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 JULY/AUGUST 2011

through diversity & inclusion

diversity into the very fabric of who we are and what we do. By building and developing an inclusive workforce across all levels, we’ve been able to

JULY / AUGUST 2011

At Fannie Mae, our company strives to weave

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Serving those who House America

12 Innovation awards, 8 ThoughtLeaders, 6 Perspectives PLUS: RBC Wealth Management

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helping to advance our nation’s housing recovery.

If you want to build a truly rewarding career with an organization that is actively improving the housing

VOLUME 13 • NUMBER 4

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www.fanniemae.com/careers. We are an equal opportunity employer.

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time to work at Fannie Mae. Apply online at

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26 Unique Ways Organizations are Enhancing Their Corporate Image www. d i v e r si ty j o u r n a l . co m


DIverSIty IS the WAy Diversity & Inclusion at Waste ManageMent

We Do

We are BuSIneSS.

Building a great career is like building great vehicles. It starts with

research, development, and experience. At Chrysler, our history of

technological innovation is matched only by our belief in the

progressive people that drive us forward. See how you can become part of a movement of the future. It’s as bright as you make it.

strong, a mosaic of experiences, ideas, and principles working together to pass our planet on to the next generation in better shape than we inherited it. It is diversity of thought that makes Waste Management North America’s leading provider of integrated environmental solutions. Apply today at wmcareers.com.

Building Great Careers www.chryslercareers.com


the WAy

BuSIneSS. research, development, and experience. At Chrysler, our history of progressive people that drive us forward. See how you can become part of a movement of the future. It’s as bright as you make it.

Building Great Careers www.chryslercareers.com


publisher

point of view Everything Comes Down to Communication...

W

e have two exciting features in this issue. First, we congratulate those companies that are being honored with our 2011 International INNOVATION in Diversity Award. They should be emulated by all. We continue to be impressed by the creativity shown by organizations that solve problems through innovation. We also have a fine story about philanthropy, complete with real-life examples of companies that give back to their communities, often to the tune of millions of dollars. Their generosity directly benefits thousands of people all over the country. Read their stories and be inspired. Finally, we have a feature about one of our most in-demand publications: the International Diversity & Inclusion Lexicon™. Never in human history have we had so many ways of communicating with each other. We have snail mail, email, fax, texting, radio, television, Twitter, Facebook, Instant Messaging, infomercials, Skype, webinars, and who knows what’s coming next week or next month. With all these tools at our disposal, you’d think we’d all be communication experts, easily finding the shared meaning of words that makes the communication of ideas possible. Not even close. Slang, regional dialects, and corporate jargon have garbled our speech and impeded understanding. The problem becomes compounded by the inherent difficulties of cross-cultural communication. People are offending their coworkers, most often inadvertently, but the result is the same—hurt feelings, resentment, anger, and even litigation. That’s why Profiles in Diversity Journal created the International Diversity & Inclusion Lexicon™. This handy reference guide is an education in the language of diversity, and everyone ought to have one. This pocket-size book explains the meanings of words, the traditions of various faith communities, and the cultural nuances that can either enhance our ability to understand and get along with one another or which stand in the way of our ever coming to a place of understanding and respect of all for our coworkers. Words are powerful. They can cut like a knife. None of us wants to hurt another by our words, yet it happens every day. This book ought to be handed to every single employee and be put into every new employee’s orientation package. Bulk ordering plans make it affordable to do so. Order yours in any quantity at www.diversityjournal.com/lexicon. Enjoy the issue! James R. Rector Publisher/CEO P.S. Oh, and as a reminder… Your participation in Diversity Journal qualifies your organization for the 2012 Diversity Leader Award. Visit www.diversityjournal.com/ diversity-leader-award for details. 2

Pro f il e s in D iv ersi t y J ourna l

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James R. Rector

PUBLISHER/CEO

John Murphy

MANAGING EDITOR

Damian Johnson

Vice President, Editorial Services and Client Partnerships

Paul Malanij

ART DIRECTOR

James Gorman IT DIRECTOR

Matt Hoffman

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Laurel L. Fumic

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Carlton Yearwood C onsultant

Elena Rector

E x ecutive assistant

Alina Dunaeva

O verseas C orrespondent

Grace Austin Jasmine Garcia

E ditorial S ervices C ontributing W riters

Mark McLane Pamela Arnold Elizabeth A. Campbell Marie Philippe, PhD Sandy Price Jeremy Hein, PhD Sonu Ratra Henry Hernandez, Jr. Shari Slate Tisa Jackson Craig Storti Linda Jimenez Nadine Vogel Tammy Klugh Trevor Wilson Lisa Horuczi Markus LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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issue

table of contents [ f e a t u r e s ]

JULY / AUGUST 2011 Volume 13 • Number 4 www.diversityjournal.com

[special features] 19 RBC Wealth Management RBC U.S. Wealth Management CEO John Taft uses his commitment to diversity and inclusion to help drive business outcomes. Discover how Taft’s commitment to social justice and equal rights sets the tone for RBC Wealth Management.

26 Innovations In Diversity Imagine how difficult it is to be innovative under adverse business conditions. Now imagine how bold a company must be to move forward with diversity and inclusion innovations that by their very nature are risky. Few organizations would be willing to press ahead under the difficult post-2008 economy, when every form of risk taking was shunned.

[ o n

t h e

c o v e r ]

48 Corporate philanthropy It is extremely encouraging to learn that companies are continuing to reach out and make a difference to those less fortunate. A few months ago we asked some of the world’s major organizations to share with our readers the one philanthropic success story that they feel most proud about!

4

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Your perspective is our advantage

When you want a fresh perspective, you need to look from a different angle. That’s why Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina is committed to diversity in our workforce, in our partners and suppliers, and in the community organizations we support. Because how you understand the world may help others understand it better, too.

An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U7621, 5/11


[ d e p a r t m e n t s ] [ p e r s p e c t i v e s ] 10 CULTURE MATTERS

[ c o l u m n s ] 34 THOUGHTLEADERS • Sonu Ratra, Akraya Inc.

A lot of American managers wonder how they’re supposed to be an expert on so many cultures. By Craig Storti Communicating Across Cultures

• Elizabeth A. Campbell, Andrews Kurth LLP • Mark McLane, Booz Allen Hamilton • Shari Slate, Cisco

Storti

12 From My Perspective

• Tammy Klugh, Kelly Services, Inc.

We all have a calling … mine is to create the energy and vision to lead positive change. By Linda Jimenez WellPoint, Inc.

• Henry Hernandez, Jr., SAIC • Sandy Price, Sprint • Tisa Jackson, Union Bank, N.A.

JIMENEZ

14 Human Equity™

WILSON

A methodology to allow organizations to rate their approach to diversity, inclusion and human equity using a single yardstick. By Trevor Wilson TWI Inc.

