawyers. Essentially, if you are going to be in this profession for the long haul, you’d better have thick skin. You’d better have an ability to take, for example, a potentially offensive remark and chuckle at the ignorance from which the remark stemmed. You’d better have the ability to give people the benefit of the doubt more often than not – not for their sake, but for yours. If you allow yourself to be consumed with trying to figure out people’s intentions, you will not have the mental and emotional energy that is necessary to master this profession. In any social construct, people who are different are generally treated differently. The legal profession is not unique in that regard. Wellintended diversity and inclusion initiatives are aimed at limiting that different treatment, and many are doing a great job of it. But while we are working toward a fully inclusive profession, we have to make the best of the imperfect profession that is ours at this moment. I love this profession. The rewards are many. And the water that rolls off our collective backs today is forming the river of prosperity for generations of women to come.

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TITLE: Partner and Member of Firm’s Executive Board EDUCATION: BA, Cleveland State University; JD, Florida State University College of Law FIRST JOB: Burger King WHAT I’M READING: Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption, by Laura Hillenbrand MY PHILOSOPHY: If, in the end, I’m half the person my father believed I could be, then I will have accomplished much. FAMILY: Partner Lainie and 19-month-old son Jackson INTERESTS: Family, civil rights/ equality, animals, a good novel or biography, summer nights FAVORITE CHARITY: Lambda Legal COMPANY: Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P. HEADQUARTERS: Minneapolis, Minnesota WEBSITE: www.rkmc.com BUSINESS: Law firm EMPLOYEES: 679

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Susan Elizabeth

TITLE: General Manager

Parker Hannifin Corporation

WHAT I’M READING: To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Byrd

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eadership is about people, engaging a team to establish a shared vision, developing an executable strategy, and accomplishing goals that drive the organization forward. Three leadership principles guide my day-to-day actions: treat all with respect, walk the talk, promise only what you can deliver. I learned these principles early in my career by watching the best leaders in Parker. I still see it today in my mentors and colleagues that have a passion for what they do and truly enjoy the people they work with. To sustain this culture we are tasked with developing new leaders that understand and demonstrate these guiding principles. Respect. Respect is not given with title. Respect is earned through our words and actions. As individuals we must treat everyone with respect – listening, communicating and connecting. Every interaction with a person is a chance to learn, a chance to earn respect. I encourage new leaders to know all of their team members by name, to look them in the eyes, and greet them with a smile and say hello. Take a moment to connect, stop and ask how things are going or simply thank someone for a job well done. It sounds easy, but we all get so engrossed in our timelines, tasks, and

critical situations that we can forget something so basic yet so powerful. Walk the talk. Team members are always observing leaders, seeing if their words and actions match. If I tell someone that wellness is important to the overall organization, do my actions support the statement? If I want my leaders to respect others do I do the same when I interact with someone? A leader’s actions define what is important. Promise only what you can deliver. As a leader, following through on your commitments establishes your credibility. When you give your word and commit to something; deliver on it, and if you believe you cannot deliver on something, do not commit to it. Start meetings on time, finish the project by the due date, attend the dinner you accepted, all of these commitments establish your credibility. Without follow-through your commitments simply become words and empty promises with nothing behind them. Again, leadership is about people and your team looks to you to see if you enjoy what you are doing. If you are passionate about your work and enjoy what you do, it radiates throughout the whole organization. Be remarkable in all that you do – respect all, have fun and grow leaders.

Respect is not given with title. Respect is earned through our words and actions.

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EDUCATION: MBA, Christian Brothers University; BSIE, Auburn University FIRST JOB: Time and motion studies in our Batesville, MS manufacturing plant

MY PHILOSOPHY: Be Remarkable. FAMILY: I have a wonderful, loving family that has always supported me, challenged me to achieve more, and cheered me on along the way. INTERESTS: Fitness, waterskiing, cross-country skiing, travel FAVORITE CHARITies: Local charities COMPANY: Parker Hannifin Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Cleveland, Ohio WEBSITE: www.parker.com BUSINESS: Motion and control technologies and systems REVENUES: $10 billion EMPLOYEES: 55,000 people


Debra A.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Canales

Trinity Health

I consider it my calling and privilege to help people reach their full potential.

O TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer EDUCATION: BBA Management, University of Texas at Austin FIRST JOB: Shift supervisor at Burger King WHAT I’M READING: Enlightened Power: How Women are Transforming the Practice of Leadership, by Linda Coughlin, Ellen Wingard & Keith Hollihan MY PHILOSOPHY: I will not trade wholeness for approval. INTERESTS: Physical fitness, traveling, volunteering with different women’s groups FAVORITE CHARITies: Mercy Education Project, Women’s Bean Project COMPANY: Trinity Health HEADQUARTERS: Novi, Michigan WEBSITE: www.trinity-health.org BUSINESS: Health Care REVENUES: $8.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 53,397

ne of the most important things I’ve learned in my career is that I need to remain true to myself. This has been a challenge, particularly early in my career. In moving up the ladder, I often found myself conforming to whatever corporate culture I happened to be in at the time. I don’t think my experience is that unusual. As I reflect on the stages of my own career, I see a lot of similarity with the feminine life cycle referred to in women’s literature. According to the literature, there are three stages of the feminine life cycle: maiden, mother and crone. In recent years, Dr. Joan Borysenko added a fourth stage, the guardian, to recognize the powerful role played by middle-aged women in modern society. These stages have played out in my career in the following ways: Maiden: Age 20-29. Doing vs. being. Conforming to the norm. Doing for approval. Not breaking out. Looking and talking “right” for the work culture I was in. Mother: Age 30-39. Nurturing others. Building friendships. Starting to recognize power and build confidence. Guardian: Age 40-49. Bringing my whole self to work. Truthful period. Focus on humanity, healing and the spiritual side. Shift of discovery from neurotic things to enlightenment.

Wise Woman (Crone): Age 50+. Inspiring others. Being true to me. I think it’s helpful to recognize these stages may exist in your own career if for no other reason than to encourage you to challenge the norm. During my 20s and 30s, I was a conformist. Although I know I did my best, had I exercised more courage to be myself, I might have been more true to my unique gifts as a leader. I was fortunate to have mentors who helped me build my confidence and claim my power, and I know that without them, I would not be in this position today. As I enter the guardian stage of my career, I am encouraged by a new set of mentors, including some religious sisters who have dedicated their lives to serving others. These wise women inspire me to pay it forward by helping others grow professionally. I consider it my calling and privilege to help people reach their full potential. This is my passion and what drives me in my work. I encourage you to follow your passion, too, and do what you love. When you love what you do, it is no longer a job; it is a vocation. Building a rewarding career may not always be easy, but perseverance, embracing your unique and powerful gifts, and allowing others to support you will enable you to accomplish great things.

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Linda

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Cash

Ford Motor Company

My advice is to speak up when you have something to say.

O

ne of the best pieces of advice I received when I started out as an industrial engineer in one of Ford’s assembly plants was, “Don’t be afraid to do the job the way you do it. It may be different, but we look forward to your differences.” This encouragement gave me the confidence to be myself and find my own style. Today I pass that same advice on to others: “Be the best you can be, always utilizing your gifts and skills – not someone else’s.” When you’re beginning your career, it’s easy to be quiet and blend into the background. My advice is to speak up when you have something to say. Let the team know that you can contribute. Be open to experiences with the people around you. Interaction is as much a part of the job as engineering is a process.

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Networking and political savvy are key components to your overall success within the business. Getting involved is the only way to make a change. Don’t stand on the sidelines; get in the game! You are responsible for your career, so you have to actively participate in the direction it takes and in the opportunities that come your way. However, I’ve found that focusing too much on the next promotion is a mistake. Many times, a lateral move or crossfunctional assignment brings the better experience and does more for your development. Focus on the job at hand and perform that role with excellence. As a leader, don’t be afraid to let the team shine and be recognized for their work. As a woman of faith, I equate my leadership role with

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

being a servant leader. I serve my employees through mutual respect and collaboration and getting them the things they need to succeed as a high-performing team. Know your priorities, both professionally and personally. In manufacturing, there’s a high level of urgency and the tough decisions you make can have longranging, visible effects. Always make data-driven calls that line up with your leadership priorities. With family, work-life balance has not been a problem because I know my priorities. I never feel guilty about spending the time I need on personal matters. The key is communication and planning. At the end of the day, remember to set your priorities. Whatever job you’re in, do it well, hold yourself accountable and have fun.

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TITLE: Executive Director, Global Manufacturing Business Office EDUCATION: BSIE, Georgia Institute of Technology; MBA, University of Phoenix FIRST JOB: Industrial Engineer at Ford’s Atlanta Assembly Plant WHAT I’M READING: The Oz Principle, by Rodger Connors; Points of Power, by Yolanda Adams; everything by Rashonda Tate Billingsley and Victoria Christopher Murray MY PHILOSOPHY: Hold yourself accountable and live life to the fullest. FAMILY: Husband, Frank; daughter, Shetoria; son, Matthew INTERESTS: Music, especially jazz, singing, reading, spending time with my family FAVORITE CHARITY: American Heart Association COMPANY: Ford Motor Company HEADQUARTERS: Dearborn, Michigan WEBSITE: www.ford.com BUSINESS: Automotive REVENUES: $120.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 166,000


Kim M.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Catullo

Gibbons P.C.

Through mentoring opportunities, I try to help attorneys identify and pursue their career goals...

T TITLE: Chair, Products Liability Department; Administrative Co-Director, New York Office EDUCATION: BA, Rutgers University; JD, Seton Hall University Law School FIRST JOB: Assembly line in an electronics factory WHAT I’M READING: Life, by Keith Richards MY PHILOSOPHY: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” – Gandhi FAMILY: Partner Chris and two shelter dogs, Sadie and Justin INTERESTS: Music, reading, cooking FAVORITE CHARITY: New York City Animal Care & Control COMPANY: Gibbons P.C. HEADQUARTERS: Newark, New Jersey WEBSITE: www.gibbonslaw.com BUSINESS: Law firm REVENUES: $106.5 million EMPLOYEES: 373

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he most effective leaders not only move their organizations forward, but, while doing so, also help shape the next generation of leaders. An important way for leaders to connect with that next generation is through mentoring. Mentoring was a key building block in my career, and, in return, I feel privileged to have the opportunity to mentor many firm associates, counsel, and junior partners. Through mentoring opportunities, I try to help attorneys identify and pursue their career goals, while I simultaneously have a hand in the firm’s future by striving for a more diverse partnership. I assisted in designing our partner/associate mentoring program, to create more consistent and viable mentoring opportunities for all firm attorneys, particularly women and minority attorneys. For example, I have been very involved in the development and growth of the Gibbons Women’s Initiative, founded in 1997, as part of a talented team that has nurtured this program into a thriving network for women in the legal and business communities. I have served as chair of the Career Development and Mentoring Committee, responsible for the initiative’s mentoring platform. In that role, I supervised and monitored mentoring groups of women attorneys at various levels in the firm, important sup-

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port networks that met regularly to discuss professional growth, business development strategies, and work-life balance. I hold other leadership positions at Gibbons that I hope hold me up as a role model to future firm leaders and give me the opportunity to assist in guiding their careers. As chair of our products liability department, I manage one of the firm’s largest litigation groups. My responsibilities include ensuring that all our attorneys are provided high quality work, meet client expectations, manage work loads, and develop professionally. Similarly, I am one of the firm’s litigation staffing partners, overseeing associates’ workflow and ensuring that they gain a broad range of practical knowledge and experience, grooming them to be wellrounded, well-trained attorneys capable of taking on the future management of the firm. I am also administrative codirector of our New York office, which houses more than 60 attorneys representing each Gibbons practice group. Finally, as one of ten members of the firm’s executive committee, I am closely involved in all aspects of firm management, including policy development, financial management, growth strategies, and operations procedures to ensure that my peers and I leave a dynamic, diverse, and successful operation to its next generation of leaders.


Work that makes a difference.

Opportunities that expand your horizons.

A culture that embraces diversity.

Are you ready for what’s next in your career? At Booz Allen Hamilton, our ability to help clients solve their most challenging problems and achieve success in their most critical missions hinges on our people. We also believe diversity of backgrounds contributes to more innovative ideas, which in turn drive better results for clients. Booz Allen’s commitment to an inclusive environment incorporates facilitating understanding and awareness, and creating initiatives to improve the quality of work life for our staff. From our long-standing relationships with organizations such as Girls Inc., Society of Women Engineers, and League of Black Women, to supporting events such as Women in Clearable Careers, we understand diversity is central to who we are and what we do. If you’re looking to do work that makes a difference at a firm that’s committed to helping you achieve your professional and personal goals, Booz Allen could be what’s next in your career. For more information, e-mail diversityrecruiting@bah.com.

Ready for what’s next. www.boozallen.com/careers We are proud of our diverse environment, EOE/M/F/D/V.


Susan

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: President, Brokerage Processing Services EDUCATION: MBA, St. John’s University FIRST JOB: Analyst at Bankers Trust WHAT I’M READING: Knowing Your Value, by Mika Brzezinski; Elizabeth Street, by Laurie Fabiano MY PHILOSOPHY: Nothing is impossible. If you are determined and passionate, you can accomplish anything. FAMILY: Husband, Mike; daughter, Jaclyn; son, Michael; and parents INTERESTS: Education, technology, reading, music, inventing FAVORITE CHARITY: Make A Wish Foundation COMPANY: Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Lake Success, New York WEBSITE: www.broadridge.com BUSINESS: Outsourcing provider to financial industry REVENUES: $2.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 5,000

Certoma

Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc.

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s I reflect back over the course of my career, I realize that I have had many opportunities to learn important lessons of leadership from everyone who has touched my life. Most of them are fundamental principles practiced by great leaders throughout history. However, they are often lost in the hectic swirl of our everyday working lives. One of the key principles of leadership that has been important for me, especially in difficult times, is be visible. This means spend time with your employees where they work. Walk the floor. Stop and talk with people about the work they are doing and challenges they are facing. Hold communication forums of various formats that enable you to share information, hear feedback, answer questions and, most importantly, just speak with the people who are

the creators of your organization’s success. Inspire your team. Create and communicate a vision that people understand and drive toward. Everyone wants to have an impact and provide value. They want to believe that their work has meaning and that they will leave a legacy for others. I have found that if I provide the goal and empower people, the results are always astounding. Believe in people. Rally them around a dream. Give them the tools they need and support them. With this recipe, you will find that the energy and innovation unleashed will be extraordinary. Live in the moment. It took me a long time to learn this valuable lesson. It is one I value in others and I continuously strive to follow this in my life. Living in the moment requires focus. It means all of your attention is

on the matter at hand, whether you are in a oneon-one discussion or in a large meeting. Put down your BlackBerry. Don’t glance at your computer. Don’t answer your phone. Immerse yourself in the discussion. The result is that you will be truly listening and will hear critical points you would have missed. More importantly, those involved in the conversation with you will feel valued because you made them your top priority. There is no better way to engage and motivate others – the basis for long-term loyalty. The world is filled with great leaders. Study them. Emulate them while still being true to yourself. I am always discovering new leadership lessons. I have realized that the secret to this is to be open to new experiences and listen to others who have much wisdom to share.

Create and communicate a vision that people understand and drive toward.

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Ann Cathcart

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Firm-wide Litigation Practice Group Leader, Managing Principal of the Twin Cities office EDUCATION: BA, University of Minnesota; JD, Harvard Law School FIRST JOBs: Running a Scandinavian shop, working as a waitress, fundraising for a local non-profit theatre company WHAT I’M READING: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter, by Liz Wiseman and Greg McKeown MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard; laugh often. FAMILY: Husband Tony; three sons: Andrew, Alex, Aaron INTERESTS: Pilates, reading, cooking FAVORITE CHARITY: Second Harvest Food Shelf COMPANY: Fish & Richardson HEADQUARTERS: National – 12 offices worldwide WEBSITE: www.fr.com BUSINESS: Intellectual Property Law Firm REVENUES: $383 million EMPLOYEES: 1,070

Chaplin

Fish & Richardson

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ere are some simple things you can do to get ahead in your company. • Define Success – If you want to be successful, you need to know what that means in your organization. What does it take to gain promotion from your current position? Can you articulate the requirements? Who decides whether you will be promoted? Who has input into that decision? What information do they consider? Are there things you need to avoid doing to be promoted? Wherever you work, you need these answers. If you do not know what it takes to succeed in your organization, you need to ask and learn this information. • Ask Questions – If you don’t know how to do something or are unsure if you are doing something right, ask for guidance. While people worry about asking questions for fear that it will show they do not know the answer, it is much better to seek guidance than to blindly move forward and do something wrong. • Understand Expectations – Obviously, you should work hard. But what does it mean to work hard within your organization? Do you really know what the standards are for hard work? You need to make sure you are doing enough to satisfy and hopefully to exceed expectations.

• Positive Attitude – Your attitude is critical to your success. Do not underestimate the power of being a positive person who works well with all kinds of colleagues at all levels, and one who thinks about the best interest of the organization. • Participate – Attend training sessions that are offered. Pay attention and learn from them. Also, if your company provides opportunities to attend outside events, go whenever possible, even on evenings or weekends. • Open Communication – Communicate with your teams and your supervisor. Understand everyone’s roles and help the group work together well. Share information and don’t close yourself in your office like an island. You need to understand how everyone fits into the bigger project or objective. • Be Proactive – Show your interest in taking on additional responsibilities. Look ahead and see what needs to be done. Volunteer to do it. Your superiors will appreciate it and see that you are ready for additional responsibility. • Enthusiasm Matters – Be enthusiastic about new opportunities and thank the person that gave it to you. This will encourage the person to continue to give you more opportunities that will help you succeed.

Your attitude is critical to your success.

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Apalla U.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Chopra

O’Melveny & Myers LLP

...mix expertise with intensity, perspective and a sense of humor.

T TITLE: Chair of the Labor and Employment Practice, Partner EDUCATION: BA, UC Irvine; JD, Hastings College of Law FIRST JOB: Restaurant hostess WHAT I’M READING: Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, by Amy Chua MY PHILOSOPHY: Better to die on your feet than to live on your knees. FAMILY: Husband and three children INTERESTS: Hiking, reading, spending time with my children and family FAVORITE CHARITY: Public Schools COMPANY: O’Melveny & Myers LLP HEADQUARTERS: Los Angeles, California WEBSITE: www.omm.com BUSINESS: Law firm REVENUES: $782.4 million EMPLOYEES: 850

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hroughout my career at O’Melveny & Myers, I have been fortunate to have had trusted mentors and challenging work experiences. From those relationships and experiences, I have learned any number of lessons which have been critical to the growth of my career. I share below a few of my favorite lessons learned with the hope that others may benefit from them. Be an inspirational leader. When leading within your workplace, mix expertise with intensity, perspective and a sense of humor. The leaders who have most inspired me are those who combine these characteristics. They are those rare breeds for whom you will walk through walls. While it is not easy to summon these traits all the time, I work hard to invoke this potent mix in my role as a practice group leader at O’Melveny. Invest in others. I have been the beneficiary of incredible mentors who taught, supported and platformed me at the firm. Do the same for others within your workplace. Some of the most satisfying and rewarding moments at work for me include watching a colleague in whom I have invested grow and thrive. These individuals will come and go from your immediate workplace, but they will be a source of loyal friendships and opportunity throughout your life. Take advantage of “inopportune” opportunities. There will be a few moments during a career where you are presented with THE case or project which will be career-shaping. Take and relish those opportunities even if the timing is not perfect. Such a moment presented itself to me when I had just given birth to my second child, Grace. One of my good mentors offered me the opportunity to take the lead in an important class action. The case ended up being a seminal building block in my development as an employment class action litigator and placed me on a stage alongside some of the best litigators in the country. While jumping into a case during my pregnancy leave was not in my plans, my decision to take the opportunity was career defining.

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Denise

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Coll

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide

Live out your imagination, not your history.

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s I think about where my career has taken me over the years, I quickly realize that three fundamental beliefs have influenced me every step of the way. I believe in order to be successful you need to be doing something you love, something you’re truly passionate about. I believe that throughout your career you need to challenge yourself and take risks in order to keep learning and growing. Most importantly, I believe that none of us can be successful alone. You need to search out great leaders to mentor you along the way. I do think my beliefs are simple to understand, but may not always be simple to implement. Finding work that you are truly passionate about takes time, trial and error. And I can tell you from experience, you will know the right role when you find it or when it finds you. I have spent most of my career in hotel operations, taking a couple of side paths along the way. I spent some time in information technology and human resources, and those experiences provided me with great learning and development opportunities. But neither was my true calling. Nevertheless, it was because of these varied experiences that I came to realize my real

passion was in operations. Taking on different roles as I searched for my passion required me to challenge and stretch myself. I will admit, taking a role in IT was a real risk, as this was not my area of expertise. But I had confidence in my ability to listen and to learn and to develop new skills. I developed an understanding of intelligent risk taking and made it a part of my career development strategy. I also learned early in my career that I could not do it alone. I needed people who were willing to teach and to mentor me. When it comes to mentoring for a specific skill or talent that you want to develop, seek out someone who is already good at it. You’ll be surprised at how willing others are to support you and how much you can learn in a casual conversation over a cup of coffee or lunch. How you think about your career is personal and it will change over time. So, where do you start? Start with the courage to try new things, make choices that give you the opportunity to stretch and surround yourself with great people for learning and support. As Stephen Covey said, “Live out your imagination, not your history.”

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TITLE: President, North America Division EDUCATION: BS, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; MBA, Simmons College FIRST JOB: Management trainee, Howard Johnson’s Restaurants WHAT I’M READING: Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China, by Jung Chang MY PHILOSOPHY: Be true to yourself. FAMILY: Married INTERESTS: Skiing, travel FAVORITE CHARITies: Boys & Girls Club COMPANY: Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide HEADQUARTERS: White Plains, New York WEBSITE: www.starwoodhotels.com BUSINESS: Hotel REVENUES: $5.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 145,000

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SHRM 2011 DIVERSITY & INCLUSION CONFERENCE & EXPOSITION D&I GAME CHANGERS Reinventing the Playbook

The SHRM Diversity & Inclusion Conference & Exposition is where HR professionals, diversity practitioners and other business leaders from a cross section of business sectors gather each year to get inspired by, collaborate and network with others who lead workplace diversity initiatives. Why You Should Attend • Walk away with innovative, forward-thinking strategies that take your diversity & inclusion efforts to the next level. • Learn how to build on the strengths of differences and develop plans that support organizational objectives and goals. • Find new ways to use workplace diversity as a catalyst for new ideas and initiatives. • Learn from senior executives at major companies including McDonald’s Corporation, Merck, the U.S. Armed Forces and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) in our Game Changers series.

Reserve your seat today.

www.shrm.org/conferences/diversity

24-26 O C T O B E R

2011 Washington, D.C. KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Shirley Davis, Ph.D., Director of Global Diversity & Inclusion, SHRM

Susan O’Malley, Former President of Washington Sports and Entertainment

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, Ph.D., President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)

Patricia Sowell Harris, Global Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer, McDonald’s Corporation, LLC

Erik Weihenmayer, World Class Adventurer

11-0440


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Pamela Culpepper, PepsiCo • Mary Daschner, Medco Health Solutions • Lori Cornmesser, Juniper Networks Sharon Czyzewski, UPMC Insurance Services Division • Grace Cowan, Waste Management, Inc. • Donna Owens Cox, MWV • Paula Davis, Alcoa Inc. Aimee Eubanks Davis, Teach For America • Dr. Shirley A. Davis, Society for Human Resource Management • Lisa Davis, Royal Dutch Shell

10

th

annual

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Lori

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Cornmesser Juniper Networks

We now have freedom and choices that were once only a dream.

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omen in America have come a long way. We now have freedom and choices that were once only a dream. Today, women comprise more than fifty percent of the workforce and are represented in executive ranks. We have closed the gap and broken through the glass ceiling. We’ve earned the right to choose a career, stay at home with the family or do both. Over the years we’ve fought for a woman’s right to have it all, and now we have the obligation to do it all. The kicker: How do we do it all without taking valuable time away from our family, our marriages, our careers and ourselves? The answer: mastering plate spinning. You’ve got to keep all your plates going at once. My personal experience in this comes from early in my career when I became overextended trying to do everything. I had accumulated so many obligations and responsibilities that my head was spinning, not the plates. Through this experience, I learned a valuable life lesson. Some plates will bounce when they fall, while others, including family, health, friends and spirit, are fragile and will break if not watched. The takeaway was learning what was really important in my life. I realized that as a working woman, I could have it all – just not all at the same time. Plate spinning requires many checks and balances, especially for career-minded women who do want it all. You must check in with your personal business plan and re-connect with where you are headed, why it is important to you and how it will impact others in your life. As a plate spinner, you will often have to re-prioritize. Take time to step back from the craziness and make certain you’re happy. Also, don’t be afraid to use your woman’s intuition. And last, take a look at all the great women who have shown us it’s possible to thrive in the business world and embrace our roles as wife, mother, daughter, sister and friend. We can have it all, but must work hard to make it happen.

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TITLE: Vice President Service Provider Channel Sales EDUCATION: MBA, Columbus University FIRST JOB: Law Clerk WHAT I’M READING: The 10 Laws of Enduring Success, by Maria Bartiromo MY PHILOSOPHY: You are responsible for all things in your life, so make sure you show up well. FAMILY: Married to Tony Ruiz; two children Mateo and Sofia INTERESTS: Travel, cooking, music, current affairs, films, entertainment and kickboxing FAVORITE CHARITY: Fundforward.org COMPANY: Juniper Networks HEADQUARTERS: Sunnyvale, California WEBSITE: www.juniper.net BUSINESS: Technology REVENUES: $4.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 9,000+


Grace

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Customer Experience EDUCATION: JD, University of Iowa FIRST JOBs: Supervisor at Chicken Unlimited, receptionist at Lutheran General Hospital, waitress WHAT I’M READING: Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing, work hard, be honest and have integrity, love and care for family and friends, help those less fortunate, grow and learn, and never judge a book by its cover. FAMILY: Daughters Virginia and Vivian; husband William; dogs Daisy and Snowy INTERESTS: Spending time with family and friends, being outdoors, learning, helping others in the community FAVORITE CHARITIES: Any related to children and Alzheimer’s Disease COMPANY: Waste Management, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEBSITE: www.wm.com BUSINESS: Waste collection REVENUES: $13 billion EMPLOYEES: 43,000

Cowan

Waste Management, Inc.

M

y guiding principle of leadership is to do the right thing, even if it means putting your job at risk. It’s not always easy, but speak up and take action when the right things aren’t being done. Have the courage to stand up and make the best decision for the business, not what’s in it for you. Have integrity and honesty in everything you do because ultimately, you have to live with yourself and those decisions. It’s also important to surround yourself with people who have a diversity of backgrounds and ideas and who complement each other because of those differences. Listen to hear meaning, ask questions to understand different views and options, and be inquisitive. Working as a team doesn’t only apply to your own department. Take off the functional hat you wear and look across boundaries. And when you have the opportunity to be in a leadership role, have empathy and reach out to help other people. Continuously push yourself to grow and have a passion to learn so you will be valuable to the organization. With so many changes in technology, marketing, demographics, and in the workforce, you have to keep learning and growing. Read the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Harvard Business Review. Go to seminars so you’re hearing a

diversity of ideas and thought. Here are more of my career “dos” and “don’ts”: • Make sure you have key metrics to drive and measure performance. • Know your business strategy and how initiatives drive strategy and outcomes. • Be engaged and open to growth and change. • Be educated about the market and your competitors. • Have fun and a passion for what you do. • Share the work you’re doing and get the visibility you and your team deserve. • Work/family balance is always a challenge when you have a strong career. Have the discipline to leave work and the time management to get work done. Regular physical exercise can keep your stress in check. • Don’t judge a book by its cover. Everyone walks in different shoes. • Don’t spend time on activity without execution. Set objectives with outcomes that are meaningful. • Don’t waste your or other people’s time. • Don’t sit on decisions. Get information, distill it quickly and make a quick decision. • Don’t be a yes person. Have an opinion and be engaged.

Have the courage to stand up and make the best decision for the business... w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Donna Owens

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Vice President, Global Communications EDUCATION: BS, University of South Carolina; MBA, The Citadel FIRST JOB: Grocery store cashier WHAT I’M READING: Too Big to Fail, by Andrew Sorkin MY PHILOSOPHY: “Work hard, laugh often and keep your honor.” – Tim Russert FAMILY: Husband, Ben INTERESTS: Reading, hiking FAVORITE CHARITies: Various animal charities COMPANY: MWV HEADQUARTERS: Richmond, Virginia WEBSITE: www.mwv.com BUSINESS: Packaging REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 17,500

Cox

MWV

T

he mantle of leadership comes with great responsibility, and even more so for women in business. Growth and development of others is a core responsibility –preparing the next generation to execute future goals shows commitment to the individual and the organization. I’ve had mentors do that for me, and I consider it a privilege to make the same investment in the next generation of business leaders. Early in my career, I learned the importance of surrounding yourself with people who see something in you and are willing to take a risk on your development. The selfless act of reaching down and pulling someone up is invaluable. Throughout my tenure I’ve purposefully connected with those who express an interest in my growth and future, both professionally and personally. These relationships have given my career a strong foundation, and given me the confidence to execute with excellence. Realizing someone stepped outside of their comfort to support a vision they saw in me, gives me the extra vigor to rise above and beyond their expectations. As I grow in responsibility, a few guiding principles help me mentor others and lead an effective team. First, no two people are the same, therefore your management approach must be unique

to each individual. Understanding this early on allowed me to lead many groups of talented individuals who work even better as a team. Second, create a team with diverse backgrounds and viewpoints, but with similar commitments to productivity and successful execution. This foundation ensures the strength and development of a phenomenal group. Lastly, when faced with difficult decisions, first take time to step back and assess the overall situation. Lean on those whose council you value – test theories and gain valuable feedback to create a pathway to the right solution. In effective decision making, it is imperative to consider all options to help make an ethical final decision. The journey does not come easily, but the lessons along the way are immeasurable and I’ve come to realize that a career void of these lessons is unsuccessful, unmemorable and shortlived. I encourage everyone to take ownership of their careers and lead toward a desired outcome. In addition to personal initiative, it’s important to also seek out the support, guidance, and vision of others. The sum of us is greater than one of us; we can’t do it all on our own – it’s our responsibility to pass along these lessons to the next generation of female leaders in business.

Your management approach must be unique to each individual.

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Pamela

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Culpepper

PepsiCo

Being a sponsor is more active than being a mentor.

I TITLE: SVP, Human Resources and Chief Diversity Officer EDUCATION: BA, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; MOPC, California State University, Hayward FIRST JOB: Cashier/Cook, Taco Bell WHAT I’M READING: The World Café: Shaping Our Futures Through Conversations That Matter, by Juanita Brown and David Isaacs MY PHILOSOPHY: “Be the Change that You Want To See in the World.” – Mahatma Gandhi FAMILY: Husband, Clifton; Son, Jordan INTERESTS: Traveling, reading FAVORITE CHARITY: Food For Good COMPANY: PepsiCo HEADQUARTERS: Purchase, New York WEBSITE: www.pepsico.com BUSINESS: Food and Beverage REVENUES: $65 billion EMPLOYEES: 300,000

am often asked to be a mentor, a request I am both honored and humbled by. In corporate America in order to be successful we need someone who provides guidance and helps to identify unwritten rules of engagement that help navigate your organization. Your mentor should be someone you can trust in asking questions, sharing information and guidance. Mentors should see their primary role as helping mentees think about their aspirations while painting a realistic view of what it takes to get there. Mentees should realize that most of the work in the relationship is directed by them in the form of self-reflection, action planning and the ultimate execution of that plan. I emphasize who owns the work in a mentoring relationship because so often the relationship is interrupted by unrealistic expectations. Mentees often want to know the formula for winning and a subsequent checklist to work from. How success was achieved before is a nice historical reference, but following the footsteps of past success is not formulaic. Mentoring does not guarantee advancement or visibility. However, with increased individual effectiveness, a mentee increases the probability of her own success. Unlike a mentor, who is chosen by

the mentee for select reasons, the sponsor chooses the employee based on performance. The sponsor will provide strategic exposure, networking and positioning for an employee. Being a sponsor is more active than being a mentor. The mentor provides personal and professional development, plus career help. Sponsors openly campaign for career advancement, often putting their own reputations on the line. At PepsiCo, leadership takes career advancement seriously. We call this “talent sustainability.” Talent sustainability is the promise to invest in our employees to help them succeed and develop the skills needed to drive the company’s growth. Our company’s growth requires leaders and associates who can understand the world’s evolving needs. We intend to evolve our culture so our leaders and associates are recognized for their contributions and valued for the differences they bring to the workplace. Because of this, it is more important than ever to have mentors and sponsors who can provide guidance and position employees for career advancement. As you assess your career, identify people who provide professional development and who may be positioning you for career advancement. Both mentors and sponsors are important and recognizing them will make you more successful.

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Sharon

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Czyzewski

UPMC Insurance Services Division

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have always viewed the workplace as the land of opportunity – not only for me but for everyone. To me, the ideal workplace has respect at its core, embraces differences and encourages a variety of opinions, contributions and learning. Although the ideal is not always reality, the good news is there still are opportunities to take advantage of at your workplace today. Here’s more good news: Workplaces are dynamic, they change all the time – more opportunities are heading your way! I learned a valuable lesson many years ago about workplace opportunities. A female executive who was open to sharing gave me great career advice. She told me to always look at the best people in your company. Watch what they do, see how they conduct themselves. And then, do that. What she was telling me, in effect, was you have a great opportunity to learn from others. I never was disappointed in finding great people at work to learn from. My definition of the best is a person of character, intelligence, courage, strategy, and purpose. The best are usually identifiable in your company as people who are doing the right things the right way.

Learning from others can take on another meaning if you participate in mentoring. As a mentor and job coach I’ve learned many things about the business and about myself. It’s a two-way learning process – both the mentee and mentor learn from the experience. If you haven’t tried it, what are you waiting for? Opportunity is knocking. Here, we believe in treating all people with dignity and respect. That’s part of our mission and we take it seriously. Our efforts around this mission begin with our president, are supported by the company’s leadership and are becoming part of our DNA. Our efforts include recognition programs that celebrate inclusion champions, taking a pledge, mapping our journey of departmental events and community partnerships. We offer cultural competency training to our employees who have customer contact. We are committed to the well-being of our employees, and we provide health coaches and onsite wellness clinics. We see ourselves on a journey to ensure our employees, our customers and our community partners are in the best place to work, get excellent services, and receive dignity and respect.

I never was disappointed in finding great people at work to learn from.

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TITLE: Vice President, Human Resources EDUCATION: BA, MA, Carlow University FIRST JOB: Personnel coordinator, Time-Warner Cable WHAT I’M READING: The Forgotten Garden, by Kate Morton MY PHILOSOPHY: Take every opportunity to influence and persuade. FAMILY: Grandmother of four INTERESTS: Skiing, having fun with my grandkids FAVORITE CHARITY: Autism Speaks COMPANY: UPMC Insurance Services Division HEADQUARTERS: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania WEBSITE: www.upmchealthplan.com BUSINESS: Health Insurance REVENUES: $3.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 2,000


CHEVRON, the CHEVRON HALLMARK and HUMAN ENERGY are registered trademarks of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC. Š 2009 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

Our people are as diverse as their ideas.

tplace, rldwide marke To work in a wo represents workforce that Chevron has a siness, we rever we do bu the world. Whe r our y is essential fo believe diversit . Because d partners alike employees an human ts of view, our with more poin er. es even strong energy becom om. visit chevron.c To learn more,


Mary

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Daschner

Medco Health Solutions

Share your vision and passion; it fuels commitment, creativity and confidence in others.

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eflecting on my professional journey, I offer three pieces of advice to those entering the workforce. Take the time to develop yourself and your people. Share your vision and passion; it fuels commitment, creativity and confidence in others. Lastly, challenge yourself to venture into unfamiliar territory. While each of these principles has led me to success, the third is very important. When evaluating career opportunities, women sometimes undersell themselves when the position requires a new skill set or involves engaging in an unfamiliar domain. Moving out of your comfort zone can lead to unexpected opportunities that fuel your career advancement. I share this because it worked for me. Throughout my career, I’ve embraced projects that were not always high profile or completely aligned with my experience, but were important to the business. At the beginning of my career as a pharmacist, I stepped up and led the computerization of our network of clinic pharmacies. I successfully accomplished this, despite my limited experience with technology and senior management’s doubts that the change would be beneficial to the business. Upon completion, I realized that I had

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gained a new domain of knowledge in an emerging area, exposure to people in other areas of the clinic, negotiation skills and the confidence of my supervisor and colleagues. As my career progressed, other opportunities to build new skills and explore new markets presented themselves. While working for a national retail pharmacy chain, I successfully built and managed a national business of closed shop pharmacies dedicated to long-term care, despite the fact that neither my organization nor I had previous experience in this market. In my current role, I have had the opportunity to grow Medco’s Medicare Part D program from a simple project into an important line of business for the company. In both examples, the career choices I made helped me to gain experience and advancement that would not have been available to me if I had stayed on a more traditional path. Commitment to lifelong learning and development improves your chances to be a successful leader. My final advice to each of you is to maintain perspective; you will be remembered for your results for a short time, but you are remembered for your interaction with and treatment of people for a lifetime.

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TITLE: Group President, Medco Medicare and Medicaid Solutions EDUCATION: BS Pharmacy, University of Minnesota FIRST JOB: Bean walking and corn detassling (field work) WHAT I’M READING: Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth and Happiness, by Richard Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein MY PHILOSOPHY: To live a fun life as completely, honestly and passionately as I can. FAMILY: Husband and best friend Dan Chowen; Boston Terrier / fur kid SunRa; an extended family that includes over 54 nieces and nephews INTERESTS: International travel, cooking, bicycling, reading FAVORITE CHARITies: CARE– Power Within, ASCP Foundation COMPANY: Medco Health Solutions HEADQUARTERS: Franklin Lakes, New Jersey WEBSITE: www.medcohealth.com BUSINESS: Pharmacy and clinical research REVENUES: $66 billion EMPLOYEES: 20,000


Aimee Eubanks

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Davis

Teach For America

Failure, in my mind, wasn’t an option. I knew this program had to thrive.

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he question I ask myself constantly as a leader is, What legacy will I leave? Right after college, during my two years as a Teach For America corps member teaching 6th grade, I learned important leadership principles. Now reflecting on my 16-year career, most of which has been spent starting up and expanding high-performing teams, I still operate with these leadership principles. I’ve also had the good fortune of having amazing managers who’ve taught me invaluable lessons and skills that have built my confidence, particularly at adverse times. Early in my career, I made the decision to decline offers at highly competitive law schools to follow my heart and stay in what many consider a far less prestigious career. I was asked to assume the leadership of an unstable nonprofit, whose mission I deeply believed in, given the potential it had to put children growing up in low income communities on a college trajectory. People wondered if it was possible for anyone, especially a 23-year-old novice manager and leader, to put this organization on a path to fiscal sustainability and high quality programming. Failure, in my mind, wasn’t an option. I knew this program had to thrive. Immediately, I realized I needed to

develop a bold vision for the organization that was tied to ambitious yet realistic goals. Hiring and building an outstanding team had to happen quickly. Investing the team in the goals, planning purposefully, executing flawlessly, and tracking our progress was imperative. There was also no short cutting, as I was relentlessly working hard to ensure increased effectiveness (while having fun in the process), and constantly taking time to reflect alone and with the team in order to listen, learn, continuously improve, strategize, and rejuvenate for the challenges ahead. My drive comes from my knowledge that children growing up in low income communities can achieve academically at the highest of levels when given the opportunities they deserve. Ninety percent of the children our corps members teach are African American, Latino or Hispanic. Poverty and race shouldn’t determine destiny. This is a civil rights issue; failure isn’t an option. And so I wake up every day passionate about ensuring that we are creating systematic ways to attract, engage, develop, and retain extraordinary, diverse talent for our organization and other educational organizations. For the next generation of young women leaders, I encourage you to ponder the question, what legacy will you leave? w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

TITLE: Executive Vice President of People, Community and Diversity EDUCATION: BA, Mt. Holyoke College FIRST JOB: Babysitter WHAT I’M READING: Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose by Tony Hsieh MY PHILOSOPHY: With a positive mindset and spirit, you can make your stumbling blocks your stepping stones. FAMILY: Husband, Marcus; children, Hudson, Aïda, and one more on the way in December, and a playful Boxer dog INTERESTS: Reading, traveling, scuba diving, spending time with family and friends FAVORITE CHARITies: Teach For America, Education Pioneers, Crescent City Schools in New Orleans COMPANY: Teach For America HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.teachforamerica.org BUSINESS: Non Profit/Education REVENUES: $217 million EMPLOYEES: 1,500

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Lisa

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Davis

TITLE: President, Shell Commercial Fuels & Lubricants Americas President, Shell Oil Products U.S. EDUCATION: BS, University of California, Berkeley FIRST JOB: Production Engineer, Exxon’s Alaska E&P operations WHAT I’M READING: Team of Rivals, by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Royal Dutch Shell

L

ooking back, some of the best moves of my career were also the toughest. Likewise, my biggest shortcomings have become my greatest strength. How? In my career, I’ve held a variety of jobs across many different businesses. Most brought very steep learning curves and the challenge of earning the respect and support of colleagues who were often much more senior. Today, I have a diverse cross-section of business and leadership experience that I draw upon and, in many ways, this hard-won breadth gives me an advantage. It has also been very rewarding to develop myself and succeed in these assignments. Early in your career, it is important to build a strong track record of performance and show you can master new areas and deliver on your commitments. With a strong foundation, you are then ready to move on to new positions where you can leverage your strengths, develop some new skills, and grow professionally. Demonstrating that you’ve performed well in unfamiliar areas is an advantage in broadening your career and creates that excitement and confidence that brings out your best. Early in my career, I received some advice that helped greatly and I’ve

always remembered: If you have confidence in yourself, others will have confidence in you. Just as success builds success, so does confidence build confidence. Throughout your career, you will need this confidence as you develop as a leader and among other things, make decisions that impact your team. Making those critical decisions requires confidence in your judgment. I find that some of the hardest decisions I’ve made were in refining where risk and the potential harm to others was always present. In the mostly operational roles that I’ve had in my career – from production and technology in upstream to refining, supply and sales in downstream – I’ve found that being willing to contribute in any way possible and treating others with respect and consideration has helped to overcome the challenges I’ve faced. I’ve also found that if you are clear regarding your objectives and motivations and you listen to the input and advice of others, not only do you learn more quickly but you also create relationships with others who are happy to share their knowledge and help in the collective success of the team. And in the end, the team’s success is your success.

If you have confidence in yourself, others will have confidence in you.

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MY PHILOSOPHY: Live up to commitments. Be decisive when it’s time for action. Have fun. FAMILY: Husband of 25 years, Brian Davis INTERESTS: Golfing, traveling, reading, spending time with family, watching Cal Berkeley football! FAVORITE CHARITies: American Red Cross, United Way COMPANY: Royal Dutch Shell HEADQUARTERS: The Hague, the Netherlands WEBSITE: www.shell.com BUSINESS: Oil & Gas REVENUES: $368.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 93,000


Paula

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Davis

Alcoa Inc.

Find out what’s important to influencers and deliver wins for them.