16 Viewpoint

ARNOLD

Bridging the generational divide in the workforce, whether in building goodwill or reporting higher stock prices. By Pamela Arnold AIMD By Lisa Horuczi Markus Buck Consultants

With travel to seminars and conventions being curtailed, we recognize that you still may not be able to get to the seminars and conventions this year. We bring eight diversity thought leaders to you.

[ r e g u l a r s ] 08 MOMENTUM Diversity Who, What, Where and When.

44 Extra

International Diversity & Inclusion Lexicon™ The Essential Guide for Every Employee Participating in a Diverse Work Place.

82 CATALYST

Markus

86 My Turn

vogEl

Employee resource groups that connect directly to business goals and objectives can be a tremendous asset for a company. By Nadine Vogel Springboard Consulting LLC

88

philippe

LAST WORD

Diversity leaders must not lose sight of the important role they play in building diversity power. By Marie Philippe, PhD The Lifetime Healthcare Companies

An Assessment of Talent Management Systems.

84 corporate index

Names and Websites of Participating Companies & Advertisers.

FOLLOW US AT: facebook.com/diversityjournal twitter.com/diversityjrnl scribd.com/diversityjournal twitter.com/mentorings

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© Eastman Kodak Company, 2011

Diversity & Inclusion

drives innovation and growth

Kodak’s commitment to diversity and inclusion means everyone counts: consumers, employees, customers, suppliers, shareholders, and more. Our global leadership in digital imaging and printing enables us to serve cultures and communities with innovative technologies and services. At Kodak, we seek diverse talent to help drive creativity and innovation, and delight customers around the world. Become part of our picture— and join us on our journey to enrich people’s lives.

www.kodak.com/go/careers


updates

momentum KeyCorp Names Johnni Beckel to Lead Human Resources Organization

CLEVELAND—KeyCorp (NYSE: KEY) has announced that Johnni Beckel, a human resources executive with 25 years’ experience in the healthcare, financial services and hospitality indus- Beckel tries, has joined the company as its chief human resources officer. Beckel will be a member of Key’s executive team, management committee and executive council and lead the company’s HR organization for 15,300 employees in 24 states and overseas. She will lead the development and implementation of the bank’s human capital strategy, including talent management, compensation, benefits, organizational development, culture, corporate diversity and philanthropy. Beckel replaces Thomas Helfrich, who is retiring after 16 years with Key. Beckel comes to Key from Cardinal Health Inc., where she was a senior vice president, accountable for the company’s human resources strategies and core processes. Beckel holds a master’s degree in education and instructional technology from the University of Central Florida and a bachelor’s degree from Pennsylvania State University.

Comcast Awards Major Position to Giles

PHILADELPHIA—Comcast Corporation (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK), one of the world’s lead8

Pro f il e s in D iv ersi t y J ourna l

who…what…where…when

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited taps Spruell for Global Position Byron Spruell is the newly appointed Global Managing Director of the Financial Advisory practice for Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL). He chairs the Global Financial Advisory Executive Committee, and is a member of the DTTL leadership team. Spruell is responsible for leading the Spruell 8,500 person practice, which, spanning nearly 150 countries, provides highly specialized advisory solutions for companies facing critical business events where significant value is at stake. He is based in New York City. Spruell had served as a managing principal of Deloitte LLP, acting as chief of staff to the former U.S. CEO and current global CEO Barry Salzberg. He also held the role of midwest regional managing principal for Deloitte Financial Advisory Services LLP. He specializes in dispute/litigation consulting, business insurance consulting and complex damage claims analysis. Spruell received his undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering and an MBA with honors from the University of Notre Dame.

ing media, entertainment and communications companies, has announced that Johnnie Giles has been named executive director of external affairs for Giles Comcast Corporation and VP of external affairs for Comcast Cable. Giles previously served as regional vice president of government affairs for Comcast’s California region. In his new position, Giles will be based at Comcast’s Philadelphia headquarters and will develop policy positions and advocacy strategies in support of the company’s various lines of business. He will serve as the principal interface between Comcast and the national Asian Pacific Islander community organizations. He will also support Comcast’s Legislative Affairs group in

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working with the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus. Giles has been active within the Asian Pacific Islander community for nearly three decades. He currently serves on the executive board of the Center for Asian American Media. He is secretary and founding member of Asian Americans for Good Government, which supports API candidates for elected office. Giles also is the founding board chairman for the California Asian Pacific American Chamber of Commerce. He is a board member of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and Bay Area Council and is an expert advisor to the California Emerging Technology Fund. A graduate of University of California-Berkeley with a BS in life sciences, Giles received his MBA from Pepperdine University’s Graziadio School of Business. continued on page 84


BRING YOUR IDEAS AND PASSION. BRING ALL OF WHO YOU ARE. BRING YOUR DIVERSE PERSPECTIVES. Bring it! You’re bristling with ingenuity. Crackling with creativity. Inspired by the thrill, the realization of seeing your ideas through, from explosions of brilliance in the mind to powerful instruments of communication and connectivity. And with Verizon, you’ll find a dynamic environment that thrives on the diverse perspectives and unique contributions of each and every one of its team members — and puts you in a position to effect positive change, locally and globally. Take the lead at yourverizoncareer.com. You can also like us on Facebook at facebook.com/verizoncareers for information on career opportunities and upcoming events.

Careers For Everything You Are

Verizon is an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.


Culture Matters

So Many Cultures, So Little Time By Craig Storti

I

In an increasingly multicultural workplace, a lot of American managers wonder how they’re supposed to be an expert on so many cultures. If you supervise a team that includes an Indian, a Vietnamese, and a Russian (among others), how can you be expected to know what makes all these people tick, hence how to manage each of them in order to call forth their best performance? The bad news: You can’t. The good news: You don’t have to. Say that again? I don’t have to understand my people in order to manage them well? Sure, it helps if you know your people, but when your people come from cultures very different from your own, cultures you have had little or no exposure to, it’s just not possible to know and understand them the way you will people from your culture. It’s not rocket science: we understand what we are familiar with and used to, and we don’t understand what we are not familiar with and not used to. So there’s no need to be defensive about all this, to feel bad that you’re probably not going to understand—hence manage—some of your staff as well as others. That said, you’re not completely helpless; there are a couple of things you can do, short of becoming an expert in other cultures, that is, to better manage foreigners. The first thing is to realize that there are going to be some, perhaps many, differences—in worldview or mindset and in resulting behaviors—between American culture and the cultures of your non-American staff. (Indeed, identifying and explaining just these differences are the raison d’etre of this column; they’re what we do here in this space every two months.) These are the differences, alluded to above, which, if you could know them, would make you an expert and help you understand how culturally diverse staff members tick. But as we’ve already said, it’s just not realistic for you to become expert in the numerous different cultures you might need to know to do your job. 10

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And not necessary. But it is important to at least realize that non-U.S. staff are going to bring some very different notions and behaviors to the workplace, and you need to (1) be on the lookout for these and (2) try not to react when they show up. When a staff member from another culture does not question bad guidance from his manager, for example, or doesn’t like to ask questions when he doesn’t understand something and just tries what he hopes is right, you would probably react; that is, you would probably judge those behaviors negatively and write them up as weaknesses in his yearly performance evaluation. But what if you realIf we assume that foreigners ized that these behaviors want to succeed in the U.S. might be cultural? What workplace, then they have to if, in other words, you know which behaviors lead to suspected that maybe success and which lead to failthese behaviors are propure, and they need to cultivate er and normal in that the former and ditch the latter. person’s culture, and he Imagine that the tables were is doing them in your turned and you went to work in workplace, just as he did China; you’d certainly appreciback home, to please ate it if someone told you what management and posiwould make you effective in tion himself for advancethe Chinese work environment and what would offend or ment? If you suspected upset people. this was a possibility, then you would regard those behaviors and that individual quite differently and not react, or at least not as much. And then you would look into the matter, most importantly talking with that individual—who will be an expert in his culture—and figuring out what’s going on.

“...Be sensitive to the fact that when non-U.S. staff do annoying things, they’re probably not aware of it.”


So that’s the first thing: Be It’s no question that managing a multicultural workforce has more chalsensitive to the fact that when lenges than managing a homogeneous one, and that you won’t always non-U.S. staff do annoying understand what’s going on in the mind of staff from other cultures. But things, they’re probably not if you’re aware of your limitations and you’re not too quick to judge, aware of it. The next step is much you will have two key qualities necessary to succeed in this brave new easier: after you determine where multicultural world. the unusual behavior is coming from, that it’s unintentional and innocent, then you need to coach the individual about what is appropriate and expected in these things out to non-U.S. staff is that it sounds like the U.S. workplace; that direct reports should question we’re saying the American way of doing things is better dubious guidance and ask questions if they don’t under- than or superior to their way. It’s not, of course, not in an stand something. In other words, you should help the absolute sense, but the American way is definitely better individual adapt to—and therefore succeed in—the U.S. in the United States, just as the Chinese way is much betworkplace. ter in China. Sometimes in our politically correct world, American On the positive side, meanwhile, managers should be managers are afraid to suggest that what someone from alert to and exploit all the ways that someone from ananother culture has done in the workplace is wrong or in- other culture can add value to the American workplace. appropriate; afraid, in other words, to judge a foreigner by People who grow up in other cultures bring a different American standards. This is not only absurd; it’s patron- perspective to common issues and situations. They may izing. If we assume that foreigners want to succeed in the see solutions Americans don’t see or identify problems no U.S. workplace, then they have to know which behaviors one else has noticed. They tend to be close observers of lead to success and which lead to failure, and they need to behavior because they’re trying to learn the ropes in their cultivate the former and ditch the latter. Imagine that the new environment. They tend to be very flexible. They are tables were turned and you went to work in China; you’d survivors. certainly appreciate it if someone told you what would It’s no question that managing a multicultural workmake you effective in the Chinese work environment and force has more challenges than managing a homogeneous what would offend or upset people. one, and that you won’t always understand what’s going In many cases you will not even need to point these on in the mind of staff from other cultures. But if you’re things out to people, as they will be studying their envi- aware of your limitations and you’re not too quick to ronment—observing the natives, as it were—and figuring judge, you will have two key qualities necessary to succeed out for themselves what works here and what doesn’t, in this brave new multicultural world. PDJ and adjusting their behaviors accordingly. But in other, more subtle cases, they may not be able to pick up on the cultural differences, and then the manager can give the all-important feedback. And note again that this does not require any special knowledge of the employee’s culture on the part of the manager; it just requires being a keen Craig Storti, a consultant and trainer in the field of intercultural observer and then being able to articulate U.S. workplace communications, is the author of seven books. His latest, Speaking of India, describes the common cultural flashpoints when Indians work together expectations. with North Americans and western Europeans. He can be contacted at: I think the reason there is some hesitation to point craig@craigstorti.com or learn more at his website: craigstorti.com. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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11


FROM My perspective

We All Have a Calling… Mine is to Create the Energy and Vision to Lead Positive Change By Linda Jimenez

O

Chief Diversity Officer & VP—Diversity & Inclusion, WellPoint, Inc.

On May 25, Oprah Winfrey aired her final show after 25 years.With tears in her eyes, she talked about finding her calling —how stepping out onto her stage every day has given her a platform to show millions of Americans that each of us has value. According to Oprah, “Everybody has a calling, and your job is to figure what that is and start doing it.” Her words strongly resonated with me. I started to look for themes and connections that would show me my life’s purpose. And, I came to the realization that my calling is to create the energy and vision to lead positive change, which I do every day for WellPoint. As a Latina mother of three, change and adaptability are what I know best. My family lets me hone my skills in diversity and inclusion. If I ever get off track, they will help me keep it real. What has propelled me into my career is a strong sense of self, a desire to lead change and a passion for diversity and inclusion. It’s not a position for the faint of heart. As a chief diversity officer, you must be prepared for a high-profile and often politically-charged role. I believe that success for a chief diversity officer lies in the following attributes. Mastery of diversity issues. An influential chief diversity officer should be a change agent with the energy and courage to fight for fairness and equity and challenge that which is unjust. Political savvy. A chief diversity officer must be particularly astute at navigating the corporate culture and responding well to politically charged or politically sensitive situations. An influential chief diversity officer also must have the strength to stand up and be heard.

A common and compelling vision. You must also be committed to working with others to build a common vision and strategic direction with regard to diversity and inclusion. Experience leading organizational change. You should understand organizational change and be able to lead large-scale change initiatives. Strong interpersonal relationships. You must possess a high degree of emotional intelligence and charisma and be a good communicator. Results orientation. You must be able to show how diversity is an integral component to the success of an organization’s mission and commitment to excellence. Continuous learning. You have to continuously raise the bar on your own personal performance. In my own role, I encourage WellPoint leadership and associates to value individual differences and support a culture beyond that of tolerance—one of awareness, respect and understanding. I believe diversity of thought and opinion in a multigenerational workforce contributes to more understanding of the opportunities and issues before us. This understanding contributes to better decision making and, ultimately, a competitive advantage. Like Oprah, I am grateful every day that I have a platform to be able to live my life’s calling. My energy and vision come from the respect, trust and validation I receive every day from my peers, my colleagues and my leadership team, as well as the energy and passion I sustain by knowing I am making a difference in the lives of others. PDJ

“Like Oprah, I am grateful every day that I have a platform to be able to live my life’s calling.”