F TITLE: President, Alcoa Foundation EDUCATION: BA, University of Michigan; MBA, Northwestern University FIRST JOB: Communications coordinator, Sara Lee Corporation WHAT I’M READING: Moonwalking with Einstein, by Jonathan Foer; Bossypants, by Tina Fey MY PHILOSOPHY: Family first. Every job is worth doing well. FAMILY: Parents; two sisters and a brother; 11 nieces and nephews; fiancé Adam INTERESTS: Michigan football, college hoops, politics, tennis FAVORITE CHARITies: USO, Fisher House COMPANY: Alcoa Inc. HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.alcoa.com BUSINESS: Mining and Manufacturing REVENUES: $21 billion (2010) EMPLOYEES: 59,000

ate has introduced me to talented, motivated and patient people who have taught me how to be a more effective professional, a stronger leader and a better person. Five of the most compelling lessons I’ve learned from these mentors, colleagues and family members follow: Say, “I’ll do it!” In my first PR job, I raised my hand for every assignment. I read the newspapers in the morning and painstakingly cut and pasted them for executives. I ran errands and faxed without hesitation. Gradually, I was asked to write news releases and organize media events. When I landed my next job, I was told, “Your attitude and eagerness got you noticed.” I still volunteer for extra assignments. Embrace opportunities outside your responsibility. Add value in every task. When I was asked to help with events at Sears, I always came back

with, “what if we did it this way?” Rather than ask what to do, I suggested options and recommendations for my boss to react to. It highlighted my critical thinking skills, creativity and initiative. Be inclusive. Build relationships with colleagues in a meaningful and sincere way; you want them to care whether or not you make it. Ask for advice and seek buy-in from the right business owners; they will feel vested in your success. Find out what’s important to influencers and deliver wins for them. They will see that you get things done and will be more eager to support your initiatives. And share the credit, even when it’s not entirely due. If you want people to feel a sense of ownership, include them in your success. Learn to say, “I’m sorry.” I had always thought that admitting w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

a mistake was a sign of weakness. My brother taught me otherwise, and the lesson was reinforced at Siemens when I apologized for missing a media opportunity, even though it wasn’t my fault. I took the hit and averted a strained relationship with a senior executive. Quickly admit when you are wrong. It demonstrates credible leadership. Lighten up. Colin Powell once wrote, “Avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your position falls, your ego goes with it.” In short, don’t take things personally. If your idea doesn’t get selected or it’s criticized, learn from the outcome and move on. Don’t pout. It is about getting to the best solution. These are my top five learnings that have helped me advance my career. Admittedly, some of these were learned the hard way, but they all made me stronger.

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Dr. Shirley A.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Davis

A

opportunities before they happen, and position people to produce extraordinary results. Women have the EQ and the unique ability to do all three. Be Visible. It’s important to seek broad exposure across the organization, your industry, and your community. Expand your alliances, your network, and your presence on social media, and be willing to leverage those contacts and build meaningful relationships that can benefit both of you. Don’t just collect business cards that only accumulate dust. Be Vocal. As women, we must speak up, speak out, and be willing to have courageous conversations. This is a prevailing weakness of women in the workplace. Studies reveal that women are less likely than men to demand more pay, promotions, and are uncomfortable “tooting their own horn.” Women still tend to think that their results alone will speak for themselves. There is an art to getting your results noticed and rewarded, and it starts with being politically and vocally savvy. Add Value. Know that you have unique skills, gifts and talents that can be developed, perfected, and leveraged in a way that makes an impact. Don’t settle for mediocrity but let excellence be your standard.

As women, we must speak up, speak out, and be willing to have courageous conversations.

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EDUCATION: BS, University of Maryland College Park; Master’s Degree in HR Management; PhD, Business and Organization Management FIRST JOB: Receptionist at doctor’s office

Society for Human Resource Management s a female professional, a person of color, and a single mom, moving up the corporate ladder has been wrought with unique challenges, setbacks, and life lessons. Being identified as “high potential,” or receiving the highest performance rating year after year didn’t always translate into new development assignments, coaching/mentoring from the company’s executives, or receiving a promotion or a raise. And after years of asking “how much more do I need to do,” “how much longer do I need to wait,” and “how much harder do I have to work to prove that I am worthy of the next level” with no real movement, I flipped the script. I became more selective about the types of companies, cultures, and bosses that would fit for me. I was prepared to negotiate my salary up front, and I observed and learned from the men who seemed to be promoted more quickly, with less experience, less education, and less effort. In all of those experiences, here are the 4 V’s of career success that I learned: Be a Visionary. Companies today are starving for visionary leadership, the ability to invoke followers without coercion, to perceive challenges and growth

TITLE: Global Diversity and Inclusion Officer

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WHAT I’M READING: Game Changers, by A.G. Lafley and Ram Charan; The Difference Maker, by John Maxwell; various business journals; and the Bible MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t settle for mediocrity but let excellence be your standard. FAMILY: Daughter, Gabrielle Victoria; fiancé, Terrell INTERESTS: Traveling around the world, culture and the arts, managing my daughter’s career FAVORITE CHARITies: My church, Reach One Ministries and missions COMPANY: Society for Human Resource Management HEADQUARTERS: Alexandria, Virginia WEBSITE: www.shrm.org BUSINESS: Non-profit membership association Members: 255,000


SEE IN US WHO YOU ARE

At New York Life we believe that people’s differences can be their greatest attributes. We recognize that employees’ unique qualities often lead to innovation, positive change, and a more productive and dynamic workplace.

For more information about a career with New York Life visit us at www.newyorklife.com/diversity NEW YORK LIFE. THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.® © 2010 New York Life Insuranace Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010 EOE/M/F/D/V


BRING YOUR IDEAS AND PASSION. BRING ALL OF WHO YOU ARE. BRING YOUR DIVERSE PERSPECTIVES. Bring it! You’re bristling with ingenuity. Crackling with creativity. Inspired by the thrill, the realization of seeing your ideas through, from explosions of brilliance in the mind to powerful instruments of communication and connectivity. And with Verizon, you’ll find a dynamic environment that thrives on the diverse perspectives and unique contributions of each and every one of its team members — and puts you in a position to effect positive change, locally and globally. Take the lead at yourverizoncareer.com. You can also like us on Facebook at facebook.com/verizoncareers for information on career opportunities and upcoming events.

Careers For Everything You Are

Verizon is an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Sheila Ellis, Terex Corporation • Mary Jo Eaton, CB Richard Ellis Group, Inc. • Maria Feeley, Pepper Hamilton LLP Elizabeth L. Elting, TransPerfect • Johanna Flower, Websense • Martha Delehanty, Verizon Communications • Kimberly A. Disandis, Arrow Electronics Michelle DiTondo, MGM Resorts International • Clydie Douglass, 3M • Andrea M. Farley, Troutman Sanders LLP

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Martha

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Delehanty

Verizon Communications Inc.

...as a corporate citizen, I have a duty to my community...

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Human Resources EDUCATION: BA, Mt. Holyoke College; MBA, University of Texas at Austin FIRST JOB: Secretary, National Cancer Institute WHAT I’M READING: Book of Daniel in the Bible; Mocking Jay, by Suzanne Collins MY PHILOSOPHY: Surround yourself with people who are not like you and accept their feedback. FAMILY: Husband, son and two daughters INTERESTS: Exercise, running FAVORITE CHARITY: 180 Turning Lives Around COMPANY: Verizon Communications Inc. HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.verizon.com BUSINESS: Broadband, video, and communications provider REVENUES: $106.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 196,200

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“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

ciples at work to ensure I am making a positive impact by listening to diverse thoughts and taking time to mentor employees within and outside my team. I’ve also reinforced the guiding prinorking at Verizon, I am influciples with my family, emphasizing the enced daily by some remarkable importance of teamwork, integrity, and employees who foster teamwork and respect for each other and our stakehold- respect to my children and encouraging them to be the best that they can. ers. Verizon’s employees make a differAnd while I work long hours and try to ence, whether they’re changing commuspend as much time as possible with my nities where they live, work and play or partnering across business units to better family, I realize that as a corporate citizen, I have a duty to my community, as well. serve our customers. Their dedication So I am humbled to serve on the board and commitment are shining examples of 180 Turning Lives Around, a nonof who we are as a global company. So when Verizon implemented a set of profit organization dedicated to eliminating domestic violence. National statistics guiding principles, what we refer to as our credo, it wasn’t difficult for me and report 960,000 incidents of violence against a current or former spouse, boyour employees to fully embrace these friend, or girlfriend and reveal that three edicts, which define who we are and million women are physically abused per who we aspire to be: the best company year. 180 Turning Lives Around provides to work for and the best company for our customers. The credo provides clear a safe haven and offers resources to individuals to help rebuild their lives. directions around how work should Any company can put words on a page get done and how we should treat each and call it a credo, mission or values; other. It is one of the tools we use to reinforce our culture every day, remind- however, that has limited impact on culture. Here, the credo is much more. ing us that integrity, customer needs, Rather than words on the wall, the credo urgency and teamwork must drive is alive in the halls shaping our future as everything we do 24/7. More importantly, the credo is a tem- a company. It’s a way for us to transform plate that helps me to manage relation- how we do business, and it energizes us to be change agents not only in the ships at work, with my family and my workplace but also in our communities. community. I try to apply these prin-

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Kimberly A.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Disandis

Arrow Electronics

Always project confidence and others will have confidence in you.

M

y leadership journey has been filled with challenges, risks and lessons learned. Each of those experiences taught me how to overcome obstacles, drive results, trust my team and celebrate success along the way. One of the favorite opportunities I have had is to mentor other women leaders. Some of the most common topics that we discuss are self-confidence, the art of delegation and how to motivate others. I always enjoy discussing these areas because they have been part of my development. Learning how to use these skills and cultivate them will make you a leader that others will want to follow. Self-confidence is about learning to trust your instincts. You have been selected for your role because of your success. Always project

confidence and others will have confidence in you. This will free you up to take risks, challenges and dare to make mistakes. It is okay to be wrong if you learned some lessons from the experience and can apply them the next time. I keep a journal to capture what worked well and what did not work well. At the end of the week I reflect on what I learned. Since women tend to be multi-taskers and problem solvers, we sometimes feel that we have to have all the answers. The best leaders recognize that delegating to their team and giving them the room to innovate will result in better solutions. This also will allow you to prioritize your time professionally and personally and create better life-balance. One of the most important things that I have learned is to carve out strategic

thinking time every week. This is a two-hour time slot that I protect in my calendar. It allows me to improve my strategic thinking as well as adjust strategies if needed. Employee motivation is key to individual performance, group productivity and a positive culture. Your team wants to know that they are trusted and their work is valued. Public recognition during meetings or team calls are effective ways to highlight outstanding performance. Sometimes women leaders are stereotyped as emotional. So be sure to not go overboard with your recognition or you will not be taken seriously. A nice personal touch is to send a handwritten thank-you card. Believe in yourself, recognize your strengths and build a support network with other women leaders. Enjoy your journey!

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TITLE: Vice President, Sales, Central Region, Global Components EDUCATION: BS, BA, Bowling Green State University FIRST JOB: Mowing lawns in my neighborhood WHAT I’M READING: The Street Lawyer, by Michael Connelly MY PHILOSOPHY: As written in the Bible, there is a time for everything. In addition to taking time to work, take time to think, read, play, be quiet, be aware, love and be loved, laugh, be friendly, dream, pray and give. FAMILY: Husband, Brad, and two amazing children, Alyssa and Nina INTERESTS: Running, hiking, gardening, watching my kids’ volleyball tournaments FAVORITE CHARITies: Susan G. Komen Foundation; our church, Hudson Chapel COMPANY: Arrow Electronics HEADQUARTERS: Melville, New York WEBSITE: www.arrow.com BUSINESS: Technology distribution REVENUES: $18.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 12,700

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Michelle

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TITLE: Senior Vice President of Human Resources, MGM Resorts International EDUCATION: BA, Arizona State University; MBA, Brigham Young University FIRST JOB: Cashier at Diamonds Department Store WHAT I’M READING: Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, by Amy Chua MY PHILOSOPHY: Treat everyone as important. FAMILY: My husband Rick, an elementary school principal, and I stay busy with our 7-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter INTERESTS: Cooking FAVORITE CHARITY: Asian Chamber Foundation COMPANY: MGM Resorts International HEADQUARTERS: Las Vegas, Nevada WEBSITE: www.mgmresorts.com BUSINESS: Hotels and Casinos REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 61,000

DiTondo

MGM Resorts International

A

fter I informed my mother of my new executive position – a job I could have only dreamed of landing ten years ago, she replied, “Hope you will be able to spend enough time with your family…”. I responded, “Of course I will, Mom, you know that to me, family has always been first priority.” I’m sure thousands of other women have received a similar response from their mothers after sharing their promotion. Like mine, their mothers are probably happy to hear of their daughter’s most recent professional achievement. During these conversations, however, our mothers bring up a genuine concern and a challenge many women face today. That is, how does a professional woman balance the roles of being a mother and/or wife, on

top of their career? Here are a few guiding principles I have found to be helpful in managing a balance between my family life and career. Personally define what “work-life balance” means to you. We all live in different situations and hold varying degrees of responsibilities; therefore, each of us will have a different work-life balance. Understand that no one can define where the appropriate balance is but you. When you are in the process of defining your balance, include your spouse (or significant other) and consider your job’s expectations. Establish parameters and communicate them. After you’ve defined your work-life balance, establish parameters that ensure the balance is upheld. Then, confidently communicate those parameters amongst your

family, workplace and friends. In doing so, you are setting the expectations others place upon you and by managing those expectations, you are managing your dual roles. Stick to your guns. Don’t be afraid to say no to a request that requires you to go beyond your work-life parameters. Work is going to take as much as you give it – that’s just the nature of business. It’s your responsibility as a mother (maybe wife) and an employee, to communicate your boundaries and remind your colleagues what they are if they forget. The question of my mother’s generation is being answered by many women today. Balancing the roles of family life and a career is possible and is accomplished by women nationwide on a daily basis.

Understand that no one can define where the appropriate balance is but you.

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Clydie

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Chief Diversity Officer EDUCATION: MEd, University of Minnesota FIRST JOB: Avon door-to-door sales WHAT I’M READING: The Why of Work: How great leaders build abundant organizations that win, by Dave and Wendy Ulrich MY PHILOSOPHY: Be part of the solution. Support others to be their best. FAMILY: My husband and two wonderful daughters INTERESTS: Motorcycling, classic cars, reading, cooking FAVORITE CHARITY: United Way COMPANY: 3M HEADQUARTERS: St. Paul, Minnesota WEBSITE: www.3M.com BUSINESS: Diversified Technology REVENUES: $26.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 80,000

Douglass

3M

I

have had a variety of roles at 3M, from production employee to HR business partner and now chief diversity officer. My career has crossed various industries as well as most of the corporate support functions, like finance, R&D, etc. While I worked full-time across multiple businesses, locations and job functions, I earned both my bachelor’s and master’s degrees. While 3M offers many opportunities, I realized that it was up to me to determine my future and find the support that I needed to build my career. There were two pieces of advice I received during my career that helped me to continue to grow and develop. First, the most challenging people or situations create the greatest opportunity for growth, and second, don’t just point out issues, become part of the solution. Throughout my career I have always looked for ways to be part of the solution. For instance, as an inventory analyst, I realized that the inventory issues were largely due to reporting errors, so I developed training for employees to increase reporting accuracy. As a result, I was selected as a production supervisor. In this role, I volunteered to train supervisors in other locations, which led to a position as a training specialist. As a training specialist responsible

for organizational development in 15 manufacturing sites across the U.S. and Canada, I asked to participate on the design team for a new manufacturing facility. I believe in continually looking for ways to challenge myself and contribute to the success of the company. 3M’s collaborative culture is a large part of my success as well. I had the opportunity to lead a virtual cross country team to support the integration of three newly acquired businesses. I worked to leverage the strengths of the entire team by sharing leadership with each team member. I purposefully engage people with diverse backgrounds to gain different perspectives. These diverse connections have led to opportunities to lead global design efforts to support our global HR model. I continually seek out stretch opportunities. In each new role, I make connections with other leaders for coaching and insights. As a result, I have had the opportunity to design new organizations, processes and tools which contribute to my growth and to the success of 3M globally. I encourage you to identify issues, create solutions and reach out to others to build your expertise while supporting business success.

The most challenging people or situations create the greatest opportunity for growth. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Mary Jo

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Eaton

CB Richard Ellis Group, Inc.

Take the word “can’t” out of your vocabulary.

I TITLE: Senior Managing Director, Florida EDUCATION: BA, Case Western Reserve University; MA, Temple University FIRST JOB: Worked for a real estate developer in Philadelphia WHAT I’M READING: The Corner Office, by Adam Bryant MY PHILOSOPHY: Having a strong work ethic, healthy work-life balance, respect and integrity and doing the best job you can do day in and day out, whether serving your firm or others. FAMILY: Single INTERESTS: Avid golfer FAVORITE CHARITY: Board of Directors, Jubilee Support Alliance COMPANY: CB Richard Ellis Group, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Los Angeles, California WEBSITE: www.cbre.com BUSINESS: Commercial real estate REVENUES: $5.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 31,000

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f you want to be successful, be committed to learning. I’m not just talking about academics but about learning from everyone around you and from your experiences. Push yourself and get out of your comfort zone so that you can acquire new skills and expertise. If someone had told me my first year of college that I would be running the State of Florida for CB Richard Ellis, the largest global real estate services firm in the world, I would never have believed it. My career aspiration was to be an accomplished oboist. I moved to Philadelphia to pursue a graduate degree in music. Once there, I got a temp job with a real estate company and developer to help pay the bills. But things didn’t turn out the way I thought with a career in music. When I was offered a full time job in the company’s corporate office and asked to manage their buildings, I took it and it opened up a whole new world for me. I also took with me some important lessons. Being a musician is about performance and discipline – you have to do 600 auditions to be the one selected to play in a performance or snag a coveted chair with an orchestra. My experiences as an oboist also taught me about team work and collaboration. Soloists have their time and place but great music is made when an orchestra plays together to make something greater than any one note or one instrument. A good conductor brings out the very best in his or her musicians, as does a great manager in nurturing and strengthening a team or individuals. Learn how to take advice and guidance so that when you get into management you’ll know how to give it. The rigor, the attention to detail, the striving for excellence that are all essential to being a great musician carry over into almost any field. Don’t settle for mediocrity. Take the word “can’t” out of your vocabulary. The only people who can’t are the ones who tell themselves they can’t. You can do anything you set your mind to. Lastly, all work and no play make anyone dull. Find things you love – hobbies, sports – and pursue them with the same vigor that you do your work. You’ll be happier and your performance at work will be stronger as well.

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Sheila

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Vice President, Business Processes EDUCATION: BS, Miami University FIRST JOB: Bagging groceries and pushing carts at Kroger’s; detailing cars WHAT I’M READING: Understanding A3 Thinking, by Durward Sobek II and Art Smalley MY PHILOSOPHY: Never underestimate the power of simplicity and common sense. Strive to make something better or easier for at least one person every day. Leave things in the way you found them, or ideally better. Always be learning. FAMILY: Husband, son and daughter-in-law, daughter INTERESTS: Music, team sports, boating, traveling FAVORITE CHARITY: Red Cross COMPANY: Terex Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Westport, Connecticut WEBSITE: www.terex.com BUSINESS: Industrial Equipment REVENUES: $4.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 16,000

Ellis

Terex Corporation

I

n my experience, a rewarding career comes from hard work, perseverance, and timing, more than from talent. It takes discipline to perform mundane tasks, but practice makes perfect, and focus on the fundamentals pays off in the long run. My career has been in operations and support functions in global aerospace and industrial equipment industries, both public and private. Some roles have been traditional, some unique, and one that I took on the advice of a well-respected mentor turned out to be a game changer for me. In most of my roles, I have been the only woman in the department. The knowledge I gained by working harder to win people over benefits me every day. Repeated success leads to credibility, trust, and future opportunities of greater responsibility. A study mission to Toyota in 2000 exposed me to lean manufacturing. As it becomes more widely accepted, I see the application of “lean” to any process as a tool to help remove waste, reduce cost and increase productivity. In my current role, I use lean principles to make our team members’ jobs faster and easier. Key learnings for me have been: Ask a lot of questions, and always thank people for sharing their knowledge. When you are new to a situation or task, it’s a fast way to learn specific

information and company culture, and it’s a great way to build a network. Growth comes from pushing beyond your comfort zone. Difficult challenges are the most rewarding. We learn far more from failure than success. Admit when you’re wrong, and move on; everyone makes mistakes. Learn from them and focus on quick recovery. It sets a great example and leads to a culture of teamwork and trust. Look for the potential in people. Values can’t be taught, but skills can be developed. People are the lifeblood of the business. Say “thanks,” and recognize suggestions and improvement frequently and publicly. Seeking input from a diverse group always results in a more optimal solution. Capitalize on diversity as a competitive weapon. Never stop learning. If you reach a senior position, make time to teach others. Prevent, prevent, prevent – my mother must have said this to me a million times, and she is right. It’s so much more enjoyable and cost effective to do things right the first time. Communicate beyond the obvious audience. Be an active listener. Have the courage to admit you don’t know everything, and surround yourself with people who complement each others’ strengths.

...relentless focus on the fundamentals always pays off in the long run. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Elizabeth L.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Elting

TransPerfect

I continue to set specific goals with my team each year.

I TITLE: Co-founder, Co-CEO EDUCATION: BA, Trinity College; MBA, New York University FIRST JOB: Walking a child to school, delivering newspapers, babysitting WHAT I’M READING: The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Reader’s Digest, Crain’s New York Business; Leading with the Heart, by Mike Krzyzewski, Setting the Table, by Danny Meyer, and Obama’s Wars, by Bob Woodward MY PHILOSOPHY: Collaborative, hands-on and trusting leadership style. FAMILY: Husband, Michael; kids, Zachary and Jason INTERESTS: My kids and their sports, travel, skiing, swimming FAVORITE CHARITies: Joyful Heart, United Cerebral Palsy, Achilles, National Autism Association, American Heart Association COMPANY: TransPerfect HEADQUARTERS: Offices – more than 70 around the globe WEBSITE: www.transperfect.com BUSINESS: Global Language and Business Services REVENUES: $251 million EMPLOYEES: 1,600

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have come a long way from co-founding TransPerfect in my dorm room at the New York University Stern School of Business in 1992. Last year, the company reached more than $250 million in revenue. With approximately 1,600 full-time employees in 66 offices around the globe, TransPerfect is a top five woman-owned business and the third largest language services company in the world. Starting from my dorm room with $5,000 in startup funding from credit cards, I set a goal: In six months, the company would move into office space. It did. I continue to set specific goals with my team each year. This focus on goal setting and an employee-friendly corporate culture has helped me achieve my competitive advantage. To gain the customer service edge, my employees listen and go above and beyond their clients’ needs. “You don’t need a novel idea – you [just] need to do it better and ‘wow’ the client.” One of the biggest challenges I have encountered was maintaining the absolute highest level of quality and service as the business scales. Providing outstanding quality and service, or put more simply, spoiling the client, has

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always been my highest priority and the key to TransPerfect’s success. I have been able to take the business from a dorm-room start-up to a multinational company, adapting to each new phase of the company and changing my approach accordingly. Throughout the entire process, I considered myself blessed that I have had the opportunity to continually learn and grow as I master the art of leadership at a growing business. My CEO leadership style matures along with the company. Through the years, I acquired collaborative, handson and trusting leadership skills. These skills allow me to empower employees to excel in their individual areas through trust and education. As I have matured as a CEO, I’ve learned that winning isn’t easy, and it’s not a popularity contest. I focus every day on seeking the best for my employees and company. I have formed an entrepreneurial, team-building type of environment wherein employees are part of a professional organization with clearly stated goals and visions. TransPerfect is known as a great place for overachievers. People who want to control their own destinies flourish in the meritocracy that I have created.


Walmart is proud to support our more than 800,000 female associates in the U.S.

Spark empowerment


Andrea M.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Partner and Business Law section chief EDUCATION: BA, University of Florida; JD, Vanderbilt University FIRST JOB: Professional tennis player WHAT I’M READING: Open, by Andre Agassi

Farley

Troutman Sanders LLP

MY PHILOSOPHY: There is a time for everything, it just may not all be today. FAMILY: Husband Paul Carriere; son Grant; daughter Margot INTERESTS: Tennis, wine FAVORITE CHARITY: American Cancer Society COMPANY: Troutman Sanders LLP HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia WEBSITE: www.troutmansanders.com BUSINESS: Law firm REVENUES: $363.5 million EMPLOYEES: 650 lawyers

I

wish I had the magical answer to the work-life balance dilemma that faces so many women in the legal profession. Although there are (and have been for over two decades) an equal percentage of male and female first-year associates at large law firms, the percentage of women partners, and in particular women partners in leadership roles, is far less. This “leaky pipeline,” as it’s called in the legal profession, is due in part to the need for many women to work fewer or more regular hours during child-rearing years or as a result of other family responsibilities. For me, work-life balance is not something that I achieve in that “aha!” moment of “here’s how you do it.” Achievement is personal and in order to have professional as well as personal satisfaction, you first have to know what that means for you, which may be different than it is for the person who sits in the office next to you. That seems like an easy task, but too many women, and men for that matter, have a difficult time separating their own personal desires from the desires of society, employers, family, etc. I’ve learned that I am personally accountable for my own happiness and that I cannot lay that responsibility on others. At the same time, I know with 100 percent certainty that I could not achieve balance in my life or satisfaction in my career without the support and total buy-in from my husband. I’m fortunate that he also is a corporate attorney and therefore knows that when I’m working on a deal, it will have a timetable of its own with little regard for my work-life balancing act. But because I love being a deal lawyer and the professional satisfaction it brings me, I can’t measure balance on a daily or even weekly basis. Of course, there are times when maintaining that overall perspective is difficult. In those times, two things keep me going: a healthy sense of humor that allows me to readily laugh at myself when things don’t go as planned, and something a friend told me, “There is a time for everything, it just may not all be today.”

...work-life balance is not something that I achieve in that “aha!” moment of “here’s how you do it.

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Your perspective is our advantage

When you want a fresh perspective, you need to look from a different angle. That’s why Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is committed to diversity in our workforce, in our partners and suppliers, and in the community organizations we support. Because how you understand the world may help others understand it better, too.

An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U7843, 8/11


Maria

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Feeley

Pepper Hamilton LLP

Self-promotion...may be all that stands between you and that next great opportunity.

W

e all like to think that we will be rewarded with opportunities and advancement if we work hard, obtain results, and strive for professional excellence. But, competency, hard work and good results do not automatically translate to professional rewards. Selfpromotion is often the missing ingredient and may be all that stands between you and that next great opportunity. Here are some tips to master the art of effective self-promotion. Modesty is not the best policy. If you are uncomfortable promoting yourself, change the way you think about it. Consider it a job requirement, not unnecessary bragging. Making self-promotion a priority will help you present your best professional image to those making decisions about your future. Employers often require employee self-assessments prior to determining raises and promotions. If you do not learn to effectively selfpromote, you will not present your best self-assessment to the decision makers. By thinking of self-promotion as a function of your profession, akin to mandatory training, you will become more comfortable with the concept and less modest when it comes to your career. Keep track of your achievements. If you are not conscious of your achievements, others will not be. Keep track of your achievements, and leadership 82

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appointments. If you record your achievements as they occur, you will have them handy when it is time to self-promote. Be prepared to self-promote when an opportunity presents itself. Have a commercial ready for unexpected opportunities. If you end up in an elevator with your department head, be ready to introduce yourself, explain what you do, and how you contribute to the organization. Convey enthusiasm so that she will understand your passion. Be prepared to self-promote when an opportunity does not present itself. If you accomplished something important, get the word out. Send an email to a colleague telling her about a recent project, and ask for opportunities to assist her with similar projects. Or, if you want a leadership position, ask for a meeting to discuss how you can better serve the organization. Accept well deserved praise. When someone compliments you, do not belittle your contribution. Acknowledge your efforts, explain how rewarding the results are and express gratitude. Be proactive. Do not assume your work will speak for itself. Be proactive and plant the seeds for future opportunities, including assignments, leadership positions, etc. Do not wait to be handed your opportunity to shine.

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TITLE: Partner, Member, Hiring and Diversity Committees EDUCATION: BA, Rosemont College; JD, Washington and Lee University School of Law FIRST JOB: Waitress at Denny’s WHAT I’M READING: Cutting for Stone, by Abraham Verghese; The Help, by Kathryn Stockett MY PHILOSOPHY: Choose to be happy. Appreciate what you have. Work hard but enjoy life. FAMILY: Husband, Pete; son, Bennett INTERESTS: Music, dance, reading fiction FAVORITE CHARITies: The Philadelphia Bar Foundation, Women’s Way, the Steward’s Alliance of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia COMPANY: Pepper Hamilton LLP HEADQUARTERS: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania WEBSITE: www.pepperlaw.com BUSINESS: Law Firm REVENUES: $313 million EMPLOYEES: 1,094


Johanna

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Flower

TITLE: Vice President, Marketing & Small Business Sales EDUCATION: BA, University of Brighton, United Kingdom FIRST JOB: Early morning shifts in a bakery WHAT I’M READING: Snowman, by Jo Nesbo MY PHILOSOPHY: Enjoy and embrace every opportunity, set high standards and work to achieve them. FAMILY: Husband Tony and two wonderful daughters Isabelle and Alexandra INTERESTS: Travel, skiing, spending time with my family FAVORITE CHARITY: SOS Children’s Villages COMPANY: Websense HEADQUARTERS: San Diego, California WEBSITE: www.websense.com BUSINESS: Internet Security REVENUES: $332.8 million EMPLOYEES: 1,500

Websense

F

rom Europe to the Middle East, Asia and the U.S., I’ve had the good fortune to travel the world, shaping marketing and business strategies for Websense, a global provider of web, email and data security solutions. Born in Sweden and raised in a very small town, I aspired from a young age to explore the world through a career in international business. Today, at Websense, I enjoy a career that challenges me on a daily basis. At 36, I oversee a global team of 90 and operate in a fastpaced tech industry that requires my attention nearly 24/7. To stay on track, I adhere to a core set of principles that reflects my own brand of leadership – one that takes into account today’s rapidly evolving, global business environment. First and foremost, I believe in embracing

change. To grow, we must step outside of our comfort zones, take calculated risks and seize new opportunities. Embracing change is something that I’ve never been afraid to do, and I’ve learned so much because of it. My confidence stems from the strong network that I’ve built, both professionally and personally. I seek out the best and most talented individuals to join my staff. If their skills are stronger than mine in a particular area, all the better. I have also benefited from the tremendous support of my family. In traveling the world, I’ve learned the significance of respecting local practices. I advise my staff to follow international customs and conduct themselves with diplomacy, while standing firm in their beliefs. Another one of my principles – essential in today’s economic climate

– is to ensure that all projects align with overall business and financial goals. This principle drives my decisions and guides my actions, and as a result, has allowed me to gain the trust of other executives and colleagues. Staying true to commitment is perhaps my most important advice for up-and-coming business leaders. It’s essential to deliver on what’s promised, and if you fall short, to be transparent in explaining why and learn from your mistakes. This principle, above all others, can make or break your career. From my childhood in Sweden to my work at Websense today, I’ve followed my dreams of becoming a global business executive. It’s my hope that my story, and my leadership principles, demonstrate that young professionals can pursue their dreams with integrity and commitment.

I seek out the best and most talented individuals to join my staff. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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FOSTERING A DIVERSE AND

INCLUSIVE

CULTURE

SIKI GIUNTA: A WOMAN WORTH WATCHING We salute Siki Giunta, Global VP, Cloud Computing & Cloud Services, selected by the Diversity Journal for “Women Worth Watching” in 2012.

At CSC, we believe that diversity empowers creativity and fosters collaboration, openness and innovation. It brings together unique perspectives, fresh ways of thinking and new insights for solving our clients’ most intractable IT challenges.


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Françoise Gri, ManpowerGroup • Ellen D. Gonda, Hilton Worldwide • Cristy Gallo-Aquino, Ryder System, Inc. Joan Hogan Gillman, Time Warner Cable • Jill M. Granat, Burger King Corporation • Natalie Lorenz Givans, Booz Allen Hamilton • Cindy Gentry, Mercer Kathleen Gibson, Citi • Siki Giunta, CSC • Andrea Greene, Network Hardware Resale

10

th

annual

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Cristy Gallo-

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Vice President and Controller EDUCATION: BACC, MBA, Florida International University FIRST JOB: KPMG’s audit practice WHAT I’M READING: The Male Factor, by Shaunti Feldhahn MY PHILOSOPHY: One day at a time. FAMILY: Husband Henry; daughters Gabriela and Victoria INTERESTS: Traveling, music, baking, scrapbooking FAVORITE CHARITY: American Heart Association COMPANY: Ryder System, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Miami, Florida WEBSITE: www.ryder.com BUSINESS: Commercial Transportation and Supply Chain Solutions REVENUES: $5.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 26,000

Aquino

Ryder System, Inc.

K

nowing the career path you want to take and having the drive to get there are key components to success. I’ve always had a passion for accounting and enjoy finding accounting solutions that meet business needs. I knew early on that I wanted to be the controller of a public company. I set my sights high, charted the course, and just recently attained that goal, having been promoted to vice president and controller of a Fortune 500 company. I believe that in addition to working hard and knowing your path, it’s important to surround yourself with good people. Throughout my career I have been able to build significant relationships with my peers, staff and supervisors. Surrounding yourself with quality staff is important because your success is ultimately a tribute to their success. Because of my ability

to perform my job well, build strong relationships and develop a high-quality team, leaders in other areas began to see me as a resource they respected and relied upon. They knew that I approached my work with integrity and precision, always putting forth 100 percent. Over time, this enabled me to build sponsors. I began my accounting career in KPMG’s audit practice, where I spent seven years serving corporate accounts, including Ryder. I made my way to Ryder after one of my early mentors recognized my drive and capabilities and recommended me for an accounting position. I joined Ryder in 2004 and soon became pregnant with my first daughter. My second daughter followed only one year later. Initially, I was unsure how to hit the work-life balance. I sought out other women in the organization whom

I respected and learned from them. I was fortunate to have the support of my boss and mentor, who are both strong advocates of the family unit. But most importantly, I have the support of my husband and family, who recognized that I am a career woman. They gave me the flexibility I needed to be successful at work and at home. My best advice to women aspiring to become corporate leaders is to know the path you want to take and pursue it with passion, energy and drive. Hold yourself to the highest levels of professional standards. Surround yourself with good people and ask for feedback from those you trust and respect. Most importantly, believe in yourself and set no boundaries. You really can have the right balance. You can advance at high levels, be successful in your career and still be a great mom.

...know the path you want to take and pursue it with passion, energy and drive.

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Cindy

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Gentry

Mercer

...to bring the strength of who you really are to the workplace.

F TITLE: Senior Partner EDUCATION: MPH, UC Berkeley FIRST JOB: Taught preschool in migrant labor camp WHAT I’M READING: Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Be the person you want to become. FAMILY: Husband John; children Daniel, Maria, Lexie INTERESTS: Hiking, yoga, Zumba FAVORITE CHARITY: Autism Speaks COMPANY: Mercer HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.mercer.com BUSINESS: Human Resource Consulting REVENUES: $3.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 18,000

or a generation, my family hid in the shadows, concealing the richness of our Latino heritage, changing surnames to anglicize them and hiding the “arroz con pollo” when neighbors visited. With blue collar backgrounds and no formal education, my parents instilled a strong work ethic that still inspires me. I remember when my first grade teacher told my mother that I was “college material,” a statement that fueled my mother to push me beyond limits that I thought were possible. As I started my early career, I tried to emulate business practices commonplace at the time, ignoring my instincts as a woman and as a parent, and sometimes failing to draw upon the foundation of values ingrained by my family. I sought business advice in every corner, reading books on habits of highly successful people, and devouring great authors and business advisors such as Drucker, Collins, Deming, Blanchard and Peters. As I advanced in my career, I realized that, as women, we get conflicting messages about who we should be and how to comport ourselves in business. The best advice I have to give others is to bring the strength of who you really are to the workplace. The lessons learned from your family values, the illustrative education as a parent and the value of self reflection are the

foundation of what makes us unique and successful in the workplace. Determination, hard work, a nevergive-up attitude and thinking of others as a unit or family were principles that I began to espouse as I mentored young women in the workplace. I have learned to push people to take on tasks and jobs beyond what they believed they are capable of doing, a lesson that I learned from my mother. I have seen the value of providing candid feedback about a person’s strengths and weaknesses. I have encouraged women to break through the cultural barrier of subservience to find their voice, use their intellect and take a stand. I have mentored and advised by example and shown Latinas, in particular, a model for decision making, career and family choices and leadership styles, and instilled a sense that it is possible to succeed. The qualities that women bring to the workplace, e.g., inclusion, collaboration, teamwork and the desire to create a legacy for future generations, are the foundation of how we enjoy success. On Mother’s Day, my college-age daughter wrote to tell me, “I want to grow up to be like you.” In completing this cycle, the family values that I learned from my mother have been passed on to the next generation and to young budding leaders in the workplace.

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Kathleen

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Gibson

Citi

Embrace change as the true opportunity to make things better for your company and your teams.

I

believe leaders must be change agents because change is critical to business growth and success; it is not optional. As soon as we realize that change is required, those who want to succeed realize that it’s critical to develop the skills to deal with and lead through the change. Being fully responsive to the needs of our customers, our teams, and our industry requires change management every day. Leading change requires our leaders and our teams to step into uncomfortable situations and do things differently. It is much more comfortable for teams not to change. Leading change is leading toward new ground, new ideas, and new opportunities while helping teams develop new thinking and new

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habits. Effective leaders need to acknowledge that it is hard for teams to feel competent when things are changing around them. Many, many times the leader’s job is to encourage, but also consistently require new skills to develop and make sure that individual development is a priority. It takes patience and consistency over a long period of time for our teams to understand that the changes are required and lasting. As hard as it may be on certain days, leaders must also not allow themselves to focus internally very long. It is external focus that will create the wins and successes teams need, especially in the difficult times. Work to have all the tools and resources your teams need to succeed. Model the behaviors you want from your

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team. Keep a rigorous focus on your customers and your teams. Celebrate and thank your teams and your customers. They are the way forward and will lift you out of the trials of the moment. Focus forward all the time and help create the vision for the recovery. Ultimately, you must work hard, show up every day, and do all you know to do. Lead from the front, and develop trusted relationships with your customers, your teams, and your bosses. Learn from your mistakes and don’t let mistakes keep you from making progress. There will be change throughout any career so don’t let it weigh you down. Embrace change as the true opportunity to make things better for your company and your teams.

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TITLE: President Central Division, US Commercial Banking, Citibank EDUCATION: BS, Texas A&M University FIRST JOB: Management Trainee, RepublicBank Dallas WHAT I’M READING: Empire of the Summer Moon, by S.C. Gwynne; Vanity Fair; The Big Short, by Michael Lewis MY PHILOSOPHY: Find something good in every day. If you stay focused on your family, your people and your customers – you will. FAMILY: My husband, Robert, my daughters, Catherine and Sarah INTERESTS: Traveling, spending time with family and friends, playing the piano, learning about gardening FAVORITE CHARITies: Children’s Medical Center, United Way, March of Dimes, Dallas Regional Chamber, Dallas Committee on Foreign Relations, The Association of Former Students at Texas A&M COMPANY: Citi HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.citigroup.com BUSINESS: Financial Services REVENUES: $65.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 260,000


Joan Hogan

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Gillman

Time Warner Cable

M

y perspective on diversity was shaped at an early age. I realize today that my childhood experiences had a profound influence on my world view and leadership style. While in kindergarten in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1968, the National Guard was called into our city to control protests over the lack of civil rights and the murders of Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King. Mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters, rich and poor, educated and uneducated, people from all walks of life, stood up for their belief that every American should have an opportunity for personal advancement, a livelihood, a career or a chance at the presidency. Furthermore, as the product of an inner city school system that also served Yale University graduate school housing, I had the good fortune of being exposed to the most diverse population of students. My class of children from more than 30 foreign countries opened a window into a world very different from the one that I knew. We celebrated every holiday with the music and cuisines of the native countries of our classmates. Together, we shared intense curiosity about our cultures, discovered all that we had in common and developed a mutual

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Time Warner Cable; President, Time Warner Cable Media EDUCATION: BA, The College of the Holy Cross; MA, George Washington University FIRST JOB: Staff Assistant to U.S. Senator Chris Dodd WHAT I’M READING: How We Decide, by Jonah Lehrer

respect for how we were different. Even though I did not realize how unusual it was, my parents also taught me to celebrate differences and embrace diversity. They always encouraged me to see things from a different perspective and to treat all people equally. They never criticized anyone, with the exception of Richard Nixon during Watergate. They led by example and instilled in me the importance of being respectful and open towards all people, their cultures and ideas. In business, as in life, the more open we are to the value that each individual can bring to a team, a school or a community, the greater are our chances of getting the best out of everyone. The best leaders surround themselves with complementary skills and perspectives. The best leaders realize that diversity is the foundation upon which great teams excel. In an increasingly interconnected world, prioritizing diversity is essential. Time and again in my life and my career, I have drawn on my early childhood experiences to develop teams, leaders, and even my own two children, teaching them to stretch outside their comfort zone, embrace differences and trust their teammates. And when they do, the results speak for themselves.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Seek and celebrate diverse skills and perspectives to drive business success and personal growth. FAMILY: Husband and two children INTERESTS: Family activities and adventures, gardening, reading, traveling FAVORITE CHARITY: The City Parks Foundation COMPANY: Time Warner Cable HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.timewarnercable.com BUSINESS: Cable, Internet, Phone Services REVENUES: $18.9 billion as of fiscal year 2010 EMPLOYEES: 48,000

...diversity is the foundation upon which great teams excel.

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Siki

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Giunta

EDUCATION: BA, BA, De Vedruna College; BA, BA, Sorbonne FIRST JOB: System Engineer WHAT I’M READING: The Last Song, by Nicholas Sparks

CSC

I

thought it would be fun to provide some lessons learned that I typically give when I am mentoring a colleague or just having coffee with a friend. Not everything here will apply to you, but some of these suggestions could help you when you are in a bind. As a good friend of mine once taught me, let happiness be your guide, and always remember that “misery is optional.” If you decide to change jobs, do it because you are running to an opportunity, not because you are running away from something. When in doubt, be yourself. Never be afraid to show your passion, your skills, or your point of view. Have a plan for yourself; not one that is measured in days or months, but rather, in milestones and goals. Having this plan will give you purpose in a time of boredom and strength when you

are stuck in a dead end. Your plan will guide your actions when you seek new employment or a change of field. Hard decisions should have “short legs.” I have learned that procrastinating on the tough choices creates stress for you and your environment. Good examples of this include hiring and firing, decommissioning a product, delivering bad news to a board or a boss. Set a schedule to collect all the data needed to make a decision and then execute with confidence. In my experience, long decision times frustrate people and customers and affect the agility of business. You don’t have to like the people you work with, but it helps. Affinity in business helps when the going gets tough and the hours grow long. Build broad network connections in your working adventures; they will have lasting effects in your

career and can even make your day-to-day life easier. It is OK to say “I don’t know.” This phrase has a very powerful effect on people. When I was a CEO, in my first board meeting, I felt that I had to know everything. I have since learned that what’s really key to credibility is knowing your data, having a clear point of view and having good judgment. Being a working woman is certainly tough, but it has been a rewarding life choice for me. On the other hand, nothing can match the happiness and serenity that I see in the eyes of the children of hard working moms like my sister, Anna. To these women who made the really tough choice to stay home and raise happy and healthy children I say, “job well done!” Most importantly, be happy with your choices. As Oprah says, “Try to live the life that you want.”