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Linda Jimenez is a native of San Antonio, Texas, and attended the University of Texas at Austin where she received her BA with honors. She is also a graduate of the University of Texas School of Law and has spent 20 years specializing in labor and employment law.


Spark Leadership Developing the leaders of tomorrow. Providing opportunities to learn, grow and advance. Making a difference every day. At Walmart, diversity is the doorway to opportunity, growth and excellence. Inclusion is the key that unlocks that door.

To learn more, scan the QR code or visit us online at walmartstores.com/diversity.


HUMAN equity ™

The Hierarchy of Inequity By Trevor Wilson Author and Global Human Equity Strategist, TWI Inc.

T

The E q u it y © Continuum was first introduced in the book Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity over a decade ago. Since that time this simple measurement tool has evolved into an industry-recognized methodology to allow organizations to rate their approach to diversity, inclusion and human equity using a single yardstick. For the past five years the continuum has been used to benchmark hundreds of organizations that apply to win Canada’s “Best Diversity Employers Award,” the largest competition of its kind in North America. A few months ago, one of our most progressive clients indicated that they wanted to move to a “four” on the Equity Continuum. Actually they wanted to be the first “four” in North America because the highest score awarded in the competition so far is 3.79. My response to this request was, “Be careful of what you ask for.” Moving to a “four” may appear reasonable after achieving a “three,” but there are plenty of hidden obstacles. Perhaps the most vexing is the required shift in focus beyond the group to the individual. In a “four,” leaders in the organization are more concerned with talent differentiation of each employee rather than under-representation of any diversity group. This could threaten the raison d’etre of every diversity advocacy group established over the past twenty years. For the past two decades, the groups surrounding various diversity dimensions have become quite institutionalized. Separate diversity fiefdoms exist for women, minorities, gay men, lesbian women, new immigrants, parents of kids with special needs and (insert your group here). The Catalyst organization is approaching its 40th anniversary of fighting for the better representation of women at senior levels. Well-established advocacy groups in— the African American, Latino, Asian, LGBT, etc.,—are 14

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The Equity Continuum©

(1995 - 2011)

Source: Wilson, T.; Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity, Toronto: John Wiley & Sons, 1996

fighting for the representation of their respective groups. Thus, any program that puts the individual before the group is likely to generate suspicion if not criticism. I have labeled this condition the hierarchy of inequity. It is the notion that the unfair treatment of white females is somehow more important than the exclusion of black males. And for sure the experiences of these two groups must be much more critical than the age discrimination faced by a straight, white, able-bodied male over the age of 55. This is just not true. In order to achieve total human equity we must avoid this temptation to assess one group’s inequity against another. We must learn to approach this issue from a perspective of what the great Nelson Mandela calls “rainbow jurisprudence.” We must deal with inequity wherever we find it, regardless if it is inequity being faced by some group other than our own. Avoiding the hierarchy of inequity is another advantage of moving beyond diversity and inclusion to human equity. By focusing on the talents of an individual, we move beyond the obsession with righting wrongs and shift to focusing on maximizing the talents of the entire workforce. PDJ In 1996 Trevor started TWI Inc. to specialize in the area of equity and diversity as a business issue. In the same year, Trevor published a highly acclaimed book titled Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity. The firm’s clients include some of the most progressive global employers. TWI’s Human Equity™ approach was instrumental in catapulting Coca-Cola’s South African division to the top performing division worldwide. Visit www.twiinc.com for more information.


Thanks to You,

together, we’ll make a difference.

In 2011, 32 miles of trails were cleared, 55 gardens were planted, 167 community centers benefited from improvement projects and 27 tons of food were sorted for distribution—all in just four hours. At WellPoint, our associates drive our ability to fulfill our mission – to improve the lives of the people we serve and the health of our communities. The 3,800 associates, families and friends that volunteered during WellPoint’s 2011 annual Community Service Day Project took that mission to heart and over one hundred communities across the US benefited as a result. Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers

® Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. ® Registered Trademark, Profiles in Diversity Journal. ® Registered Trademark, Diversity Inc Media LLC. © 2011 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved. EOE


viewpoint

Changing the Game: Diversity, Inclusion and Engagement [Part 1 of 2 in a Series]

By Pamela Arnold, President, AIMD and

By Lisa Horuczi Markus, Director, Buck Consultants

T

Board member, AIMD

The hottest ‘game’ in the diversity space is bridging the generational divide in the workforce. There are two sides to this epic struggle: • Baby Boomers, as large a workforce as their Millennial counterparts and bolstered by experience, seniority and executive authority, who perceive the different working style, tech savvy-ness and work-life balance priority of their younger counterparts as evidence of lack of focus and commitment; and • Millennials, who will outnumber the Baby Boomer workforce by 2015 and driven by significance in work and opportunity to learn, grow and use new technology, who perceive their more seasoned peers as rigid, slow to change and competitive. Meanwhile most of the infrastructure to support connecting the two side—benefits, talent management and communication programs—has been designed by Baby Boomers for Baby Boomers. Winning the game means changing the game. A great opportunity exists to capture the imagination and speak to the values of the emerging workforces, while improving business results and aiding the knowledge transfer from Baby Boomers to Millennials, if we use technology to bridge the differences in world view and working styles of both sides. Source: The Economic Burden of Health Inequalities in the United States. Johns Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Sept. 2009. Web. Dec. 2009; 401(k) in Living Color. Ariel Investments. July 2008; and 2004-2008 individual Fortune 100 client demographic studies.

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Technology Tipping Point: Consumerism to Participation As the global consumer base and talent pool continue to become more generationally and culturally diverse, and all are gravitating toward increasing the use of technology to connect, create and act, what tops the list of preferred mode of connection is gaming. Globally, Gen Ys average more than 10,000 hours of video game play by the time they reach age 21. That’s the magic number of hours needed within a field of study to become a virtuoso at anything, according to author Malcolm Gladwell. However, Millennials are not the only ones who game: • 40% of gamers are women. • 35% of C-suite executives are gamers. • 70% of gamers are heads of American households. • They are age 34 on average. And what makes games so engaging? The Institute for the Future’s Jane McGonigal attributes the mass appeal to four fun factors provided by the game experience: • Epic meaning • Urgent optimism • Blissful productivity • Tight social fabric. All these things are possible if we ‘change the game’ by gaming the change. The very opposite of treating employees as “an audience of one,” a digital approach can lead to the creation of teams that collaborate on what matters most. When that happens, the employee becomes the creator and catalyst for greater personal and collective wellbeing.

Change the Game Traditional communication approaches to engaging employees in improving their health and wealth have been only marginally successful with majority populations and


largely unsuccessful with minority populations—even when they make the same amount of money. Research shows that, holding socio-economic factors constant: • Ethnicity and then gender are the primary predictors of health and wealth behaviors • Minority employees and women are more at risk of poverty in retirement than majority employees. Traditional ‘enlightened self-interest’ approaches rooted in behavioral economics has not significantly improved outcomes among minority employees, as follows: • $229.6 billion is the estimated cost of ethnic disparities in U.S. health care • African Americans and Hispanics: Underutilize doctor office visits (7% to 12% less than whites) Overutilize emergency rooms (38% to 70% more). While the per employee per year cost of financialstress-related illness more than doubled during the Great Recession ($7,500 in 2007 to $15,000 in 2010), minority and female employees remain more susceptible due to differences in saving and investing behaviors: • Lower participation rates in 401(k) plans (11% to 27%) • Lower savings levels (14% to 60%) • Smaller retirement balances (50%) • Less investment in equities (5% to 50%) • More loans (55%). Fortunately, there is an opportunity to create greater inclusion in wellbeing across all employee populations through creating a transmedia approach to integrating health, wealth and career. Learning, social media, virtual worlds and game mechanics can provide what’s been

missing in traditional approaches by accommodating different preferences in values, learning, communication and ongoing support. Harnessing the power of diversity management and technology together will propel us to reach new heights of achievement and success on our diversity journey. Join us in this ongoing dialogue in November as we continue to look into the power of changing the diversity landscape through the power of technology. PDJ

Pamela W. Arnold is President of the American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc. The organization is a 501(c)(3) public interest nonprofit dedicated to advancing diversity thought leadership through research, education, and public outreach. AIMD works to strengthen our communities and institutions through effective diversity management. For more information, please visit www.aimd.org.

Lisa Horuczi Markus is the Director of Diversity and Interactive Technology at Buck Consultants and a board member of the American Institute for Managing Diversity and the Los Angeles-based Youth Mentoring Connection. She has an MBA and a BA in journalism from Michigan State University, where she graduated with the school’s highest honor in journalism. Lisa is a member of the Financial Planning Association’s Diversity Taskforce. You can contact Lisa at lisa.markus@ buckconsultants.com or 949-228-7907.

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Commitment At RBC Wealth Management, one of our core values is service. We express this value by building meaningful relationships with the clients and communities we serve. We are committed to the community because we recognize that the strength of our business is directly related to the well-being of the communities where we live and work. www.rbcwm-usa.com

Create your path forward.

Š 2011 RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC.


company

profile

Company: RBC Wealth Management DATE FOUNDED: 1909 headquarters: Minneapolis, Minnesota COMPANY website: www.rbcwm-usa.com Primary business: Full-service investment, advisory and wealth management INDUSTRY RANKING: Sixth-largest full-service investment, advisory and wealth management firm in the United States 2010 Revenues: $1.3 billion

Authentic Leadership RBC U.S. Wealth Management CEO John Taft uses his commitment to diversity and inclusion to help drive business outcomes w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Discover how Taft’s commitment to social justice and equal rights sets the tone for RBC Wealth Management A Personal Journey

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EO of RBC U.S. Wealth Management John Taft grew up near the campus of Yale University in the 1960s, in an environment he calls “an atmosphere of change.” The son of tolerant and openUnder Taft’s leadership, employees at all levels are activeminded parents, he was exposed to diverse surroundings and ly engaged in making diversity a value that defines RBC people at a young age—factors that undoubtedly contributed to Wealth Management’s culture and drives the business. his personal beliefs about inclusion of people of all backgrounds. “I don’t think anybody comes to a set of beliefs on a straight path. considers one of the proudest moments You develop your convictions whether going forward, going backin his career. wards or in circles, and personally, diversity and inclusion have “John’s leadership on diversity is become important personal values to me,” said Taft. second to none,” reflected Justin G. However, it wasn’t until the defining moment of learning about his Nelson, NGLCC co-founder and presidaughter’s sexual orientation that Taft’s personal beliefs about diversity dent. “His commitment to NGLCC and inclusion crystalized and cohered. inspires other leaders to further our “We all have been excluded in some way during the course of our mission to serve as strong business lives. It’s a terrible feeling, being isolated, but it’s something that advocates for the LGBT community.” everyone can connect to,” he explained. “We’re social creatures and Within RBC Wealth Management, we belong in a community setting. To feel like your community Taft has served as the executive sponsor rejects you is incredibly difficult.” of the firm’s Gay, Lesbian, Allied and After supporting his daughter during that trying period of her life, Diverse Employees (GLADE) employee he was motivated to become an advocate for lesbian, gay, bisexual resource group for the past seven years, and transgender (LGBT) issues on a broader scale, both professionwhere he has championed inclusion efally and personally. Over the years, Taft has donated his time, talent forts for LGBT employees. Throughout and financial resources to organizations in both Minnesota and on his work with GLADE, he has been a a national level that support the LGBT community, including the role model who has paved the way to Minnesota AIDS Project, Minnesota AIDS Walk, National Center recruit more diverse employees and clifor Lesbian Rights, National Coming Out Day, Human Rights ents to the firm. In addition, Taft served Campaign, and Greater Seattle Business Association. as a leading voice in an effort that advanced RBC Wealth Management’s A Leadership Strength stance on a respectful workplace, apaft’s work was recognized when he was named the 2010 proving the modification of the firm’s Outstanding Corporate Diversity Leader by the National Gay non-discrimination policy to include and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC)—an honor he gender identity and gender expression.

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“ The pivotal experience I had was my daughter coming out as a

teenager and needing to adapt—and living that experience with her and seeing how people responded to her and the challenges that she faced. That was a watershed moment for me in the — John Taft evolution of my attitude towards diversity.”

Taft has also shown that diversity advancement has a true business case. Diversity for growth and innovation is one of RBC Wealth Management’s core values and is a part of the firm’s overarching business strategy. Under his guidance, the firm’s continued focus on diversity and inclusion is an integral part of the business, embedded into the firm’s stewardship culture and shared with employees, clients and communities. While continuing to lead RBC Wealth Management, Taft has also introduced the strategic importance of diversity and inclusion to a broader business audience. Taft is currently serving as chairman of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA), the leading securities industry trade group representing securities firms, banks and asset management companies. In this role, he is working to help ensure the U.S. financial system avoids future crises like those experienced in 2008 and 2009, while allowing financial institutions to effectively do their part in supporting America’s economic recovery. Said Joseph Vaughn, SIFMA’s vice president of governmental affairs, “John has steadfastly worked to expand the horizons of opportunity for diverse groups in the financial services sector. SIFMA and the industry are very fortunate to have a visionary leader who is working to shape the financial services sector of tomorrow.”