...procrastinating on the tough choices creates stress for you and your environment.

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TITLE: Vice President of Global Cloud & Computing

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MY PHILOSOPHY: Have passion in all that you pursue. FAMILY: Husband Dustin INTERESTS: Golf FAVORITE CHARITY: Susan G. Komen for the Cure COMPANY: CSC HEADQUARTERS: Falls Church, Virginia WEBSITE: www.csc.com BUSINESS: Technology REVENUES: $16 billion EMPLOYEES: 91,000


Natalie Lorenz

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Givans

Booz Allen Hamilton

...my overarching passion is being a catalyst for improvement...

I

spent my childhood in Hawaii and California, where I became enamored of four things: hula, Girl Scouts, math/science/environment and Star Trek. Encouraged by my parents, who were hardworking and determined themselves, I threw myself into all these passions. Dancing gave me pure joy – it fed my soul. Earning Girl Scout badges was fun and fulfilling. Designing electrical circuits, conducting science experiments in summer camp, and studying environmental challenges in the 70’s in California fed my desire to solve hard problems. And building model planes and spaceships inspired by Star Trek underscored my love for science. (I hoped I’d be an astronaut someday!) While I didn’t become an astronaut, I went to MIT, where I majored in electrical engineering, competed in ballroom dance, sang in a band, and developed my mantra: “Be authentic and fully present.” Upon graduation, I had offers from a dozen companies. Eleven wanted me to work in a lab, designing something. Only Booz Allen’s offer, which included working with clients while solving hard problems, allowed me to be true to my whole self. After plenty of trial and error, I built on “Be authentic,” codifying my other guiding principles: “Strive for balance

and integration” and “Pursue my passions.” Each is crucial to my overall well-being. Being authentic means I give the best of myself to the people or task at hand. If I’m riding bikes with my 10-yearold, I don’t check my iPhone. If I’m in a meeting, I close my laptop. I’m committed to what’s happening now. I learned the hard way that if I don’t integrate the parts of my life into a coherent whole, I’m overloaded, unproductive, and unhappy. That’s why I created the “Three I’s” framework. Simply put, I can’t be Involved in everything all the time. I prioritize and revisit what I’m doing every six months, deciding when I can just be Informed or merely Interested and let others lead and drive the outcomes. My passions have shifted over the years. Although I still dance hula with my halau and work with Girl Scouts, AFCEA, and MIT on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), my overarching passion is being a catalyst for improvement through others and their strengths and interests. By bringing the right people with the right skills together, I can effect tremendous change for my family, my clients, my community, and our world. For me, that’s being authentic – dancing with my whole heart, as if nobody’s watching. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Cybersecurity Leader EDUCATION: BS, MIT; MS, Johns Hopkins University FIRST JOB: Consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton, the only company I interviewed with that wanted me to work with people – not in a lab. WHAT I’M READING: A New Earth, by Eckhart Tolle; Artemis Fowl, by Eoin Colfer, with my 10-year-old MY PHILOSOPHY: Be fully present. Dance as though nobody’s watching. FAMILY: My kids: Zane, twins Samantha and Andy INTERESTS: Polynesian dancing and culture, skiing, geocaching, riding bikes, playing basketball and bass guitar, experimenting in the kitchen FAVORITE CHARITies: Girl Scouts, American Heart Association, the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) International COMPANY: Booz Allen Hamilton HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEBSITE: www.BoozAllen.com BUSINESS: Strategy and technology consulting REVENUES: $5.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 25,000

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Ellen D.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Gonda

’m often approached by people for guidance at varying stages of their careers. My advice to them is based on my personal experience, as well as the wisdom I have been fortunate to get from my advisors and mentors along the way. I would sum it up as the following: Be a true team player. Be conscientious and collaborative. These two qualities will be essential throughout your career. Be an active listener. One of the keys to being a good communicator is to be a good listener. Have patience and tenacity. Always keep your vision and goal in mind, but understand it may take time and creativity for them to come to fruition. Remain true to yourself. Understand when to evolve and when to stand your ground. Your principles and values define who you are and are important to your success. Be flexible. In an ever-changing world, adapting to circumstances is essential – you can do this and still remain true to yourself. Be passionate about your work. Pursue what makes you happy and then you can truly love what you do. Invest in the people around you and help them develop. You are only as good as your team and if you invest

in their growth, it will help everyone be successful. Lead a balanced life. Never lose sight of what makes you unique. Make time to nurture and develop personal interests. These additional dimensions can help you bring different perspectives to your job, while also providing great and necessary outlets. Perfect your craft. Always seek knowledge and hone your skills. Learn as much as you can about your profession and look for stretch assignments that will challenge you and help you develop professionally. Don’t mistake humility for weakness. Never underestimate the skill set or hidden abilities each person possesses. Everyone has something to offer. These points can serve as great guides to just about anyone, at any career stage. However, since women in the workforce still confront unique challenges, it is particularly important that we share advice with each other and support each other’s growth. At Hilton Worldwide, we are launching an initiative, which I will lead, to provide a forum to share experiences, advice and strategies to ensure our women meet their full professional potential in an environment that enables them to do so.

Never lose sight of what makes you unique.

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EDUCATION: BA, University of California, Berkeley FIRST JOB: French patisserie in Sydney, Australia WHAT I’M READING: A Visit from the Goon Squad, by Jennifer Egan

Hilton Worldwide

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TITLE: Senior Vice President, Global Corporate Communications

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MY PHILOSOPHY: Enjoy! FAMILY: Lucky to have a wonderful, loving extended family INTERESTS: Travel, food, photography, music and so much more FAVORITE CHARITies: I support a number of charities COMPANY: Hilton Worldwide HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEBSITE: www.hiltonworldwide.com BUSINESS: Global hospitality company EMPLOYEES: 600,000 Team Members at Hilton Worldwide-branded properties


Jill M.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Granat

Burger King Corporation

Being a successful leader is a lifelong endeavor.

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y personal and professional experiences have taught me many things, including the importance of leading by example, recognizing great talent and building strong teams. I strive to provide my team members with the right opportunities to showcase their strengths and excel in their careers. Being a successful leader is a lifelong endeavor. I believe there are five essential characteristics that make a successful leader. A leader must first be strategic. He or she must set goals and have a clear vision and plan for the future. Second, a leader ought to be courageous. A true leader will be on the frontline instilling confidence and providing support, while leading their team towards success. Third, a leader has to inspire and motivate

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people to help them meet and achieve their goals. Fourth, humility is a necessity. A leader must be able to admit when he or she is wrong or has made a mistake. Lastly and what I deem as the most important attribute, a leader must be honest and have integrity. His or her team will appreciate someone who is sincere, truthful and acts in a way that is consistent with his or her principles. Supporting these leadership qualities are the five core values held by my organization, which I believe will help your employees enhance their skills and move toward their career goals. These values are Bold, Accountable, Empowered, Meritocratic and Fun. Bold represents one’s determination to approach every situation with dynamic,

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innovative thinking. Accountable means embracing responsibilities to achieve goals or targets. Empowered is being charged to make a difference – as a team – in a sustainable way. A meritocracy rewards high performers and encourages individual growth. And my personal favorite, fun, means working and playing hard while fostering an environment where people enjoy coming to work every day. With a vision for the future and a solid strategy for getting there, good leaders foster change. To accomplish this change, I recommend that you surround yourself with highly talented people who are passionate, creative and intuitive. This will pave the way for creating a dynamic and rewarding environment for both you and your employees.

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TITLE: General Counsel, Corporate Secretary and Chief Compliance Officer EDUCATION: BS, Florida International University; JD, University of Florida FIRST JOB: Worked in the MetroZoo gift shop at the age of 15 WHAT I’M READING: The Lincoln Lawyer, by Michael Connelly MY PHILOSOPHY: Every moment you get is a gift. Spend it on things that matter. FAMILY: An incredibly supportive husband and two adorable boys, ages 6 and 5 INTERESTS: Reading, cooking, exercising FAVORITE CHARITY: HAVE IT YOUR WAY® Foundation COMPANY: Burger King Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Miami, Florida WEBSITE: www.bk.com BUSINESS: Quick Service Restaurants EMPLOYEES: Over 27,000


Andrea

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Chief Financial Officer EDUCATION: BA, Duke University; MBA, Harvard Business School FIRST JOB: Camp counselor WHAT I’M READING: Blessing of a Skinned Knee, by Wendy Mogel MY PHILOSOPHY: To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone. FAMILY: A husband, one son, and one daughter INTERESTS: Anything with my kids, running, reading, traveling FAVORITE CHARITY: CoachArt COMPANY: Network Hardware Resale HEADQUARTERS: Santa Barbara, California WEBSITE: www.networkhardware.com BUSINESS: Global provider of pre-owned and new networking solutions REVENUES: Over $220 million EMPLOYEES: 325

Greene

Network Hardware Resale

T

here’s a sign on my office wall which sums up a key piece of advice I would give to any aspiring professional: “Every Day in Every Way.” In the context of your career, here are the ways you can enhance your progress every day: Make yourself indispensable: Don’t limit your job role to your job title; get involved wherever needed. You will be a more valuable employee if you show your superiors that you are willing to help out and be a team player. This also means coming to work with a positive attitude and ready to do work. It sounds obvious, but by being prepared to focus and doing your best every day, you become more effective in your role. Focus on service and improvement – constantly: No matter where you work or what your position is, you always have a customer. A CEO’s customer is the board; an executive assistant’s customer is the executive. Every action should be focused on generating high customer satisfaction. The people with leadership potential are those who are internally-driven, always thinking about making improvements and better servicing their customer. Be emotionally attuned: As you advance and take on leadership roles, the importance of being a team player pivots on your ability to build a strong, supportive team. Work to understand the team dynamics, each person’s

strengths and weaknesses, and develop your team relationships. Sometimes, a leader has to convey a difficult message or motivate a team during tough times. To do this successfully, focus on the way the message is delivered (the emotional value), not just the content. Clarify the difference between ideas and recommendations: There is a time for brainstorming and a time for making recommendations. Brainstorming is a free process where anything goes and conversely, when making a recommendation, you need to back it up with data and information to offer an evidencebased solution. Be clear about both, and this will build trust in your skills and ability, helping develop your role as a go-to team member. Have the courage to make decisions: Decision-making is a skill you need to develop early on, and becomes more important as you take on more responsibility. It is important to be collaborative, but also to know when to make independent decisions. Also, you cannot expect to have perfect information before making every decision. The key is to know when you have enough information to proceed, rather than being paralyzed by the process. Focusing on these aspects in every part of your job, every day, will help you build a great career for yourself.

Focus on service and improvement – constantly.

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Françoise

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Gri

ManpowerGroup

...access to talent is rapidly gaining recognition as the key competitive differentiator.

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am often asked to give advice to women on ways that they can be successful in business. Of course, I am only too happy to share my experiences to help women achieve gender parity in the workplace. I’m passionate about this as a woman in a high-profile position with an innovative workforce solutions company. Unfortunately, the fact that women’s lack of representation in power positions continues to be newsworthy means that much remains to be done if we are to achieve workplace equality. I have been fortunate to work with companies that are committed to diversity and the advancement of women, and who know that it is in their own interests, as well as their clients’, to ensure diversity among leadership so that there is maximum scope for variety. The velocity of change in the world of

work now is such that only companies who are fully open to the ideas of all will be able to win. ManpowerGroup recently released the results of our 2011 Talent Shortage Survey, which showed that one third of employers cannot fill key positions, yet women remain an underleveraged talent pool. This situation is not sustainable now that the world has entered the Human Age, where access to talent is rapidly gaining recognition as the key competitive differentiator. Forces at work, including shifting demographics, have brought us to this point. Working populations are shrinking in many markets. In other markets there is an over-supply of available workers but an under-supply of qualified talent. In many cases, the dreaded glass ceiling and barriers to women’s advancement are not

deliberate. However, outdated work models and people practices mean that women are forced to choose either professional success or personal fulfillment. To counter this, businesses must embrace greater flexibility to empower high-performing women. They must be given the opportunity to develop professionally while balancing work and home duties so that more emphasis is placed on results and knowledge gained rather than time spent in the office. One shouldn’t need to be a superwoman to excel in a high-profile position and take care of one’s family at the same time. Early in my career, a well-meaning boss felt I needed to be protected because he believed I would be unable to juggle my professional and my personal life. My response to that? “You take care of my career, and I’ll take care of my personal life.” w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

TITLE: Executive Vice President, President of Southern Europe and France EDUCATION: ENSIMAG, Grenoble, France FIRST JOB: Commercial engineer with IBM France WHAT I’M READING: La géopolitique de l’émotion, by Dominique Moïsi; Womenomics, by Avivah Wittenberg-Cox & Alison Maitland; L’écume des jours, by Boris Vian MY PHILOSOPHY: Always look ahead of you, never look back. FAMILY: Two daughters INTERESTS: Cooking, gardening, opera, sailing FAVORITE CHARITies: Helping women find a job and choose their path in school COMPANY: ManpowerGroup HEADQUARTERS: Milwaukee, Wisconsin WEBSITE: www.manpowergroup.com BUSINESS: Innovative workforce solutions REVENUES: $22 billion worldwide EMPLOYEES: 30,000

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 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Pat Hemingway Hall, Health Care Service Corporation • Crystal C. Hardie, Vanguard • Julie B. Kampf, JBK Associates, Inc. Kerry Frank Hester, US Airways • Deborah James, SAIC • Margaret A. Keane, Dewey LeBoeuf LLP • Rita Johnson-Mills, UnitedHealth Group Joyce Ibardolasa, Pacific Gas and Electric Company • Dr. Junqi “Jean” Hang, Brooks Kushman P.C. • Laura Shapira Karet, Giant Eagle, Inc.

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annual

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Dr. Junqi “Jean”

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Hang

Brooks Kushman P.C.

It is up to you to navigate the changes that will be the most beneficial in your career.

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y decade of working in the biomedical industry, as well as years practicing law, have allowed me to gain invaluable professional and personal life experiences. It hasn’t always been easy, however, as I have encountered many challenges and obstacles along the way. Through these challenges and the lessons I have learned, I came to understand what it takes to navigate a successful path to achieving goals. Show respect. Be respectful towards others and the differences of others. Respect shines everywhere. Do not let negative comments or doubts bother you. Change them and turn them into a positive learning experience. It is up to you to navigate the changes that will be the most beneficial in your career. Dwelling on the negative will only make things more difficult. Do not be stopped by obstacles, but be encouraged to turn them around as motivation to accomplish your goals. Be a leader. A leader is someone who can comprehend what others cannot, while striving to go above and beyond. Being a leader is not merely about delivering great speeches, but it is about executing the unthinkable, looking at the big picture and never losing sight of the end goal. Balance. Although your career is important, balancing work and life is a necessity and an art form. I’m still working on mastering this, as both can be demanding. My advice: balancing these two life spheres is a must – not an option. Work, especially as you advance, is not merely a job to make a living, but more of a platform to give back. I am a true believer of feeling satisfied in both my professional and personal lives and strive to achieve this balance every day. A golden piece of advice I received and feel necessary to pass along is to be a good citizen first, then be a good employee. A good citizen, in my opinion, is one who is trustworthy, dependable, hard-working and devoted. After all, every aspect of life and work is about personal interactions.

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TITLE: Associate EDUCATION: BS, Shanghai Jiao Tong University; PhD, Wayne State University; JD, Wayne State University FIRST JOB: Research assistant at Wayne State School of Medicine WHAT I’M READING: Short articles, with a focus on essence of families and values of societies MY PHILOSOPHY: Love what I do and be useful. FAMILY: I am the only child of my parents, and have two daughters, Unie and Eyda INTERESTS: Fitness, jogging, playing tennis with my girls, shopping FAVORITE CHARITY: Chinese Association of Greater Detroit COMPANY: Brooks Kushman P.C. HEADQUARTERS: Southfield, Michigan WEBSITE: www.brookskushman.com BUSINESS: Law Firm EMPLOYEES: 150


Pat Hemingway

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: President and Chief Executive Officer EDUCATION: BS, Michigan State University; MPH, University of Michigan FIRST JOB: ICU nurse WHAT I’M READING: Caleb’s Crossing, by Geraldine Brooks MY PHILOSOPHY: To grow and learn and lift others up alongside you. To reach out eagerly and without fear for newer and richer experiences. FAMILY: Husband, Robert INTERESTS: Reading books, playing the piano, listening to great music FAVORITE CHARITY: The Salvation Army COMPANY: Health Care Service Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEBSITE: www.hcsc.com BUSINESS: Health insurance REVENUES: $19.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 17,000

Hall

Health Care Service Corporation

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ver the course of my career in various leadership positions, I have mentored and have been mentored by many people. I’ve seen through those experiences and conversations that it’s very important to set examples and guide people in their careers. I’ve also learned that a simple way to approach priorities in career development is to focus on the “4 R’s.” The first “R” is to develop a strong resume, built upon your education and experiences. The second “R” is for reputation. It is important to develop and protect a reputation of fairness, ethical behavior and trustworthiness. The third “R” is relationships. Never underestimate the influence of relationships on your career. Before people will give you opportunities, they must trust you. Before they can trust you, they must respect you. And before they respect you, they must know you. Finally, the last “R” is risk. Taking on new and challenging experiences will enrich your life and help drive your career. Your resume, reputation, relationships and the risks you take will create the foundation for professional growth. Equally important is a focus on mentoring – both giving and receiving advice. More and more organizations are adding mentoring programs as they realize the value of developing their talent to ensure their long-term success. Research in the business and educational settings shows that both employees and students are more apt to do well if they’ve had a mentor. The importance of mentoring also can be heard in countless award acceptance speeches. Inevitably, honorees thank their teacher, coach, boss or other mentor figure for making their honor possible. That’s because mentors have real-life examples to share about what does and doesn’t work. Learning through their experiences is an ongoing effort of every successful leader, and sharing that knowledge is essential if we are to help create the next generation of effective leaders.

Never underestimate the influence of relationships on your career.

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Crystal C.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Principal, Financial Advisor Services EDUCATION: BS, University of Virginia; MBA, Duke University FIRST JOBs: Department store sales, Debt private placements analyst WHAT I’M READING: Life is a Series of Presentations, by Tony Jeary; Women Want More, by Kate Sayre and Michael Silverstein MY PHILOSOPHY: Never underestimate the importance of relationships. People and the relationships you have with them make all the difference. FAMILY: Two amazing parents and a wonderful little brother INTERESTS: International travel, reading, music, dining FAVORITE CHARITY: Alzheimer’s Association COMPANY: Vanguard HEADQUARTERS: Malvern, Pennsylvania WEBSITE: www.vanguard.com BUSINESS: Financial services EMPLOYEES: 12,800

Hardie

Vanguard

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hen I was six, my father’s company profiled him and our family in their internal magazine. When asked what I wanted to do when I grew up, I was quoted as saying, “I want to be in business like my Daddy.” At the time, all I knew was that what he was doing seemed really important and that he was proud of doing it. Over time, as I got more educated about the business world and what it entailed, I found myself gravitating toward it. Through the years, I’ve picked up a lot of tenets that I use in my career. Along the way, I’ve seen that many of these principles closely parallel what I use to maintain a satisfying personal life as well. Mind wide open. My academic years were a wonderful time in my life because I was exposed to so many different subjects, types of people, and ways of thinking. I now realize that I never stopped being a student, and I’ll serve myself well if I continue being one. I seek opportunities to learn and gather insights from others to expand my thinking. The minute I stop doing that, I will stop growing and making contributions to the people in my life and the organizations I work in.

Learn by listening. For me, listening is an extremely valuable way to learn and I often wonder if it’s used effectively enough among corporate citizens. If you talk more than you listen, it’s hard to be a good student or an effective coach and teacher. Hearing what’s said and what’s not said makes all the difference – whether solving business problems, addressing client issues, mentoring and coaching, or sustaining a personal relationship. Relationships are not to be underestimated. My relationships are critical in my professional life and precious in my personal life. I value the ones I have developed throughout my career and place a great deal of importance on maintaining them. Leaders are not successful alone. Nurtured relationships are vital to good leadership and they start with respect and appreciation. Know what value you add. It is important to be aware of what you bring to your organization. Use assessment tools, feedback from peers and your leadership, and self-reflection to recognize what you contribute. Having this awareness will allow you to control your brand as you articulate your value-add to others.

Nurtured relationships are vital to good leadership...

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Kerry Frank

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Hester

US Airways

I ask a lot of questions with a genuine intent to learn and understand...

F TITLE: Senior Vice President, Operations Planning and Support EDUCATION: BA, Tulane University; MBA, University of Michigan FIRST JOB: Ice cream scooper at Haagen Dazs WHAT I’M READING: Vertical: the follow-up to Sideways, by Rex Pickett MY PHILOSOPHY: The only thing you can control in life is your own attitude. INTERESTS: Travel, hiking, wine, reading, spending time with family and friends FAVORITE CHARITies: Homeward Bound, Junior Achievement COMPANY: US Airways HEADQUARTERS: Tempe, Arizonia WEBSITE: www.usairways.com BUSINESS: Airline REVENUES: $11.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 32,000

or some leaders, climbing the corporate ladder is a straight path up, while others zigzag along the way. When I finished business school in 1996, I wanted to join a company where I could continue learning and use my analytical abilities to make an impact, but I didn’t have a clear idea of exactly what type of role I desired. After a conversation with an airline recruiter, I was drawn to the complexities and challenges that define the industry. I started my career as a pricing analyst, moved on to planning and strategy functions and later found my home in operations. The hallmarks of my success, and traits I most value in others, are an intellectual curiosity and a “put me in, coach” attitude. I ask a lot of questions with a genuine intent to learn and understand, and I often challenge current practices and beliefs. At times, I have enthusiastically accepted new roles even when they didn’t seem aligned with my experience and objectives because someone I respected and trusted asked me to. Being willing to try new things and having demonstrated success in a variety of functions has helped me to build a diverse portfolio of

experience that can translate well to a variety of leadership positions. The zigzags in my career have helped me to become a well-rounded and more effective leader. I surround myself with people who share my quest for learning and energetic attitude. People who have been most successful in working with me are those who eagerly raise their hand when new projects or positions are presented, and consistently deliver impressive results in varied functions. Team members who have been flexible and willing to assume new roles to fill business needs earn my loyalty and support in achieving their goals, and I appreciate the trust they put in me to help manage their careers. I am grateful for the variety of opportunities I have had throughout my career and to all of the many mentors who have helped to guide, support and coach me along the way. I’ve learned things about the kind of leader I want to be from every boss I’ve had. While there is no one set formula for career advancement, I believe that pursuing diverse experiences and a broad network of mentors opens the widest range of possibilities.

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Joyce

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Ibardolasa

Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Do one thing outside your comfort zone every day.

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y first job out of college was as a temporary staffing placement specialist. While I looked forward to selecting and placing staff, there was a sales component too. Reaching out to potential clients or cold calling total strangers to build the business was just shy of terrifying for me. But to earn a paycheck and keep my staff working, I had to do it. I set out to learn and picked up some sales books. One piece of advice has stuck with me ever since: Do one thing outside your comfort zone every day. Calling on a prospect or starting a conversation with someone at a networking event was the worst part of my day. By putting that advice into action, one thing every day, I learned a great thing about comfort zones is that they have infinite capacity

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to stretch. And those fears we have are really unfounded. No one ever turned and walked away and no prospect slammed down the phone. I didn’t convert every prospect to a client, but I did with many. Now people are surprised when I share my early experiences. They thought starting a conversation with someone new came naturally. My comfort zone is still stretching and includes starting a new role, learning a new industry, working with new people, testing a new skill, and implementing something that’s never been tried before. Or learning a new sport, traveling to a country where you don’t speak or read the language, trying a new cuisine. Stretching will always be uncomfortable, but it is also a lot of fun and leads you down rewarding paths. In fact, it’s directly

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related to my current position and may be the reason I enjoy working in the diversity and inclusion field. Embracing diversity requires learning and talking about things that make most people uncomfortable. But I have yet to meet a single person who has regretted stretching outside their comfort zone and learning about the diverse experiences and perspectives of their colleagues. I have yet to meet someone who doesn’t appreciate an inclusive environment which encourages stretching outside your comfort zone to learn about and leverage diverse perspectives. Inclusion lessens the natural discomfort that comes with learning. To the author of that book whose name I’ve forgotten, but whose advice continues to hold true in so many ways, thank you.

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TITLE: Director, Performance and Inclusion EDUCATION: BA, Psychology and Economics, University of California at Santa Cruz FIRST JOB: McDonalds WHAT I’M READING: Poker Bride, by Christopher Corbett; The Paris Wife, by Paula McLain MY PHILOSOPHY: Everything is a choice. FAMILY: Married INTERESTS: Cooking, golf, origami FAVORITE CHARITies: Contra Costa Crisis Center, SPCA COMPANY: Pacific Gas and Electric Company HEADQUARTERS: San Francisco, California WEBSITE: www.pge.com BUSINESS: Gas and Electric Utility REVENUES: $13.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 20,000


Deborah

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

James

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)

Watch for new opportunities and seize them when they present.

T TITLE: Executive Vice President, Communications and Government Affairs EDUCATION: AB, Duke University; MIA, Columbia University FIRST JOB: Professional staff member in the House Armed Services Committee WHAT I’M READING: Cleopatra: A Life, by Stacy Schiff MY PHILOSOPHY: Be aware of new opportunities and be ready to seize them when they present. FAMILY: Sam and Regina INTERESTS: Golf, history FAVORITE CHARITies: The Pentagon Federal Credit Union Foundation, Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) COMPANY: Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEBSITE: www.saic.com BUSINESS: Information Technology Services REVENUES: $11.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 41,000

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hroughout my career I have been fortunate to serve in a range of positions in government, nonprofit, and private industry. Along the way I have learned, grown and achieved, challenging myself and preparing for that next new opportunity, all the while relying on the engine that has fueled my success, mentorship and networking. Many women fail to actively seek mentoring. Don’t fall into this trap. Ask for guidance, network and collaborate with your peers and seniors, and be upbeat and ethical while you’re doing it. This will bring you success, but not necessarily in the form you may expect. During my college years, my dream was to be a Foreign Service Officer, but when the Foreign Service didn’t offer me a job I had to quickly recalibrate my dreams. After doing so, I came up with a new focus – national defense. Three decades later, I can’t imagine my life any other way. A mentor once told me, “Good people are like bars of soap, if you push them under water, they pop right back up.” When life throws you a curve ball, be persistent and open to new ideas; this will serve you well, as I feel it has served me. Of course, learning to have fun and laugh along the

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way will only make the journey more enjoyable. Looking back on my career, I have derived tremendous satisfaction from the change in course I took, however unexpected. Watch for new opportunities and seize them when they present. I was lucky to have good bosses and mentors help me watch for those opportunities over the past 30 years, beginning with my first job as a professional staff member on the House Armed Services Committee. These mentors taught me the importance of being competent and educated, of going above and beyond in all that I do, and of thinking of the team before myself. I have learned that as a leader, you have to make the tough calls, even when they aren’t popular. You also have to be a good listener and ask for the counsel of your people. Don’t charge ahead without them because you can’t achieve great results alone. In a nutshell, if you focus on priorities and your colleagues, and deliver results, all the while making ethical behavior a top priority, the sky is the limit. And while you’re conquering all of those challenges, don’t forget about yourself. Take time for you and your family, let the little things slide and find something that makes you smile and then go for it!


G TA L E N T & I N I NN IT N OV U AT IO N

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Executive Talent Solutions

or

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W O R

. H T

O N S I B LY ! P S E ..R

Creating a culture both in our internal organization and by building diverse leadership teams for our clients where excellence comes from all perspectives.

Our team has gone to great lengths to reduce our environmental impact through responsible resource management and sustainable development to help build a better global business landscape.

We believe that giving back to the community both financially and through volunteerism is essential to creating a strong society and satisfying work environment.

An award-winning talent management firm that specializes in identifying and securing your best talent options by fully understanding the intricacies of your environment with individuals who will help your company soar to new heights.

•Executive Search •Organizational Development •Talent Management

JBK Associates, Inc. www.jbkassociates.net One Engle Street Suite 201 Englewood, NJ 07631 201.567.9070 tel

777 South Flagler Drive Suite 800 West Tower West Palm Beach, FL 33401 561.515.6026 tel


Rita Johnson-

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Mills

UnitedHealth Group

...never forget the help you receive from those around you...

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n every great career, there are great obstacles to overcome, and great lessons to be learned along the way. As one of 12 children of a low-income single mother in rural Missouri, I thought my dreams of getting an education and pursing a career were nearly impossible. But as I worked towards my goals, I discovered my mother’s resolve, inner strength and strong work ethic were deeply embedded within me. These core strengths helped me gain confidence in knowing I could excel to heights beyond my meager beginnings. The summer after graduating high school, I worked at a plastics factory to put myself through college and, from there, earn two graduatelevel degrees. My education allowed me to begin focusing on how I could use my skills to help make communities like the one I came from healthier. 108

Growing up on Medicaid, I know firsthand how important it is for families to have access to affordable health care. That perspective has helped motivate me to serve communities, first with the state of Ohio and now with UnitedHealthcare Community & State. At UnitedHealthcare, where I manage state partnerships for a business that serves more than three million low-income children and families, I find great satisfaction knowing I am helping children in need access better health resources. Throughout my career, mentors have played an important role in helping me to grow professionally and personally. They helped me realize that you should never be afraid to ask questions and call on those around you for their perspective and input to get the job done in the best way possible.

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A good leader knows how to utilize the diverse skills of the people around her, a key reason I was committed to serve as a charter member and help establish the vision and goals of UnitedHealth Group’s Diversity and Inclusion Council. This group supports workforce diversity so talent from every background can bring forth their unique contributions. I’ve also learned how important it is to make time for family, exercise and staying healthy. In the long run, investing in your health and wellbeing will help give you the energy you’ll need to reach your personal and professional goals. But perhaps the most important lesson of all is one for today’s young professionals: never forget the help you receive from those around you, and find ways to “pay it forward” by helping others to grow and meet their goals.

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TITLE: Senior Vice President, State Partnership and Accountability, UnitedHealth Group EDUCATION: BS, Lincoln University; MA, MPA, The Ohio State University FIRST JOB: Working on the assembly line of a plastics factory WHAT I’M READING: Mandela’s Way, by Richard Stengel MY PHILOSOPHY: Pay it forward. FAMILY: Husband Eric; son Tavion; Eric’s daughters NiQeta and Erica; his son Eric, Jr.; grandchildren Isaiah and Deiona INTERESTS: Shopping, staying in shape with early morning workouts FAVORITE CHARITY: The Salvation Army COMPANY: UnitedHealth Group HEADQUARTERS: Minnetonka, Minnesota WEBSITE: www.uhccommunityplan.com BUSINESS: Diversified health and well-being company REVENUES: $10.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 4,000


Julie

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Kampf

TITLE: CEO and President EDUCATION: BS, University of Rhode Island FIRST JOB: Management Trainee, Macy’s Executive Program WHAT I’M READING: Change your Questions, Change Your Life, by Marilee Adams

JBK Associates, Inc.

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y best leadership lessons started as disappointments. I was the kid who wanted to captain every team, earn every Girl Scout badge and sell the most cookies. So when I got to Camp Kenwood and saw that they rewarded achievement by handing out feathers, I fully expected to receive a whole hatful. And I did, but the feather I remember is the one I never got. It was fuchsia, and it was given to the Girl of the Week, and hard as I tried I was never that girl. That missing feather was my first lesson in rejection, and what I learned is that you keep going. Determination took me pretty far in my first career. Then I had a child and faced the pressures shared by most new mothers. One day when my son was an infant, I had to leave the office to manage an emergency with the caretaker. My male boss said to me, “You’re husband is at home. Can’t he handle it?” In fact, my husband was not at home and I needed to be there. That boss showed me how not to manage a working mother, and I promised myself that I would never run a business that way. By the time I took over as president of the 1,750-member Healthcare Businesswomen’s Metro Chapter in 2009, I was running three businesses and had learned a lot about leadership. But nothing compares to the challenge of managing high-powered volunteers who know they can’t be fired. When someone misses the mark, the only option is to sit down and talk openly about the situation, even if the conversation leads to an organizational change. I learned that the conversations no one likes are sometimes the most valuable. Disappointments have inspired me to persist through a recession, create a flexible workplace, and become a better problem solver. And that in turn has brought the immeasurable joy that comes from making a difference doing the work I love with a team I love. So here are three principles of leadership. Keep going no matter what. Give your team what they need to thrive. Have the hard conversations. You won’t always win the fuchsia feather, but you might just succeed beyond your wildest dreams.

MY PHILOSOPHY: “Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.” – Jack Welch FAMILY: My husband Andy, and son, Adam INTERESTS: Golf, shoes, charity work FAVORITE CHARITY: Table to Table COMPANY: JBK Associates, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Englewood, New Jersey WEBSITE: www.jbkassociates.net BUSINESS: Executive Talent Solutions REVENUES: $2 million EMPLOYEES: 10 and growing!

The conversations no one likes are sometimes the most valuable.

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Laura Shapira

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Karet

Giant Eagle, Inc.

...all relationships must be based on mutual trust and respect.

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TITLE: Chief Strategy Officer and Senior Executive Vice President EDUCATION: BA, Amherst College FIRST JOB: Giant Eagle Deli WHAT I’M READING: The Blind Assassin, by Margaret Atwood; How Remarkable Women Lead, by Joanna Barsch and Susie Cranston MY PHILOSOPHY: Happiness comes from three things: setting goals, caring about others, and taking responsibility for yourself. FAMILY: Husband, Tom; children, Will, Charlie, Alexa INTERESTS: Children and family, gardening, cooking, reading, yoga COMPANY: Giant Eagle, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania WEBSITE: www.GiantEagle.com BUSINESS: Retail grocery and fuel REVENUES: $9 billion Team Members: 35,000

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t Giant Eagle, Inc., our dedicated Team Members are the heart and soul of our company. We are committed to serving each other and our customers, shareholders and the communities in which we live. I am a firm believer in modeling the company’s expectations through serving leadership, which I have also adopted as my personal philosophy and management approach. Put simply, great leadership is the result of serving others. Many leadership experts have defined serving leaders as being visionaries and excellent communicators with the ability to engage, develop and mentor; to reinvent and improve continuously; to value results and relationships; and lastly, to focus on others. Companies will only achieve greatness when their entire team is successful, which means senior leaders must be focused on serving others. At Giant Eagle, our Respect for People Priority places emphasis and importance on the unique abilities and contributions of each of our Team Members. We also believe that all relationships must be based on mutual trust and respect. As a leader, it’s my responsibility to create the environment that makes this possible. Our leadership philosophy and values reflects these efforts. For example, we do what we say we will do and mean what

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we say; make decisions that are best for the entire team; provide ongoing job security; support Team Members’ physical, emotional, social, and financial well-being; and support Team Members’ professional development. Throughout my career, I have also discovered that there are several important leadership principles that guide interactions with others. Examples of serving leadership include establishing and clearly communicating a mission and vision and connecting every Team Member/employee to it; developing, implementing and articulating plans to achieve collective goals; and involving Team Members in decisions that affect them. Leadership also involves seeking employees’ feedback and actively listening to their ideas, opinions, suggestions and concerns; holding them accountable for their performance by rewarding and celebrating accomplishments and allowing them to learn from their mistakes; building diverse teams and encouraging them to share their varied ideas and thoughts; and coaching for success and development. Lastly, serving leadership often leads to a positive culture and work environment. When Team Members are happy and feel connected to one another and to their leaders, they are often more productive and positive.


Margaret

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Partner and Co-Chair of Employment Litigation Practice EDUCATION: BA, Boston University; JD, University of Pennsylvania FIRST JOB: Babysitter at age 12 WHAT I’M READING: The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood, by James Gleick MY PHILOSOPHY: “There is a special place in hell for women who don’t help other women.” – Madeleine Albright FAMILY: Married to Bruce Bales INTERESTS: Yoga; exploring the California coast; volunteering as a mediator FAVORITE CHARITies: Insurance Industry Charitable Foundation; St. Vincent de Paul Society of San Francisco COMPANY: Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.dl.com BUSINESS: Law Firm REVENUES: $910 million EMPLOYEES: 1,100 lawyers

Keane

Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP

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he practice of law has changed dramatically since I began my career at Dewey & LeBoeuf as a summer associate in 1985. Today, as an employment litigator and counselor, I constantly focus on changes in the workplace and how I can help my clients keep up. Two changes in particular will define the careers of today’s new lawyers. First, multiple career moves are now the norm, and lawyers can expect to move many times over their careers. Second, technology – used broadly to include the internet, remote on-line access, smartphones, and social media – has transformed the profession. In practical terms, this means each of us must plan and develop our own career and not depend on employers to ensure our success. Personal planning and branding are essential, as is the abil-

ity to take credit for our accomplishments. Look at those ahead of you and take stock. Do you see a path for yourself? Do you have the tools you need to get there? It’s easy to view others’ success as the product of luck, but luck rarely comes without hard work. We can’t be reluctant to share our achievements or our expertise. We should always find time to mentor. Second, technology has given us a 24/7 workplace. The ability to work anytime and anyplace is empowering, but demands for instantaneous response challenge work-life balance. We can’t lose sight of relationships amidst emails, IMs and texts. I’ve been lucky to have strong female influences, and one person in particular stands out. Years ago, I met Carole Hoover, principal of Hoover Milstein in Cleveland. Carole acted as the neutral

mediator in a case where my client had been sued. I was impressed with her ability to maintain a calm presence and unfailing dedication to respect and dignity for all, despite rising tempers and more than the usual amount of lawyerly posturing. In doing so, she gave three groups with widely divergent views the tools to bridge very challenging racial issues. I knew she was a person I could learn from and we stayed in touch over the years. Carole has taught me that the best way to achieve your goals is to envision success. Carole starts every session by asking, “How do we define success?” and closes by measuring that success and planning next steps. I am grateful for her mentoring and friendship, and I strive to emulate her strength, judgment and grace in my professional and personal relationships.

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Thanks to You,

A generation of stories is just another part of growing up.

WellPoint congratulates all of the WomenWorthWatching®, including our own recipient, Pam Kehaly.

Pam Kehaly President and General Manager California Health Plan WellPoint, Inc.

WellPoint is proud of our dedication to diversity. Still, with all that we've achieved, we will always strive to better attract, retain and develop top diverse talent. One way is through Associate Resource Groups like SOMOS, our Hispanic associate resource group, where employees work to develop and sustain our culture of inclusion, enhance and maximize customer relations, and create and leverage leadership opportunities for all of our associates. Pam Kehaly serves as an executive sponsor of SOMOS. She, and other WellPoint leaders, empower these groups to help our company to better address our customers' needs, and ensure that our workforce is as unique as our wide range of health benefits products. At WellPoint, diversity is more than just the 'right thing to do.' It's the way we approach business, how we interact within our communities, how we mobilize our employees and, more than anything, why we appreciate moments like this. For more information, visit: wellpoint.com/careers

® Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. © 2011 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved. EOE. ® Profiles in Diversity Journal. ® Registered Trademark, Diversity Inc Media LLC.


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Maryanne R. Lavan, Lockheed Martin Corporation • Pam Kehaly, WellPoint, Inc. • Selena J. Linde, Perkins Coie LLP Doe Kittay, W.W. Grainger, Inc. • Cathy G. Mann, Halliburton • Barbara G. Koster, Prudential Financial, Inc. • Anne T. Madden, Honeywell Angie Kyle, New York Life • Elizabeth Krauss, Sandia National Laboratories • Dr. Punam Malik, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

10

th

annual

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Pam

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Kehaly

WellPoint, Inc.

My advice is to steer your career in the direction you want it to go.

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TITLE: President & General Manager, California Health Plan EDUCATION: BA, California State University, Stanislaus FIRST JOB: Winchell’s Donuts WHAT I’M READING: Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand MY PHILOSOPHY: Take personal responsibility and ownership for driving results. Support, appreciate and value the most important company asset – employees. Communicate often. Have fun. FAMILY: Married with two sons INTERESTS: Hiking, skiing, reading FAVORITE CHARITies: Susan G. Komen Foundation COMPANY: WellPoint, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Indianapolis, Indiana WEBSITE: www.wellpoint.com BUSINESS: Health benefits REVENUES: $58.8 billion in 2010 EMPLOYEES: Approximately 37,000

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ithout goals and plans to reach them, you are like a ship that has set sail with no destination. My advice is to steer your career in the direction you want it to go. I wish someone had given me this advice when I started out. I began working for a small health insurer in 1986, before the many mergers and acquisitions that have made WellPoint what it is today – the nation’s largest health insurer by membership. Working in an environment that’s in a constant state of flux can be very exciting, especially when you’re young and eager to take charge. But, it can be challenging to chart a course and stick to it. With 20 plus managers in 26 years, I frequently had to fight the current to keep my career headed in the right direction. Add to that the frequent changes in the health insurance industry, and one could say that change has been my norm. I definitely made a few mistakes along the way. Early in my career, I remember my boss asking me why I did not meet my claims inventory targets. My response was, “The system has been down more than usual and my team has expe-

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rienced a lot of absences.” That was followed by a long, painful pause as my boss waited for more. I stood there frozen, not knowing what she wanted. I replayed this scenario in my head many times over the years. I should have taken personal responsibility and found a way to achieve the results. I should have said, “We had some system downtime and unplanned absences that impacted our productivity this week, but we will be back on plan by Tuesday as I have pulled in extra resources.” Always anticipate that something will go wrong, then create a contingency plan and take responsibility for achieving results despite the obstacles. It all goes back to how you captain your ship. You can be a captain and not take control of the wheel, instead letting the current carry the ship downstream, rudderless. Or, you can accept personal responsibility, take the wheel and steer the ship where you want to go. Sometimes you’ll need to go against the current to stay on course. I have seen both kinds of leaders and the most successful ones are steering the ship, not floating aimlessly downstream.


Doe

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Kittay

W.W. Grainger, Inc.

Good leadership means your team understands and supports your vision.

I TITLE: Vice President, Customer Service Operations and Planning EDUCATION: BA, University of Colorado FIRST JOB: Part-time Sales Associate, Target Stores WHAT I’M READING: Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell; Andy and Me, by Pascal Dennis MY PHILOSOPHY: Be true to yourself, regardless of what others think. FAMILY: Husband Barry, son Jesse INTERESTS: Spending time with family and friends, hockey, scuba diving, camping FAVORITE CHARITY: St. Jude COMPANY: W.W. Grainger, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Lake Forest, Illinois WEBSITE: www.grainger.com BUSINESS: Distributor, facilities maintenance products REVENUES: $7.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 19,000

’ve received a lot of good advice over my career, but none better than when I was considering a promotion and consulted a colleague about adapting to the new role. I asked if I would have to change myself to match the corporate culture, and he told me, “Doe, the reason they asked you to take on the role is because they like who you are.” That’s why I always advise leaders to be themselves and to focus on creating their best work. The key to a successful career is figuring out what’s important, determining how you can add value and then doing the best you possibly can. Networking and making connections are valuable, especially if you use them in purposeful ways related to your work or where your individual

skills can help the business. Networking is not about self promotion, rather it’s about adding value. The best leaders, from my point of view, are those who understand that their success comes from how their people work. Once again, it’s all about being true to who you are and being authentic with your people. Good leadership means your team understands and supports your vision. At the same time, you need to understand what your people need and be able to communicate clearly how they can help the team reach its goals. It’s also very important to maintain a sense of humor and have fun while you work. People who enjoy their work are invariably more productive and innovative. We all work too hard to not enjoy what we do.