A Strategic Value

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aft believes it is no surprise that RBC’s culture of diversity and stewardship contributed to its strong performance during the financial crisis, as the company continued to operate its business consistent with its core values and an inclusive atmosphere for employees. “We’ve seen first-hand how diversity and inclusion create a working environment where personal development and creativity can help lead us to new heights,” said Taft. “Tapping into and drawing on the diverse experiences and backgrounds of our employees is becoming an increasingly important core competency for successful businesses.”

A Professional Priority

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aft follows media coverage of LGBT topics and adjusts his focus as needs change and headlines evolve. For example, when the news of Tyler Clementi leaping to his death after being taunted about his orientation on social media gained national attention, Taft and his wife, Laura, not only began supporting antibullying efforts personally, but also rallied various corporate leaders to spearhead efforts to heighten awareness around the deeplyconcerning issue. Since then, he has made it a personal mission to bring attention to anti-bullying issues by supporting organizations that address tolerance and respect for differences. While there will always be more work to be done, Taft has been— and will continue to be—a true visionary for diversity and inclusion advancement. “I believe that we are all created equal. The path toward diversity and inclusion is not just to tolerate and not only to accommodate, but ultimately, to embrace and celebrate differences.” “At RBC Wealth Management, diversity and inclusion are embedded in our culture. For all of our employees across the firm, diversity is a way of life—it’s an aspect of everything we do.” PDJ

“ Many leaders believe in corporate diversity,

but John is a deeply committed, visibly involved leader. John’s direct support has been instrumental in garnering employee participation and organizational leadership, and has helped drive RBC Wealth Management’s overall diversity and — Wanda Brackins inclusion strategy.”

Head, Wealth Management Global Diversity

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profile “ I’ve learned a lot from Irv,

Irv Weiser, former CEO of RBC Wealth Management, and John Taft.

A History of Diversity at RBC Wealth Management As told by Irv Weiser, former CEO

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hen I became CEO of RBC Wealth Management (then, known as Dain Bosworth) in 1990, diversity was not about the color of one’s skin—it was more about thought and approach. It wasn’t until the downtown Minneapolis

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and I admire that aspect of his leadership and try to celebrate it—I feel responsible for keeping that element of his legacy alive.” — John Taft

headquarters moved office locations that I began to think more and more about the need for the firm to undergo a cultural change, as well. Dain Bosworth was always a great company; however, my upbringing and personal experiences shaped my perspectives of how inclusion should look and feel, which at that point was not prevalent within the firm. I was raised in the blue collar district of Buffalo, NY. As a child, my playmates were kids from all walks of life and ethnicities—from Italian and Polish to Hispanic and African American. I thought that this was the way the world was. Over the years, I have been fortunate to have had opportunities to travel extensively and experience different cultures and customs. My upbringing and travel have shaped who I am and have made me sensitive to diversity. Unfortunately, many people don’t have these experiences or exposure, and as a result, may shy away from the unfamiliar. I realized early on that people who have not been exposed to diversity need uniquely positioned learning experiences and teachable moments to successfully broaden their outlook.


For nearly 20 years, RBC Wealth Management has collected and presented art that reflects the society in which we live and work. The Human Touch art tour visits communities across the country where the company’s offices are located. Left to right: Man with Dog, Willie Birch, 1999, acrylic and charcoal on paper. Untitled (L.A. Portrait), Roland Fisher, 1994-2000, C-print and acrylic on fiberboard. Two pieces of art from The Human Touch art collection.

When Dain Bosworth moved into its new tower, it was the ideal time to start fresh—the firm needed a change, and I wanted to help make that change happen. The firm’s female financial advisors were eager to partner with me to help lead the change, and several female advisors collaborated to create a women’s group, now known as the Women’s Association of Financial Advisors. As I looked for practical ways to heighten diversity awareness that employees could connect with, I knew that it was not something that could simply be preached from the CEO’s office. Therefore, I connected with an art curator to identify various mediums of art that depicted human figures—diverse subject matter created by diverse artists. Today, select pieces from the company’s art collection, known as The Human Touch, are exhibited at art galleries across the country. The Human Touch continues to provide an educational way for employees, clients, and our communities to learn about diversity. Without a doubt, diversity and inclusion have truly become part of the fabric of RBC Wealth Management. PDJ

“ One of the enduring legacies of

Irv Weiser has to be the diversity culture of RBC Wealth Management. Irv was a pioneer. Irv was both an advocate for gay and lesbian inclusion and support, as well as an activist for women at the highest levels of management at a time when it wasn’t necessarily — John Taft common place.”

The Irv Weiser Effect: A Legacy Continues

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Five Diversity and Inclusion Best Practices

RBC Wealth Management’s goal is to make diversity and inclusion a theme that runs throughout all aspects of our business, from the people we hire and the culture we cultivate to the clients and communities we serve.

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BC Wealth Management has used a variety of strategies to make its corporate values a meaningful part of its business operations. Here is a sampling of the ideas that work, including examples of how they were implemented.

1) Make diversity and inclusion a priority of executive leadership

current and prospective clients. At our “Women, Wine and Wall Street” events, clients learn from a local female wine expert who talks about wine appreciation, as well as a female RBC executive who talks about current investment opportunities. Our speaker series on Latin America and the global economy held at the University of Texas at Austin invites clients, prospective clients and community members to learn about globalization and the challenges that Latin American countries face in achieving.

Nearly 95 percent of RBC WM’s 40 senior-most leaders are engaged in efforts to drive the firm’s diversity strategy and execution on a daily basis. Executive involvement includes active leadership 4) Support worthy causes in the community in the firm’s employee resource groups, service as executive chairs RBC Wealth Management partners with many external organizafor our diversity growth strategy teams and advisory councils, and tions that share our common goal of inclusion and raising awareinvolvement on the firm’s Diversity Leadership Council. ness. Through these relationships, we elevate our brand profile in the community and help develop relationships with prospective em2) Provide employee development and opportunities for ployees and clients. In 2010, RBC Wealth Management contributed more than $3.2 million to charitable organizations through foundation employees to contribute Demonstrating support of our corporate diversity and inclusion grants, employee matching gifts and charitable sponsorships. strategy is not a box our employees check off on their annual performance reviews, but rather, is a part of our daily life. Through 5) Demonstrate commitment to environmental our three employee resources groups—Women’s Association of sustainability Financial Advisors (WAFA), Multicultural Employee Alliance (MEA), We are committed to a path of environmental sustainability. This and Gay, Lesbian, Allied and Diverse Employees (GLADE)—our means reducing our environmental footprint, promoting environmentally employees actively demonstrate our shared diversity and inclusion responsible business activities, and offering environmentally responvalues throughout the year. sible products and services. The RBC Blue Water Project is an innovative, 10-year, $50 million (Canadian) global commitment to help 3) Get clients involved foster a culture of water stewardship, so that people in communities and Throughout the year, we host a variety of unique events for our cultures across the world have clean fresh water, today and tomorrow.