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Finally, I believe that in order to achieve a successful career you must have a comfortable balance between your work and your family life. I started with Target part time at l6 and enjoyed 20 years with the company. But shortly after my son Jesse was born, I realized that retail’s nights and weekends schedule was putting my life out of balance. When my baby didn’t want me to pick him up one night, I knew I had to change. Five weeks later, I joined Grainger. I was very lucky to find a company that truly values its employees and enables me to have better balance. It’s always a challenge and I have to make it a priority as I manage my schedule. I work hard to not miss the important things at home. This enables me to be true to myself and still deliver my best work.

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Barbara G.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Koster

Prudential Financial, Inc.

...my father taught me that nothing is more important in life than people...

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aring about people, really listening to what people are saying, and giving your all to any task you undertake is what transforms managers into leaders. When I was growing up, my father taught me that nothing is more important in life than people and our relationships with each other. My father lived that principle and my own life experiences have proven over and over again how right he was. People and their feelings matter. In my day-to-day life I am surrounded by family, friends and co-workers who care for and provide support to each other. Having a network, a team, working together and sharing knowledge, wisdom, and strength leads to greater success than could ever be achieved by going it alone. When I attended St. Francis College, it was just beginning to admit female students. I wanted to study business and, at the time, a woman in business was an almost revolutionary concept. The business program had very, very few women students but I had wonderful professors who told me that if I was going to enter a ‘man’s world’ then I would have to hold my own. This chal-

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lenged me to work a little harder so that I would not give any reason to be viewed differently than the male students. I learned from this to be true to myself and always give more than 100 percent to any job I tackle. Early in my business career, my mentor cautioned me to always listen closely when other people are speaking to really hear what was being said. That is not as simple as it may sound. Often, after the first few words we think we know what another person is saying but, once you master the art of intense listening, it is amazing to see how much is missed when you don’t give your undivided attention to the person speaking. These lessons have not only accompanied me throughout my life in business and technology, they were what ignited my career and led to all my achievements. I frequently talk to students about finding the right paths in business and technology. I tell them not to hold back. I tell them to pour everything they are, everything they have, into what they do. I tell them to give their best to their jobs and to the people in their lives. That, I am convinced, is the formula for leadership.

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TITLE: Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer EDUCATION: BS, AS, St. Francis College FIRST JOB: Accountant at Chase Manhattan Bank WHAT I’M READING: Read My Pins, by Madeleine Albright MY PHILOSOPHY: There is nothing more important in life than people. People are the most important part of any equation. FAMILY: My husband Bob, my daughter Diana, and my daughter and son in law Katie and Josh INTERESTS: Reading FAVORITE CHARITY: HeartShare Human Services of New York COMPANY: Prudential Financial, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Newark, New Jersey WEBSITE: www.prudential.com BUSINESS: Financial services REVENUES: $30.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 40,235


Elizabeth

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Krauss

TITLE: Vice President, General Counsel & Corporate Secretary EDUCATION: BA, Connecticut College; JD, Boston College Law School FIRST JOB: Nurse’s aide at Stamford Podiatry Group WHAT I’M READING: Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised Our Nation, by Cokie Roberts

Sandia National Laboratories

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ow did a woman with a history major and a law degree end up in a science and engineering laboratory with a white male dominant culture, successful and loving it? By following a couple of principles – some might call them career objectives, but I simply think of them as words to work by. Be open to new challenges, always. In order to succeed, staying flexible and open to new challenges are key characteristics. I have never remained tied to one vision of success. I started my career as a corporate and securities lawyer, but soon realized I needed to make a mark in the law firm distinct from all the other associates hired at the same time. While I had no background in science and shied away from such courses in law school, when a new and very different opportunity presented itself – to practice environmental law – I jumped. Taking this leap allowed me to stand out in the firm and provided the springboard for my next enticing prospect, an environmental law position at Sandia National Laboratories, which led to my current role as vice president and general counsel. Of course, there were other challenges and jumping opportunities along the way; I sought

them out and relished the experiences in each new and untried area. Call attention to yourself in a respectful way. Another key characteristic for success is the ability to be noticed in ways that are respectful of your organizational culture. As I entered the workforce, I believed that hard work and impressive results alone would move me onward and upward. But when your colleagues are smart, talented and hard-working, it takes a little extra help to move ahead. Don’t wait for someone to notice and offer support. Yet not all attention is good attention; learn the culture and styles of those from whom you want attention. Moving from a private law firm to a federally funded research and development center threw me into a vastly different culture. I watched, listened, and thereby learned a different communication style that allowed my voice to be heard and my impact to be recognized. Make your mark in a positive way that distinguishes you from your co-workers and fits within your culture. Show your organization that diversity and inclusion means recognizing the talent within you. Don’t wait, don’t hide. Be noticed, respectfully.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Always be true to who you are, while valuing and respecting others. FAMILY: My husband David; our son Andy; daughter Lauren; and son Ben INTERESTS: Travel, fine wine and dining, family and friends, reading FAVORITE CHARITies: National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Breast Cancer Research, United Way COMPANY: Sandia National Laboratories HEADQUARTERS: Albuquerque, New Mexico WEBSITE: www.sandia.gov BUSINESS: Science & Technology REVENUES: $2.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 8,671

Be open to new challenges, always. Call attention to yourself, in a respectful way.

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Angie

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Kyle

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Head of Marketing, Communications and Events, U.S. Life & Agency EDUCATION: BA, University of Houston FIRST JOB: Physician’s receptionist and billing clerk

New York Life

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y career has enabled me to work with talented people in a variety of organizations, and each position has challenged and stretched me in unique ways. I am also fortunate to have several strong mentors and supporters in my life – with my parents being the earliest and greatest examples – who have consistently modeled qualities that I admire and want to emulate. When I have the opportunity to serve as a mentor or to “pay it forward,” these are the words of advice I offer. Start with a strong work ethic. You simply can’t fake it. There is no substitute for reliability, responsibility or initiative, and there is also no comparison to the personal satisfac-

tion you feel when you know you’ve earned the results.

think about qualities that have been tested throughout my career, topping the list would be resolve and resilience. It takes great determination to stay the course during trying times, and a flexible nature to rebound from inevitable setbacks or changes.

Commit and deliver. No matter what role you play in your organization, you can create a reputation for being a consistently strong and reliable contributor. Be willing to commit to high performance goals, and then deliver!

Manage your brand. Although the workplace often emphasizes what is accomplished more than how it is accomplished, I believe they are equally important. When I consider leaders that I admire, it is their character – often marked by traits such as integrity, empathy, fairness and diplomacy – that I remember far more than any single work-related achievement. That’s the kind of legacy I want to leave.

Be courageous and ready. Pursuing larger responsibilities requires courage and belief in your ability to meet the challenge. To prepare yourself, set high personal and professional development goals, and strive to exceed them. When the right opportunities arise, you will have the confidence to meet them head on. Have resolve and resilience. When I

Be willing to commit to high performance goals, and then deliver!

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WHAT I’M READING: The Confession, by John Grisham; Shift, by Peter Arnell MY PHILOSOPHY: Make every day count. FAMILY: Husband Mike; one son, JD; and four stepdaughters, Lyndsey, Cydne, Halley, Rylie INTERESTS: Traveling, reading, sailing, jewelry design FAVORITE CHARITies: Comfort Zone Camp, Sanctuary for Families COMPANY: New York Life HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.newyorklife.com BUSINESS: Life Insurance REVENUES: $15 billion EMPLOYEES: 9,000


Serving those who House America through diversity & inclusion

At Fannie Mae, our company strives to weave diversity into the very fabric of who we are and what we do. By building and developing an inclusive workforce across all levels, we’ve been able to create an environment that encourages and embraces open communication, personal creativity, and professional excellence. Together, we’re helping to advance our nation’s housing recovery.

If you want to build a truly rewarding career with an organization that is actively improving the housing industry, then there’s never been a more important time to work at Fannie Mae. Apply online at www.fanniemae.com/careers. We are an equal opportunity employer.

®


Maryanne R.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary EDUCATION: BS, State University of NY at Albany; JD, American University FIRST JOB: State Park Attendant WHAT I’M READING: Bossypants, by Tina Fey MY PHILOSOPHY: Always do your best, as you never know when the next opportunity may present itself. FAMILY: Husband, Larry Harris; children, Mikayla and Zachary INTERESTS: Running, gardening FAVORITE CHARITY: Autism Speaks COMPANY: Lockheed Martin Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Bethesda, Maryland WEBSITE: www.lockheedmartin.com BUSINESS: Global Security REVENUES: $45.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 126,000

Lavan

Company Lockheed Martin Corporation

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s you advance in your career, your attitude and leadership traits will often trump your technical competencies as distinguishing characteristics and define your legacy. The career advice that I generally provide to younger employees focuses on seven key points: be yourself; build your network; solve your boss’s problems; be resilient; reach out; maintain perspective; and do the right thing. Be yourself. Find the style that is most comfortable for you, and your genuineness will shine through. You will be viewed as a promotable person with whom people will want to work. Build your network. Treat people well. You never know who you will meet and need on the way up or down your career ladder. Use your daily interactions to build a career support network. Look for that characteristic in those you mentor and promote. Solve your boss’s problems. As you seek to advance, promotional opportunities may not match your personal timetable for career advancement. Expanding your job responsibilities to clearly demonstrate your initiative to develop and hone your skill base beyond a formal job description will position you to step up to the next opportunity. Be resilient. A positive outlook is

infectious. Think about it. Would you rather work with a complainer with a negative attitude, or with a person who is positive and always seeks to add value? When you approach your boss with an issue, also be prepared to present a set of solutions. Reach out. One of the most powerful moments in my career was when an executive reached out to give me positive feedback at a time when I was particularly discouraged. He may not remember that conversation, but I certainly do, and I try to remember how a few words can inspire, provide encouragement and change an outlook. As you progress in your career, give back and reach out to younger employees. Maintain perspective. Know your priorities, keep your sense of humor, and be able to laugh at yourself. Humility is an underrated yet important component of leadership. The ability to learn from your mistakes and to help others to learn from your mistakes is highly valued. Do the right thing. Emulate honesty, ethical behavior and integrity. Your rewards will be many. As you can see, it’s easy for me to connect my personal philosophy to our core values at Lockheed Martin: “Do what’s right. Respect others. Perform with excellence.”

...keep your sense of humor, and be able to laugh at yourself.

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It takes all of us to shape innovation As a global leader in packaging solutions, MWV understands that diversity fuels innovation. That’s why we’ve built a culture of inclusion in which people of all backgrounds are valued and multiple viewpoints are encouraged. Together, our talented workforce generates creativity that keeps us competitive in the marketplace. That’s the power of diversity.

mwv.com


Selena J.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Linde

Perkins Coie LLP

To lead you must choose the challenging path and assist others...

D TITLE: Partner EDUCATION: JD, University of Virginia FIRST JOB: Lifeguard WHAT I’M READING: Interpreter of Maladies, by Jhumpa Lahiri MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is short – always evaluate whether you are happy. FAMILY: Husband, Gary; 3 boys, Sawyer, Ferris, Miles INTERESTS: My children’s baseball, reading, biking FAVORITE CHARITies: Ronald McDonald House, Whitman-Walker Clinic COMPANY: Perkins Coie LLP HEADQUARTERS: Seattle, Washington WEBSITE: www.perkinscoie.com BUSINESS: Legal REVENUES: $476 million EMPLOYEES: 1,934

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espite what some may suggest, women can have it all: a successful career and a loving family – the whole package. But I find that in my effort to have it all, I have to work hard to strike a balance between the two. First, as a woman your work absolutely has to speak for itself. At the same time I have found that when clients see me as essential to their business, they are willing to accommodate my needs. For instance, I once asked an important client to reschedule a meeting in South Dakota so that I wouldn’t miss my son’s all-star baseball game. I admit it – I was nervous making that phone call. But the client moved the meeting because they valued my work highly. Second, good mentors can be found in unexpected places. One of my greatest female friends and advisors has been my secretary, Cindy. As a non-attorney, she offers me a perspective often unavailable elsewhere. Moreover, she has taught me the delicate skill of being assertive while hitting the right tone. On the other end of the spectrum of mentors is my colleague Leon Kellner. Leon is a former U.S. Attorney appointed by Ronald Reagan; I used to intern for the late

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Senator Ted Kennedy. While we may disagree on a few issues from time to time – especially political ones – we still respect each other as attorneys and professionals. Moreover, Leon’s wealth of knowledge regarding insurance coverage law and how to navigate the legal world has provided me with innumerable lessons in practice. Third, talent needs to be cultivated. Bringing associates into cases early and providing them with the experience to shadow a partner benefits not only the associate but the firm itself. Training those that work for you is imperative if you want your practice to succeed. Anyone can mentor a superstar and mold her into a profile for success. It is the real challenge to take the underachieving hard worker and guide her in the right direction. Sometimes even a small nudge towards success can lead to a flourishing performer. To lead you must choose the challenging path and assist others in strengthening their own capabilities, growing their networks of reliable and trustworthy colleagues and working towards ensuring the success of their own team and its members. By doing so you can ensure the success of your practice and your firm.


Anne T.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Madden

Honeywell

Well-calculated risks often lead to the biggest wins.

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s I reflected on the principles of leadership and critical decision making that have helped me throughout my career, I kept coming back to a very simple premise – flexibility. The mergers and acquisitions world is very fluid. It’s been important to stay flexible and to listen to what is being said (and not said), how those communications are being made, and from whom. Staying in tune with all of the players involved in the deal and their actions has allowed me to anticipate and deffuse issues before they happen and to prepare for challenges that may arise. In my world, speed and agility make a huge difference in whether a deal gets done or not. Roles I’ve held throughout my law and finance career have required me to operate through many competing

priorities and navigate diverse personalities. It’s been important as a leader to be very rigorous and tough minded, but it’s been equally important not to be afraid to use my emotional quotient or “EQ.” I often find that my instincts have helped as much as the facts at hand in shaping the most effective approach. Leadership and good deal-making requires more than just knowing what to do; it requires great judgment in evaluating a situation and estimating what risks are worth taking when balanced with their estimated rewards. The same is true for any business role. I’ve learned not to be afraid to take risks, but to always act with prudence. Wellcalculated risks often lead to the biggest wins. Similarly, adopting a flexible approach both in leading those who report

to me and in supporting my own leaders has helped me enable them to make the best decisions they can in support of our company’s growth objectives. This approach is working. At Honeywell we’ve led approximately 69 acquisitions and 45 divestitures since 2003. I’m proud to say that a vast majority of transactions have been successful, added to our company’s portfolio of intellectual property, expanded our global footprint and contributed to our strong financial performance. Having flexibility both in approach and professional style can allow you to adapt to a wide variety of situations. Remember to always remain calm in any business interaction, act with a sense of urgency, and never operate with a mindset that what you say or do doesn’t matter. It always matters.

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TITLE: Vice President, Corporate Development, and Global Head of M&A EDUCATION: AB, Brown University; MBA, New York University; JD, Fordham University FIRST JOB: Accountant for KPMG WHAT I’M READING: Little Bee, by Chris Cleave MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t forget to be yourself. FAMILY: Son Jack; husband Sean INTERESTS: Golf, court tennis, history, environmental protection and community involvement in Tuxedo Park, New York FAVORITE CHARITY: National Down Syndrome Society COMPANY: Honeywell HEADQUARTERS: Morristown, New Jersey WEBSITE: www.Honeywell.com BUSINESS: Technology and Manufacturing REVENUES: $33.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 130,000

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Dr. Punam

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Malik

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Boldly, truthfully, and respectfully speaking your mind helps others understand your purpose and vision...

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TITLE: Professor of Pediatrics and Director, Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology EDUCATION: MBBS, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India; MD, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India; MS, University of Maryland FIRST JOB: Medical resident WHAT I’M READING: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot; Harry Potter, by J.K. Rowling MY PHILOSOPHY: Get a good education, work hard, speak your mind and help others. FAMILY: Many cousins and two uncles in U.S. INTERESTS: Gardening FAVORITE CHARITies: Doctors Without Borders, Sickle Cell Research COMPANY: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center HEADQUARTERS: Cincinnati, Ohio WEBSITE: www.cincinnatichildrens.org BUSINESS: Children’s Hospital REVENUES: $1.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 12,368

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fter a decade of work, my team at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center is preparing to perform a human trial of a new gene therapy that could potentially cure sickle cell anemia. This achievement was made possible for us by following four principles for success that I recommend to anyone who aspires to a leadership role. Get a good education. Growing up in India, I wanted to help the many kids with blood cell disorders. I was fortunate to live in a country that values education so highly. A good education enables you to achieve your full potential. Coming to the United States for medical training introduced me to resources that would allow me to help many needy people. The decision to stay was difficult because I wanted to

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improve the lives of sick children at home, but my Indian education had prepared me for this rare, American opportunity. Work hard. A mentor told me: “You will face hurdles; keep going strong and stay focused on long-term goals. Little hurdles may slow you down, but they won’t stop you, and will make you better.” The culture shock I experienced when I came to America was a daunting hurdle that I overcame through perseverance. I didn’t feel different from others, and I knew English well, but following American accents and fully understanding the complex culture was difficult. Overcoming this challenge was hard work, but I learned by listening to my patients and watching their interactions with loved ones. Speak your mind. At first, the directness with which people spoke in

New York and Baltimore caught me off guard, but I grew to appreciate its value. Boldly, truthfully, and respectfully speaking your mind helps others understand your purpose and vision, enables you to forge lasting connections with colleagues, and positions you to be the advocate for your own success. Help others. At Cincinnati Children’s my team and I have the resources to translate laboratory science to clinical applications, help develop new standards of care, and change the way blood cell diseases are treated around the world. A genetic cure is my ultimate goal, and it all started with the desire to help people that I first felt as a child in India. I want to make a difference in people’s lives, and I believe that desire can be the driving force for success in any field.


Cathy G.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Mann

TITLE: Director, Strategic Marketing, Drill Bits & Services, Halliburton EDUCATION: BS, Texas A&M University; MBA, Rice University FIRST JOB: Youth Volunteer, Friendswood Chamber of Commerce

Halliburton

T

here is a common misperception about leadership that I believe every successful leader has to encounter, grapple with, and ultimately discard: “I am in charge, therefore I must control, I must rule.” I have had the privilege of working with and learning from many gifted leaders, each with his or her own unique way of leading. But, from the high-energy super-motivator to the low-key nurturer/encourager, they all had something in common, and it had nothing to do with controlling or ruling. What every successful leader learns is that all the best advice, all the studies, all the books about leadership agree on one fundamental rule, and it is hardly new: Treat others as you want to be treated. The Golden Rule, as this ancient axiom is called, is another way of saying that what you value in a leader – respect, honesty, fairness, affirmation – should shape your way of leading. Knowing and understanding what each member of the team brings to the table is a good beginning; affirming and fostering their talents and affinities is the leader’s most crucial job. This is not an easy job, but ultimately it deepens the leader’s abilities, and opens the way for the kind of creativity that drives success. A leader approaches every new project as an opportunity to grow and as an opportunity for the team, too, to reach for fresh achievement. Working alongside a team – not ruling over it – leads to authentic relationships characterized by respect and trust. As good leaders know, that is how everyone wants to be treated.

WHAT I’M READING: Disciplined Dreaming: A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity, by Josh Linkner; 365 Thank Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed My Life, by John Kralik MY PHILOSOPHY: Be bold. Be brief. Be gone. FAMILY: Husband Stan INTERESTS: Sailing, reading, baking FAVORITE CHARITies: Girl Scouts, CanCare COMPANY: Halliburton HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas and Dubai, UAE WEBSITE: www.Halliburton.com BUSINESS: Energy Services REVENUES: $18 billion EMPLOYEES: 60,000

Treat others as you want to be treated.

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Our doors are

open. At Freddie Mac, you’ll have a rewarding career as you play a role in keeping the mortgage markets open and helping the nation recover from the housing and economic crisis. A vital component of the secondary mortgage market, Freddie Mac has made homeownership and rental housing more accessible and affordable for one in six homebuyers and over five million renters. When you join the Freddie Mac team, you’ll discover an inclusive, empowering culture with an equal opportunity employer who recognizes the value of diversity. You’ll also find a total rewards package that supports your success both at work and in your personal life. We encourage you to visit us at upcoming diversity conferences, which are listed on our career site. Visit us online at:

FreddieMac.jobs careers with impact


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Laura Mildenberger, DaVita • Martha May, Bell Helicopter • Lynn A. Mortensen, Raytheon Company Tracy Mooney, Freddie Mac • Nadine Mirchandani, Ernst & Young LLP • Margery Mayer, Scholastic • Jennifer W. Murphy, Legg Mason Global Asset Management Lynn C. Martin, NYSE Euronext • Nishi Narula, Optimal Solutions and Technologies • Terri McClements, PwC

10

th

annual

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Lynn C.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Martin

NYSE Euronext

...find your voice and, in doing that, you find yourself.

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ven as a child, the most important thing to me was self expression. If you ask anyone in my life, from my family and friends to my colleagues, they will tell you that I have strong opinions. Although having strong viewpoints is important, the art is in how you express them and your ability work with others to reach consensus. In many circum­stances, women are uncomfort­ able expressing their true thoughts. I have seen it both person­ally and professionally. Often, these women tend to remain quiet or simply agree with the opinions of others. Many times this is a result of their fear of being viewed as weaker, or somehow less intelligent than their male counter­parts. My advice to those women is to find your voice and in doing that, you find yourself. 128

Having a voice does not mean always being the first to speak or having the most to say. Instead, it’s remaining true to your character and speaking with con­ fidence. For me, one of the most effective ways to communicate is to say nothing at all and simply listen to the opinions of others. This goes far beyond just hearing what people are saying to you, but truly endeav­ oring to understand their viewpoint. Having a voice involves taking what you learn, considering it carefully, and sharing a resulting opinion that is unique to your personal­ity, your voice. Taking the time to consider a topic before defining your stance will always serve you well, as it will show your careful consideration of a view rather than just your reaction to words. Most importantly, having a voice does not

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

mean insisting that you are right. Always have the courage to admit your mistakes and con­ tinue to move forward. That simple recognition will earn the respect of your peers and the wis­ dom of the moment. We can learn much from our mistakes and from the mistakes of others. If we were never wrong, we wouldn’t evolve person­ ally or professionally. Most of all, it’s impor­ tant for women to be in an environment where they feel comfortable expressing themselves, making their voices heard. I am fortunate to be a part of an organiza­tion in NYSE Euronext that rec­ ognizes the con­tributions of women, particularly in senior roles. Intelligence, drive and commitment are not the property of any background or gen­ der. They are what you cul­tivate in yourself and express to the world, using your voice.

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TITLE: Senior Vice President, NYSE Euronext, Chief Operating Officer, NYSE Liffe U.S. EDUCATION: BS, Manhattan College; MA, Columbia University FIRST JOB: Computer Programmer, Con Edison WHAT I’M READING: Moneyball, by Michael Lewis MY PHILOSOPHY: Remain true to yourself, never forget where you come from. FAMILY: Husband, Thomas Doherty INTERESTS: Yoga, Cycling FAVORITE CHARITY: God’s Love We Deliver COMPANY: NYSE Euronext HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.nyse.com BUSINESS: NYSE Liffe U.S. NYSE Euronext’s U.S. Futures Exchange REVENUES: $4.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 2,968


NYSE LiffE U.S. coNgratULatES

Lynn Martin

for bEiNg NamEd oNE of thiS YEar’S womEN worth watchiNg


Martha

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

May

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer EDUCATION: North Carolina State University FIRST JOB: Fleet Service clerk at American Airlines WHAT I’M READING: The 2020 Workplace, by Jeanne C. Meister and Karie Willyerd

Bell Helicopter

M

y career started very differently than I envisioned. I began working as a Fleet Service Clerk at a major airline while still in college. After 19 years and 17 jobs at the airline, everything from supervisor, general manager, employee relations, to HR director, I decided to see if I could replicate the success I had experienced in one industry into another industry where I had no experience and where I knew virtually no one. Besides doing my homework and selecting a company that matched my personal values and goals, it was important to me to leave behind a legacy of thought leadership and an organization better than I found it. At Bell Helicopter I continue to build on a solid and growing foundation of life and work experiences at an organization that wants me to succeed. That leap of faith continues to serve me well and I have not looked back once – nor regret­ ted for one minute the decision I made to spread my wings and once again learn something new. It may not result in seventeen different jobs but I wel­ come the opportunities change brings to my career and my perspective. I played team sports growing up and moved from guard to center on the basketball team in one season, most likely due to an extreme growth spurt.

What a powerful lesson of perspective I learned about how things can appear when viewed through a different lens! I brought that experience with me as my professional career developed. Little did I know those experiences would be the foundation for the variety of posi­ tions I would later hold. I learned not to be afraid of changes because when you embrace them, you can see the business from multiple angles and are better for having done so. One of the best leadership lessons I have learned is about collaborative lead­ ership, which means creating an envi­ ronment where people bring their full selves to work. This is not something that can be forced or simply occurs on its own. A true leader must cre­ ate a work environment where people know they can trust you and you genu­ inely care about them. The team then becomes a true masterpiece because the organization comes together as a col­ lection of fully functioning, thinking, feeling human beings who support each other and want success for the collective more than for themselves. This philosophy seems simple, but not many female or male leaders are able to consistently pull off “walking their talk.” When it happens, leaders create remarkable teams that achieve remark­ able results – with and through others.

...I welcome the opportunities change brings to my career and my perspective.

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MY PHILOSOPHY: “Leave things better than you found them.” FAMILY: Husband and daughter INTERESTS: Golf, skiing, traveling, outdoor sports FAVORITE CHARITies: Boys and Girls Clubs, Girl Scouts of America, American Diabetes Association COMPANY: Bell Helicopter HEADQUARTERS: Fort Worth, Texas WEBSITE: www.bellhelicopter.com BUSINESS: Helicopter manufacturer REVENUES: $3.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 10,500


Margery

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Mayer

Scholastic

...keep an open mind with all antennae tuned to unforeseen possibilities.

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TITLE: President, Scholastic Education, Scholastic Inc. EDUCATION: BA, Middlebury College; MS, MIT FIRST JOB: Sales clerk WHAT I’M READING: Tangled Webs: How False Statements are Undermining America, by James B. Stewart MY PHILOSOPHY: It takes a great team to be successful and stay sane. FAMILY: Husband; two children; two grandchildren INTERESTS: France, food, fan magazines FAVORITE CHARITY: Babies Hospital, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center COMPANY: Scholastic HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.scholastic.com BUSINESS: Children’s publishing, education, and media REVENUES: $1.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 10,000

hen a newly minted graduate asks to meet and discuss career options, it’s hard for me to say no. The truth is I selfishly enjoy meeting young people interested in education and publishing. Almost without fail, their pas­ sion for doing something worthwhile with their professional life reminds me of why I’ve enjoyed virtually every day of my career. I didn’t start out want­ ing to work in educa­ tional publishing. In fact, I wanted to publish just about anything but educational materials, but the business of pub­ lishing for K-12 pulled me in like a magnet. My first job out of business school was in strategic planning for a company made up of multiple publishing lines. With considerable reluctance, I kept being pushed into assignments for the edu­ cational branch of the

business. It didn’t take long for me to have one of those “aha!” moments and realize that I had a real affinity for K-12 education. I quickly became fasci­ nated with all aspects of the business: the science of learning, the oppor­ tunities for innovation, the culture of schools and how all those fac­ tors bear on creating and maintaining a successful business model. I’m still fascinated by the com­ plexity and changeability of the education market­ place, and because of this I find my job persistently intriguing. This brings me to a piece of advice that I offer almost every young person with whom I meet. Certainly, one should pursue career opportunities in areas in which one has an inter­ est. However, at the same time, I always recom­ mend that young career seekers keep an open w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

mind with all antennae tuned to unforeseen possibilities. Often the best jobs find you, rather than the other away around. I think this is particu­ larly true for women. While I believe there is considerable equality once women get into the workplace, they often face greater obstacles than men in finding out what opportunities are out there and how to pursue them. I also have one purely practical piece of advice to offer: master the numbers. Understanding the metrics of your busi­ ness model is absolutely essential for business suc­ cess. Be persistent and become expert with the algebra of your business. Once you do you’ll have a necessary and sturdy foundation on which to build new plans and ideas, and you’ll be rec­ ognized for your clear, crisp thinking.

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Terri

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

McClements

PwC

I

n my career, I learned to ask myself, What do I want to achieve? What experiences do I want to gain? Part of that planning involves cultivating a personal brand and defining who you are, who you want to be and what you can contribute to both work and life along the way. When I was young and setting out in my career, I realized planning was essential. Not only did I lay out how I wanted to advance in my career, but I thought about what I could learn and experi­ ence along the way. When I started at PwC, I was the epitome of a team player – I took on projects that stretched beyond my experience at the time. As I advanced, I began to think about what experiences I wanted to have and what made me excited about coming to work every day. I encour­ age young professionals to have the confidence and courage to take opportunities presented to them. Too often women say no to things because they are worried they do not have enough or the right experi­ ence, or women opt out before even having the opportunity presented to them. Know that you can take on the challenge and do it well. Do not underestimate your potential.

Work hard to build your credibility and a foundation of support from your employer. There were times in my career where I needed the support and encouragement of my leaders and partners to deal with personal chal­ lenges. I am very fortunate to have a wealth of personal and professional support at PwC. There will be times when personal life becomes most important. I tell our women at PwC that my experience will be different than theirs. Talk to your partners and your coach about what is important to them and what is important to you – both at work and in life – as both parties need to know what suc­ cess looks like. Work-life flexibility is not so much a dichotomy – it is about how work and life fit together. The people in your career will be there for you and will help you navi­ gate the challenges that arise. Follow your passion. That is my philosophy. When you choose your career path and plan where you want to go and what you want to experi­ ence, you need to feel excited about getting up each day to do it. Each experience in your career and life will build up to a longer term goal. If you are not excited about the journey, you are not following your passion.

...work hard to build your credibility...

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TITLE: Partner, member of the PwC U.S. Board of Partners and Principals; East Region Advisory Leader; U.S. Advisory Diversity Leader EDUCATION: California University of Pennsylvania FIRST JOB: McDonald’s Drive-thru Attendant WHAT I’M READING: Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion and Purpose, by Tony Hsieh MY PHILOSOPHY: Follow your passion. FAMILY: Husband Michael; son Matthew; daughter Erin INTERESTS: My children, exercise FAVORITE CHARITies: American Cancer Society Relay for Life, American Diabetes Association, The Food Allergy Network COMPANY: PwC HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.pwc.com BUSINESS: Assurance, tax and advisory services GLOBAL REVENUES: $26.6 billion in 2010 EMPLOYEES: 161,000


Laura

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Mildenberger DaVita

Everything you do in your career shapes where you’re headed...

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ever stop learning: three words that can have an immeasur­ able impact on the path of any career. In order to succeed in the business world, one’s willingness to try something new can often yield positive and even surprising profes­ sional results. Just as DaVita’s path to success followed a unique route, so did my career. More than 30 years ago, I began my career as an occupational therapist at Mayo Clinic. When I joined DaVita in 2001 as vice president of opera­ tions, the company had just recently changed its name to DaVita and was looking to turn things around after being on the brink of bank­ ruptcy. Today DaVita is a Fortune 500 kidney care company that provides dialysis to over 128,000 patients across the coun­ try. Without having any formal background in human resources, but

with a limitless desire to keep learning, my role is now the “chief people officer,” the one who heads up human resources. In rebuilding the fail­ ing company, DaVita learned the value of creating a worthwhile culture, one that encour­ ages people to be the best version of themselves while providing the best possible patient care. Under the leadership of our Chairman and CEO Kent Thiry, DaVita became a community first and a company sec­ ond, and is a village with 36,500 teammates rather than employees. As our company began to dig its way out of debt and blossom into something great, we learned that it pays to take risks and try something new. We also learned the power of personal and professional development. Whether a person provides daily patient care in one

of our 1,600 clinics or is a senior vice president overseeing a region of operations, we believe in the value of “never stop learning.” We are com­ mitted to mentoring and building future leaders and offer unique programs for DaVita teammates and students dedicated to furthering their education and professional develop­ ment. These leadership development and educa­ tional programs are built on DaVita’s core values of service excellence, integrity, team, continuous improve­ ment, accountability, ful­ fillment and fun. I believe the success of my career is because I made learning, taking risks, and professional and personal development a priority. Everything you do in your career shapes where you’re headed and it’s never too late to learn something new and valu­ able. You never know where the journey will take you! w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

TITLE: Chief People Officer EDUCATION: BS, Occupational Therapy, Colorado State University FIRST JOB: Occupational Therapist, Mayo Clinic WHAT I’M READING: Art of Possibility, by Rosamund Zander, Benjamin Zander MY PHILOSOPHY: Assume the best of intent; live in gratitude. FAMILY: Son, Andrew; daughter, Kristen INTERESTS: Architecture and design, travel FAVORITE CHARITies: Kidney TRUST, Arapahoe House, Ronald McDonald House COMPANY: DaVita HEADQUARTERS: Denver, Colorado WEBSITE: www.DaVita.com BUSINESS: Kidney care provider REVENUES: $6.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 36,500

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Nadine

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Partner, Transaction Advisory Services (TAS); Global TAS Industry Leader for Financial Services, the Americas; Inclusiveness Champion for TAS EDUCATION: BComm, Queen’s University at Kingston; Chartered Accountant, Canada; CPA, New York, Illinois FIRST JOB: Auditing, Ernst & Young, Ottawa, Ontario WHAT I’M READING: Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell; Bossypants, by Tina Fey; New York Magazine; The Economist MY PHILOSOPHY: Embrace every opportunity, strive for success, don’t take yourself too seriously, and enjoy the moment. FAMILY: Wonderful parents; an amazing sister; very special cousins; nephews Damian and Zachary INTERESTS: Travel, music, art FAVORITE CHARITies: City Harvest, various cancer related charities COMPANY: Ernst & Young LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.ey.com BUSINESS: Professional services REVENUES: $21.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 141,000

Mirchandani Ernst & Young LLP

S

uccess is never achieved in isola­ tion. I have been fortunate to benefit from a variety of people who have helped me to achieve success throughout my career. Many have been mentors, many have been peers and others have been sponsors, both at Ernst & Young and in the wider business community. With women still notably under­ represented on corporate boards and in the C-suite, I think every professional, especially women, should ensure that they not only have mentors, but also sponsors. I believe a mentor is some­ one who provides perspective, advice and insight. A sponsor is someone who advocates and who takes risks on your behalf to position you for visibility, relationships and career opportunities. I’ve been fortunate enough to participate in programs such as the Inclusiveness Leadership Program at Ernst & Young that have opened up new career opportunities for me. This program pairs high-potential partners and principals across all dimensions of diversity with an executive coach and members of our Americas Executive Board who serve as mentors. As someone who has benefitted from sponsorship and mentorship, I believe it is my responsibility to help develop those around me. I adhere to the say­

ing “be the change that you want to see in the world,” which is why I’m actively involved with Ernst & Young’s Career Watch program for women and minorities who are on the partner track. The program is designed to help ensure high-performing women and minorities at the firm receive the expe­ riences and opportunities they need to advance to the partnership. I often tell those I mentor that they should have a vision or a destination in mind for their career, but at the same time they must remain open to the unexpected opportunities. In my own career, I’ve taken various paths through roles in our offices in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. I’ve also seized the chance to work with international clients on global projects. Working in different locations and with our professionals around the world has enabled me to hone and develop a global mindset that has been extremely valuable to me in my current role. In honor of those who have influ­ enced and guided my career, I remain committed to seeking out ways to work with and guide the next genera­ tions of leaders. I believe if we take care of the people, the people will take care of everything else – consider it the pay-it-forward legacy we all strive to achieve.

...I believe it is my responsibility to help develop those around me.

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Tracy

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Single-Family Servicing and Real Estate Owned EDUCATION: BS, George Mason University FIRST JOB: Arthur Andersen LLP WHAT I’M READING: Letters to My Younger Self, by Ellyn Spragins; The Lemon Tree, by Sandy Tolan MY PHILOSOPHY: Lead by example. FAMILY: Husband; son INTERESTS: Family, friends, tennis FAVORITE CHARITY: Prevent Child Abuse COMPANY: Freddie Mac HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEBSITE: www.freddiemac.com BUSINESS: Financial Services REVENUES: $5.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 5,300

Mooney

Freddie Mac

C

areer advice is always valuable, but it’s precious when it comes from someone you admire. I’ve been lucky to receive a lot of both throughout my 25-year career at Freddie Mac working with talented, highly motivated and supportive colleagues. I’m also fortunate to work for a company that provides its employees with career-advancing resources such as counseling, mentoring, and leadership and management training. Unfortunately, not every company offers their employees these options, and for those that do, not every employee chooses to take advantage of them. So ultimately, it is up to each individual to advance his or her own career. Whether you’re just starting out or a veteran, I’d offer others three things that have worked for me throughout my career. Do your best work every day, learn as much as you can in every position you hold and establish a check-in procedure with yourself to make sure you’re on track with your goals. This last point is especially important. Consciously set time aside to do this even if you have to put it in your cal­ endar. By forcing yourself to do this, you’ll think differently about your current position, the daily tasks you’re assigned to and the value you bring to the table. You’ll also find that instead of trying to master your current position 100 per­ cent, you’ll focus more on what you are learning and how you can leverage your new skills for when the next oppor­ tunity presents itself. In many ways, it comes down to hav­ ing a better perspective and keeping perspective. But more importantly, it’ll help you become a well-rounded employee, making you a more attractive candidate for that promotion you’ve been wanting, or even a position with a new company. Finally, don’t be afraid to take risks, and if you’re not already asking for what you want, start immediately. If you ask, you will probably get what you deserve.

...it is up to each individual to advance his or her own career.

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Lynn A.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Mortensen

Raytheon Company

Through networking, we can learn so much from each other and understand diverse perspectives...

A

TITLE: Vice President of Engineering, Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems EDUCATION: BS, California State Polytechnic University FIRST JOB: Sales clerk in a flooring and cabinet shop WHAT I’M READING: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson MY PHILOSOPHY: Do a good job on everything – no matter how small or simple – if you do, unlimited opportunities will be presented to you. But most important, always have fun. FAMILY: Husband; daughter; son; lots of cats and dogs INTERESTS: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) initiatives FAVORITE CHARITY: United Service Organizations, Inc. (USO) COMPANY: Raytheon Company HEADQUARTERS: Waltham, Massachusetts WEBSITE: www.raytheon.com BUSINESS: Defense, homeland security, information security, other government markets REVENUES: $25 billion EMPLOYEES: 72,000

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s I have progressed through my career, I have come to find that the most valuable asset I have is my network of relationships. Today we call this networking, but early in my career, networking wasn’t discussed and I didn’t think about its value. Over the years, I’ve learned that I can call upon my network to help me get the right information and solve problems. My network not only makes it easier to do my job, but makes me more successful, both personally and professionally. My advice to any young profes­ sional is to begin networking today. Build your network of peers and leaders wherever you spend your time – at school, in the community and in professional organizations. Look for mentors as well as others you can mentor. By building strong connections, we expand our horizons while also supporting one another. It may help you with projects, give you opportunities or even help you find your path forward. In my job, I put a focus on the sci­ ence, technology, engineering and math (STEM) needs of our country through a strong network of K-12, community college and university educators and leaders. Just recently, I again realized the power of the

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network when I learned that two educators I introduced to each other had collaborated and were creating an engineering curriculum transfer­ able from the community college to the university. Imagine my delight in this partnership, as it is a huge step in helping develop more engineers for the future, which is something my business needs to succeed. At Raytheon, networking inside and outside of the company is essential. Connecting employees in virtual teams across the company has helped us give our customers the best solution for their missions. It also helps attract talented employees and connects us in important ways to our communities. I realize networking isn’t easy for everyone. Some of us have to challenge ourselves to actively connect with oth­ ers. I encourage that effort because the payoffs are big. We can learn so much from each other and understand diverse perspectives to make better, more informed decisions. Networking maximizes your resources and leverages your knowledge in new ways. You have an incredible base of expertise and experience at your fingertips through your connections. If you reach out to and use this network, you will be posi­ tioned for success.


r e d a e L e u A Tr Defined

“A true leader must create a work environment where people know they can trust you and you genuinely care about them. The team then becomes a true masterpiece because the organization comes together as a collection of fully functioning, thinking, feeling human beings who support each other and want success for the collective more than for themselves.” – Martha May, Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer, Bell Helicopter Congratulations, Martha, for recognition as an exemplary leader. When it comes to promoting a favorable work environment, you are © 2011 Bell Helicopter Textron Inc.

www.bellhelicopter.com


Jennifer W.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Murphy

Legg Mason Global Asset Management

Feedback is critical to professional growth and success.

M

y first job after college was as a junior analyst for a small mutual fund. As soon as I started, I began work­ ing towards several pro­ fessional certifications that related to my role. After four years, I went to business school to get an MBA. By the time I was 27, I had completed most of the formal train­ ing that was relevant to my field. Reflecting back on it now, I’m glad I got this done early in my career, because once I got mar­ ried and started hav­ ing children, my time constraints grew expo­ nentially. I’d encourage those starting out to tackle any formal train­ ing as early as possible – it only gets more dif­ ficult later! Much of my best work was not assigned to me. Early in my career, I had a minor role on

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a team working on an acquisition. When our CEO decided to proceed with the purchase of the company, I figured he would need a presenta­ tion about the deal, his rationale for it, and the expected impact to our bottom line. I drafted a presentation for him with the appropriate charts, pictures, and projections. It was great experience for me to put myself in his shoes and think about how to present this to our share­ holders. He was very happy I had anticipated what he would need. I encourage our employees to create projects that ignite their particular interests. I believe everyone can be a leader. Every job provides the opportunity to embody the values of your organization, serve others, listen, use your unique talents to be a

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

force for good, and try to bring out the best in your colleagues. Senior managers notice and appreciate people who practice these things consistently. Feedback is critical to professional growth and success. Recently, I gave a presentation to a board. Afterwards, I asked a colleague for feedback. While she was encouraging about what I said, she thought the way I said it did not instill confidence. While I thanked her for her comments, I felt a bit defensive. I liked the way I approached the meeting. But I have come to appreciate that candid feedback is very difficult to come by and, for the most part, likely to be close to the mark. Asking for feedback is good, but hearing it is better! I still work on this every day.

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TITLE: President and CEO, Legg Mason Capital Management EDUCATION: BA, Economics, Brown University; MBA, Palmer Scholar, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania FIRST JOB: Junior Analyst, Legg Mason Funds WHAT I’M READING: Game of Thrones, by George R.R. Martin; Adapt: Why Success Always Begins with Failure, by Tim Harford MY PHILOSOPHY: Every role provides an opportunity for leadership and service to others. FAMILY: Husband Bryan; four children INTERESTS: Sports cars, science fiction FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way, The Walters Art Museum COMPANY: Legg Mason Global Asset Management HEADQUARTERS: Baltimore, Maryland WEBSITE: www.leggmason.com BUSINESS: Financial Services/ Asset Management REVENUES: $713.4 million (as of 3/31/11) EMPLOYEES: 3,395 (as of 3/31/11)


Nishi

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Narula

Optimal Solutions and Technologies

I focus on work-life synergy rather than work-life balance.