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Personal

profile

Q&A with John Taft Why diversity focus is important as a business leader: I didn’t have any business exposure until I was in my late 20s; I was a comparative French and English literature major and worked as a newspaper reporter, and it wasn’t until I graduated from business school at the age of 27 that I gained any kind of business experience. So, I guess what I’ve done is cobbled together this collage of business and community leader influences, and there are many people whose style and approach, pieces, elements of it, I’ve picked up, and used, and that I use today. I could go through a pretty long list, but there are people that I worked for, people on that list that I had watched operate in the world. Role models who shaped his thinking as a business leader: I wouldn’t say there is any one person after whom I’ve tried to model myself or anybody that I thought walked on water per se. Most leaders that I admire are flawed individuals—at their core, they’ve got some kind of dysfunctionality that drives them. The question is how have they harnessed that, and how have they managed that, so that it translates into constructive leadership behavior instead of dysfunctional leadership behavior. Concept and style of leadership: Leaders need to be adaptable, they need to be flexible and they need to have more than one style and approach. You have to be ready to do different things at different times, based on the circumstances your business faces. If you ask what do I try to have as a common aspect at all times, I try to be completely transparent and honest. I think integrity is absolutely critical, and I try to manage from a place of integrity. Communicating honestly and directly, and treating people fairly, being clear about what you’re doing, and being honest when it’s not working and you’re changing direction—all of those things have to do with integrity. I think just being an authentic leader is really important—that is, being yourself. The most important advice he would give another business leader about diversity and inclusion: After my experience running RBC Wealth Management, I am a complete and total believer in the power, engagement and energy that an inclusive environment creates in the workplace. I am totally convinced that motivated employees who care create a workplace environment that engages employees—which translates directly and immediately into client satisfaction and business success, particularly in our business, where client satisfaction and the client experience is driven by employees. So, I would say don’t hold back. Embrace diversity and inclusion completely, and it will come back to you many times over in terms of employee engagement, which will come back to you in terms of business performance. That would be my advice. PDJ

John Taft Company: RBC Wealth Management Title: CEO of RBC U.S. Wealth Management Education: Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale University; MA in Public and Private Management from the Yale School of Organization and Management First job: Reporter, Taos News Favorite saying: “Stewardship is a moral activity.” What I’m reading: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot Interests: Contemporary art; athletics Childhood hero: Mickey Mantle Best picture (film/art): Anything by Julie Mehretu Favorite charities: Walker Art Center; Yale University; St. Mark’s Cathedral What diversity initiatives has RBC Wealth Management planned for 2011? RBC Wealth Management’s top diversity goals in 2011 include leveraging the leadership talent of women through our Women’s Growth Strategy; focusing on strengthened internal and external communication about diversity initiatives; and laying the groundwork for a Minority Growth Strategy.

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1. RoyaL Dutch Shell 6. New York Life 2. University of the Rockies 7. Moss Adams 3. WellPoint 8. Marsh & McLennan 4. Sodexo 9. Ecolab Inc. 5. Walmart 10. CDW LLC Award of Excellence: Marriott International and PricewaterhouseCoopers HE COMPANIES ABOVE were among the few who made the commitment to be bold, and who then carried out their plans to success. For their effort, we are recognizing them as recipients of the 2011 International INNOVATION in Diversity Award. They truly deserve to be emulated for their efforts. We hope you will read through the summary of their most innovative initiatives. Perhaps doing so will ignite the spark of creativity in your own company. Our hope is that next year we will be profiling your company, and holding you up to the same level of esteem that these fine organizations have earned. Well done, award winners! Well done, indeed!

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2 0 1 1 international innovation in diversity awards

International Women’s Day — Global Webcast From 2008-2010, Royal Dutch Shell had chosen to recognize International Women’s Day by sponsoring or participating in events and webcasts coordinated by outside organizations. In 2011, we chose to organize and execute our own global webcast in recognition of International Women’s Day. Since we have operations in over 90 countries, it was no easy task to ensure all time zones were given a reasonable opportunity to participate. The webcast was designed to communicate our progress against our goal of increasing the number of women in our senior leadership, to give visibility to more leaders who have been champions of our women’s initiatives, and to showcase the numerous contributions being made by our women’s employee networks around the world. We scheduled two webcasts coordinated out of our headIn the end, well quarters in The Netherlands over a thousand to give everyone a chance to participate. Women’s Employee individuals Network leaders from the participated in Netherlands and the UK at least one presented the many accomplishments of the Employee of the webcasts. Networks around the world. The webcasts were taped for playback for those who could not participate live, and we transcribed the webcasts for those with a hearing impairment. In the end, well over a thousand individuals participated in at least one of the webcasts. The quantitative feedback collected at the end of each webcast and the anecdotal comments made in the office indicate this was the most successful webcast we’d ever held. It clearly accomplished our three objectives and raised the overall visibility of D&I globally. The fact that we initiated our own global webcast with internal presenters conveyed a level of management commitment that went far beyond what we had done in the past. In addition, the profiling of our women’s networks globally had never been done in this way before, and it showcased a “joined up” effort across all the networks and, for most, was the first time others outside their country had heard the success stories from other regions. PDJ

Mixing It Up to Make a Difference University of the Rockies has a commitment to diversity work that goes beyond a traditional sensitivity program, toward a holistic operation designed to support an inclusive culture. For us, the focus of diversity work has a mix of three components: raising consciousness about the impact that difference can have on a system; equipping people with the skills to respond to differences; and shaping systems to align with differences.

“We have blankets to sit on, pizza to eat, discussion cards and live music.” The Mix It Up to Make a Difference initiative supports our commitment to climate improvement for our entire community. This concept is based on a model developed by the Southern Poverty Law Center. National Mix It Up Day is an initiative to help school children overcome the divides that separate them. While the focus of the National Day is a single day event, we transformed the concept to support our adult staff, students and the local K-12 community. Once a quarter we host a lunch in Colorado Springs and in San Diego where we ask participants to engage in dialogue with people from different departments. We have blankets to sit on, pizza to eat, discussion cards and live music. All are invited to join in. On National Mix it Up Day, we take the concept a step further. The day begins with a presentation about the importance of looking beyond the surface to understand other people. Last year staff, faculty and students decorated large sheets of paper with artwork, finger-paints and graffiti. The artwork is currently hanging on the UoR campus in Colorado Springs. Following the presentation, a contingent from our university visited local schools to share the Mix It Up experience with the young students. There, we asked students to sit with people they didn’t know and initiated conversation using question cards to keep the discussion flowing. The outcome has been tremendous. Attendees share stories with us about the value of the connections that have formed as a result of these activities. Each month participation increases and commitment strengthens. PDJ