M

y journey to the executive title has been one of great pleasure and fulfillment. The credit, given by my peers to many of the leadership qualities I possess, really belongs to the countless special guardians who have protected and provided the strong inner core that is common in every leader and yet makes them unique. For those aspiring for a C-title, here are three important principles that guide me. First, keep an open mind so you can dynamically adapt. Being open to ideas, regardless of the source or the paradigm shifts they may bring, has helped me to grow. I have been hum­ bled by transformational ideas shat­ tering my belief systems. An example is the challenge of leading a multigenerational workforce through today’s rapidly changing business environ­ ment. By emphasizing a free flow of ideas, I have witnessed the unparalleled performance we have achieved through the marriage of the energy, passion, and drive of the Gen X/Yers with the stability, experience, and serenity of the senior staff. Second, build partnerships. My life satisfaction comes from encouraging others to thrive and become the best they can be. This requires the mentor­ ing, care and protection that I take

very seriously. Empowering others to contribute to initiatives is one way I encourage this growth. I also find that time spent getting input from all stakeholders in any proposal is invalu­ able to crafting agreements that are a win-win from all viewpoints. Third, focus on your own wellbeing. In today’s business climate, expect work to spill over to home and vice versa. I focus on work-life synergy rather than work-life balance. When demands start to get beyond my tip­ ping point, I shift focus to what is acceptable vs. ideal. However, proac­ tively empowering my trusted team­ mates has minimized the need for this. Taking care of your physical, mental, social, and spiritual health is crucial. I find the regular practice of workouts and meditation effective stress busters. And this quote from Mother Teresa always puts a smile on my face and re-energizes me during tough times: “I know God will not give me anything I can’t handle. I just wish that He didn’t trust me so much.” Finally, while it is important to learn from the past and keep your eye on the target, do not forget to pay attention and enjoy where you are today. Everything else in your rise to a C-level is a natural side effect.

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TITLE: Director, Business Performance EDUCATION: BS, Mathematics, Delhi University; MS, Operations Research, Delhi University; MS, Computer Science, Bowie State University FIRST JOB: Trainer, Delhi University WHAT I’M READING: Palace of Illusions, by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is a school. Be open to learning and dynamically adapting to people, places, events and situations. FAMILY: Husband, Vijay; son, Rushil; daughter, Juhi INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, reading, volleyball FAVORITE CHARITies: Several charities that help children COMPANY: Optimal Solutions and Technologies HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C. WEBSITE: www.ostglobal.com BUSINESS: Government Systems Integrators REVENUES: $25 million EMPLOYEES: 250

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© Eastman Kodak Company, 2010

Diversity & Inclusion

drives innovation and growth

Kodak’s commitment to diversity and inclusion means everyone counts: consumers, employees, customers, suppliers, shareholders, and more. Our global leadership in digital imaging and printing enables us to serve cultures and communities with innovative technologies and services. At Kodak, we seek diverse talent to help drive creativity and innovation, and delight customers around the world. Become part of our picture— and join us on our journey to enrich people’s lives.

www.kodak.com/go/diversity


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Alison Kenney Paul, Deloitte LLP • Laura M. Newinski, KPMG LLP • Ann M. Oglesby, ConocoPhillips M. Marnette Perry, Kroger • Nina Ramsey, Kelly Services • Anabel M. Perez, Catalyst • Nilde V. Passanesi, Eastman Kodak Company Alison Quirk, State Street • Jackie W. Parker, Newell Rubbermaid • Andrea Nitzan, AXA Equitable

10

th

annual

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Laura M.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Newinski

KPMG LLP

...a great leader is one who excels at helping others achieve their goals.

R TITLE: Regional Managing Partner EDUCATION: BBA, University of Iowa; MBT, University of Minnesota FIRST JOB: I’m a lifer. WHAT I’M READING: Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand MY PHILOSOPHY: A leader leads by example, whether she intends to or not. FAMILY: Husband, David; sons, Jon and Andrew INTERESTS: Hiking, golf, biking, camping, reading FAVORITE CHARITies: Catholic Charities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, United Way, Vail Place COMPANY: KPMG LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.us.kpmg.com BUSINESS: Audit, Tax, and Advisory Services GLOBAL REVENUES: $20.6 billion in 2010 EMPLOYEES: 21,000

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ole models and mentors have had a significant impact throughout my career and in developing my strategy on how to integrate my family, career and community activities. I have been fortunate enough to have had many women leaders as role models during my career at KPMG, from senior partners who are now retired to women leaders in the firm who are encouraging and supportive. From them I have learned much. It is my mentors, both men and women, who have contributed most to shaping my views. Over the course of my career, my mentors have encouraged and inspired me. They’ve served as a sounding board and provided level-headed advice. They’ve asked me tough questions and told me hard truths. In sum, they’ve helped me

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see things more clearly and inspired me to strive to reach my full potential. There are three pieces of advice I received from listening and watching important mentors in my life that I’d like to pass along. One has to do with dealing with adversity. Many can lead when times are good; however, a great leader must be big enough to admit their mistakes, smart enough to profit from them and strong enough to correct them. And our conduct when we are correcting our mistakes will tell others the most about our character. The term work-life balance sometimes conjures a sense that to have more of one means having less of the other. Another piece of advice from a long-time mentor challenged me

to defy this thinking. Work is part of life; family is part of life; and focusing on excellence, whether I’m with my kids, my spouse, or my work, makes me better at all aspects of what I do. It also provides me with the capacity for more of both. Finding ways to integrate all aspects of life provides balance for me when demands sometimes cause conflicts. The last piece of mentoring advice I’ll share I learned from my dad, who was an outstanding elementary school principal. He always told me that a great leader is one who excels at helping others achieve their goals. I placed this simple philosophical ideal at the center of how I’ve served clients, how I lead my teams, and how I continue to serve my fellow partners at KPMG.


Andrea

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Financial Planning & Analysis EDUCATION: BBA, Hofstra University FIRST JOB: Drug Store Clerk, Staff Accountant at Coopers & Lybrand WHAT I’M READING: Teenage as a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual, by Barbara Greenberg and Jennifer Powell-Lunder MY PHILOSOPHY: Be happy with what you do each day. FAMILY: Husband Mitchell; daughters Julia, Leah, Ava INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, travel, art history FAVORITE CHARITY: St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital COMPANY: AXA Equitable HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.axa-equitable.com BUSINESS: Financial Protection, Wealth Management and Retirement Savings REVENUES: $11.44 billion EMPLOYEES: More than 9,000 employees including sales personnel

Nitzan

AXA Equitable

I

was forced to embrace adaptability when at the age of five my father died in a traffic accident. Learning to adapt to an unimaginable situation was critical in coping with my loss. It also shaped forever how I would view change – you can’t stop it, you must embrace it. Change is often hard to accept, especially when you are happy and fulfilled. Adapting to change and adjusting quickly to a new normal has helped me make the most of my career opportunities. You will often find that the change, while painful at first, will lead to opportunity and success where there might otherwise be failure. Another lesson learned, from my mother, was to always find the good in people and to focus on their best qualities. This advice has proven invaluable throughout my education and career when I was faced with a difficult professor, manager or colleague. I remember a time when I was required to work closely with a colleague whom I just did not like. We disagreed about everything at the start of the project, making every day at work unpleasant. Finally, I put my mother’s advice into action. I forced myself to find that one trait that would help me relate to this colleague on a different level, creating

a connection that subsequently led to an enjoyable working relationship. Self-awareness is critical to adapting to changing situations and to working with different work styles and personalities. The key to self-awareness is feedback. I seek feedback often from mentors and peers inside and outside of our organization, as well as from my direct reports and team members. A pivotal experience for me was working with a professional coach to further develop my leadership and communication skills. This taught me many things, but the most significant was learning how to view the same set of facts and circumstances from multiple perspectives. This gave me a greater level of self-awareness, enabling me to more easily solve problems and improve collaboration in a variety of working relationships. The recent economic downturn forced many businesses to make changes, whether to their business models, product offerings, locations or employee population. These decisions are never easy to make or to readily accept. A positive outlook and selfawareness, however, can make it easier on you and those around you. If you can learn to adapt to change or even embrace it, success will follow.

Change is often hard to accept, especially when you are happy and fulfilled.

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Ann M.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Oglesby

ConocoPhillips

...interacting with fascinating people, learning new things and achieving success with others is fun.

O TITLE: Vice President, Communications & Public Affairs EDUCATION: BS, Oklahoma State University FIRST JOB: McDonald’s WHAT I’M READING: Work-related information; suspenseful fiction MY PHILOSOPHY: Work really hard but be deliberate about finding time for things that make you happy. FAMILY: Husband Bill; two incredible kids, Amy and Matthew; son-in-law, Garrett INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, horses, water-skiing, college sports FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way, several Christian and youth organizations COMPANY: ConocoPhillips HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEBSITE: www.conocophillips.com BUSINESS: Energy REVENUES: $224 billion EMPLOYEES: 29,900

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ne of my greatest blessings is the legacy of hard work, family commitment and fun instilled by my parents and grandparents. Their actions, more than words, set the three powerful bedrock values that have guided me throughout my career. If I’m honest, there are times when I curse that darn family work ethic, which causes me to redo work to meet my high standards and put in long hours. But in the end, I know putting forth my best effort and maintaining a disciplined focus on excellence gives me a leg up to success. It’s true that sometimes the lucky person wins, but more often it’s whoever puts in the time and effort. My parents always had jobs when I was growing up. Although they put in long hours, I

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always knew our family was their priority. I have been a working mom my whole career, so I know the roller-coaster emotions that come from balancing career and family. There is no fail-safe way to avoid the trade-offs, but you can take steps to make the journey easier. It’s important to have partners who can be a support network and help with both logistics and moral support. There have been times when my husband reminded me that missing a school event would not leave a lasting scar on the kids. Hearing that helped me get out the door to work. It’s also important to have realistic expectations. You won’t be perfect and that’s OK. Learn from the times when it doesn’t go well, but don’t let guilt weigh you down. The best

payoff, which you might have to wait decades to hear, is when your kids express pride in your accomplishments and thank you for the example you set. I hope my parents know I feel this way about them! One of the best things about the example my parents and grandparents set was that they managed to work very hard, but always found time to have fun and invest in relationships. So often we hear retirees talk about the people and adventures that made their careers meaningful. While no job is fun all the time, interacting with fascinating people, learning new things and achieving success with others is fun. For me, being deliberate about absorbing this “good stuff ” along the way helps maintain a healthy perspective.


Jackie W.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Parker

TITLE: President, The Newell Rubbermaid Foundation EDUCATION: BS, Hampton University; MS, Johns Hopkins University FIRST JOB: Retail Sales Representative for General Foods WHAT I’M READING: Smart Giving is Good Business, by Curt Weeden

Newell Rubbermaid

T

he greatest lesson of my career, and one I bring to Newell Rubbermaid each day, is the importance of establishing meaningful relationships with those I meet, and I’m not simply talking about networking. Connecting with business associates is important, but expand the scope to nurture relationships with people beyond peers, team members or your usual sphere of influence. Connect with a broader group with whom you regularly come into contact. Show how you appreciate what they do and care about them as individuals. Don’t underestimate those who hold positions of less influence. The strongest asset you bring to your business, regardless of your position, is how you value people and their contributions. First, it’s important to recognize the difference between networking and relationship building and know when to apply the techniques of each. Relationship building is often not given the merit it deserves because it is misunderstood as networking. Traditional networking techniques are quite different from the skills used in cultivating relationships. Networking is typically viewed as a quid pro quo or “one-way” exchange; building a relationship is a two-way exchange. Second, learn about those whose

paths you frequently cross, from customers to vendors to employees, so when their needs change, you’re poised to keep them aligned with and supportive of your business priorities. Ask, “What can I do for you?” Then, do it. They’ll appreciate your interest and investment to help them be successful. Third, extending oneself is at the center of building authentic relationships, so take the first step in establishing a new relationship. Most individuals begin relationships with a personal “ask” – here’s what I need from you. Try starting with a “give” – here’s what I want to give you. For instance, offer three ideas that could positively impact a new acquaintance’s business or performance on the job. Research their background and identify their goals. Then leverage your first meeting with thoughtful ideas to make them more successful. These key principles guided my team as we worked to establish The Newell Rubbermaid Foundation earlier this year. In summary, remember: Networking is a quick process; relationships take time. Networking is a one-way street; relationships are two-way. Start each relationship with an “offer” not an “ask.” Extend yourself first keeping others’ goals in mind. Share these steps with someone else.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Nothing beats a failure but a try. FAMILY: Married; two daughters INTERESTS: Community service, traveling, reading, playing tennis FAVORITE CHARITY: YWCA COMPANY: Newell Rubbermaid HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia WEBSITE: www.newellrubbermaid.com BUSINESS: Consumer and commercial products REVENUES: $5.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 22,000

The strongest asset you bring to your business...is how you value people and their contributions.

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Nilde V.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: General Manager, Silver Halide Operations; Vice President FPEG EDUCATION: Instituto de Engenharia, Sao Paulo FIRST JOB: Product Engineer Trainee, Black-and-White Papers, Eastman Kodak WHAT I’M READING: The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, by Stieg Larsson MY PHILOSOPHY: You need to be passionate about what you do. FAMILY: Three sons: Andre, Thais, Eduardo INTERESTS: Travel, cooking Brazilian cuisine FAVORITE CHARITies: ICRIM, APAE, Lollypop Farm – the Humane Society of Greater Rochester COMPANY: Eastman Kodak Company HEADQUARTERS: Rochester, New York WEBSITE: www.kodak.com BUSINESS: Digital imaging and printing technologies REVENUES: $7.18 billion EMPLOYEES: 18,800

Passanesi

Eastman Kodak Company

W

hen I joined Kodak in Brazil after graduating from university, I was one of a community of engineers, but I was the only female. I always had to prove myself. I never mapped my career in terms of particular jobs. Instead, I focused on results, recognition, and doing what I enjoyed. At the time, engineering was not a field that attracted many women. So I would hear people ask, “Is it really going to work? Does she have what it takes?” So I focused on persistence as I advanced from an engineer to a supervisor, and then to sensitizing manager at Kodak’s Brazil operation in 1999. In that culture, there were no formal mentors, but my peers would come to my office to do a little informal coach-

ing and counseling, even though we were all very competitive. I believe in developing oneself through interesting challenges and assignments. I’d been with Kodak for 19 years before someone asked if I needed a mentor. But, in fact, my peers were my mentors. I work from a mindset that nothing really stops me. When I came to the U.S., my biggest challenge was to try to understand the culture. You learn to adapt and face challenges. That attitude worked well when I became a manager for Kodak’s large U.S. sensitizing operations. We were challenged to create an inclusive culture, and along with other managers from other regions, we applied our non-U.S. perspectives to help create a more inclusive environment. Mentoring in our

transforming environment led me to discover new approaches. I had to become an advocate. When we were ending production at a plant, I worked to enable people to transition to a next phase. For example, I knew one young engineer would do well on the business side, and when the local management didn’t see it, I called a manager with an opening in the U.S. and agreed to continue funding that person’s salary for six months. In time, she became a successful product manager in the new business. Today I mentor many women at Kodak, both as a manager and as a sponsor via a Women of Color initiative. Whenever people ask me, I try to help both men and women understand how they can get other organizations to get “hooked” on their abilities.

I work from a mindset that nothing really stops me.

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Alison Kenney

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Paul

Deloitte LLP

Relationships drive trust, and trust drives business.

I

’ve taken a less traditional path than some to building my career. In fact, I’ve had three careers to date – in consumer goods, market research, and now consulting. Some people may think it’s a big leap to go from working at a startup to a well-established business like Deloitte. But it’s all part of a continuum of invention and reinvention. And one constant through it all has been my network of colleagues and mentors. I’m a big advocate of career development, whether it’s through formal training or through conversations with the people in your network. In fact, it was just such a conversation that brought me to consulting. I had not considered it as a career path, but when I had lunch with a former colleague one day, he ticked off a list of experiences and attributes I had that he felt would be a good fit with a consulting career. And Deloitte agreed. Different perspectives are key. Diversity of thought and experience has helped me make my career choices, and it helps businesses in much the same way. That’s why I joined friends and colleagues in starting the Network of Executive Women (NEW) 10 years ago. Our goal was to enhance opportunities for women and people of color in retail and consumer products industries. By

expanding our perspective, welcoming men and a greater variety of companies into our membership, we built what was intended to be a local initiative into a national network. Network-building doesn’t have to take place on an industry-wide scale. We created a fellows program within Deloitte’s Retail & Distribution practice that brings together people with different backgrounds from each of Deloitte’s business areas. As the fellows step out of their comfort zones, they form bonds that help them reach out across business areas to tap others’ perspectives and create new ways to team. Our clients benefit from a range of Deloitte’s services. My network has taught me three important lessons: Relationships drive trust, and trust drives business. The economy may fluctuate, industries and companies may change, but relationships provide a source of good advice to help you excel. I am the CEO of my own career. Build your brand around your strengths, and if you’re not sure of your strengths turn to your network and ask. Get a different perspective every time. Build a diverse network and be open to their advice. You never know where the next growth opportunity will come from.

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TITLE: Vice Chairman, U.S. Retail & Distribution Sector Leader EDUCATION: BA, University of Massachusetts at Amherst FIRST JOB: Sales Management Trainee, Procter & Gamble WHAT I’M READING: Life, by Keith Richards; Griftopia, by Matt Taibbi MY PHILOSOPHY: I’m a believer in the “everyone knows 250 people” principle. Every one of those people has a story to tell, has a connection you should get to know, and has the power to give a positive review or a negative one, so treat each person with respect and listen to their story. FAMILY: Husband, William; 2 Burmese cats, Ozzie and Lola INTERESTS: International travel, Comedy, Music, Urban gardening FAVORITE CHARITY: Child Fund International COMPANY: Deloitte LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.deloitte.com/us BUSINESS: Professional services REVENUES: $10.94 billion EMPLOYEES: 50,000

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Anabel M.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Perez

Catalyst

CQ has helped me manage effectively across cultural differences.

F TITLE: Senior Vice President, Development EDUCATION: BA, Tufts University; JD, Boston College Law School FIRST JOB: CSC Index WHAT I’M READING: The Widow Clicquot: the Story of a Champagne Empire and the Woman Who Ruled It, by Tilar J. Mezzeo MY PHILOSOPHY: Where people truly wish to go, there their feet will manage to take them. FAMILY: Married with 1 child INTERESTS: Travel, yoga, autobiographies, farmers’ markets FAVORITE CHARITY: Save the Children COMPANY: Catalyst HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.catalyst.org BUSINESS: Nonprofit REVENUES: $12.2 million EMPLOYEES: 78

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or me, diversity has a very personal meaning beyond the color of my skin or how I speak English with a Spanish accent. Working in Europe at a French organization was a particularly eye-opening experience. Cultural intelligence (CQ) refers to a person’s capability to adapt to new cultural situations. It is an important factor in determining who succeeds in global work assignments. A person with CQ will try to understand how different cultures work and have an open mind to learn from new experiences. These skills are not only essential when undertaking an international assignment but also will improve performance for the whole team. If you are working outside your home country where no one speaks your native language, you get a different perspective on what it means to be a minority. As a woman of color in the United States, I have always felt bicultural. When I was working in France, for the first time in my professional life, I felt my experiences dealing with diversity in the United States were useful. In the United States, I have always been part of a minority in the workforce. I already knew how to adapt and be successful in that kind of environment. I was able to take advantage of this knowledge to navigate a global environment from the beginning.

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Working in France broadened my approach to leadership and the meaning of diversity. As a Latina, I am accustomed to being different from the dominant group, and I am more comfortable in situations where I am different than others are. I was the only Latina on my team in France, and it was no big deal. Likewise, I am used to being the only Latina on the executive team at Catalyst. CQ has helped me manage effectively across cultural differences. The opportunity for a global assignment opened doors I never imagined existed. It also allowed me to learn more about myself. I became more willing to assimilate and learn while on foreign soil than I ever was in this country. Never did I feel I was expected to lose my sense of self in this new culture. CQ is an essential tool for every manager who deals with diverse teams. We all know that diversity on any team promotes creativity and innovation. But it is how we manage that diversity which empowers a team. If you are a woman of color considering a position abroad, you have a terrific opportunity not only to learn from a stretch assignment but also to be vulnerable to cultural interactions you don’t expect. You will return to the United States with a fuller and richer knowledge of your own diversity.


CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR OWN BARBARA KOSTER FOR HER SELECTION AS ONE OF PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL’S WOMEN WORTH WATCHING. As Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Prudential, Barbara provides one of the world’s most successful corporations with strategic advice and innovative business and technology services and solutions that enable global growth. We proudly support the work of leaders who, like Barbara Koster, elevate the aspirations and performances of everyone around them.

© 2011. Prudential, the Prudential logo, and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc., and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Prudential is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and is committed to diversity in its workforce. 0205991-00001-00


M. Marnette

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Perry

Kroger

Mentorship is a personal and professional imperative...

A

TITLE: Senior Vice President EDUCATION: Ohio University FIRST JOB: Part-time cashier, Kroger WHAT I’M READING: Stieg Larsson Trilogy and The Starbucks Experience, by Joseph Michelli MY PHILOSOPHY: Good is the Enemy of Great. FAMILY: Husband; one daughter; two grandchildren INTERESTS: Collecting Classical and Russian Impressionist Art FAVORITE CHARITY: Appalachian Scholars Program COMPANY: Kroger HEADQUARTERS: Cincinnati, Ohio WEBSITE: www.kroger.com BUSINESS: Grocery Retail REVENUES: $82 billion EMPLOYEES: 338,000

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t Kroger, we like to say, “Come for the job, and stay for the career!” Nothing could be truer when it comes to my experience at The Kroger Co., the nation’s largest traditional grocery retailer. I started as a part-time cashier in 1972 while I attended Ohio University. Thirty-nine years later, I have enjoyed a career that takes me from our stores in Alaska to our executive office in Cincinnati. Equally as enriching have been the communities we have grown close to in cities such as Memphis, Detroit, Columbus, and Cincinnati. All along the way we have been fortunate to meet wonderful friends and colleagues. On this journey, one thing has never changed, and that is how important people are in every aspect of life and business. I was fortunate that my career began

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in our stores. From the very beginning I knew I loved customers and creating an experience that makes customers feel good about choosing us. Today, that experience still guides me and is the foundation for our Company’s success. At Kroger, our strategy is called “Customer 1st.” It is a strategy I find exciting and effective. Working with diverse groups of talented colleagues as a senior executive and corporate officer, as well as an outside corporate director and a university trustee, has given me broad experiences to shape my leadership. I follow the principle that my most important contribution is always helping others achieve their goals and dreams. People and organizations that thrive create cultures of giving to each other. Mentorship is a per-

sonal and professional imperative and I try to find ways to mentor each and every day. Mentorship comes in many forms. Often, it is as simple as asking, “How can I help?” Finally, in my own development (a journey that continues with every experience), I have learned that finding the right question is so much more important than knowing the answer. I love “action and doing,” however, “assisting and helping” contributes exponentially. What I find most fulfilling about my career at Kroger is that we are a company of people who value our customers more than anything else. We have a culture of achievement and an environment where everyone can contribute to serving our customers. That’s the essence of Customer 1st!


At Bank of the West, we value the individual.

Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. We’ve grown stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees that keep us a step ahead of the rest. For career opportunities, visit us online at bankofthewest.com.

© 2011 Bank of the West. Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V


Alison

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Head of Global Human Resources EDUCATION: BA, University of New Hampshire FIRST JOB: Compensation and Benefits Specialist at Boston Financial Data Services WHAT I’M READING: Play Their Hearts Out: A Coach, His Star Recruit and the Youth Basketball Machine, by George Dohrmann MY PHILOSOPHY: Live a meaningful life. FAMILY: Husband; three kids; two dogs INTERESTS: Fitness, reading, dining, the ballet FAVORITE CHARITies: City Dance, Year Up, The United Way COMPANY: State Street HEADQUARTERS: Boston, Massachusetts WEBSITE: www.statestreet.com BUSINESS: Financial services REVENUES: $8.953 billion EMPLOYEES: 28,600

Quirk

State Street

O

ne of my favorite sayings is, “Life has to be lived going forward, but it can only be understood in reverse.” It’s true, one of the best ways to understand life and your career is to look back at the decisions you’ve made along the way, both good and bad, and glean what you can from them. Throughout my career, I’ve worked with a very diverse group of people and have learned some valuable lessons that are worth bearing in mind no matter who you are or what stage of your career you’re in. Early on, for example, I realized how important it is to learn as much as you can about your job. Not just your role, but also your department, your company and your industry. Doing so will make you more knowledgeable and improve your performance. Plus, you’ll show everyone that you are engaged, enthusiastic and proactive. The bottom line is that high performers who have a great attitude are the ones who stand out and get noticed. It’s also important to build your personal brand by recognizing your natural talents and the value of your unique and diverse point of view. Communicating those talents and viewpoints to others, along with your goals and ambitions, is essential. As

your exposure increases and you develop your network of contacts, the value of being able to succinctly describe who you are and what you can offer cannot be overestimated. As you move through your career, new opportunities will present themselves and you should consider thinking of your career in terms of a career lattice rather than a career ladder. While career ladders imply that there’s only one path to success, career lattices encourage adaptability, and give you the broad background and experience you’ll need to move into more senior roles. One of the best things you can do for your career is to accumulate a variety of skills and experiences by taking on new responsibilities, moving into other roles, or even working for different companies or in different industries. Lastly, be careful to strike the work-life balance that’s right for you. Patience and flexibility are key. It’s important to understand that you’re not going to find that perfect balance every day or even every week, and you should be open to making course corrections as your circumstances change. Meeting your career goals isn’t easy, but if you truly learn from your own and other peoples’ experiences, you will already be a step ahead.

...high performers who have a great attitude are the ones who stand out...

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Nina

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Ramsey

T

EDUCATION: BS, Oakland University; MEd, Wayne State University FIRST JOBs: Babysitting, candy counter sales clerk WHAT I’M READING: Powering Up, by Ann Doyle; Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell

Kelly Services he inspiration for my career in human resources began in junior high. After reading Man’s Search for Meaning, by Viktor E. Frankl, I knew I wanted to help others recognize their potential and find meaning in their work. HR is a perfect field to do this, and being part of a workforce-solutions company is the icing on the cake. I applaud those aspiring to be tomorrow’s leaders. You are key to creating a culture that captures the hearts and minds of those you lead. By engaging your employees, you will also increase customer loyalty and your company’s profitability. The guidance I would offer comes from a lifetime of experiences. I’ve learned that every company is also a community, so your ability to build strong relationships with colleagues will be key to your success. Keep these things in mind as you develop those relationships and build your teams. Keep integrity and humility as your unwavering north star and never try to shine your star by tarnishing someone else’s. Build a team with diverse talents and empower them to be successful. Develop a repertoire of skills that help you adapt and lead effectively in any situation. Engage in life-long learning. It’s

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Global Human Resources

essential to keep your edge and help others keep theirs. Be willing to offer and accept gamechanging ideas. As your business relationships grow, remember to keep investing in your relationships with family and friends. Work-life balance is a lifelong journey that changes over the years, but some things remain constant. If you have children, remember you are growing tomorrow’s leaders at home. Keep people in your life who help you see a broader reality. Take care of yourself physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. Journal what you learn along life’s path. It’s a great reference manual for your future. I realized early in my career how important it was to have faith, know my values, and work for people and companies with whom I could feel aligned. At Kelly I was hired four months pregnant and promoted while on maternity leave. I love to share that story with women who wonder if they can have a family and a career. My life-mentors have been my husband, daughter, bosses, colleagues, friends, and family. They have challenged me to expand my vision, find meaning in my work, and offer this gift to others. I encourage you to do the same.

MY PHILOSOPHY: There are always gifts within us waiting to be discovered. To whom much is given, much is expected. FAMILY: Husband Ron; daughter Christina INTERESTS: Time with family, reading, cooking, staying fit FAVORITE CHARITies: HAVEN, Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure COMPANY: Kelly Services HEADQUARTERS: Troy, Michigan WEBSITE: www.kellyservices.com BUSINESS: Global workforce solutions company REVENUES: $5 billion EMPLOYEES: 8,000

Keep integrity and humility as your unwavering north star.

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energized by

Diversity

With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Jackie Scanlan, Campbell Soup Company • Saskia W. Korink Romani, Cargill, Incorporated • Virginia Seggerman, CDW LLC Sharon Rossi, Unilever • Rena Hozore Reiss, Hyatt Hotels Corporation • Alexandra L. Schwartz, DreamWorks Animation SKG • Robin Russell, Andrews Kurth LLP Marcy L. Reed, National Grid • Sonu Ratra, Akraya, Inc. • LeAnn Ridgeway, Rockwell Collins

10

th

annual

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Sonu

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Ratra

Akraya, Inc.

...I never once forgot my roots and the people that helped me...

I

still remember the day 15 years ago when I first arrived to the United States from my native India with two big suitcases and full of big plans to build a successful life for my family. Throughout the years, I gained experience working at large corporations, then became a woman entrepreneur in charge of my own business, Akraya, Inc., a booming Silicon Valley staffing and managed solutions firm. However, during my long journey, I never once forgot my roots and the people that helped me get where I am today. My childhood was not an easy one. My mother has always been my primary role model. In spite of being paralyzed from a spinal cord tumor, she raised two daughters, my sister and me, to face the world and its hardships with a smile. She provided precious education and guidance for her family although she was completely bedridden herself. This determination and positive energy helped me through my life and motivated me to never give up. In fact, one of the most important things my mother taught me was to become fearless. Her strength that could not be shaken even in the shadow of illness inspired me to never fear trying new things. This philosophy set me free to explore each and every

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opportunity life offered, including new ventures like founding and building a business from the ground up. My husband Amar and I founded Akraya in 2001, and we have grown rapidly since inception. Today, our annual revenue has reached $32.5 million, and we employ 300 people nationwide. I truly believe in preserving one’s integrity in business even under the toughest circumstances. Respect for other people, our employees, clients and consultants, has also been a value guiding me. I am proud that Akraya gained a great reputation for being a very transparent and straightforward supplier and employer in all areas of business. One piece of advice I would give to young women professionals starting their journey towards success is to never underestimate the strength of female friendships. A close-knit group of girlfriends can become an anchor guiding you through difficult situations, both professionally and personally. I think of the lessons learned from women mentors and friends as larger lessons in life. These women helped me understand the importance of building my career on my beliefs and never compromising on the values dear to me.

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TITLE: President EDUCATION: MS, Tata Institute of Social Studies FIRST JOB: Tata Consulting Services WHAT I’M READING: The Reading Promise: My Father and the Books We Shared, by Alice Ozma MY PHILOSOPHY: Doing best at this moment puts you in the best place for the next moment. – Oprah Winfrey FAMILY: Husband, Amar; daughter, Ananya INTERESTS: Skiing, travelling and exploring new countries, building friendships FAVORITE CHARITY: India Literacy Project COMPANY: Akraya, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Sunnyvale, California WEBSITE: www.akraya.com BUSINESS: IT Staffing & Managed Solutions REVENUES: $32.5 million EMPLOYEES: 300


Marcy L.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Reed

TITLE: Massachusetts President EDUCATION: AB, Dartmouth College; MS, Northeastern University FIRST JOB: Staff auditor, Coopers & Lybrand WHAT I’M READING: A Reason to Believe, by Governor Deval Patrick

National Grid

L

eadership is an art more than a science. I learned long ago that good leaders are great at a few things – thinking strategically, building and maintaining relationships and motivating a team to achieve a positive result. Watching the good leaders I’ve encountered over the past quarter century has taught me quite a bit. Assuming I have the technical abilities to perform the task at hand, I find myself focusing on HOW I go about work so that I, too, can be considered a great leader. I sit here today knowing that a few lessons learned early on in my career have helped carry me to where I am today. And it’s no coincidence that these are the leadership qualities that we espouse at National Grid for all of our employees. First, deliver great performance. It’s important

to perform well in your assigned role. Knowing what’s expected and seeking frequent feedback is important to gauge progress. Second, develop yourself and others. Employees at all levels need to continually pursue development while at the same time doing what they can to help those around them succeed and develop. It could be as simple as one analyst helping another with a project or with presentation skills. We all have something to share with others. Third, create the future. Gandhi told us to “be the change you want to see in the world.” This applies to work, too. Think about ways to move the company, the department or even just a big project forward. Don’t just do what’s expected. Think about how the task at

hand can change the game and move the ball forward. And fourth, my favorite, build relationships. I’m convinced that most progress is made through relationships. Build networks with others in the company. This will facilitate collaborative initiatives and also create opportunities for advancement when the time is right. And build relationships outside the company, too. Whether it’s customers, suppliers, key stakeholders or others in the business community, find a way to meet and interact with others. I promise it will only benefit you. Adopting these four leadership qualities sounds simple, but they are the basic keys to success in any organization. I know now that this is what I was seeing in great leaders, and now I try to be that way, too.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Keep a positive attitude about everything. FAMILY: Husband Steve; teenage children Carter, Hailey INTERESTS: Travel, watching my kids’ sports, golf FAVORITE CHARITies: Anything that keeps kids in school COMPANY: National Grid HEADQUARTERS: Waltham, Massachusetts WEBSITE: www.nationalgrid.com BUSINESS: International electricity and gas company REVENUES: $22 billion EMPLOYEES: 28,000

First, deliver great performance.

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Rena Hozore

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Reiss

Hyatt Hotels Corporation

Take time to listen to what others have to say.

A

passion for what you do, a great support network and a sense of humor are key ingredients to a successful career. These principles have guided me and helped me grow as a person, a business professional and a leader. I started my career, as do many young lawyers, with a law firm. When I was offered the chance to move inhouse, working with one of the firm’s former partners, I grabbed it. It was a serendipitous opportunity that was the first step in my in-house career. The work-life juggle has always been top of mind for me. I have deliberately sought out working environments that enabled me to accommodate my personal and professional goals, and I was fortunate to be able to work a flexible schedule when my family was young. I am also lucky to have a husband and children who cheered me on every step of the way. As General Counsel of Hyatt, one of my goals is to create a work environment that recognizes that professional excellence does not have to come at the expense of our personal lives and our families. Supportive peers and mentors helped me get where I am today, and it is thrilling to be able to reach a hand back to provide encouragement and a sounding board to younger colleagues. 158

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To me, there are a few basic tenets of leadership. Be yourself; authenticity goes a long way in building strong relationships. Take time to listen to what others have to say. Create an environment that encourages honesty and communication and builds trust. Get out of your office and get to know your colleagues; it will help you to do your job, and a team that is connected personally is more likely to have strong morale and to perform more effectively. Thank people for a job well done. Whether you are at the beginning, middle or end of your career, stay passionate about your work, and if it no longer excites you, don’t let inertia prevent you from moving on. Seek out the next challenge, but don’t compromise your personal priorities. And, most importantly, don’t forget to laugh. A sense of humor will keep you grounded as you face inevitable challenges in your everyday life. Your professional journey will likely involve twists and turns. Stay open to new possibilities and, as one of my most inspirational mentors counseled me, embrace chances to “re-pot” yourself. As new opportunities come along, by all means talk to friends, family and colleagues. But trust your instincts and don’t be afraid of taking a leap into the unknown. S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

TITLE: General Counsel and Secretary EDUCATION: AB, Princeton University; JD, Harvard Law School FIRST JOB: Paralegal WHAT I’M READING: The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, by Siddhartha Mukherjee MY PHILOSOPHY: Keep your sense of humor, live with gusto and cultivate great personal relationships. FAMILY: Husband, Steve; two children, Samuel, Amalia INTERESTS: Reading, movies, theatre, college basketball, discovering great restaurants FAVORITE CHARITies: My alma maters, Jewish Communal Organizations COMPANY: Hyatt Hotels Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEBSITE: www.hyatt.com BUSINESS: Hospitality REVENUES: $3.527 billion EMPLOYEES: 85,000


LeAnn

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Ridgeway

Rockwell Collins

...approach all that you do with a positive attitude...

T

hroughout my career, one of the challenges I’ve often faced is being the first female or the only female on a leadership team. To overcome this challenge, I set gender aside and invest the time needed to gain a better understanding of the team’s dynamics. I have been very fortunate at Rockwell Collins to have several strong female leaders whom I can turn to for guidance and advice on how to navigate certain situations. Don’t be afraid to utilize your networks. Chances are that your problem isn’t unique, and you often can find someone who’s been there before and who will be more than willing to help you along the way. In addition to networking with internal employee groups and external association

groups, identify a mentor who has been down the path you want to go, or someone who has skills in an area you’d like to develop. Don’t be shy about asking this person for his or her time. My experience is that most good leaders are happy to accommodate you. I also suggest that you show your commitment to go above and beyond by volunteering for special projects where you can learn new skills – especially those in different parts of the company. The better you understand the big picture, the more invaluable you become. And, of course, approach all that you do with a positive attitude and people will want to surround themselves with your talent. Confidence and a positive attitude are character traits I feel

are essential to success. Successful leaders also have a clear vision of the future that is rooted in the organization’s core values and communicated clearly. Finally, a successful leader must possess critical decisionmaking skills and take responsibility for the decisions they make. Above it all, if there is one thing you take away from me, it is to be passionate about all you choose to do in life. When you love what you do, you truly can have fun at the same time you are working hard. I think it is crucial to an organization’s success that people look forward to going to work. After all, since we spend more waking hours with our coworkers than we do our families, we need to do what we can to make it the best possible environment.

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TITLE: Vice President & General Manager, Simulation & Training Solutions EDUCATION: BS, Mt. Mercy College; MBA, St. Ambrose University FIRST JOB: Detasseling corn in the summers as a teenager WHAT I’M READING: Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen MY PHILOSOPHY: Live, Love, Laugh. FAMILY: Husband, Tom; children, Kris, Duff, Randi, Erin INTERESTS: Music, travel, reading, golf FAVORITE CHARITY: Susan G. Komen Foundation COMPANY: Rockwell Collins HEADQUARTERS: Cedar Rapids, Iowa WEBSITE: www.rockwellcollins.com BUSINESS: Aerospace and Defense REVENUES: $4.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 20,000

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Saskia W. Korink

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Romani

Cargill, Incorporated

I try to make an authentic connection with people...

I

believe that identifying and following a set of personal guiding principles have laid a professional foundation for me to be successful over the course of my career. These principles have shaped my career and helped me in the decisions I’ve made. My first guiding principle: always choose what you are passionate about. The first choice that impacted my career was my decision to study physics. I liked mathematics and physics, but had no clear picture of what I would professionally become with a physics degree. I chose it anyway because I had a passion for it. When I decided to get my MBA, I was faced with a few job offers, and I again followed my heart. Instead of choosing the top-ranked strategy consulting firm, McKinsey, and a potentially high-powered career with them, I chose the Boston Consulting Group (BCG), which was new to the Netherlands (where I was to work) and was less renowned at the time. My passion about joining BCG was mostly driven by the people I had met and the philosophy of the company. As it turns out, life at BCG was a fantastic choice, as I was immersed in a variety of intellectually challenging projects and had the opportunity to work with very diverse teams. My second guiding principle: learn from your mistakes. 160

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Learning from what went wrong is so much more powerful than learning from what went right! In fact, most people don’t learn from successes at all, they just celebrate them. I learned from a number of mistakes, and will illustrate what I mean with an example. Not so long ago I made a presentation for a large group of coworkers, but I failed to understand my audience. (Cargill is a large company!) I ended up doing a presentation that was too complex for my audience to follow. I got a bad review, but more importantly, I failed to use that moment to connect with my colleagues and get an important message across. I guarantee you that I more than thoroughly prepared for my next presentation. My final guiding principle: embrace people leadership. During my career at Cargill, I have learned the difference between managing and leading. It is not about executing projects and delivering results, as much as it is about developing people and inspiring them to work towards achieving their goals. In order to be successful, I try to make an authentic connection with people, to really understand what drives each and ever one, and to coach them on their choices. And if they ask me which choice to make, I preach the one you are passionate about! S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

TITLE: Vice President and Director of Marketing, Cargill Animal Nutrition EDUCATION: BS, State University in Netherlands; MBA, Columbia Business School FIRST JOB: Thermal development engineer, Fokker Space & Systems (NL) WHAT I’M READING: The Economist; Room, by Emma Donoghue MY PHILOSOPHY: Pursue your passions. You will be happier and be good at what you do if you have passion. FAMILY: Husband, Renato; three children, Lara, Luca and Alexia INTERESTS: Sports, exotic travel, music, friends and family FAVORITE CHARITY: Education COMPANY: Cargill, Incorporated HEADQUARTERS: Minneapolis, Minnesota WEBSITE: www.cargill.com BUSINESS: Food, agricultural, financial and industrial products and services EMPLOYEES: 131,000


What a mark you’ve made. Congratulations, Trish Adams, Diversity Journal’s Executive Award Winner of the “10th Annual Women Worth Watching in 2012 ”.

© 2011 Target Brands, Inc. Target and the Bullseye Design are registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc. All rights reserved. 471453


Sharon

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: VP, Customer Development EDUCATION: BA, University of Massachusetts; MA, University of Illinois FIRST JOB: Herman’s Sporting Goods WHAT I’M READING: The Cycle of Leadership: How Great Leaders Teach Their Companies to Win, by Noel M. Tichy; The Confession, by John Grisham MY PHILOSOPHY: Be the change you want to see in the world. – Mahatma Gandhi FAMILY: Single, and blessed with a close family INTERESTS: Golf, Boston Red Sox, Pilates FAVORITE CHARITies: Healthy Lifestyle Choices, American Heart Association COMPANY: Unilever HEADQUARTERS: Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey WEBSITE: www.unileverusa.com BUSINESS: Consumer Goods REVENUES: $10 billion EMPLOYEES: 13,000

Rossi

Unilever

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hurchill said: “We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give.” For over 20 years, I’ve held a variety of positions in sales and marketing in the consumer packaged goods industry. With the help of many wonderful mentors, I’ve learned valuable lessons. The following are a few I often share. Choose a Company you Admire I am proud to be part of a company that manufacturers high quality products while maintaining its unwavering commitment to sustainability. With brands like Ben & Jerry’s, Hellmann’s, Lipton, Suave, and Dove, at Unilever we are collaborating with suppliers and retail partners to meet our shared business objectives while simultaneously addressing the social, economic and environmental challenges of our day. Throughout your life, you will invest your time and talents in your career; make that investment in a company with a mission you admire. Decide how to Make a Difference In 2008, Healthy Lifestyle Choices (HLC) asked me to join their board. It was an opportunity to make a difference. HLC is a nonprofit organization that empowers children with the knowledge and skills to make healthier choices. Advising HLC on its strategy is a tremendous privilege, and also an

honor to make a meaningful difference in the lives of over 200,000 children in 44 states who receive HLC programming. Both planned and unexpected opportunities come along; make purposeful decisions about how you will make a difference. Sit at the Table Despite being key contributors, emerging women leaders sit frequently in the outer circle of meeting room chairs instead of directly at the meeting table. Sit at the table. And prepare your eligibility to sit at the table to which you aspire. Build your knowledge. Take on assignments that round out your skill sets. The more experiences you have, the more effective you will be as an executive. Currently women represent only 15 percent of Fortune 500 company board seats. Studies show that companies with diverse boards perform better financially. Private and public companies need diverse leaders capable of serving on their corporate boards. Perhaps that will be the table at which you aspire to sit. It is for me. Over the last several years, I have been preparing myself for board eligibility through coursework, networking, mentoring, nonprofit board experience and more. Which seat at which table will you choose? Pave your own path and enjoy the journey.

...make purposeful decisions about how you will make a difference.

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Embracing differences, creating possibilities, growing together -that's what diversity is all about. Unilever understands the importance of diversity and that's why it is a critical component of our business strategy and an integral part of everything we value and do. www.unileverusa.com


Robin

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Russell

W

agement is particularly important for women trying to balance career and family. I make lots of lists and am constantly prioritizing and reassessing. Work hard. There is no short-cut or substitute for hard work. As a young woman starting my professional career, establishing my reputation as someone who would follow through on difficult projects with a commitment to excellence was critical. Once I earned the respect of my superiors, I was rewarded with more responsibility and leadership opportunities. Another benefit of working hard is that it enables you to gain the respect of those working around you. At the end of the day, in business, it is more important to be respected than to be popular. Embrace responsibility. I was given the

opportunity early on to work on a multi-year, high-profile project for a key client – 1,800 miles away from home. I agreed to go, and it was truly a career defining event. I was given huge responsibilities and I still benefit today from the experiences I had and the lessons I learned. By accepting that project, I also demonstrated the commitment I had to my career and to the firm. Keep your sense of humor. The business world is serious enough, but I try not to take myself too seriously. Every so often we have to have a good laugh at our own expense. Most colleagues appreciate this aspect of my leadership style, which creates a more comfortable and productive work environment. Life is short so make every minute count – in your career and in your personal life.

There is no short-cut or substitute for hard work.

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EDUCATION: BS, Texas Tech University; JD, Baylor Law School; LLM, Boston University FIRST JOB: Flower shop WHAT I’M READING: Freedom, by Jonathan Franzen

Andrews Kurth LLP hen my mother passed away, a colleague wrote: “In a quiet, unassuming way, Helen was a leader. If she were on your team you could expect success. People followed her, sensing that here was a woman who had, through education, experience or research, arrived at good and solid conclusions.” I was fortunate to grow up with this strong role model. My mother was the president of numerous organizations and taught me the principles of leadership I rely on today. Prioritize. My mother had no choice. She raised three children, worked full-time, was a civic leader and ran our family business after my father became ill. Her approach: “We all have 24 hours in our day. What we choose to do with them is up to us.” I learned that time man-

TITLE: Managing Partner, Houston Office

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MY PHILOSOPHY: Make every minute count. FAMILY: Married to law professor; son Sterling; daughter Diana INTERESTS: Travelling with my family and friends, reading, cooking, working on projects with my children FAVORITE CHARITY: Houston Food Bank COMPANY: Andrews Kurth LLP HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEBSITE: www.andrewskurth.com BUSINESS: Legal REVENUES: $268 million EMPLOYEES: 800


Jackie

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Scanlan

Campbell Soup Company

...be bold and challenge the way that things are done...

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ork-life balance is a struggle for many women with family responsibilities. How do you manage it personally? How do you keep the stress level in check? We all take on multiple roles or as some say wear many hats in our lives, whether we are a single woman, a wife, a mother, a daughter, a manager, an assistant, and the list goes on. As a result, we each face unique challenges managing work and personal responsibilities no matter the circumstance. I believe that handling everyday tasks in the workplace and at home isn’t about striking a balance; rather, it’s about connectivity and integration. Many people feel that they need to compartmentalize their work and personal lives. Instead, I bring my whole self to work and include my family and friends in my professional experiences. I believe it’s important to understand who you are as a person and embed elements of “you” into all facets of your life, so you don’t lose yourself. Your sense of self will guide your priorities and will help you stay focused on what really needs to get done. It’s easy to be overwhelmed by the stresses and pressures in life, and if you don’t stay connected to yourself and the people around you, you will ultimately compromise your core values and forego the benefits of gaining

perspective from others. I am assertive, and like to think of myself as a major driver. This quality helps me prioritize, develop plans, honor my commitments and challenge the status quo. I like to be the champion of the projects and causes I get involved in and try to advance everything around me. I also try to be creative in the way I approach developing others, leading projects, and even making the best item for my son’s bake sale. I’ve even turned to modern technology like Apple FaceTime when I can’t be home due to work obligations. With that, I recognize that I am incredibly lucky to work for a company that supports workplace flexibility. I’ve had the opportunity to be a key influencer in the development of the resources we offer, including flexible work schedules, telecommuting and job share programs. By recognizing that every employee has unique needs and preferences for different work styles, our policy is designed to provide diverse work arrangements that enable employees to maximize their contributions to the company. I encourage others to be bold and challenge the way that things are done in order to foster an environment that brings personal and work responsibilities in harmony with little compromise. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

TITLE: Vice President, Global Talent Management and Organizational Effectiveness EDUCATION: BA, St. Joseph’s University; MS, University of Pennsylvania FIRST JOBs: Cashier at a family grocery store; Change Management Human Capital Consultant at Anderson Consulting WHAT I’M READING: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter, by Liz Wiseman MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t aspire for the small things, aspire for the big things. Have the vision to get to it. FAMILY: Husband Vince; son Aidan INTERESTS: Cooking, spending time with family and friends FAVORITE CHARITies: March of Dimes COMPANY: Campbell Soup Company HEADQUARTERS: Camden, New Jersey WEBSITE: www.campbellsoupcompany.com BUSINESS: Food products REVENUES: $8 billion EMPLOYEES: 18,400

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Alexandra L.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Schwartz

DreamWorks Animation SKG

If you can imagine it, go for it.

G TITLE: Head of Development EDUCATION: BA, Boston University; MA, New York University FIRST JOB: Apprentice Film Editor WHAT I’M READING: 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, by Charles C. Mann MY PHILOSOPHY: All descriptions of reality are a temporary hypothesis. Everything we do matters – immensely. FAMILY: Married to my greatest friend Larry; 2 amazing daughters, Willa, Layla INTERESTS: Movies, playing guitar, singing, food and wine, enjoying time with my friends and family FAVORITE CHARITies: Alliance for Children’s Rights, Girls Inc. COMPANY: DreamWorks Animation SKG HEADQUARTERS: Glendale, California WEBSITE: www.dreamworksanimation.com BUSINESS: Entertainment – Media/Television/Film/Video REVENUES: $785 million EMPLOYEES: 2,150

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rowing up in New York City I was a movie freak. I saw every movie that came out in the theaters and watched anything and everything on TV, from 1930’s comedies to B-movie science fiction, WWII dramas to romantic epics. It all seemed like something magic that happened in a fantasy place far away from the real world. So when I stop to think that I have now been making movies for the past 20 years, overseeing and producing films that have been seen by millions of people all over the world, working with many of my idols and heroes, I have to pinch myself. It is truly extraordinary. If I were to give any single piece of advice to young women who are aspiring to a professional or artistic goal today, it is this…dream. If I had stopped to think at the time that I first moved to Hollywood with a credit card and a rental car, or applied for a job at the Walt Disney Company in the wrong clothes, I might have lacked the courage. Luckily I was more afraid of how I would feel if I didn’t try than of how I would feel if I failed. If you can imagine it, go for it. I find that many talented women come to a point where they feel that they have to make a choice between a

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meaningful career and having a home life and a family. I not only don’t believe that to be the case, I believe that our world depends on women and mothers sticking it out in every area of endeavor and especially in the arts. Coming up in Hollywood as a studio executive I encountered all kinds of minor gender bias. Not the big dramatic issues like sexual harassment, but more subtle and unintentional ones, like wanting to take a female character in a story and make her male for casting purposes. Or forgetting to give a female character a reasonable job or point of view. I think those messages we send are powerful in ways we sometimes don’t realize. I always feel satisfaction when I know that I brought more balance or inspiration to the view of the world expressed in the movies I work on. For me one of the most exciting aspects of making animated movies is that they are only limited by the breadth of one’s imagination. I have the amazing good fortune to be surrounded by brilliant and passionate artists and technologists who can bring any idea to life. They are the living embodiment of my most dearly held belief – if you can imagine it, then you can make it happen.


Virginia

TITLE: VP and Controller

CDW LLC

WHAT I’M READING: The Power of Many: Values for Success in Business and in Life, by Meg Whitman

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Seggerman

I

’ve learned that the trajectory of a career path can change in an instant. My course was forever altered during one brief conversation that occurred years ago when my mentor challenged me to cast away any notion of professional limitations and embark on a less-traveled career path that would lead to me accomplishing my goal of becoming a corporate controller. My mentor convinced me to pursue an MBA at the University of Chicago – a program, I thought at the time, that might not be practical from a time standpoint and far too expensive. She helped me realize that returning to school after a 15-year break would not be a costly sacrifice made in vain, but rather an investment that would pay long-

term dividends in both my life and in the lives of others. Upon receiving my MBA and achieving my goal, I was inspired to find a way to repay this person, who obviously saw something in me that no one else did. Having lost contact with her as she approached retirement, I felt I could repay her best by striving to become the type of manager she was – one who engages people to extract their hidden qualities, enhances their best talents and encourages them to achieve the improbable. Today, as a vice president and controller at CDW, one of my biggest priorities is to place people in positions to be daring, solve difficult challenges and pursue long-term professional goals that others wouldn’t dare. Over

time, I’ve found that being a mentor takes a significant time investment, tireless compassion, an empathetic ear, and a keen sense of what truly motivates and inspires people to do great things. For the most part, these things can’t be taught – only learned through others who first came alongside us to nudge us when we needed direction. People are a company’s most valuable resource, and even the best business strategies will not succeed without the right people in place – being mentored by servant leaders. Looking back on my career, I’ve had the opportunity to both inspire and be inspired, to serve and be of service to others. I serve because I was first served by another, and feel a great sense of gratitude and responsibility to pay it forward.

EDUCATION: BBA, College of William and Mary; MBA, University of Chicago FIRST JOB: Little league baseball umpire

MY PHILOSOPHY: Always try to do the right thing. FAMILY: Husband, married for 23 years INTERESTS: Sports, Pilates, my five-year old Norfolk Terrier FAVORITE CHARITY: Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy COMPANY: CDW LLC HEADQUARTERS: Vernon Hills, Illinois WEBSITE: www.cdw.com BUSINESS: Technology REVENUES: $8.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 6,372

...the trajectory of a career path can change in an instant.

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Bringing unique talents together is what sets us apart. At CVS Caremark, we are able to achieve market-leading business results every day because we understand and truly value the power of diversity. Through genuine respect and by embracing everyone’s differences, abilities and complexities, we have created an all-inclusive work environment and a more innovative, creative and rewarding organization. Join us and add your unique voice, strength and character to our mission of improving lives daily.

Congratulations to Paulette Thabault! Paulette is our Chief Nurse Practitioner Officer for MinuteClinic and is a recipient of the Women Worth Watching 2012 Award. Read the feature on Paulette inside this issue to learn more about her accomplishments.

Join our team and experience a fulfilling career at CVS Caremark. Visit us at

www.cvscaremark.com/careers

CVS Caremark is an equal opportunity employer supporting a drug-free work environment.


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Gilda Spencer, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company • Karen Sledge, Harris Corporation • Darlene R. Slaughter, Fannie Mae Laura J. Soave, Chrysler Group LLC • Paulette Thabault, MinuteClinic • Marie-Helene Sicard, Sodexo • Nikki Lewis Simon, Greenberg Traurig Regina Y. Speed-Bost, Schiff Hardin, LLP • Shari Slate, Cisco Systems, Inc. • Carin Stutz, Brinker International

10

th

annual

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Marie-Hélène

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Sicard

Sodexo

I choose where I focus...

I TITLE: Senior Vice President, Quebec, Canada EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in Economics, HEC Montreal FIRST JOB: Marketing Intern at a packaging/printing company WHAT I’M READING: Magazine and newspapers: Monocle, Sunday NYTimes, HBR, Wall Paper MY PHILOSOPHY: Always look for the silver lining. FAMILY: Married; boys, Matthieu, Julian INTERESTS: Wine, leadership, running, travel FAVORITE CHARITy: Sodexo Foundation COMPANY: Sodexo HEADQUARTERS: Gaithersburg, Maryland (North America) WEBSITE: www.sodexo.com BUSINESS: World leader in Quality of Daily Life Solutions REVENUES: €15.3 billion consolidated revenue (global) EMPLOYEES: 380,000 (global)

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t’s such a simple phrase heard on a flight and it’s one of my guiding principles. “Always put your mask on first, before you help others.” In order for me to give my best, and to foster and support others, I need to be at the top of my form. Balance: It is your responsibility to make sure that what you give equals what you get. And, you are the only one who can know what that equation means for you. Focus: I choose where I focus and do not waste my energy on things where I can’t control the outcome. I do not dwell on the past – what is done is done. So many people waste time and energy on little things that have no impact on the big picture. I keep my eyes on the horizon and this allows me to stay focused. Confidence and Passion: People want to be around those who know who they are, what they want and where they are going. Everyone should know their strengths and weaknesses. Surround yourself with the talents that complete you. Influencing others: Early in my career, I was fulfilled by tasks, projects and assignments. But then, it was no longer about how good you were at doing something, but how you influenced people in giving, thriving and

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contributing their best. I get the most pride from my team’s achievements and they become my own. Risks: If you don’t take risks, you don’t progress. I had the opportunity to take a senior leadership role that involved moving my entire family to France. It was a big risk. I knew I wanted it, I knew my husband was at my side and I knew my boys would be cheering me on – what was the worst that could happen? This experience confirmed I could take on anything if I put my head and heart to it. To anyone contemplating making a life-changing decision, weigh your pros and cons and just go for it. Networking: You never know who’s sitting next to you. I flew from Toronto to Montreal and sat next to a gentleman. We shared a brief conversation, exchanged business cards and parted. I sent him a Christmas card six months later just to keep in touch. Turns out he was the CEO of a Canadian company. I reached out to him, asked if he could spare some time to meet with me and provide some guidance on a difficult situation at work. Since then, we have both made ways into our careers, yet he remained my mentor. I never thought that a person sitting next to me on a one-hour flight would end up playing such a significant role in my life.


Nikki Lewis

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Shareholder EDUCATION: BS, Florida A&M University; JD, University of Miami FIRST JOB: Nurse’s Assistant at Pineview Extended Care Center (HS); Administration (after college) WHAT I’M READING: Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office, by Lois P. Frankel, PhD; various magazines MY PHILOSOPHY: From everyone who has been given much, much will be demanded; and from the one who has been entrusted with much, much more will be asked. – Luke 12:48 NIV FAMILY: Married to Louis; raising Jahcobi, Jasmine, Jahshua, Jahnathan INTERESTS: People, traveling, reading FAVORITE CHARITY: United Way COMPANY: Greenberg Traurig HEADQUARTERS: Miami, Florida WEBSITE: www.gtlaw.com BUSINESS: Law Firm REVENUES: $1.236 billion EMPLOYEES: 3,589

Simon

Greenberg Traurig

T

he professional landscape can be overwhelming and the learning curve steep. Aspiring professional women can overcome these challenges by embracing certain “do’s.” Often learned over time, I share four such “do’s” here for early guidance. First, understand and accept that there are no shortcuts. Sacrifices, mistakes, hard work and success are inseparable bedfellows. I am aware of absolutely no sustainable shortcuts to developing your career. If there are, remember your reputation is your most valuable asset. Do not knowingly put it at risk. Second, believe you are fabulous, capable and successful. The heading says it all. This is you today, not tomorrow. No permission slip is required. No apologies are necessary. Be mindful too that a self-promotion mindset is enhanced when you use your manners. Remember the ageless proverb, “as a woman thinks in her heart, so is she.” Third, take calculated risks. Be prepared to step outside of your comfort zone and take calculated risks. For example, you may propose an unpopular counter-position to your key sponsor’s new marketing strategy. Whether you establish buy-in on your perspective is not as important as the professional capital you can earn by providing a credible alternative to that

strategy. No risk, no reward. Fourth, identify and live in harmony with your core values. I define core values as the key principles guiding our decisions, actions and interactions in the workplace. They help establish why we do what we do in the business world, while defining our business roles. When working in harmony with our core values, I believe success is inevitable because our passions and purposes are aligned. My core values, including excellence, service, mentorship, sponsorship, stewardship, inclusion, achievement, success, power, and influence, are drawn from my understanding of the scripture that reads: From everyone who has been given much, much will be demanded; and from the one who has been entrusted with much, much more will be asked (Luke 12:48 NIV). For me, this is the story of a trusted, gifted and prosperous steward, who must understand that her gifts are to be used to benefit others, as well as herself. It confirms a universal truth that with professional success comes increased responsibility to others. Identify and reflect upon your core values when your work is challenging. That reflective time will hopefully replenish the fortitude you need to get to or stay in the corner suite.

...with professional success comes increased responsibility to others. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Shari

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Slate

TITLE: Chief Inclusion and Collaboration Strategist, The Americas EDUCATION: BA, Mills College FIRST JOB: Sales Representative, Eastman Kodak WHAT I’M READING: My Life on the Manor, by Hailey Slate; Wired; Fast Company

Cisco Systems, Inc.

T

hroughout my career, I’ve relied on one guiding principle to shape my outlook, my life goals, and my contributions to my family, my community, and my company. Dream big. This is my mother’s mantra, and now it is mine as well. Two compelling words that remind me to push beyond the predictable and explore new ways of making a profound difference. Within the realm of inclusion and diversity, I am in awe of the progress we have made. My mother is a testament to what it takes to break down barriers and create a new level of consciousness about what is possible. As a woman of color, born in an era in which her options could have seemed limited, she chose to dream big. She graduated from medical school while

married and with two babies in tow (one was me!) and became a surgeon. Together, with her family, her colleagues, and her community, she not only dreamed, she did. The difference that she has made in the world is profound not only to her patients but also to the countless individuals who have been inspired by her passion and courage. Like me. My big dream as an inclusion leader is to evolve the conversation around diversity and inclusion beyond the notion that it is simply the right thing to do – beyond the traditional objectives of compliance – and towards a focus on the tangible value that inclusion creates. It’s a conversation that has both roots and wings, grounded in what we already have been taught about

inclusion by courageous individuals like my mother and given flight by what we imagine will be possible when we can fully realize the potential of diverse mind sets, skills, experiences and perspectives. What’s your big dream? My advice is to collaborate. Find other people who dream big and work on fulfilling your dreams together. Work across boundaries and engage others who have different strengths and skills than you do. Be a sponge. Absorb everything they have to teach you. And give back; your unique strengths and skills can make all the difference in the fulfillment of someone else’s dream. In the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson: “Don’t go where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”

Find other people who dream big and work on fulfilling your dreams together.

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MY PHILOSOPHY: Dream big, collaborate, be a sponge, give back, leave a trail so others can follow in your footsteps. FAMILY: Married, two kids; close to my parents, sisters, aunts and uncles; many mentors INTERESTS: Travel, innovation, food, culture, history FAVORITE CHARITY: Hailey’s Birthday Angels COMPANY: Cisco Systems, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: San Jose, California WEBSITE: www.cisco.com BUSINESS: Networking REVENUES: $40 billion EMPLOYEES: 73,408


Darlene R.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Slaughter

Fannie Mae

In the best of times and the worst of times, learning occurs.

A

s I sit and reflect on what mentoring means to me, I realize that words of wisdom come in all shapes and sizes, and from many who will cross your path. Many times you won’t recognize the value of mentoring until long after you’ve received it. Through mentoring, I’ve learned four valuable life lessons that have carried me through the years of my career. Be true to yourself. Find your passion, find what drives you, and incorporate that into everything you do. I attended school to become an elementary school teacher, and while I have not taught in the school system, I’ve stayed true to that profession in every role that I’ve had. I’ve held positions where teaching others became an important aspect of the job. Staying true to myself enabled me to fulfill my passion to teach while being in a corporate setting. Everything has a lesson. In the best of times and the worst of times, learning occurs. I believe there is something to learn in everything you do. Thinking back on the wins and losses in my career has allowed me to focus and ask myself questions that helped me to continue to succeed, or pick myself up and move to the next venture. Every lesson learned prepares

you to give and receive feedback, reflect on the moments to assess how it could have been done better or differently. Go with the flow. You don’t have to swim upstream to take advantage of the opportunities that come your way. Pay attention to your internal voice and your natural instincts. Since I never planned my career step by step, “going with the flow” presented opportunities that may not have happened if I had planned them. When you go with the flow, everything falls in sync. It helps you to become open to the opportunities that come your way and accepting of the things that pass you by. Give back; energize others. Be the support for others. Lift as you climb. When the call comes, answer and give your time back to others and the words of wisdom that have been shared with you. Many lessons come from listening to the words of wisdom and advice given to you by others. It has been said that smart people learn from their mistakes, and wise people learn from other people’s mistakes. You never know when you become a mentor how your experiences and guidance will touch the lives of others.

w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

TITLE: Vice President & Chief Diversity Officer EDUCATION: BS, Howard University; MS, American University FIRST JOB: Cashier at variety store WHAT I’M READING: Expect to Win, by Carla Harris MY PHILOSOPHY: If you go with the flow, all things will work. FAMILY: Maurice, Chris, a host of others INTERESTS: Tennis, traveling, learning FAVORITE CHARITies: Arlington Arts Center, American Stroke Association COMPANY: Fannie Mae HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C. WEBSITE: www.fanniemae.com BUSINESS: Financial Services REVENUES: $154.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 7,000

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Karen

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Sledge

Harris Corporation

It’s amazing, the difference you can make.

I

’m mentoring a young woman who has great potential. So one day I told her about a seminal moment in my early working life. A vice president to whom I reported had made a passing remark about a strategic initiative. Afterward, I realized that not only was his comment inaccurate, but it could adversely affect the initiative. So with no small amount of nervousness I picked up the phone, called him and told him so. “You’re absolutely right,” he said. Even though it was intimidating, I had taken the initiative to be heard. I continually encourage my team to take initiative and flag issues when they see them and speak up. Even if there are louder people in the room, keep at it. Be respectful but be persistent. It’s amazing the difference you can make. There is an art to this kind of risk taking, one that is grounded in a clear sense of how you want to advance in your career. Think about the projects or roles you take on. Some might be low-profile, grinding or just plain tough but perfect for your career. Give them strong consideration. I once took a position that moved me from Texas to Toronto. It was a challenging assignment but exactly the right role for my professional development. And then there’s relationship building. It’s essential to have a trusted group to help advance your career and improve your leadership abilities, from those who sponsor your initiatives to others you can turn to with tough questions. But it’s not always easy to find them, and it’s sometimes a little nerve-wracking to make contact. I continually look for opportunities to build these relationships. Recently, I was at a major conference in Amsterdam. I was new at Harris Corporation and hadn’t yet met our European team leaders. After a week of long hours, I could have gone straight back to the U.S. But I knew I wouldn’t have the opportunity to meet the U.K. leaders in person for another five months. So I flew to London, stayed an extra week, and as a result accelerated my relationship building with them. These kinds of gestures go a long way. There are numerous professional rewards to be gained by this kind of goal-driven risk taking. I encourage you to take yours!

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TITLE: VP Controller, Broadcast Communications Division EDUCATION: The University of Texas at Dallas; Baylor University FIRST JOB: Tax & Trust accountant at a Dallas bank WHAT I’M READING: The Help, by Kathryn Stockett MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t sweat the small stuff. FAMILY: My parents; brother; sister-in-law; niece; dog, Jack INTERESTS: Running, traveling, hiking, snow skiing, reading FAVORITE CHARITies: SPCA, Salvation Army COMPANY: Harris Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Melbourne, Florida WEBSITE: www.harris.com BUSINESS: Communications and information technology REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 16,000


Laura J.

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TITLE: Head of FIAT Brand North America EDUCATION: BS, Walsh College; MBA, University of Detroit FIRST JOB: Mail coordinator, Mail Clinic WHAT I’M READING: Organizing Genius, by Warren Bennis; fashion magazines MY PHILOSOPHY: The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short, but in setting our aim too low and achieving our mark. – Michelangelo FAMILY: Unbelievably supportive parents; siblings; 4-year-old niece who keeps me smiling INTERESTS: Travel, movies, shopping FAVORITE CHARITies: Breast Cancer organizations COMPANY: Chrysler Group LLC HEADQUARTERS: Auburn Hills, Michigan WEBSITE: www.chryslergroupllc.com BUSINESS: Automotive REVENUES: $40 billion EMPLOYEES: 52,000

Soave

Chrysler Group LLC

I

am a first-generation Italian American, born and raised in Detroit. Growing up in the Motor City, I swore I would never work in the automotive industry. I also spent my childhood trying to fit into American culture and never truly embraced my Italian heritage. As life would have it, I am now heading up the return of an iconic Italian automotive brand to North America. My journey is proof that no matter how well you try to plan your life, your experiences are what make you unique and successful. I don’t believe success can be defined by any one person or that there is a definition that fits all. I do believe that success is measured daily, and there is never an end to one’s personal or professional success. Some days, I am a successful head of a brand and a leader, and on others, I am a successful daughter, sister, aunt or friend. Both are equally rewarding and important. My guiding principles for success are to be true to yourself and trust your own voice, define success in your own terms, and avoid setting artificial limits on yourself. Don’t be afraid to express your point of view. The market is becoming so fragmented and diverse that the onesize-fits-all approach no longer works. Share your ideas and opinions, and

don’t hesitate to ask questions. Do not let anyone force a notion of success on you. We all have to work on our personal definition of success and accept that this can evolve over time. For example, when you start your career working 12 hours a day, learning about your business and developing contacts, this may be success for you. However, if you start building a family, your priorities may shift, and a better work-life balance becomes the new standard of success. See obstacles as opportunities in waiting. Don’t allow your mind to believe that something can’t be done; that being a woman in the automotive industry is inherently an advantage or disadvantage; or that the world is against you. Identify your strengths, develop who you are in the market place and the value you can add to an organization, and then work hard. Talent, perseverance and hard work defeat stereotypes, and tangible results speak for themselves. I also believe that we need some flexibility for life to take its own course. Trust your instincts, but know that the wind may push you in a direction you never expected. Go with it, and use your gifts and talents to better the work and the world wherever you are led.

Don’t be afraid to express your point of view. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Regina Y.

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Speed-Bost

Schiff Hardin, LLP

I enjoy being a bridge between two worlds...

I TITLE: Partner EDUCATION: AB, Dartmouth College; JD, Georgetown University Law Center FIRST JOB: Non-legal: a sales clerk in a drugstore; legal: law clerk for the General Counsel of the Metropolitan Police Department WHAT I’M READING: Quiet Strength: The Principles, Practices, and Priorities of a Winning Life, by Tony Dungy MY PHILOSOPHY: Failure is the result of not trying. FAMILY: Married to my wonderful and supportive husband, Mark; mother of two incredible young people, Ariel and Avery INTERESTS: I love to dance! I also enjoy cooking. I’m a great entertainer! FAVORITE CHARITies: Soteria Christian Center, EduSeed/SisterMentors COMPANY: Schiff Hardin, LLP HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEBSITE: www.schiffhardin.com BUSINESS: Law Firm REVENUES: $224 million EMPLOYEES: 740

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practice in an area of the law that I find interesting at a firm I find supportive. Both my decision to practice energy law and my path to joining Schiff Hardin, LLP as a partner in its Energy and Public Utilities Practice Group reflect the value of mentorship at critical decision-making moments in my life, coupled with my faith and knowledge of who I am and what I was created to do in life. I carry the mentoring lessons I have learned with me in day-to-day practice. As I graduated Georgetown University Law Center, I had two options – a position on Capitol Hill or one in a boutique government contracts firm. My life-long passion was (and still is) politics, and being a part of the lawmaking process excited my emotions. At the same time, after spending a year clerking for three administrative judges, I was anxious to put to work the knowledge of the Federal Acquisitions Register that I had gained. Using what I had learned made logical sense to me. Then along came offer number three – a trial position with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). With no experience and no passion to guide me, it seemed far from anything that would be right for me. However, one of my mentors, a woman

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named Jackie Simmons, happened to be a FERC lawyer and was persuasive in explaining the rewarding challenges and benefits of practicing energy law. Ultimately, my first career decision was neither emotional nor overly logical, but had at its core my faith in who I am, a person that loves a challenge. I am grateful to Jackie for helping me drill down to what was really important for me. Over the years, I have attempted to give a little of what Jackie gave to me back both in mentoring other young attorneys and in advising my clients. Clients are equally passionate about the positions they want advanced and logical in their approach toward their company’s best interests. As a trusted advisor in a highly regulated industry, I am a translator. I help energy companies understand the regulatory environment in which they operate, and I help regulators understand the business objectives and concerns that must be allowed to thrive under their regulatory structures. Whether in a litigated proceeding, an investigation, or a standard rate filing, translating between two worlds is critical to the success of both sides. I enjoy being a bridge between two worlds and giving back a bit of what I received early on.


You are a leader. You dare to lead when others follow. You make a true difference in the lives of those you touch. You light the way by your shining example. For your steady guidance, we salute you.

Congratulations to Leticia Aguilar, Senior Vice President and Regional Executive at Union Bank, for being named to Diversity Journal’s list of “Women Worth Watching.” We salute you, Leticia, and all of the honorees.

unionbank.com

©2011 Union Bank, N.A.


Gilda

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Spencer

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company

...the path to these long-term goals is rarely a straight line.

I

knew from an early age I wanted to be a lawyer, long before I even knew what a lawyer really did. On television, I had seen women like Barbara Jordan, the first southern black woman elected to the U.S House of Representatives, and I knew I wanted to make that kind of difference and be that kind of leader. But I also knew, maybe just as early on, that I wanted to be a wife and mother. I traveled a nontraditional career path by getting married and becoming a mom prior to pursuing a professional career. With that decision, it would have been easy to settle for just one of my life ambitions. With a husband whose job moved us frequently, and a small child to help adjust through these transitions, I would have never started – not to mention finished – law school had I waited for things to slow down. Instead, I had to jump into the deep end. And with the tenacity and work ethic instilled in me by my parents, that’s what I did. I think, as a woman, you can have it all, but it’s hard, maybe impossible, to get there all at once. You have to know what you want and maintain a long-term outlook. And you have to acknowledge that the path to these long-term goals is rarely a straight line. There are plenty of times when motherhood took precedence over my career ambitions. And there were times when making a deadline or vigorously representing a client took time from my family. I was always transparent with my employers that I was determined to balance both. I would work hard, meet deadlines and give them my all. I needed them to give me flexibility and respect my dual allegiance. Without trying to balance family and career, would success as an attorney have come faster for me? Possibly. But it wouldn’t have been nearly as sweet. As a black female attorney, an underrepresented minority in my field, I am passionate about mentoring and supporting other African-American women who also find themselves on a nontraditional path. People have opened doors for me, and I am steadfast in my resolve to hold the door open for others.

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TITLE: Vice President, Chief Litigation Counsel EDUCATION: BA, Ohio State University; JD, University of San Diego FIRST JOB: Modeled for Sears, law clerk in a law firm WHAT I’M READING: Room, by Emma Donoghue MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard with integrity. FAMILY: Married, with two sons, 25 and 18 years old INTERESTS: Mentoring diverse law students, reading, cooking, travel FAVORITE CHARITY: The Mid-Ohio Foodbank COMPANY: Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company HEADQUARTERS: Columbus, Ohio WEBSITE: www.Nationwide.com BUSINESS: Financial Services REVENUES: $20.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 33,000


Diversity is Our Competitive Advantage. We, at ITT, are committed to building a workforce that mirrors the world in which we do business. With operations in over 60 countries and customers on seven continents, ITT is well positioned and making a difference on a global scale. As we continue to grow, we look first to create an environment where our talented employees can succeed and make the world a better place through their unique contributions. We embrace diversity, which includes but is not limited to race, religion, gender, disability, nationality, age, sexual orientation, and ethnic background. Our culture, work practices and programs enable an inclusive and innovative workforce and workplace resulting in premier performance in the global marketplace.

www.itt.com/careers We are an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.

The “ITT Engineered Blocks” symbol and “Engineered for life” are registered trademarks of the ITT Corporation. © 2006


Carin

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Stutz

Brinker International

...I learned very quickly I must be an advocate for myself...

A

TITLE: President of Global Business Development EDUCATION: BS, Western Illinois University; MBA, MidAmerica Nazarene FIRST JOB: McDonald’s WHAT I’M READING: China’s Megatrends, by John Naisbitt MY PHILOSOPHY: Be an advocate for yourself. FAMILY: Husband, Rodger; adult sons Rod, David INTERESTS: Travel, golf with Rodger, Rod, David FAVORITE CHARITY: Women’s Foodservice Forum COMPANY: Brinker International HEADQUARTERS: Dallas, Texas WEBSITE: www.brinker.com BUSINESS: Dining REVENUES: $2.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 100,000

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s I reflect on my career, I feel blessed with the opportunities and experiences I have had in the food service industry. I can truly say I am equally as enthusiastic about coming to work today as I was on my first day as a manager trainee. I love what I do! I was fortunate to be in an operations position where there was an obvious career path, although the journey wasn’t always easy. Like all working mothers, we make sacrifices, work long hours, get results and just hope someone notices. However, hoping someone notices is not a good career strategy. After being passed over for the same job several times, in exasperation I said to my boss, “When is it going to be my turn?” His response

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was eye-opening as he said, “Carin, there is not a person here who thinks you have any desire to move up.” As obvious as this sounds now, I learned very quickly I must be an advocate for myself and my career. My peers were having those critical career advancement dialogues, while my career discussions with my boss were always about my team and their development. The discussions really aren’t difficult, and I must admit, I enjoy having confident team members who want to advance. Here are some tips as you prepare for the discussion with your boss. Come to the discussion fully prepared. Know what your career aspirations are; don’t expect your boss to come up with a plan for you. Be honest

about your current skills and know what is required for the next job. Learn it! Be open to feedback. Understand there will be a need for personal behavior changes; you must strengthen your current leadership skills plus learn new ones. What makes you successful in your current position won’t necessarily be a winning formula for the next. Network! Think about who will be in the room when the decision for the next promotion is made. What is your professional relationship with each of them, and will they sponsor you for the job? Always have the courage to speak up for yourself and enjoy what the future brings. There is much opportunity for great leaders.


Paulette J.

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TITLE: Chief Nurse Practitioner Officer EDUCATION: AD, University of Vermont; BS, University of Washington; MS, Simmons College; JD, New England School of Law FIRST JOB: Staff Nurse, Yale New Haven Hospital WHAT I’M READING: Salem Falls, by Jodi Picoult MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, exercise daily, stay organized, be compassionate and appreciative, apologize and forgive. FAMILY: Husband; five children INTERESTS: Fitness, running and strength training, biking, skiing, travel, Scrabble, reading FAVORITE CHARITies: Lund Family Center, Ride the Dragon, Alzheimer’s Association COMPANY: MinuteClinic HEADQUARTERS: Woonsocket, Rhode Island WEBSITE: www.minuteclinic.com BUSINESS: Retail Health Care REVENUES: $96.4 billion (CVS Caremark) EMPLOYEES: 200,000 (CVS Caremark)

Thabault

MinuteClinic

T

hese are a few things I recommend to achieve career success. When you interview for a job, do your homework and learn all that you can about the company, its key leaders and the position you are applying for. Find out what qualities are needed for success and be prepared to give relevant examples of your past accomplishments and even some of the challenges you have faced. When you start a new job, take the time to learn about the people and areas you will be responsible for. Often, leaders are not experts in the detailed work of those they manage, but it is important to have some understanding of everything within your purview. Don’t be afraid to ask the team you supervise to teach you about how they do their jobs and work with them to determine how you can help them be successful. When I was commissioner in the state of Vermont, I was the chief regulator for Banking, Insurance, Securities, Captive Insurance and Health Care Administration. During my first several months, I spent time with my general counsel and deputies and asked them to brief me on their areas of responsibility. When they asked for my signature I took the time

to listen and understand what I was signing and the impact it would have. I did a lot of reading about the various areas I was responsible for so that I could effectively represent the department and support my team. Sometimes, it slowed things down, but in the end, the outcome was better. When I left that position, my team thanked me for taking the time to learn about the things I wasn’t an expert on and their individual challenges as leaders. We did not always agree and I ultimately made the final decisions, but they always knew I was interested and valued their input. Here are a few pieces of career advice I take with me everywhere. It is so important to listen. Ask questions and really hear the answers. You might not agree with the other point of view and you might choose a different direction, but if you listen, you will gain respect for that person. When you disagree, look for common ground, identify solutions and compromise when you can. Follow-through is important. Reliability and dependability are great qualities in a leader. Be appreciative and recognize those who put in that extra effort on a project.

Don’t be afraid to ask the team you supervise to teach you about how they do their jobs... w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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“We’re bringing in the partner. She’s already on it.” People who know, know BDO.

SM


 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching ® 2012 AWARD WINNERS

Karen A. Williams, Northrop Grumman IT • Tammy J. Weinbaum, American Express • Susan Werstak, Thompson Coburn LLP • Katy Wells, Advanced Micro Devices Jill S. Wyant, Ecolab Inc • Kimberly Waller, Aon Corporation • Dana Tribula, Applied Materials, Inc. • Susan Wolak, BDO USA, LLP Carrie S. Young, Salt River Project • Wenli Wang, Moss Adams LLP • Dr. Vdis M. Vila, United States Air Force Academy

10

th

annual

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Dana

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Tribula

Applied Materials, Inc.

I

’ve learned that it is important to listen to your instincts and make sure you do something that you are passionate about. And never be afraid to ask questions. I didn’t plan to become an engineer or work in the semiconductor industry. While I’ve always been good at math and science, I originally thought I would major in French since I loved languages and imagined travelling the world as a translator. However, I soon realized that a French major was all about writing numerous papers (in French no less), which I was not excited about. I had wonderful science and engineering professors in both college and graduate school and through this experience realized that science was my passion. I also had a great research advisor in graduate school. He was

a fabulous technologist, but more importantly, knew how to communicate science and technology. He illustrated to me the power of communication – especially when it comes to communicating technical concepts. This is where my interest in marketing came from. To this day, I still get great satisfaction explaining complex technical problems or concepts to a layman. My first job out of graduate school was as a process engineer where I worked on the front lines in customer fabrication labs or “fabs,” to deliver technology solutions. In this role, I traveled the world and saw firsthand the technical challenges faced by customers, and I also saw that sometimes the products that were offered to customers didn’t always hit the mark. I realized that I wanted to move my career

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

EDUCATION: BS, Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College; MS, PhD, Materials science, University of California, Berkeley FIRST JOB: Process engineer WHAT I’M READING: Catching up on my New Yorkers

in a direction where I would be in a position to influence product direction early on. I’m proud to say that I can do that now in my role in product marketing at Applied Materials. To do this effectively, it’s important to tell a technology story to both customers and internal business partners in order to deliver the best solutions for customers. I’ve learned that in order to be a successful leader, it is important to always think not one, but two or three steps ahead, with a clear vision of the end state in sight, whether that’s a technology solution, market share or customer penetration. To this end, I’m always asking questions: What next? And after that? And after that? You have to think several steps ahead in order to anticipate opportunities and challenges and plan strategies in response.

...I still get great satisfaction explaining complex technical problems or concepts...

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TITLE: Appointed Vice President, Chief Marketing Officer, Applied Global Services

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MY PHILOSOPHY: Love what you do. FAMILY: Single INTERESTS: Gardening, hiking, travel FAVORITE CHARITY: Education COMPANY: Applied Materials, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Santa Clara, California WEBSITE: www.appliedmaterials.com and blog.amat.com BUSINESS: World’s leading provider of equipment, services and software to enable the manufacture of advanced semiconductor, flat panel display and solar photovoltaic (PV) products REVENUES: $9.5 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 13,000


Dr. Adis Maria

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Vila

WHAT I’M READING: Reframing Change, by Jean Kantambu Latting & V. Jean Ramsey; The Inclusion Paradox, by Andres T. Tapia

...I had built relationships that could help me get things done.

I

n September 1982, I arrived at the White House to meet with former Senator Elizabeth Dole, then assistant to President Reagan for public liaison. I was a 27-year old lawyer from Miami selected as a White House Fellow. In our first meeting, Mrs. Dole, my principal for the year, handed me a White House directory. She asked that I call each senior official, introduce myself, and ask if I could meet with them to learn about their work at the White House. So many different concerns ran through my head: Why would any of these folks make time to meet with me? What would I say to the senior leadership? What if they did not wish to meet with me? Mrs. Dole asked that I meet with her every week and report on my meetings with the senior White House staff. Excited to have my first assignment, I made the first few calls. What a joy! No one said NO. I never ran out of things to say at the meetings. The more senior the person, the more time the official made for me. I learned so much about the White House, the passion that leads folks to serve our country, and the challenges facing each of the offices serving the president. In six weeks, I knew my way around the White House, understood the

EDUCATION: BA, Rollins College; MBA, Chicago Booth; LLM equiv., IHEID, Geneva, Switzerland; JD, University of Florida FIRST JOB: Weighing peanuts at Miami Stadium, wrapping hot dogs at Orange Bowl Stadium

United States Air Force Academy

TITLE: Chief Diversity Officer, USAFA

importance of coordination among those serving the president, and most importantly, could get things done for the Office of Public Liaison. I became a contributing member of Mrs. Dole’s team because I had built relationships that could help me get things done. Before long, I understood the key role that different stakeholders play in advancing the president’s goals and had at my fingertips a rolodex of Washington players inside and outside government who could advance the president’s initiatives. I consider this advice among the most important I have received because it is valuable in every organization and at every level. The depth of the advice became clear in my career. Getting to know colleagues, appreciating their contributions and challenges, and adapting to the organizational culture, even as you work to improve it, are key to developing vision and implementing strategy. Failure to accomplish a goal is seldom the result of a poor strategy; often, failure results from inadequate implementation. Strategy implementation, while helped by structures and processes, depends on relationships built across interdependent departments, whether at the White House, the private sector or an academic institution. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

MY PHILOSOPHY: In matters of style bend like a willow; in matters of principle stand like an oak. FAMILY: Both parents alive, continue to look for a renaissance man INTERESTS: Foreign travel and films, golf FAVORITE CHARITies: All that do good for others COMPANY: United States Air Force Academy HEADQUARTERS: Colorado Springs, Colorado WEBSITE: www.usafa.af.mil BUSINESS: Military EMPLOYEES: 13,554

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Kimberly

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Waller

Aon Corporation

Deliver on what you promise regardless of how circumstances may change.

W

TITLE: Chief Operating Officer, Aon Cornerstone EDUCATION: BS, University of Wisconsin; MS, Northwestern University FIRST JOB: Paper route WHAT I’M READING: The Help, by Kathryn Stockett; The Harvard Business Review MY PHILOSOPHY: Know what you value and always maintain your integrity. FAMILY: An incredibly gifted and funny son Tony; fabulous extended family INTERESTS: Yoga, tennis, reading, knitting FAVORITE CHARITies: Family Focus, Chicago Sinfonietta, the Women’s Initiative COMPANY: Aon Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEBSITE: www.aon.com BUSINESS: Risk management and human resources consulting and outsourcing REVENUES: $8.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 60,000

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ell before I entered my professional role in the insurance industry, I learned a few important principles early on that have shaped my professional journey. These principles have served to keep me grounded and focused even through some of my most complex business challenges. I grew up in a suburb of Minneapolis, Minnesota, as the oldest child of four children. I was a tomboy who enjoyed hanging out with the boys in the neighborhood. One summer, at the age of 12, my friends and I decided it was time to make better use of our time. We also wanted to find a way to earn some money, which we could use for buying summer treats. Putting our energy to good use, we decided to start paper routes. I really had no idea what I was signing up for except that I knew I wanted to find a way to earn money just like the rest of the boys in my “pack.” In the beginning, I reveled in the joy of being a 12-year-old, independent business person. It was great fun. I was able to ride my bike, be outdoors, deliver papers and make money all at the same time. That was, of course, until the cold autumn days of Minnesota rolled in and rain, sleet and freezing snow descended. During the dead of winter and those dark, cold mornings (as a matter of fact, very cold mornings), I learned three basic lessons that have served me well throughout my career. Deliver on what you promise regardless of how circumstances may change. Ask for help. Identify people who will support you and push you through the rough spots. (In my case, my father, mother, sister and brothers in our heated family car all became a part of my first business team.) Success requires persistence and putting in the time to get the job done. These three principles continue to guide how I work. In my current role, for example, it may not always be easy, but my group and I are fully vested in pulling together a best-in-class team to meet our clients’ needs. To this day, when I wake up early in the morning to begin my day, I often reflect on these wonderful early lessons learned. S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11


Wenli

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Wang

Moss Adams LLP

It takes effort, determination, and caring to build a strong network...

O

ver the course of my career in public accounting, I have mentored and coached quite a few young women. One of the questions I get asked most frequently is how to build a practice. This is definitely one of the major obstacles most women face in advancing our careers. The common bias is that women aren’t rainmakers. But experience tells me that bias is just plain wrong. I often relate it to gardening, an activity I love. There are many similarities between gardening and building a practice. For example, we all know that a garden needs sunshine, rich soil, and good seeds. It’s no different in a practice: You need a collaborative working environment, strong internal resources, a great referral network, and persistent follow-ups. I had come to the United States after college. I didn’t know anyone

in the professional world when I started public accounting. Fortunately, Moss Adams offers a collaborative environment. On numerous occasions partners or senior managers took me with them to have lunch with prospective clients as well as referral sources such as bankers, attorneys, and financial advisors. I learned so much in those meetings. And they helped me gradually build my own professional network and referral sources. Associating ourselves with the right network is the first step – it’s the practice equivalent of identifying those good seeds gardeners talk about. We meet a lot of people over the course of our career. Not everyone we know will refer clients to us, and we probably won’t have the time to nurture every relationship. But over the years, I’ve learned to identify the key potential refer-

ral sources and focus on these meaningful relationships, which eventually lead to prospects. Once we identify good seeds, regular TLC is a must. Frequent contacts and follow-ups with referral sources play a crucial part of getting referrals. This is the most challenging part for me personally. I have a school-age child. I try my best to avoid evening functions so I can be home with my daughter at night. Lunchtime becomes my networking time. My lunches are usually scheduled out two months in advance. Networking and building a practice can be daunting at the beginning. It takes effort, determination, and caring to build a strong network and gain the trust of referral sources. But with the right outside factors and internal effort, you can indeed harvest the fruits of your labor. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

TITLE: Tax service partner and office tax practice leader EDUCATION: BA, English Language and Literature, Beijing University; MBA, Taxation, California State University, East Bay FIRST JOB: Counter person at a dry cleaning shop WHAT I’M READING: Master Key System, by Charles F. Haanel; Girl in the Mirror, by Nancy L. Snyderman MY PHILOSOPHY: Be a person with an open mind, a generous heart, a courageous soul and a strong backbone. FAMILY: My wonderful husband of 21 years, Jon; my amazing daughter, Annabelle INTERESTS: Reading, traveling, gardening FAVORITE CHARITY: SPCA COMPANY: Moss Adams LLP HEADQUARTERS: Seattle, Washington WEBSITE: www.mossadams.com BUSINESS: Public accounting & consulting REVENUES: $316 million EMPLOYEES: 1,700

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Tammy

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Weinbaum American Express

It’s up to leaders to recognize talent and help employees seize opportunities to build on their strengths...

T

hroughout my 21-year career at American Express, I have been fortunate to have a number of leaders who showed an interest in me and my professional development. Thus, one of my goals as a senior leader is to make sure each and every employee I lead has an actionable development plan, and that I help keep their plan front and center. I’ve also found, over the years, that development means many different things for different people. The one common thread is that developing future leaders is something that everyone owns, regardless of level at any organization. It’s up to leaders to recognize talent and help employees seize opportunities to build on their strengths as well as their weaknesses.

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I’ve always felt I own my development. I’ve been very open with all of my leaders about what I’ve wanted to achieve. Having those conversations and developing clear expectations has always helped me be successful. Every new position I’ve achieved at American Express has been because of open conversation and because I was up front about what I wanted out of my development. But owning development also means listening. I recently heard from one of our employees that she had no desire to advance her career to a leadership level. However, she is an excellent peer mentor, and she felt she had a lot to offer, and a lot to learn from others. For her, development is taking on new challenges and learning new areas.

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

She was looking to make a lateral career move so she could learn more about another area of the business. I admire her for knowing what she wants and going after it. Development is a broad term, but individuals and leaders should look at it from one common viewpoint – development is not something to do once in a while, but to think about and take action on every single day. If I had not had incredible leaders who worked with me on my development plan, I would not be in my senior position at a top company today. While I owe my leaders a lot, I’m proud that I’ve owned my development and always made it a priority to make it known what I wanted, and reached out proactively to make it happen.

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TITLE: Senior Vice President & General Manager, Phoenix and Salt Lake City EDUCATION: MBA FIRST JOB: Customer Service Representative WHAT I’M READING: Room, by Emma Donoghue; Outliers, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: The leader you work for is as important as the job you are in. FAMILY: Husband, Dan; children, Jake, Justin, Jordan INTERESTS: Shopping, skiing, spending time with family FAVORITE CHARITY: United Way COMPANY: American Express HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEBSITE: www.americanexpress.com BUSINESS: Financial services REVENUES: $30.242 billion EMPLOYEES: 60,500


Katy

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Wells

TITLE: Corporation VP, Office of CEO, Operations & Alliances EDUCATION: BS, Lamar University; JD, Yale Law School FIRST JOB: Gingerbread house baker, NCA cheerleading camp instructor

Advanced Micro Devices (AMD)

W

ow! What an amazing group of women you will find in this and past issues profiling Women Worth Watching. I spent time reading as many profiles as possible, and I encourage you to do the same. I can think of no better advice to give you than to refer you to these women and their stories. You will find a treasure of counsel and inspiration from all walks of life, and like me, you will see repeat and common themes that you can adopt to your own life and circumstance: have mentors and be one; Be and believe in yourself; develop your own style; build relationships; you can have it all but not necessarily all at the same time; embrace change and be open-minded/flexible; there is no set path to success but a series of opportunities and choices; be intentional about the choices. I also recently re-read many of the letters women leaders of my company (AMD) sent to their worldwide colleagues earlier this year in celebration of the 100th International Women’s Day, another incredible collection of stories and advice hitting all of the themes listed above. Again – truly inspiring. Gather a collection from your own colleagues, and you too will

be moved to action and fulfillment in your career, whether you call Beijing, Hyderabad, Moscow, London or Austin, Texas, your home. What strikes me in reviewing this large collection of essays – and in reflecting on countless conversations about career and family challenges – is that we seem to require repeated reminders of our individual and collective worth and potential. I am as guilty as the rest. No more doubt! It starts with you and me. Be and believe in yourself! It seems so simple, but it is worth repeating again and again, because doubt often stands as the major barrier to accomplishing all else, not just early in a career, but even for the most accomplished. Since the beginning of time, women all over the world have contributed in every way possible to families, businesses and society. We are creators and innovators; we are leaders and collaborators; we are daughters, mothers, sisters and friends – and colleagues. Without a doubt, you can achieve great heights in all areas of the economic, political and societal fabric of today’s global network. We need you, and you just need to believe in yourself!

WHAT I’M READING: The Tenth Parallel, by Eliza Grizwold; The Economist weekly editions MY PHILOSOPHY: Be glad of life because it gives you the chance to love and to work and to play and to look up at the stars. – Henry Van Dyke FAMILY: Husband, Jules; children, Austin, Reed, Rebecca, Sydney, Jackson, Jordan INTERESTS: Children’s sports, yoga, running, traveling, baking FAVORITE CHARITies: Capital Area Food Bank, Texas Advocacy Project, Educational institutions COMPANY: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) HEADQUARTERS: Sunnyvale, California WEBSITE: www.amd.com BUSINESS: Technology REVENUES: $6.49 billion EMPLOYEES: 11,000

Be and believe in yourself!

w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Sue

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Werstak

Thompson Coburn LLP

...I learned that it’s crucial to accept assignments that are challenging.

L TITLE: Partner EDUCATION: BA, Stonehill College; JD, Villanova University School of Law, Order of the Coif FIRST JOB: Summer associate at Dechert LLP in Philadelphia WHAT I’M READING: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, by Betty Smith MY PHILOSOPHY: Never give up. FAMILY: Partner and puppy INTERESTS: Bike riding, travel, wine FAVORITE CHARITies: Human Rights Campaign, Susan J. Komen Race for the Cure, PROMO COMPANY: Thompson Coburn LLP HEADQUARTERS: St. Louis, Missouri WEBSITE: www.thompsoncoburn.com BUSINESS: Legal REVENUES: $164 million EMPLOYEES: 710

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ooking back on my career, the best piece of advice I ever received was from a senior partner who was my mentor when I began my career in 1997. He told me that the key to success as a young lawyer is to work hard to gain the confidence of the partners for whom you work. By doing that, he said, a young associate can get better assignments, more challenging work, opportunities to develop new skills and a chance to learn from the top lawyers in the firm. Gaining that confidence wasn’t easy, but I was able to do so by focusing on a few key objectives. Attention to detail is of paramount importance. Think everything through, read everything three times, four times, ten times. Don’t miss a mistake or a typo. The smallest error can negate hundreds of hours of excellent work. If you don’t understand something ask questions. And ask them until you understand exactly what needs to be done, how it needs to be done and what the real deadlines are. The old adage that the only dumb question is the one you don’t ask is absolutely true. Understand your client, and understand that as a young associate your client is that senior partner with whom you’re working. Know the client’s goals, know the concerns, know the hot buttons, know what keeps

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

them up at night worrying. Make sure your client, that senior partner, knows you have his or her back. That means paying attention to detail, listening, looking for small problems and communicating to her or him in a way that keeps them from becoming big problems. So what happened once I’d gained the confidence of those key lawyers in my firm? First, I started getting the assignments that I needed to take on to develop as a lawyer, and it increased my mentoring relationships. Then I learned that it’s crucial to accept assignments that are challenging. I also learned that every great litigator feels like throwing up just before doing something significant in court and that if you don’t have that edge, you lack passion. And all great litigators have one thing in common – passion. Finally, I discovered that you can learn great skills from great lawyers, but in the end you have to develop a style that suits you. You can’t be someone you’re not and be successful. This is a very difficult and challenging profession, much more so than I ever had imagined when I was in law school. But it’s worth it, because in the end, you can achieve great things, things that were also unimaginable back in law school.


Many hands make light work Time Warner Cable’s inclusive culture fosters innovation, teamwork and customer focus. We value true diversity and an open environment that blends ideas, experiences, cultures, influences and perspectives of our 48,000 employees and our customers. Joan Gillman is a shining example of a leader who lives up to our value of Inclusiveness in how she inspires and motivates. Time Warner Cable congratulates Joan on being named one of the Women Worth Watching. Time Warner Cable is an equal opportunity employer committed to an inclusive workplace. www.timewarnercable.com/Corporate/about/careers/diversity


Karen A.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Williams

Northrop Grumman Information Systems

I

believe we’re all products of our life experiences, both good and bad. My career has been shaped the same way, by the people who came into my working life for better or for worse. It’s these informal mentors, managers and coworkers who’ve provided me with the best lessons on what to do and what not to do as I made my way in the business world. Here are some messages that I’ve found particularly helpful. Communicate again, again and again. One of my favorite supervisors had this practice, and his staff always knew where he stood on issues and always felt included. His methods made an impression on me, and I strive to emulate them today, using town halls, newsletters and social media. Never let boundaries define you. Early in my career, one manager stressed the importance of learning the business side of business while another encouraged me to learn about winning new business. In taking their advice, I gained essential business development and operations knowledge, information that served me well as I took on progressively challenging roles. As I moved in and out of other roles, I saw other leaders doing what needed to be done. I resolved to follow in their footsteps by always pitching in to get the job done, no matter what the task.

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

EDUCATION: BS, University of Delaware; MS, American University FIRST JOB: Contract administrator for NKF Engineering WHAT I’M READING: True Blue, by David Baldacci

Learning to delve into new fields and pinch-hit in a variety of roles allowed me to become a well-rounded and value-focused employee. Treat people the way you want to be treated. I once worked for a man who often shouted at his employees in anger. Another leader I knew admired a bookshelf I had in my office; then promptly ordered it removed for his own use. After these negative experiences, I vowed that I’d always be respectful to people, no matter the situation. Spend part of each day mentoring. No one taught me this, but this is how I’m able to pass on the good lessons I’ve received from my informal mentors. For example, I send out a “thought piece” to my managers once a month, using an article on leadership as a topic, and I also serve as an informal mentor in our company’s Women in Leadership program. I’ve been fortunate to work for Northrop Grumman for more than 20 years now, a company that values people, diversity and life-long learning. In keeping with those standards, I encourage all employees to be open to the informal mentors in their lives, to take advice from the unexpected teacher and to learn from the positive and negative lessons.

Treat people the way you want to be treated.

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TITLE: Vice President and General Manager, Defense Technologies Division

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

MY PHILOSOPHY: Never let boundaries define you. FAMILY: Husband, Kurt; daughters, Kathryn, Karoline INTERESTS: Sports, particularly the University of Delaware’s Blue Hen football team FAVORITE CHARITY: The Church of the Little Flower in Bethesda, Maryland COMPANY: Northrop Grumman Information Systems HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEBSITE: www.is.northropgrumman.com BUSINESS: Security and defense REVENUES: $8.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 24,000


INVEST IN RELATIONSHIPS

FOCUS ON EXCELLENCE At ConocoPhillips, a diverse and inclusive environment brings together a variety of talents, backgrounds and experiences that help drive our company. By celebrating the differences in our cultures and backgrounds, and by seeing opportunities from a diverse perspective, we will continue to share in success. Ann Oglesby inspires employees with her innovation, relationships, vision and support for our core values. We join Profiles in Diversity Journal in honoring

Ann Oglesby

for her achievements, and we offer

congratulations to Ann and all the women recognized in the

Š ConocoPhillips Company. 2011. All rights reserved.

10th annual Women Worth Watching

ÂŽ

Ann Oglesby

Vice President, Communications & Public Affairs, ConocoPhillips

www.conocophillips.com

Issue.


Susan

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

TITLE: Phoenix Assurance Partner & Office Business Line Leader EDUCATION: BS, BA, Central Michigan University FIRST JOB: “Jane-of-all-trades” at a local country market WHAT I’M READING: The Teeth of the Tiger, by Tom Clancy; Manage for Profit, Not for Market Share, by Hermann Simon, Frank F. Bilstein and Frank Luby MY PHILOSOPHY: We are only custodians here. We have a responsibility to take care of our surroundings and the people we encounter and leave them in better condition than when we arrived. FAMILY: Eight spoiled nieces and nephews INTERESTS: Performing arts, visual arts, golf, gardening FAVORITE CHARITies: National charities focused on curing cancer, local/regional charities providing assistance to women and children COMPANY: BDO USA, LLP HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEBSITE: www.bdo.com BUSINESS: Accounting and Consulting REVENUES: $585 million EMPLOYEES: 2,500

Wolak

BDO USA, LLP

A

s I think about the ingredients that have helped me attain career longevity and success, setting clear goals and putting good advice to work are the most important components. Pure tenacity and perseverance will go a long way when it comes to being successful; however, in order to end up where you want, you need to have a clear goal and plans for how to get there. While mentoring and advice are important to help support you along the way, no amount of talking will replace getting off the sidelines and engaging in the work. Early in my career, I was a diligent worker. I spent a lot of time honing my technical skills – putting my head down and performing my tasks. My mentors often spoke about the importance of developing relationships with clients and

colleagues. I heard the advice, but I didn’t put it to work. I rationalized that our clients were paying for a service, and through my diligence in applying my technical skills, they would see that I was helping provide that service. However, when I started attending client meetings, I immediately realized that my colleagues who’d spent as much time on relationship building as they did on technical performance were the ones who were recognized and rewarded. It wasn’t until that moment – when I felt invisible to the client – that I internalized what my mentors had been trying to teach. As the old saying goes, “Someone can tell you all day long that a stove is too hot to touch, but it only takes one touch to understand what they mean.” From that experience, I established a new goal: to be more intentional

about how I allocate my energy between improving my technical performance and building relationships. The beauty in focusing on relationship building is that it has given me the opportunity to cultivate my personal interests, such as visual/ performing arts and golf. Meeting people with similar interests provides an opportunity to connect; people like to know who you are as a person when they do business with you. As you move throughout your career, you will move from building your technical and business competence to an increased focus on relationship building and people development. Try to always be intentional about how you allocate your energy and keep your end goal in mind. With just a little planning, you have the power to attain career longevity and success.

...people like to know who you are as a person when they do business with you.

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HOTELS FROM LEFT The Westin Kierland Resort & Spa Scottsdale, ARIZONA Aloft New York Brooklyn, NEW YORK Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort, BAHAMAS W San Francisco, CALIFORNIA

©2011 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All rights reserved.

THE WORLD IS YOURS No matter where around the globe your travels take you, from the Big Apple to Big Ben, Dubai to Mumbai, Fiji to Mount Fuji, Starwood Hotels & Resorts can accommodate you in comfort and style. We have over 1,050 great places to stay in over 100 countries. Visit starwoodhotels.com to explore our nine internationally renowned brands. Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide is proud to congratulate our President of North America, Denise Coll, for being recognized by Profiles in Diversity Journal, “Women Worth Watching in 2012”. We salute Denise for her unwavering leadership and drive to provide world-class hospitality service and innovation for more than 25 years.


Jill

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Wyant

Ecolab Inc

I found what I could bring was leadership based on encouragement...

W

hen I came to Ecolab in 2009, I was new to the team and industry. I also was a first-time mom. Both turned out to be significant transitions, and both had a profound impact on my views on leadership. Like anyone new to a job, I had to evaluate what I could bring to the party. People on my team had been in the industry 20 years, so I wasn’t able to bring deeper expertise or stronger customer relationships. After a time of exploration and reflection, I found what I could bring was leadership based on encouragement, high expectations and the pursuit of excellence. I could help my team enlarge their voices, be heard, and elevate both business performance and their own personal leadership.

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So when you face a transition, don’t automatically expect to contribute in exactly the way you did before. Recognize the importance of figuring out the strengths you can bring to your new leadership situation in view of what is required for success. And also keep in mind that you will reach a point where it’s no longer a matter of whether you’re the smartest or most capable person on the team. Rather, it’s about building up the people around you so they can do their best work and realize their dreams. Starting my family was a transition that has enriched my leadership. My son serves as a constant reminder of what it means to nurture and develop the amazing potential that is in all people. Being a mom has reinforced for me

Pro f iles in Div ersi t y J ourna l

that truly connecting with people and inspiring them through hope, aspiration and clear expectations can be a powerful way to lead. Of course, every leader, new or experienced, knows the importance of feedback. The irony is that the longer you’re in leadership, the harder it seems to get an honest assessment and the easier it is to become entrenched in habits you can no longer see. That’s why I suggest a personal board of directors. It’s been a big help having people from all walks of my personal and professional life provide me with the unvarnished truth and a well-balanced portfolio of perspectives. Listening to them doesn’t mean I live my life according to what they say, but I find their perspectives invaluable as I make big decisions in life or at work.

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

TITLE: Senior Vice President & General Manager, Food & Beverage, Asia Pacific Latin America EDUCATION: BA, University of St. Thomas; International Degree, Osaka Gakuin University; MBA, The University of Chicago FIRST JOB: Yield Management Analyst, Northwest Airlines WHAT I’M READING: True North, by Bill George; Parenting from the Inside Out, by Daniel Siegel and Mary Hartzell MY PHILOSOPHY: Every situation is perfect the way it is. FAMILY: Husband, Patrick; son, Jacob INTERESTS: Spending time with family, running, biking, reading FAVORITE CHARITY: Greater Twin Cities United Way COMPANY: Ecolab Inc HEADQUARTERS: St. Paul, Minnesota WEBSITE: www.ecolab.com BUSINESS: Cleaning and Sanitizing Products REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 26,500


leadership in action The year was 1946, and the postwar economic boom was just beginning. Our company’s founder, William Russell Kelly, pioneered the staffing industry, giving women a gateway to new opportunities in the workforce. Since then, we’ve been supporting the rise of women in the global marketplace as well as our own ranks. Our internal business resource group, Leadership in Action (LIA): Powered by the Women at Kelly, is dedicated to impacting Kelly’s business results by helping to prepare and develop our current and future leaders. While providing a forum to initiate courageous conversations, share personal experiences, and embrace collaboration, LIA is a channel for leadership development and the voice of Kelly women. ®

As a leading workforce solutions company, we truly believe women have the power and flexibility to determine their own career paths. We are proud to have women among our senior leadership, a board of directors that is nearly 30 percent women, and LIA, which is an essential driver of professional and personal development.

kellyservices.com An Equal Opportunity Employer © 2011 Kelly Services, Inc. W1171


Carrie S.

C O M PA N Y A N D E X E C U T I V E W omen W ort h W atc h in g ® 2 0 1 2 A W A R D W I N N E R

Young

T

I continued to put my skills and experience to use when I joined Salt River Project. These same principles have been key to my success as I progressed from a senior business analyst into executive management. Throughout my career – whether it was in the military or the corporate world – as well in as my personal life, I have followed the same basic principles that were instilled by my parents. No matter what situation or challenge I have faced in my life, they have helped guide me. Be a good listener. Listen with an open mind. Don’t judge. Be compassionate. Be open and honest. Provide truthful feedback. Communicate openly and solicit employee input. Be flexible. Adapt. Embrace change as an opportunity. Lead by example. Do the right thing. Empower your employees. Continue to develop your skills. Give back. Volunteer. Become a mentor. Find opportunities for your employees to grow and develop. Stay positive. Avoid negative emotions which cloud your good judgment and drain your energy. Finally, live by the golden rule: always treat others the way you want to be treated.

Be flexible. Adapt. Embrace change as an opportunity.

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EDUCATION: BS, Chapman University; MS, Western International University FIRST JOB: Systems Analyst, United States Air Force WHAT I’M READING: The New SAP Blue Book, by Michael Doane

Salt River Project he principles that guide my interactions with others took shape during my early childhood years and were heavily influenced by my parents. My parents expected me, the oldest of six children, to be a role model for my siblings. This meant setting a good example and being a positive influence. This was a big responsibility. I had to work hard, as I knew my actions would have an impact on their development. All of the experiences and choices that I made were built on these same guiding principles as I graduated high school and started college. I joined the Air Force and moved through the ranks to achieve leadership positions. I was fortunate to work with great leaders and mentors from a variety of nationalities and backgrounds. They were positive influences who truly cared about my success and were instrumental in coaching me to continue my education and in strengthening my leadership skills. During my Air Force career I was sought out to lead different projects and special assignments. Even during tough and challenging situations, I never wavered on my leadership principles and the way I interacted with others.

TITLE: Executive Manager of Corporate Operations Services

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

MY PHILOSOPHY: Stay true to yourself and never compromise your values or integrity. Always do the right thing, even when you think no one is watching. FAMILY: Married 19 years to husband, Randy Young INTERESTS: Travel and exposure to different cultures and experiences FAVORITE CHARITY: New Life Center COMPANY: Salt River Project HEADQUARTERS: Phoenix, Arizona WEBSITE: www.srpnet.com BUSINESS: Energy/Water REVENUES: $2.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 4,322


extra

women

by the numbers

CATALYST HAS ASSEMBLED highly relevant information for the previous year

on women and their current status in the workforce The trends show overall improvements from 2009-2010, but the margins are very small. Great disparities between genders and ethnicities are still apparent.

Women in U.S. Finance & Insurance

17.4%

of the industry labor force in

Board Directors Executive Officers

Industry Labor Force 57.3%

1

8/5/11

finance and insurance, but make up

19.1%

19127 Kroger Woman Ad.pdf

women make up more than half

CEOs

3.6%

Overall,

12:34 PM

less than 5% of the CEOs. continued on page 200


extra

women

by the numbers

Top Earners

continued from page 199

14.4% Women

85.6%

men

CEOs Directors by

7.6% Women

92.4%

men

84.3%

men

3.0% Women of Color 12.7% White Women

Race/Ethnicity

Women comprise less than 10% of the top wage earners, a statistic evident of the massive wage gap between genders. Women of color only occupy 3% of the total board directors, and that number has decreased from 2009-2010.

Team. Leadership. Diversity. These are our core values. They are the ideas we live by as we work to provide life-changing opportunities for kids growing up in poverty. Meet some of our staff members and learn why these core values are so meaningful to them at: www.teachforamerica.org/careers

Congratulations to our EVP, AimĂŠe Eubanks-Davis, for being recognized as a Woman Worth Watching!


As the data shows, women have made slight gains in board seats,

but are losing pace in overall share of board seats and many companies still do not have women on their boards at all.

Womenʼs Share of Board Leadership

Percent of Companies by Number of Board Seats Held by Women LINCOLN FINANCIAL CONGRATULATES ALL THE 2012 "WOMEN WORTH WATCHING" AWARD WINNERS.

Percent of Companies by Number of Women Executive Officers

“That some achieve great success, is proof to all that others can achieve it as well.”

The numbers of women executive officers

have improved, as well as the number of companies that have women executive officers.

©2011 Lincoln National Corporation www.LincolnFinancial.com Lincoln Financial Group is the marketing name for Lincoln National Corporation and its affiliates. Affiliates are separately responsible for their own financial and contractual obligations. LCN1107-2056738


program

2012 editorial

Profiles in Diversity Journal速

People are talking... Join the conversation.

E

very year, Diversity Journal recognizes companies for sharing their successes. The Diversity Leader Award companies demonstrate their commitment by actively communicating their diversity and inclusion practices with the world in our pages. Join the conversation...


calendar

2012 editorial

January | February • • • • • •

Articles In Ad Space I/O

Ad Materials

Nov 11, 2011 Nov 30, 2011

Dec 9, 2011

African-American Heritage – Top Black Leaders in Business Military/Veterans in Workplace Women Who Rock Miami University Non-profit Profile 2012 Leading Companies for Recruiting and Retention

MARCH | APRIL • • • • • •

Profiles in Diversity Journal®

Jan 3, 2012

Jan 27, 2012

Feb 10, 2012

Inside Network/Affinity Groups Diversity Overload: How to Keep from Burning Out Age Diversity University of Oregon Entrepreneur/Organization Profile CEO Leadership in Action 2012 Winners

MAY | JUNE

Mar 9, 2012

Mar 23, 2012 Apr 13, 2012

• Asian/Pacific-American Heritage – Asian Leaders in Business • What’s Next for Gay/Lesbian Issues? • Women’s Wage Gap • University Feature • Entrepreneur/Org Profile • Employees with Disabilities 2012 Award Winners JULY | AUGUST • • • • • •

May 11, 2012

May 25, 2012

Jun 15, 2012

Evolution of Diversity How to Achieve Work/Life Balance Religious Diversity in the Workplace University Feature Entrepreneur/Organization Profile 9th Annual International Innovations in Diversity Awards

SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER Jun 22, 2012 Aug 3, 2012 Aug 17, 2012 • • • • • •

Hispanic Heritage Month – Hispanic Leaders in Business Hispanic vs. Latino Keeping Diversity Fresh University Feature Entrepreneur/Organization Profile 11th Annual WomenWorthWatching® Issue

NOVEMBER | DECEMBER Sep 7, 2012 • • • • • •

Sep 21, 2012

Oct 12, 2012

National American Heritage Month – American Indian Leaders How the Economy Affects Minorities/Women Engaging White Males University Feature Entrepreneur/Organization Profile 2012 Diversity Leader Award Winners

Departments: • • • •

Publisher’s Column Reader’s Words Digital Diversity Editor’s Column

• Bulletin • Catalyst Studies • From the Experts

• Media & Reviews • Vocabulary • Mentorings

• This Month in Diversity • Did you Know? • Contributors

Profiles in Diversity Journal • 1991 Crocker Road • Gemini Towers 1 • Cleveland, OH 44145 800.573.2867 • 440.892 0444 • Fax 440.892.0737 w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

Editorial Opportunities:

• Global Diversity Challenges • Diversity & Inclusion Business Case Issues • Diversity Technology • Small Business Diversity • The Road to Becoming a CDO • Geographic Diversity • Role of Religion • Involving White Males • Language of Diversity • Grassroots to Management • Military/Veterans • Building the Next Generation of CDOs • Diversity ROI • Student Leadership • Sponsorship vs. Mentoring vs. Coaching • Diversity Strategy • Going Green • Accountability in Diversity • Clarifying Inclusion • Diversity Paradigm Shifts • Attaining Leadership Buy-in • Mentoring • Retirement • Limited Resources for Diversity • Discrimination • Personal Branding • Diversity Overload – Burnt Out • Work-Life balance • LGBT History Taught in Schools • Keeping Diversity Fresh • Business/Entrepreneur Profiles • Gay Marriage • Evolution of Diversity – Moving on • Government vs. Corporate in Diversity • Economy affects Minorities, Women • Double Standards in the Workplace • Ex-offender discrimination • Tracking the D&I Journey • Mideast Women in Revolution • Engaging an Aging Workforce • CDO Common Mistakes • Women’s Wage Gap • Generational Diversity • How to Get Heard in the C-Suite • Women’s Expanding Role in Religion • Making Diversity Real • Women: How to Work in a Male-Dominated Workplace • Women’s C-Suite Representation • Supplier Diversity • Women in the Sciences • Women MBAs • Women Leaving and Re-entering the Workforce • History of Women in Management S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11

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HISPANIC/LATINO HERITAGE MONTH Celebración del Mes de la Herencia Hispana/Latino

Hispanic/Latino Heritage Month begins September 15th, the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries – Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua – that all declared independence in 1821. Today, more than 35 million people in the United States identify themselves as Hispanic or Latino.

We are proud to introduce these individuals to you; we applaud their efforts and celebrate their achievements.

We asked our Hispanic/Latino readers to share their stories with us. We wanted to know who influenced them early on, what they value right now, and what they share as mentors.

We hope you’ll enjoy meeting them.

Lorraine Cortés-Vázquez AARP Executive VP, Multicultural Markets & Engagement

EDUCATION: Hunter College; New York University, Toll Fellow; Certificates, Harvard University; Columbia University WHAT I’M READING: In Extremis Leadership, by Thomas Kolditz MY PHILOSOPHY: Wherever you walk in life, leave it better than you found it; Commit to individual and collective excellence, growth and development; Be your word and live a life of integrity. INTERESTS: Reading, cooking, jewelry making, theatre, music

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Pro f i les in D i v ersit y Journa l

How do you define leadership? Leadership is the ability to stand alone, stand up for you what you believe, and stand up for others. While doing all or some of these, you have to communicate with and motivate others in a competent, principled manner. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Growing the Hispanic Federation in terms of membership, influence and our Annual Gala. Equally rewarding has been my selection as EVP at AARP tasked with engaging multicultural communities by increasing awareness and support for AARP advocacy and education activities, as well as the services that we provide. Helping shape the multicultural agenda and goals for an organization with a long standing social change mission has been, at times, daunting and immensely gratifying accomplishment, to date. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Lie and shy away or cover up in crisis. Be too ego-driven. Integrity and courage are key! PDJ COMPANY: AARP, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C.

WEBSITE: www.aarp.org

EMPLOYEES: Estimated 2,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization with a membership that helps people 50+ have independence, choice and control in ways that are beneficial and affordable to them and society as a whole. S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11


CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Jorge Benitez Managing Director, North America & Chief Executive, U.S. How do you define leadership? Having a vision and making it a reality by empowering others to do their collective best. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Developing other leaders to surpass their own expectations and take on leadership roles. EDUCATION: University of Florida, degrees in Accounting and Economics WHAT I’M READING: The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell

What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Not trusting your team. What was the best advice you ever received? The most successful people are the ones who ask for help. PDJ

MY PHILOSOPHY: Live and Let Live. INTERESTS: Boating, fishing and other water sports; Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

COMPANY: Accenture

HEADQUARTERS: 200 cities in 53 countries

WEBSITE: www.accenture.com

EMPLOYEES: 223,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing

James H. Gallegos Vice President and General Counsel How do you define leadership? The ability to define a vision, explain it to the group, gain their emotional commitment, and achieve success that each individual could not, but which the group did. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Managing employees and watching what they can accomplish as a group. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? In the moment of stress, forget that one is the leader of the group, and regress to being an individual contributor. What was the best advice you ever received? Lead by example, be humble and recognize your team members because without them, success is not achievable. What are some personal or professional sacrifices to being a leader? At times the workload can impinge upon other activities of my personal life. However, if I am well-organized, I can do most of what I want professionally and personally. PDJ COMPANY: Alliant Energy

HEADQUARTERS: Madison, Wisconsin

WEBSITE: www.alliantenergy.com

EMPLOYEES: 4,500

EDUCATION: BS, Colorado; JD, University of Minnesota WHAT I’M READING: On China, by Henry Kissinger MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t let your perspective stop you from seeing what’s awaiting you. INTERESTS: Skiing, running, reading, biking, yoga

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Paul Fabara Executive Vice President/Head of Global Credit Administration How do you define leadership? Much like Lee Iacocca and other leaders, I define leadership using my own 10 C’s of Leadership: comfort with self, character, confidence, composure, courage, caring, communications, coaching, curiosity and conviction. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Joining American Express has been a great accomplishment in my career. I have always admired the Company’s drive for innovation and relentless focus on customer satisfaction. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? The worst mistake is to dismiss the importance of direct engagement with employees. The days of ‘ivory-tower’ leadership are over, and rightfully so. People matter. In fact, proper engagement and face-time with employees is the most important aspect of successful leadership. What was the best advice you ever received? By far, the best advice I have received is that feedback is a gift. Having an active feedback loop is vital to success. PDJ COMPANY: American Express Company

HEADQUARTERS: New York City

WEBSITE: www.americanexpress.com

EMPLOYEES: 60,500

EDUCATION: Colegio Indo Americano, Ecuador WHAT I’M READING: Patton: The Plot to Assassinate General George S. Patton, by Robert Wilcox MY PHILOSOPHY: Better, Cheaper, Faster. INTERESTS: Playing soccer, family, reading

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Financial Services

Alfredo N. Cepero Assurance Partner, Miami, Florida

EDUCATION: MA, Florida International University WHAT I’M READING: Rich Dad’s Conspiracy of the Rich, by Robert T. Kiyosaki MY PHILOSOPHY: Always strive to do the very best, in whatever you set out to do. INTERESTS: Coaching youth soccer

How do you define leadership? Leadership is about dreaming big and taking risks. Leadership means not being afraid to fail because a leader understands that success will ultimately occur, not only for the leader, but for the team. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Becoming an assurance partner with BDO. Becoming a partner had been my goal since I began my public accounting career. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Leaders should never become complacent. Once leaders become complacent, they lose their advantage, their credibility and tarnish their reputation. What was the best advice you ever received? It is important to be critical of oneself and more importantly, be able to take criticism from others. This makes an individual stronger and smarter. What risks should a leader take? A leader does not wait for things to happen. A leader creates the opportunity to succeed and seizes it. PDJ COMPANY: BDO USA, LLP

HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois

WEBSITE: www.bdo.com

EMPLOYEES: 2,566

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Public Accounting Firm

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CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

David A. Bracamonte Principal What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? A key tenet of leadership is the delegation and mutual trust you have with your second team. If you are not satisfied with their performance, immediately provide feedback and suggestions on how to improve. In addition, if you ask for their help, listen and embrace what they have to say. As a leader, you need to be open to alternative ideas and suggestions, resulting in a win-win situation. EDUCATION: BS in Economics; MBA in Technology Management WHAT I’M READING: Influencer: The Power to Change Anything, by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, David Maxfield, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzer

What was the best advice you ever received? You always need to be learning, developing, and sharpening your skills. Find mentors who are recognized for a specific skill that you need to enhance, develop a trusting relationship with them, and ask what makes them successful relative to that skill.

What are some personal and/or professional sacrifices to being leader? You must be cognizant of your demeanor and tone, and always remember you are a role model. PDJ Property: All properties Project: Diversity and Inclusion Job#: 55682.1 4:53 PM INTERESTS: Spending quality time Show: Ship: 8/15/11 COMPANY: Booz Allen Hamilton HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Insert: Virginia dMax: with wife Vendor: and kids, coaching youth sports, playing golf and basketball Trim: 8.5” x 5.375” Live: x www.boozallen.com VO: x WEBSITE: EMPLOYEES: 25,000 Bleed: .125" Final Mats: PDF File Art: Carrie Rev: 2 Desc.: Profiles in Diversity 8.5” xBUSINESS: Consulting Services PRIMARY MY PHILOSOPHY: Always do more than what is expected and go above and beyond the call of duty.

Savvy Women. Smart BuSineSS.

Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.


CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Douglas Souza Vice President, Audit How do you define leadership? Leadership is about demonstrating originality and a long perspective that will inspire people to achieve common goals or to move in one direction. Building strong relationships, inspiring trust and confidence, and gathering the best of people is the key to leadership. When you show people the reasons why we should believe in something or why we are doing what we do, they are more likely to understand and feel motivated to follow you. EDUCATION: BSc in Computer Science; MS, International Management, Finance WHAT I’M READING: The Voyage of the Beagle, by Charles Darwin MY PHILOSOPHY: Learn with the past, use what you learned at the present and share with others your experience for a better future. INTERESTS: Scientific research, music, jazz, bossa nova

What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Not listening to common sense and acting with ego. Most leaders of the past had strong personalities and true persuading power. Some of them fell because of their inability to keep themselves less important than their causes. What was the best advice you ever received? Never stop believing in yourself and that you can learn anything. PDJ COMPANY: Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Lake Success, New York WEBSITE: www.broadridge.com

EMPLOYEES: Over 5,000 employees worldwide

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Full-service outsourcing provider to the global financial industry

Millie Torres Vice President, Product Management How do you define leadership? Clarity of vision, a passion for excellence and respect for diversity of opinions. Never accepting status quo. A willingness to take risks, while learning from mistakes. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Assuming that respect is a given based on title. You have to earn the respect of your people through honest and sincere communications. What was the best advice you ever received? Never be afraid to ask questions. Often you find that there are more people in the room that do not understand but are afraid to raise their hands and ask. What are some personal and/or professional sacrifices to being leader? There are times when business takes priority over your personal life. What is important is that at the end of the day you are able to look at yourself in the mirror and say that you did your best. PDJ

WHAT I’M READING: Autobiography of Abigail Adams; mysteries and science fiction are also a passion

COMPANY: Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Lake Success, New York

INTERESTS: Wine, wine and more wine

WEBSITE: www.broadridge.com

EMPLOYEES: Over 5,000 employees worldwide

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Full-service outsourcing provider to the global financial industry

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EDUCATION: BA, Biology, NYU; MBA, Executive Management, St John’s University

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MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is God’s gift to you. What you make of it is your gift to God.


CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Jose S. Jimenez Chief Diversity Officer How do you define leadership? Motivating people to achieve their maximum potential. Leading by example and being an inspiration to others to achieve their best. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? I have had successful Navy and industry profit and loss careers. I have made some mistakes along the way and also gained a significant amount of experience. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Not trusting or allowing the people who work for you do their job. What was the best advice you ever received? Life is short – enjoy it to the fullest and make sure you enjoy what you do. What risks should a leader take? Informed. I think the key is not what risks to take but the decision making process that allows you to quickly assess the pros and cons of each decision. PDJ COMPANY: CSC

HEADQUARTERS: Falls Church, Virginia

WEBSITE: www.csc.com

EMPLOYEES: 91,000

EDUCATION: BSEE, MS Management WHAT I’M READING: The Inclusion Paradox: The Obama Era and the Transformation of Global Diversity, by Andres Tapia; The Post American World, by Fareed Zakaria MY PHILOSOPHY: Treat everyone with respect and how you would like to be treated. INTERESTS: Scuba diving, boating, shooting

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Technology

Big thinking. Big network. Big opportunities.

Sure, the first astronaut on the moon told the world about it with our communications equipment. And yes, we pioneered GPS. But at Rockwell Collins, we don’t rest on past ideas, no matter how big. We’d rather cultivate new, innovative thinking by building a global workforce of men and women whose experience and viewpoints are as diverse as our opportunities. Learn about our rewarding careers in engineering, corporate, manufacturing, IT, sales and more: visit www.rockwellcollins.com/careers.

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Carlos Martinez Global Finance Director, Dow Thermosets How do you define leadership? To me, leadership is helping others to be successful. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? As a young accountant in Argentina, I never thought I would be where I am today, working in a Fortune 50 company with a great team of smart and dedicated professionals. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? Leadership is a personal journey. It’s a continuous process of learning from the experiences of dealing with challenges alongside the people I lead so we become an even better team. Given the chance, would you do anything differently? With the benefit of hindsight, there are things I would do differently. But I won’t compromise on ethics, respect and safety. Working within the highest ethical standards, being respectful at all times, embracing diverse ideas, and putting safety first, I know I can look back without regrets. PDJ COMPANY: The Dow Chemical Company

HEADQUARTERS: Midland, Michigan

WEBSITE: www.dow.com

EMPLOYEES: 50,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Supplier of products and services from a diversified industry-leading portfolio of specialty chemical, advanced materials, agrosciences and plastics businesses

EDUCATION: Public Accounting, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina WHAT I’M READING: The Corner Office, by Adam Bryant MY PHILOSOPHY: A very good leader once told me that success is defined by how successful you enable others to be rather than by the individual achievement. INTERESTS: Spending time with family, travel, golf

Joseph Giunta Senior Vice President, Mortgage Operations and Securitization How do you define leadership? Leadership is the ability to focus your team on a common goal while inspiring and guiding it to success. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? There are times when leaders put too much distance between themselves and their teams, resulting in filtered communications. A good leader needs to encourage honest and open communication between themselves and their line staff, even if it’s not what he or she wants to hear. EDUCATION: BS, Finance, Fordham University WHAT I’M READING: Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Be sure to treat every experience as a learning opportunity. INTERESTS: Boating, history

What risks should a leader take? Avoid indecision! Many times you’ll need to make a decision without having perfect information. You can’t be afraid of making a mistake. It may not be the optimal decision, but you adjust and continue moving forward. Given the chance, would you do anything differently? I believe I’ve made a difference to the companies I’ve worked for and the people who have worked with me. I wouldn’t change a thing! PDJ COMPANY: Fannie Mae

HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C.

WEBSITE: www.Fanniemae.com

EMPLOYEES: 7,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Mortgage Housing Finance

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CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Carmen C. Oviedo Vice President and Operating Plan Program Lead What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Not listening to your customers, whether they are internal or external, and your team. That doesn’t mean that you have to incorporate all of their comments into your decision making, but it is critical to get input from your customers and your team before making important decisions.

EDUCATION: AB, University of Michigan; MBA, University of Michigan WHAT I’M READING: Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance?, by Louis V. Gerstner Jr.; various summer novels

What was the best advice you ever received? During an MBA summer internship job fair, a woman working at a booth for one of the major consumer packaged goods companies told me that my handshake was too firm – not something that women normally hear. But I was grateful for the feedback because it taught me a much bigger lesson, which is to pay attention to the cues that you send to others and how they might be perceived. Not doing so can have an effect on your career. PDJ

MY PHILOSOPHY: The Golden Rule. INTERESTS: My family, cooking, reading, exercising

COMPANY: Fannie Mae

HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C.

WEBSITE: www.Fanniemae.com

EMPLOYEES: 7,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Mortgage Housing Finance

Congratulations on 10 Years of recognizing Company and Executive Women Worth Watching

At PepsiCo, Performance with Purpose means delivering sustainable growth by investing in a healthier future for people and our planet. We will continue to build a portfolio of enjoyable and healthier foods and beverages, find innovative ways to reduce the use of energy, water and packaging, and provide a great workplace for our associates.

Because a healthier future for all people and our planet means a more successful future for PepsiCo.

www.pepsico.com


CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Dr. Dennis Martinez Chief Technology Officer, Harris RF Communications Division How do you define leadership? Leadership is having a vision and creating the environment in which an organization, team, or group achieves the goals of that vision. Good leaders drive others to accomplish outcomes; great leaders motivate others to accomplish things that are beyond ordinary reach. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Worst leadership mistakes include taking credit for success or passing blame for failure and placing personal interests above the interests of the group. EDUCATION: BS, MS, EE & PhD in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology WHAT I’M READING: Kingmakers: The Invention of the Modern Middle East, by Shareen Blair Brysac MY PHILOSOPHY: You get out of life what you put into it. INTERESTS: Reading history, listening to music, playing golf, watching sports

What risks should a leader take? The greatest accomplishments occur when risk factors significantly into the potential outcomes. Leaders are often called upon to accomplish what has never been accomplished before or perhaps to accomplish the seemingly impossible. By circumstance therefore, leaders must often take risk. Risks taken should be understood and viable mitigation strategies must exist. Risk/reward tradeoffs must be continually evaluated. Cost of failure must be balanced with reward upon success. PDJ COMPANY: Harris Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: Melbourne, Florida

WEBSITE: www.harris.com

EMPLOYEES: 16,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: International communications and information technology

Lyliana (Lilo) Xochitl Newberry Vice President of Advanced Programs Operations How do you define leadership? Helping others achieve what they never thought possible through vision, encouragement, support and the power of teamwork. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Ignoring or not acknowledging personal mistakes. What was the best advice you ever received? Don’t be self deprecating or you will become your criticism. What are some personal and/or professional sacrifices to being a leader? Mentally, you are rarely “off the clock.” PDJ

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in Computer Science, University of Texas, Austin WHAT I’M READING: The Road to Organic Growth: How Great Companies Consistently Grow Marketshare from Within, by Ed D. Hess MY PHILOSOPHY: Do your best every day, don’t take yourself too seriously, have fun at work.

COMPANY: Harris Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: Melbourne, Florida

WEBSITE: www.harris.com

EMPLOYEES: 16,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: International communications and information technology

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INTERESTS: My family, dogs and aquarium, kayaking, tennis, water sports


CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Carlos Abrams-Rivera Senior Vice President Marketing, Kraft Foods Developing Markets What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? It’s very rewarding for me to know that members of my team have become strong leaders. Providing them with career development advice and insight into the unspoken rules of our corporate culture, I hope will propel them to become the next generation of leaders. There is no greater pride than knowing you’ve made a positive difference in someone else’s life. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Thinking you’re smarter or more important than your team. Different perspectives and backgrounds help us create innovative and delicious products. Given the chance, would you do anything differently? The wins and the losses have all made the person I am. I often speak of the difficult challenges in my career. It is great to enjoy the easy times, but leaders are made from handling adversity, learning from it and passionately building a legacy of success. PDJ COMPANY: Kraft Foods

HEADQUARTERS: Northfield, Illinois

WEBSITE: www.kraftfoodscompany.com

EMPLOYEES: 127,000 globally

EDUCATION: BS, Economics, Carnegie Mellon University; MBA, University of Michigan WHAT I’M READING: How Brands Become Icons, by D. B. Holt; The Quantum Thief, by Hannu Rajaniemi MY PHILOSOPHY: When a door closes, a window opens…search for open windows. INTERESTS: Travel, science fiction, fitness

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Food and beverage gibb_catullo_cngrts_f:Layout 1

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Congratulations to Kim M. Catullo for being named one of this year’s “Women Worth Watching” As Administrative Co-Director of the firm’s New York office, Kim oversees a busy, full-service law practice in the foremost market in the country. As Chair of our Products Liability Department, Kim heads one of the largest such practices in the Northeast, with more than 30 attorneys in four Gibbons offices, handling significant litigation for major companies throughout the Northeast and the nation. As a longstanding, active member of the Gibbons Women’s Initiative, Kim has served as an insightful mentor and exemplary role model for the Gibbons women attorneys who have come after her. Gibbons is headquartered at One Gateway Center Newark, New Jersey 07102 973-596-4500

Newark

New York

Trenton

Philadelphia

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Uleto O. Fuentes Vice President, Internal Audit What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? My most rewarding career accomplishment is seeing people I’ve hired and worked with reach their career goals and aspirations. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? One of the worst mistakes you can make is not valuing the unique contributions of each member of your team and being overly confident in your own judgment and contributions. What was the best advice you ever received? One of the best pieces of advice ever given to me was this: The best way to ensure career success in the future is to focus 100 percent on the job you have today. What are some personal and/or professional sacrifices to being leader? The continuing difficulties of managing work-life balance, because both are important. PDJ COMPANY: Parker Hannifin Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: Cleveland, Ohio

WEBSITE: www.parker.com

EMPLOYEES: More than 55,000 worldwide

EDUCATION: BS, Finance, Babson College; Master of Accounting, Financial Information Systems, Cleveland State University WHAT I’M READING: The Last Empress, by Hannah Pakula MY PHILOSOPHY: Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accomplishments toward organization objectives. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon goals. – Andrew Carnegie INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, theater, reading, travel

PRIMARY BUSINESS: World’s leading motion and control company

Michael Portela General Manager How do you define leadership? Leadership is about service and responsibility and not about privilege and rank. I believe leaders should put their employees’ needs ahead of their own. Leadership is about people – about being visible and available, building positive relationships, being open and honest and providing coaching and support as well as expressing sincere appreciation. EDUCATION: BS, Industrial Technology, Montclair State University; MS, Management, New Jersey Institute of Technology WHAT I’M READING: Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand MY PHILOSOPHY: Be customer focused by providing responsive, innovative and valued solutions. Engage employees through frequent communication and by creating a friendly, respectful and accountable environment. INTERESTS: Family, travel, history and golf

What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Not creating mutual trust with employees, or creating an environment where you don’t give your employees the tools, knowledge and the right level of empowerment they need to get their jobs done. There is no worse situation to me than to make your employees feel worthless and disengaged. What was the best advice you ever received? Don’t become the constraint of your organization. Provide support and guidance and give them the freedom to make decisions. PDJ COMPANY: Parker Hannifin Corporation

HEADQUARTERS: Cleveland, Ohio

WEBSITE: www.parker.com

EMPLOYEES: More than 55,000 worldwide

PRIMARY BUSINESS: World’s leading motion and control company

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CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Maurice E. Quiroga, CTFA, CWS® Executive Vice President, Managing Director

EDUCATION: BA, BS, MBA WHAT I’M READING: Being the Boss: The 3 Imperatives for Becoming a Great Leader, by Linda Hill MY PHILOSOPHY: Never stop learning and improving your skills. INTERESTS: Golf, travel and reading

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? I’m proud of the fact that I’m the youngest managing director running a market in PNC’s Wealth Management division. My involvement with PNC’s Hispanic diversity initiative in St. Louis has also been extremely rewarding. I feel it’s important that PNC send a strong message to the community on the business reasons for our commitment to diversity and inclusion. As demographic changes reshape our communities, we can help raise financial awareness and provide opportunities for business growth. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? The biggest mistake I’ve seen leaders make is not listening. When you truly listen, you inspire employees to speak up and in turn are better equipped to positively advance change and improvement. Given the chance, would you do anything differently? The only thing I would do differently is network more at an earlier age in my career. PDJ COMPANY: The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania WEBSITE: www.pnc.com

EMPLOYEES: 52,000+

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Financial Services jn_connections_div_journal_ad_8.5x3.75_080811.pdf 1 8/8/2011 9:01:06 AM

THE POWER OF CONNECTIONS. Juniper Networks congratulates Lori Cornmesser being named as one of the Women Worth Watching. We believe a networked world enables limitless possibilities, and that supporting you furthers our mission to “Connect Everything. Empower Everyone.” (Really, everyone.)

juniper.net


CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Carlos F. Orta President & CEO How do you define leadership? An individual’s ability to get others to help them implement their vision, and in the end, having the individuals own the vision. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Creating programs and initiatives that empower others to succeed. Providing talented, young people with opportunities they otherwise would not have access to. Co-authoring Missouri Governor’s Commission on Hispanic Affairs (2004). What was the best advice you ever received? Failure is not trying. Reputation is king. Have a plan AND an exit strategy.

EDUCATION: BA in Liberal Studies

MY PHILOSOPHY: Small details can have a big impact on the level of your success. Always be thorough.

What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? There’s not one defining moment. For me, it is a collection of experiences. Working in politics in my early twenties. Programs like Leadership Miami, Leadership Florida and working at a Fortune 10 company. Each of these experiences showed me what good and bad leadership is about. PDJ

INTERESTS: Music, travel, architecture, design

COMPANY: Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR)

WHAT I’M READING: I read a variety of national and local publications on a daily basis.

WEBSITE: www.hacr.org

HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C.

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Nonprofit, 501(c)(3) organization

EMPLOYEES: 7

David M. Torres Vice President, CO2 Program Delivery What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? I was responsible for turning around the performance of a core business, with major assets, that had a history of underperformance. The 2008 financial crisis added to the pressure and urgency. I was delighted that taking a focused approach turned around performance and the business moved to profitability in just over a year. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Not being true to themselves. A leader needs to be genuine. People quickly see through leaders who are trying to play a role or pretending to be something they’re not. What risks should a leader take? Leaders are exposed to risk constantly. In fact I believe effective risk management is a key to good leadership. It is important to make considered decisions and more often than not it is clear that if you want to make progress you need to take measured risks. PDJ COMPANY: Royal Dutch Shell WEBSITE: www.shell.com

HEADQUARTERS: The Hague, Netherlands

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Energy and Petrochemicals

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EMPLOYEES: 93,000

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EDUCATION: BS, Chemical Engineering, University of New Mexico WHAT I’M READING: My favorite magazines: The New Yorker, The Economist, Runners World, Bicycling, and as many newspapers as possible MY PHILOSOPHY: Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted. – Albert Einstein INTERESTS: Running, cycling, hiking, travel, music, theater, spending time with my wife


CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Flora Perez VP and General Counsel, Global Fleet Management Solutions What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? One of the worst mistakes is not listening to your team and leveraging the resources and people you have. You need to be sure you’re getting input and feedback from the people who support you to drive decisions. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? When I realized that my actions could impact my team’s dynamic. For one particular situation, I realized I needed to step back and show a different kind of leadership. This was when I understood that not all situations call for the same leadership style. Given the chance, would you do anything differently? I probably would have done more at an earlier stage in my career to build relationships and define where I really wanted to go. I would have been more deliberate about the direction I wanted to take. PDJ COMPANY: Ryder System, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: Miami, Florida

WEBSITE: www.ryder.com

EMPLOYEES: 26,000

EDUCATION: BS, Accounting, University of Florida; JD, University of Miami WHAT I’M READING: Good to Great, by Jim Collins; The Space Between Us, by Thrity Umrigar MY PHILOSOPHY: Lead by example. INTERESTS: Reading, photography

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Transportation and Logistics

Congratulations Greenberg Traurig applauds the women selected to the 2012 Company and Executive Women Worth Watching list by the Profiles in Diversity Journal. We share in their commitment to diversity and to empowering women. We are particularly proud that Greenberg Traurig Shareholder Nikki Lewis Simon was included among them. For more information about our commitment to diversity, please visit http://bit.ly/gtdiversity Greenberg Traurig, P.A. 333 Avenue of the Americas Miami, FL 33131 | 305.579.0500

1800 Attorneys | 32 Locations° www.gtlaw.com Greenberg Traurig is a service mark and trade name of Greenberg Traurig, LLP and Greenberg Traurig, P.A. ©2011 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. Attorneys at Law. All rights reserved. Contact: Jaret L. Davis in Miami at 305.579.0500. °These numbers are subject to fluctuation. 12540


CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Humberto A. Patorniti Senior VP, Comprehensive Service Solutions, North America How do you define leadership? Leadership is how an individual motivates others to pursue objectives to the point of execution. Vision, integrity, and accountability are at the core of leadership. It is not confined to the boardroom; in fact, it can be seen in playgrounds as children interact with each other, in our communities, and in organizations. Leadership is not a birth right. Rather, it is earned by one’s actions. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Leaders must hold themselves accountable for their own actions and results as well as those of the team. Therefore, the worst mistake a leader can make is to blame others. What was the best advice you ever received? Imperfection is an element of the human DNA, so nurture your strengths, be aware of your limitations, and above all, be prepared to admit when you have made a mistake. PDJ COMPANY: Sodexo HEADQUARTERS: Gaithersburg, Maryland (North American Headquarters) WEBSITE: www.sodexo.com

EMPLOYEES: 125,000 (North America)

PRIMARY BUSINESS: World leader in Quality of Daily Life Solutions

EDUCATION: BS, Organizational Management, Nyack College; MBA, Rutgers University; European Business School – Schloß Reichartshausen, Oestrich-Winkel, Germany WHAT I’M READING: The Thank You Economy, by Gary Vaynerchuk MY PHILOSOPHY: All things in life are lent to us for a while; my philosophy is to return them a little bit better than when they were entrusted to me. INTERESTS: Family, friends, golf, music, photography, good glass of Malbec

Lesley Elwell Director, Human Resources Planning How do you define leadership? Leadership is an abstract term. Leaders have vision, act towards this vision, integrate people, integrate teams, motivate and inspire, raise passions for and against, influence others, and transform people, their way of thinking and the way they live. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? The worst mistake a leader can make is to not take action due to fear of making a mistake. EDUCATION: Industrial Engineering WHAT I’M READING: Basta de Historias, by Andres Oppenheimer MY PHILOSOPHY: One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself. INTERESTS: Photography, water-skiing, snorkeling

What was the best advice you ever received? To believe in myself, to be confident about myself and my work. What risks should a leader take? I don’t believe there is a list of risks a leader should take. Situations vary, so a leader needs to consider the impact and the probability of success. A leader should take risks that continue to drive creativity, innovation and performance in their organizations. PDJ COMPANY: Sprint

HEADQUARTERS: Overland Park, Kansas

WEBSITE: www.sprint.com

EMPLOYEES: Approximately 40,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Telecommunications

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CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Enrique Ramirez-Mena CFO, Pizza Hut, Inc.

EDUCATION: BA, Economics, ITAM (Mexico City); MBA, Wharton WHAT I’M READING: La Fiesta del Chivo, by Mario Vargas Llosa MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, deliver and over-deliver, and career advancement will take care of itself. INTERESTS: Soccer, golf, tennis and independent films

How do you define leadership? Finding the right things to do and doing them right. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Seamlessly gaining a large variety of functional expertise. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? Indecision. What was the best advice you ever received? Don’t ask for a solution; provide one and empower teams to improve it. What are some personal and/or professional sacrifices to being leader? Not enough time to craft perfect solutions. What risks should a leader take? Speaking up when something doesn’t seem right even if you know it will be unpopular. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? When I recruited a 50-person team from scratch and created an infrastructure and a program for a function in which the company, my boss and I had zero experience – and it worked out! PDJ COMPANY: Pizza Hut, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: Plano, Texas

WEBSITE: www.pizzahut.com

EMPLOYEES: 480 (above store) 10,000 (field)

PRIMARY BUSINESS: QSR

José Barra Senior Vice President, Health and Beauty, Target How do you define leadership? Leadership is about engaging and inspiring those around you to accomplish objectives. It is about being unfailingly supportive and encouraging open communication, diverse opinions, risk-taking, innovation, collaboration and fact-based decision making. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? I take a lot of pride in the role I play in the development of young talent who become very successful leaders in their own right. What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? The worst mistake a leader can make is over-confidence and complacency. What was the best advice you ever received? You are as good as your team. If you focus on nurturing and developing them, the business will take care of itself and the results will come. PDJ COMPANY: Target

HEADQUARTERS: Minneapolis, Minnesota

WEBSITE: www.target.com

EMPLOYEES: 355,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Retail

EDUCATION: BS, Business Administration, University of Notre Dame; MBA, University of Chicago Booth School of Business WHAT I’M READING: Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand MY PHILOSOPHY: Destiny is not a matter of chance; it is a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for; it is a thing to be achieved. – William Jennings Bryan INTERESTS: Time with my family, running and golf

w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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CELEBRATING Hispanic/latino Heritage Month

Monique M. Fuentes Partner What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? My most rewarding career accomplishment thus far has been making partner at Troutman Sanders. It took many years of hard work and long hours, but it was well worth it.

EDUCATION: BS, California Polytechnic University, Pomona; JD, University of Southern California WHAT I’M READING: Love In The Time of Cholera, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez MY PHILOSOPHY: Do not judge until you have walked in someone else’s shoes. INTERESTS: Travel, snow skiing, baking, spending time with my family

What’s the worst mistake a leader can make? The worst mistake a leader can make is failing to delegate. When a leader takes an entire project or task upon himself/herself, the project usually suffers due to mistakes that could have been avoided if some responsibility had been delegated. What was the best advice you ever received? The best advice I ever received was when I was an associate in my law firm. I made a mistake on a project and felt terrible. A partner told me that we learn from mistakes and that most mistakes can be fixed. After 12 years of practicing law, his advice has proven to be true. PDJ COMPANY: Troutman Sanders LLP

HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia

WEBSITE: www.troutmansanders.com

EMPLOYEES: 1,300

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Legal

Antonio P. Linares Regional Vice President and Medical Director What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? I served in the Public Health Service as a family doctor and cared for a large underserved Latino community in San Diego. I helped develop diabetes screening programs, which revealed a tremendous unmet need for diabetes prevention within the community. What are some personal and/or professional sacrifices to being leader? Great leaders need to be selfless and give more than they expect in return. Leaders must filter competing demands and still try to maintain a healthy work-life balance. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? When I graduated from college, the school awarded me its highest honor, The Pilgrim Medal, for outstanding leadership in academics, community service to disabled children and advanced research in molecular biology. Being recognized among my peers inspired me to reflect more deeply on my calling. PDJ COMPANY: WellPoint, Inc.

HEADQUARTERS: Indianapolis, Indiana

WEBSITE: www.wellpoint.com

EMPLOYEES: Approximately 37,000

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Health Benefits

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EDUCATION: BS, The Defiance College; MD, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, University of California, Davis Family Practice Residency WHAT I’M READING: Connected, by Nicholas A. Christakis and James H. Fowler MY PHILOSOPHY: Maintaining a balanced approach to life – including family, regular exercise and harmony with nature – will promote happiness and longevity. INTERESTS: Gardening, walking, jogging, the study of Native American art


updates

momentum Diverse

Unique

Careers

National Association of Women Lawyers Honors Empowering Gibbons Attorneys NEW Healthy

YORK – The National Association of Women Lawyers Living (NAWL) honored its 2011 Awardees and installed its new officers and board members at its annual awards lunForcheon in New York City. Gibbons atPerformance torneys were among the honorees and the newly installed leaders. Kristin D. Sostowski, a director in the Gibbons Contributing To E m p l o y m e n t & Labor Law Department and a longtime, active member of NAWL, Comprehensive was inducted to Qualitythe NAWL execu- Sostowski tive board as a member-at-large. She

Pay

Community

Benefits

who…what…where…when

currently serves on the organization’s program committee and in 2010 received NAWL’s Virginia S. Mueller Outstanding Member award. Nancy A. Lottinville, counsel in the firm’s Real Property & Environmental Department, received one of this year’s Outstanding Member Awards. The two-day annual meeting fea- Lottinville tured numerous keynote and breakout sessions. In keeping with the firm’s longstanding involvement with NAWL, Luis J. Diaz, chief diversity officer of Gibbons, was a panelist for the session “Getting to Win-Win – Strategies for Employers to Overcome Unconscious Bias and Empower the

Success of Women Attorneys.”

WBENC Honors Ernst & Young’s Theresa Harrison with Alcorn Award

Washington, D.C. – The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) has honored Theresa Harrison, director of supplier diversity at Ernst & Young LLP, with the Wil- Harrison liam J. Alcorn Award for outstanding leadership contributions to its mission. The award ceremony took place at WBENC’s National Conference and Business Fair in Las Vegas. continued on page 222

Engaging

Diverse

Perspectives

© 3M 2011. All Rights Reserved.

Women Worth Watching Congratulations to Clydie Douglas, 3M Chief Diversity Officer, on being named one of this years’ Women Worth Watching All sorts of people with one thing in common…innovative ideas Mixing creativity and powerful technologies, the people of 3M continually inspire new products that make life better. With $27 billion in sales, 80,000 employees worldwide and operations in more than 65 countries, you’ll see your ideas transform the future. Join us: www.3M.com/careers-us Connect with us: www.facebook.com/3MCareers.US www.linkedin.com/companies/3M

www.twitter.com/3MCareers www.youtube.com/3MCareers


momentum continued from page 221 The award recognizes exemplary leadership contributions made by individuals in support of WBENC’s mission to open the doors of opportunity in corporate contracting to certified women’s business enterprises. WBENC is the leading advocate for and authority on Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs) as suppliers to the nation’s corporations. Harrison joined Ernst & Young in June 2004 to develop the firm’s supplier diversity initiative. She serves on the WBENC board of directors and is chair of the Membership and Revenue Generation Committee. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in management from Emmanuel College and an MBA from Bentley College.

who…what…where…when

Lisa E. Davis Receives Women of Power Award

New York – Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz Entertainment Group partner Lisa E. Davis will receive a Women of Power Award at the 2011 National Urban League Conference. DAVIS This Award is presented annually to influential women in the civil rights, technology, entertainment, journalism, sports and corporate sectors. Other honorees include MSNBC Anchor Tamron Hall, actress Wendy Raquel Robinson, Major League Baseball Senior Vice President Wendy Lewis, Verizon Foundation President Rose Stuckey Kirk, and Massachusetts

Superior Court Associate Justice Kimberly S. Budd.

MGM Resorts International Makes List Of “Best Companies For Diversity”

LAS VEGAS – Black Enterprise (BE) magazine has named MGM Resorts International one of the “40 Best Companies for Diversity” in the U.S. for its diversity and inclusion practices. This is the seventh year in a row that MGM Resorts has garnered placement on the national list. MGM Resorts is the only company in the gaming industry, and the only company in Nevada, to be named to the magazine’s list this year. The 40 companies featured in the publication’s July issue demonstrated a commitment to diversity in one or

UPMC Health Plan and the UPMC Insurance Services Division congratulate Sharon Czyzewski for being a Women Worth Watching award winner for 2012.

EMPLOYEES OF DISTINCTION. DISTINGUISHED SERVICE. “Highest Member Satisfaction among Commercial Health Plans in Pennsylvania”* J.D. Power and Associates 2011 U.S. Member Health Insurance Plan Study SM

*UPMC Health Plan received the highest numerical score among commercial health plans in Pennsylvania in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2011 U.S. Member Health Insurance Plan Study. SM Study based on 33,039 total member responses, measuring 11 plans in the Pennsylvania-Delaware Region (excludes Medicare and Medicaid). Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of members surveyed December 2010-January 2011. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.


updates Cintas Wins Spirit of Diversity Award for Commitment to Supplier Diversity

more of four key areas, including: board of directors mix, employee diversity, senior management mix and supplier diversity. MGM Resorts was honored this year for the diverse mix of individuals who sit on the company’s board of directors.

CINCINNATI – Cintas Corporation (NASDAQ: CTAS) has announced that it received a Spirit of Diversity Award at the 2011 South Central Ohio Healthcare Supplier Diversity Symposium, a regional event that brings together senior leaders in the healthcare supply chain to enhance relationships with diverse suppliers in the region. Cintas received the award in the Major Supplier category for the development of diverse suppliers through mentoring and capacity building courses, providing actual results, leadership commitment, and accountability and outreach. Cintas’ commitment to supplier diversity is a corporate-wide initiative to educate its employees about the importance of having a diverse supply chain. While working to increase the number of small, minority and woman-owned businesses that provide Cintas with products and services, the program's goal is to ensure that every small, minority- and woman-owned business is treated fairly during the supplier qualification process. Last year, 11 percent of Cintas, supplier spend was with minority or womanowned businesses.

Heather Giordanella Begins Term as President of National Association of Women Lawyers PHILADELPHIA Giordanella, counsel in Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP’s Philadelphia office, was named president of the National Association of Women Lawyers

Heather

Giordanella

during the organization’s annual meeting in New York City. Giordanella has been preparing for

WHAT’S POSSIBLE

the position since her appointment to the executive board several years ago. continued on page 224

FOR ME?

Children look to their parents to see what is possible. Diana sees the success of her mother, Robin Russell, and imagines a world of unlimited opportunity. Robin is Managing Partner of Andrews Kurth’s Houston office. She is a firm leader, a bankruptcy lawyer and an example of the possibilities open to all women at Andrews Kurth. Diana is proud of her mother and so are we. Congratulations, Robin!

Andrews Kurth LLP • 600 Travis • Suite 4200 • Houston, Texas 77002 • 713.220.4200 AUSTIN

BEIJING

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LONDON

NEW YORK

THE WOODLANDS

Copyright © 2011 by Andrews Kurth LLP. Andrews Kurth, the Andrews Kurth logo and Straight Talk Is Good Business are registered service marks of Andrews Kurth LLP. All Rights Reserved. Attorney Advertising.

WASHINGTON, DC


updates

momentum continued from page 223 The National Association of Women Lawyers, or NAWL, is devoted to supporting and advancing the interests of women lawyers in the profession and under the law. Giordanella is a member of the firm’s Commercial Litigation Practice Group. She focuses on matters involving special master services, employment disputes, commercial litigation and federal and state qui tam litigation. Giordanella also is a member of Drinker Biddle’s Women’s Initiative, which is designed to promote the hiring, retention and promotion of women lawyers, facilitate business development and marketing opportunities for women lawyers and advise the firm on issues and policies that concern women lawyers.

who…what…where…when

AT&T Scientist Receives Technical Achievement Award

DALLAS – AT&T research scientist Mary Fernández, PhD, has been recognized with the 2011 Outstanding T e c h n i c a l AchievementIndustry award from H E N A A C / G r e a t Fernandez Minds in STEM, a nonprofit organization that focuses on educational awareness of careers in science, technology, engineering and math (collectively known as the STEM fields). Dr. Fernández is executive director of distributed computing research at AT&T Labs, where she leads a research team focused on advancing the design and development of complex distrib-

uted systems, from cloud to mobile computing. Dr. Fernández, who received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science from Brown University and a Ph.D. in computer science from Princeton University, is a leader in the nation’s efforts to encourage minorities and women to pursue careers in science. She is chair of the board of MentorNet, an award-winning e-mentoring program for students in STEM fields. Dr. Fernández has published more than 40 articles in scientific conferences and journals on databases, programming languages, and the web. She is co-editor of several Consortium recommendations on XML technologies that have become industry standards.

D&I iso uinr DNA Congratulations Debra Canales for being named one of this year’s Women Worth Watching As one of the highest-ranking female Hispanic executives in Catholic health care, Debra Canales has a unique perspective on the benefits of a diverse work force. She knows that each associate brings differences and similarities that help Trinity Health deliver patientcentered care that is respectful and sensitive of all cultural needs. At Trinity Health, diversity and inclusion isn’t just a program we’re pushing – it’s part of our DNA. To learn more, visit www.trinity-health.org Debra A. Canales

MiSSioN We serve together in Trinity Health, in the spirit of the Gospel, to heal body, mind and spirit, to improve the health of our communities, and to steward the resources entrusted to us.

Trinity Health•27870 Cabot Drive•Novi, Michigan 48377•248-489-6000

Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative officer, Trinity Health


Girl Scouts of the USA Appoints Chávez New CEO

New York – Girl Scouts of the USA announced Anna Maria Chávez has been appointed to the top post at the organization. Chávez is set to assume her new role at the Girl Scouts National Council Chávez Session/52nd Convention in November. Chávez’s appointment as the 19th chief executive of Girl Scouts, among the largest nonprofits in the country, comes as the organization readies to launch a 100th anniversary national celebration designed to honor its legacy and create urgency around girls’ issues. She will replace Kathy Cloninger, who is retiring after leading Alcoa_InclusionAd_final_cmyk.pdf 1 8/11/2011 1:42:31 PM the organization for eight years.

PG&E’S LGBT Employee Group Awards $35,000 In College Scholarships SAN FRANCISCO – Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) celebrated the historic launch and 25-year anniversary of its PrideNetwork Employee Resource Group (ERG) during the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month in June. The utility and its PrideNetwork ERG also recently awarded $35,000 in scholarships to seven college-bound students from Northern and Central California. Each student received a $5,000 scholarship in recognition of his or her demonstrated excellence in LGBT community service and academic achievement. The PrideNetwork ERG, with more than 300 members, has been instrumen-

Inclusion Drives Innovation Alcoa salutes the outstanding “Women Worth Watching” in 2012 including our very own Paula Davis. We commend their commitment to excellence and drive to make a difference.

Paula Davis President Alcoa Foundation

Alcoa fosters an inclusive environment that embraces change, new ideas, respect for the individual and equal opportunity to succeed. Alcoa invented the modern-day aluminum industry and our innovation has been behind major milestones in the aerospace, automotive, packaging, building and construction, commercial transportation, consumer electronics and industrial markets for more than 120 years. The key to our innovation has been our talent.

www.alcoa.com

a

tal in making PG&E a leader in diversity and inclusion, progressive employment policies, and public endorsement of the fair and equitable treatment of LGBT employees. It is one of nine employee resource groups representing the utility’s richly diverse workforce. The PrideNetwork ERG has for many years worked with outside LGBT groups through the eQuality Scholarship Collaborative to encourage post-secondary education for high school graduates by awarding scholarships to stellar college-bound students in Northern and Central California. PDJ


corporate index BOLD denotes Advertiser

3M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AARP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accenture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advanced Micro Devices. . . . . . . Akraya, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alcoa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alliant Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Express. . . . . . . . . . . . Andrews Kurth LLP. . . . . . . . . . Aon Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . Applied Materials, Inc. . . . . . . . . Army & Air Force Exchange Service . . . . . . . . . . Arrow Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . AT&T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AXA Equitable Life Insurance. . . BDO USA, LLP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bank of the West. . . . . . . . . . . . Bell Helicopter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blue Cross Blue Shield NC . . . Booz Allen Hamilton. . . . . . . . . Brinker International . . . . . . . . . . Broadridge Financial Solutions. .

www.3M.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 75, 221 www.aarp.org. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 www.accenture.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 www.amd.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183, 189 www.akraya.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 156 www.alcoa.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 67, 225 www.alliantenergy.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 www.americanexpress.com. . 183, 188, 206 www.andrewskurth.com . . . 155, 164, 223 www.aon.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183, 186 www.appliedmaterials.com and blog.amat.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183, 184 www.shopmyexchange.com . . . . . . . 29, 30 www.arrow.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 73 www.att.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 www.axa-equitable.com. . . . . . . . . 141, 143 www.bdo.com. . . . . . . . 182, 183, 194, 206 www.bankofthewest.com . . . . . . . . . . 151 www.bellhelicopter.com . . . 127, 130, 137 www.bcbsnc.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 www.boozallen.com. . . . . . 51, 85, 91, 207 www.brinker.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169, 180 www.broadridge.com. . . . . . . . . 43, 52, 208

Brooks Kushman Law Firm P.C.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.brookskushman.com. . . . . . . . 99, 100 Burger King Corporation. . . . . . . www.bk.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 94 Caesars Entertainment Corp.. . . . . . . . www.caesars.com. . . . . . . . . . 29, 33, 207 Campbell Soup Company. . . . . . www.campbellsoupcompany.com . . . . . . . . 155, 165 Cardinal Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cardinalhealth.com . . . . . . . . . . 15, 22 Cargill, Incorporated . . . . . . . . . . www.cargill.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 160 Catalyst. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.catalyst.org. . . . . . . . 10, 12, 141, 148 CB Richard Ellis . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cbre.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 76 CDW LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cdw.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 167 Chevron. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.chevron.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Chrysler Group LLC. . . . . . . . . www.chryslergroupllc.com. . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover, 1, 169, 175 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center . . . . www.cincinnatichildrens.org . . . . . . . . . . 113, 124, 226 Cintas Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . www.cintas.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Cisco Systems, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . www.cisco.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 169, 172 Citi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.citigroup.com. . . . . . . . . . . 9, 85, 88 Comcast Corporation. . . . . . . . www.comcast.com. . . . . . . . . . . 15, 20, 21 ConocoPhillips . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.conocophillips.com. . 141, 144, 193 Constellation Energy . . . . . . . . www.constellation.com. . . . . . . 28, 29, 35 CSC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.csc.com. . . . . . . . . . . 84, 85, 90, 209

Malika is a vibrant, energetic girl. She loves hanging out with friends and cheerleading. The only thing that might slow her down is sickle cell disease. Sickle cell is the most common genetic disease. Nearly 100,000 people in the US and millions worldwide suffer from the pain and shortened life-span associated with sickle cell. Today, scientists at Cincinnati Children’s are on the brink of a gene transfer therapy that could end the suffering caused by sickle cell disease.

To learn more, go to www.cincinnatichildrens.org/hopeforsicklecell.


advantage

CVS Caremark. . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.minuteclinic.com . . . . 168, 169, 181 DaVita. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.davita.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 133 Deloitte LLP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.deloitte.com/us . . . . . . . . . . . 141, 147 Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP . . . . . . . . www.dl.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 111 Dow Chemical Company, The. . . www.dow.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 DreamWorks Animation, SKG. . . . . . . . . . . www.dreamworksanimation.com. . . . . . . 105, 155, 166 Eastman Kodak Company . . . . www.kodak.com. . . . . . . . . . 140, 141, 146 Ecolab Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ecolab.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183, 196 Ernst & Young LLP . . . . . . . . . . . www.ey.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 134 Fannie Mae. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.fanniemae.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119, 169, 173, 210, 211 Fish & Richardson. . . . . . . . . . . . www.fr.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 53 Ford Motor Company . . . . . . . . . www.ford.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 48 Frankfurt Kurnit Klein . . . . . . . . . www.fkks.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Freddie Mac. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.freddiemac.com . . . . . 126, 127, 135 General Electric. . . . . . . . . . . . . www.ge.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 34, 49 General Motors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.gm.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 27 Giant Eagle, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . www.gianteagle.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 110 Gibbons P.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.gibbonslaw.com. . . . . . . 43, 50, 213 Girl Scouts of the USA . . . . . . . . www.girlscouts.org. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Greenberg Traurig. . . . . . . . . . . . www.gtlaw.com . . . . . . . . . . . 169, 171, 217 Halliburton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.halliburton.com. . . . . . . 39, 113, 125 Harris Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . www.harris.com. . . . . . . . . . . 169, 174, 212

Health Care Service Corporation. . . . . . . . . Highmark Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hilton Worldwide. . . . . . . . . . . . Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility. . . . . Honeywell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hyatt Hotels Corporation. . . . . . . Ingram Micro, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . ITT Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . JBK Associates, Inc. . . . . . . . . Juniper Networks . . . . . . . . . . . KBR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kelly Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . KPMG LLP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kraft Foods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kroger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legg Mason Global Asset Management . . . . . . . . . Lincoln Financial. . . . . . . . . . . . Lockheed Martin Corporation. . . . . . . . . ManpowerGroup. . . . . . . . . . . . . Medco Health Solutions, Inc. . . . Mercer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.hcsc.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 101 www.highmark.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 44 www.hiltonworldwide.com. . . . 85, 92, 93 www.hacr.org. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 www.honeywell.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 123 www.hyatt.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 158 www.ingrammicro.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 31 www.itt.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 www.jbkassociates.net. . . . . 99, 107, 109 www.juniper.net. . . . . . . . . . . . . 57,58, 215 www.kbr.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 15, 18 www.kellyservices.com. . . . 141, 153, 197 www.us.kpmg.com. . . . . . . . .95, 141, 142 www.kraftfoodscompany.com . . . . . . . . 213 www.kroger.com . . . . . . . . . 141, 150, 199 www.leggmason.com. . . . . . . . . . . 127, 138 www.lincolnfinancial.com. . . . 29, 41, 201 www.lockheedmartin.com. . . 11, 113, 120 www.manpowergroup.com. . . . . . . . . 85, 97 www.medcohealth.com. . . . . . . . . . . 57, 64 www.mercer.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 87


advantage

corporate index BOLD denotes Advertiser

MinuteClinic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.minuteclinic.com . . . . 168, 169, 181 MGM Resorts International. . . . . www.mgmresorts.com. . . . . . . . 71, 74, 222 Moss Adams LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . www.mossadams.com. . . . . . . . . . 183, 187 MWV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.mwv.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 60, 121 National Grid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.nationalgrid.com. . . . . 154, 155, 157 Nat. Assoc. of Women Lawyers . www.nawl.org. . . . . . . . . . . . . 221, 222, 225 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. . . . . . . . . www.nationwide.com. . . . . . . . . . . 169, 178 Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP. . www.ngelaw.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 32 Network Hardware Resale . . . . . www.networkhardware.com. . . . . . . . 85, 96 New York Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.newyorklife.com. . . . . . 69, 113, 118 Newell Rubbermaid. . . . . . . . . . . www.newellrubbermaid.com . . . . . 141, 145 Nokia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.nokia.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 19 Northrop Grumman Information Systems. . . . . . . . . . www.is.northropgrumman.com . . . 183, 192 NYSE Euronext . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.nyse.com www.nyseliffeus.com. . . . . .127, 128, 129 O’Melveny & Myers. . . . . . . . . . . www.omm.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 54 Optimal Solutions and Technologies . . . . . . . . . . www.ostglobal.com . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 139 Pacific Gas & Electric. . . . . . . . . www.pge.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 104, 223 Parker Hannifin Corporation . . www.parker.com . . . . . . . . 42, 43, 46, 214 Pepper Hamilton. . . . . . . . . . . . . www.pepperlaw.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 82 PepsiCo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.pepsico.com . . . . . . . . . . 57, 61, 211

228

Pro f iles in D iv ersi t y J ourna l 11RIT_DiversityJournal_FINAL_OL.indd 1

Perkins Coie LLP . . . . . . . . . . . . www.perkinscoie.com . . . . . . . . . . 113, 122 Pizza Hut, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.pizzahut.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 PNC Financial Services Group, The . . . . . . . . www.pnc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Prudential Financial Inc. . . . . . www.prudential.com. . . . . . 113, 116, 149 PwC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.pwc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 132 Raytheon Company. . . . . . . . . . www.raytheon.com . . . . . . . . 25, 127, 136 RBC Wealth Management. . . . . www.rbcwealthmanagement.com . . . . . . 29, 36, 37 Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P.. . . . . . . . . www.rkmc.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43, 45 Rochester Institute of Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.rit.edu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 26, 228 Rockwell Collins. . . . . . . . . . . . www.rockwellcollins.com. . 155, 159, 209 Royal Dutch Shell. . . . . . . . . . . www.shell.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 66, 216, Back Cover Ryder System, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . www.ryder.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85, 86, 217 Salt River Project. . . . . . . . . . . . www.srpnet.com . . . . . . . . . . 13, 183, 198 Sandia National Laboratories. . . www.sandia.gov. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 117 Scholastic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.scholastic.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 131 Science Applications International Corporation. . . . . www.saic.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 106 Schiff Hardin, LLP. . . . . . . . . . . . www.schiffhardin.com . . . . . . . . . . 169, 176 Society for Human Resource Management. . . . . www.shrm.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56, 57, 68 Sodexo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.sodexo.com. . . . . . . 3, 169, 170, 218 Sprint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.sprint.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Starwood Hotels & Resorts. . . www.starwoodhotels.com . . . 43, 55, 195 State Street. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.statestreet.com. . . . . . . . . . . 141, 152 Target. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.target.com. . . . . . . . 15, 16, 161, 219 Teach For America . . . . . . . . . . www.teachforamerica.org. . . . 57, 65, 200 Terex Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . www.terex.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 77 Textron Systems Corp. . . . . . . . . www.textrondefense.com. . . . . . . . . . 15, 23 Thompson Coburn LLP . . . . . . www.thompsoncoburn.com. 183, 190, 227 TransPerfect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.transperfect.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 78 Troutman Sanders. . . . . . . . . . . . www.troutmansanders.com. . . . 71, 80, 220 Time Warner Cable Inc.. . . . . . . www.timewarnercable.com. . . 85, 89, 191 Trinity Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.trinity-health.org. . . . . . . 43, 47, 224 Unilever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.unileverusa.com. . . . . 155, 162, 163 Union Bank, N.A. . . . . . . . . . . . www.unionbank.com. . . . . . . . 15, 17, 177 Union Pacific Railroad. . . . . . . . . www.up.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 38 UnitedHealth Group . . . . . . . . . www.uhccommunityplan.com. . 5, 99, 108 University of the Rockies. . . . . . . www.rockies.edu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 40 UPMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.upmchealthplan.com. . . 57, 62, 222 US Airways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.usairways.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, 103 U.S. Air Force Academy . . . . . . . www.usafa.af.mil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183, 185 Vanguard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.vanguard.com. . . . . . . . . 98, 99, 102 Verizon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.verizon.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 70, 71, 72 Walmart Stores, Inc.. . . . . . . . . www.walmartstores.com. . . . . . 15, 24, 79 Waste Management, Inc.. . . . . . www.wm.com and www.thinkgreen.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 59, Inside Back Cover Websense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.websense.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 83 WellPoint, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.wellpoint.com. . . 112, 113, 114, 220 W.W. Grainger, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . www.grainger.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 115

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 11 8/11/11 3:06 PM


Diversity & Inclusion at Waste ManageMent

OUR FUTURE, DRIVEN BY YOU.

Valuable resources are all around us.

AT CHRYSLER, OUR COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY ACTUALLY MEANS SOMETHING.

At Waste Management, we know how to spot a valuable resource. And, we find tremendous value in diversity of experiences, ideas, and FOR DIVERSITY®. B E C A U S E W Hprinciples. O Y O U ItAis R diversity E I S J U SofTthought A S I M that P O Rkeeps TA N T A S Management Waste W H A T Y O U ’ V E D O N E . Y O U R Tat H the I N Kforefront I N G A Nof D innovation Y O U R L Eand A Dsustainability. ERSHIP MAKE A THAT’S WHY WE ’ VE BEEN AWARDED THE 2011 DIVERSITYINC TOP 50 COMPANIES

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J O I N I N G O U R T E A M J U S T S T A R T S W I T H A V I S I T. W W W.C H R Y S L E R C A R E E R S .C O M

Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, Mopar and the Pentastar logo are registered trademarks of Chrysler Group LLC. FIAT is a registered trademark of Fiat Group Marketing & Corporate Communication S.p.A., used under license by Chrysler Group LLC.


 September/October 2011

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Featuring: 128 Leadership Essays from Senior Women Executives  27 Hispanic / LATINO leaders

25.00 U.S.

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VOLUME 13 • NUMBER 5

MAKE AN IMPACT WITH A CAREER AT SHELL.

The 2012 Company And Executive Award Winners Are... www. d i v e r si ty j o u r n a l . co m

Diversity Journal - Sep/Oct 2011  

10th Annual Women Worth Watching Awards

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