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The Community Ambassador Program WellPoint believes that having a team that reflects the diversity of the communities in which we live and work improves our ability to meet the health benefit needs of our consumers. Empire BCBS is one of 14 plans licensed under WellPoint and is the largest insurer in New York, covering nearly six million people. Empire’s membership includes African Americans, Hispanics, Columbians, Nigerians, Russians, Irish, Native Americans, Jews, Muslims, Asians, Hindis, and so many more. In 2009, Empire BCBS created The Community Ambassador Program targeting three specific segments: African Americans, Hispanics and Asians. The ambassadors provide benchmarking information on cultural and ethnic health disparities and cultural health care preferences in order to understand how our benefit plans and programs can better serve their communities. Ambassadors also attend community events and are members of the Empire BCBS diversity council. Ambassadors were selected through a formal application process. Once selected, they went through an orientation that covered Empire BCBS’s operational strategy and diversity and inclusion approach. Each Ambassador submitted an action plan that outlined events and activities planned throughout the year. The execution against the plan is monitored through monthly meetings with the team leads and other senior leaders. The Community Ambassador Program not only highlights cultural and ethnic health disparities and preferences, it also addressed WellPoint’s commitment to create more learning and development opportunities for associates. The Ambassador program is making an impact on New Yorkers’ health status by increasing access to key services. More importantly, the Ambassador program supports our corporate diversity and inclusion strategy through understanding health care preferences of emerging consumer markets, identifying enhancements to marketing in the multicultural marketplace, and by helping to increase revenue through strategic community relations in these cultural markets. WellPoint believes the Empire BCBS Community Ambassador program is indeed positioned to help our company be more effective at conveying a message that resonates within our marketplace and reinforces the fact that at WellPoint, diversity and inclusion is a shared responsibility. PDJ 28

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The Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Board (DIAB) To expand its commitment to diversity and inclusion, Sodexo launched the Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Board (DIAB) in 2010. The board is composed of a group of highly respected leaders, academicians and entrepreneurs from outside the organization with specific areas of expertise representing diverse communities. DIAB members act as external ambassadors and internal advisors, providing input on company initiatives and representing Sodexo in the community. The group also works to help the company stay focused on making progress on its diversity and inclusion objectives. After its initial meeting in October 2010, the DIAB identified specific goals to guide its work. In the shortterm, the board is focusing on strengthening engagement with the LGBT and disabilities communities. The DIAB is also devising diversity and inclusion strategies to engage middle managers within the different business lines. For the longer-term, the DIAB will focus on providing guidance around more large-scale issues and trends impacting the business such as changing demographics and connections to marketplace and workplace decisions. The DIAB also provides guidance to the overall business strategy as it relates to supplier diversity and the urban schools strategy. Members of the Sodexo Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Board include: • Eliza Byard - Executive Director of GLSEN, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network; • Michael Chen - President and CEO of Media, Communications, and Entertainment, GE Capital and Vice President and Officer, GE; • Cari Dominguez - Former Chair of the U.S. EEOC and current member of the Board of Directors, Manpower, Inc.; • Alexis Herman - Former Secretary of the Department of Labor and Chairman and CEO, New Ventures, Inc.; • John Hofmeister - Founder & CEO, Citizens for Affordable Energy and former President, Shell Oil Company; • John D. Kemp - Partner, Powers Pyles Sutter & Verville PC (PPSV) and Executive Director and General Counsel, U.S. Business Leadership Network (USBLN); and • Thomas S. Williamson Jr. - Partner, Covington & Burling and Board Member, National Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law and Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs. PDJ


2 0 1 1 international innovation in diversity awards

Leadership on the Move Series At Walmart, we believe in a shared responsibility to drive diversity and to continue to build a culture of inclusion. In 2010, we strengthened this commitment by implementing the Diversity and Inclusion “Leadership on the Move” series, designed to enhance cultural competence at every level of the organization through a series of inclusion-focused interactive discussions. This series provides our associates with a foundational knowledge of diversity and inclusion concepts, and with practical examples of inclusive behaviors. Targeting 1.4 million managers and associates across all of our U.S. facilities, “Leadership on the Move” is unique in its method of linking cultural competencies with leadership development. The series is comprised of four training tracks that include personal leadership, people leadership, results leadership and thought leadership. Each six-week track includes 15-minute discussions designed to equip associates with practical information that will help them better understand and maximize the value of diversity and inclusion. Program impact has been both broad and deep in the organization, as more than 49,000 leaders in our facilities have participated in the program since its launch. A regional human resources manager who is responsible for the development of associates at 92 stores reports, “The impact of ‘Leadership on the Move’ is huge for our region. Our store managers are telling me that this program allows us to focus on our similarities and differences, while developing our people at the same time. Even after completing the program, many stores continue to use the training materials to develop their supervisors.” By facilitating program discussions, leaders at every level of our company are building their own cultural competencies while helping our associates better understand and model inclusive behaviors. Associates are engaged in conversations about removing barriers and avoiding stereotypes, expanding their perspectives to better understand others and becoming more conscious of the dynamics of interacting cultures. The combined engagement of our leaders and associates supports our corporate objective to ensure a diverse and inclusive workplace where we can leverage and engage the talents of every associate. PDJ

Career Management Initiative Program Over the past few years, New York Life has enhanced the leadership and development offerings for senior executives, and the goal is to eventually cascade that information throughout the organization. One challenge has been that a portion of underrepresented professionals are not senior enough to participate in the programs being offered. To address this issue, New York Life launched the Career Management Initiative (CMI), a leadership development program designed to strengthen the career advancement and engagement of mid-level employees of color—Black, Latino and Asian. CMI is a four-month program focusing on three areas: career development, business acumen and leadership. Since the launch of CMI in 2010, fifty-five employees have successfully completed the program. CMI provides an opportunity for talented employees of color to gain exposure to high caliber leadership and development content at a critical juncture in their career. As part of the program, each CMI participant receives three 90-minute coaching sessions, and they develop a career plan that is discussed in a six-month follow-up session. The main goal of the CMI program is to develop and accelerate the pipeline of our talented people of color. We also hope to increase their exposure to New York Life’s business, culture and senior leaders. CMI is an example of a collaborative partnership between talent development, D&I and an outside consulting firm coming together to develop and execute the program. The outside consultant serves to both be the program facilitator and provides the one-to-one individual coaching. Employees who have participated indicate that the program has helped them develop strategies for navigating the organization, building confidence, demonstrating leadership, creating visibility and establishing critical relationships. They also now have a better understanding of the specific challenges they face as people of color and how to develop strategies for overcoming these challenges. Most notably, managers have indicated that they have observed increased levels of enthusiasm and engagement from their direct reports who have completed the program. In the short period of time since the launch of the program in July 2010, approximately 20 percent of the program’s graduates have been promoted: eight promotions and two lateral moves to roles with increased responsibility. PDJ

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The Inclusion Network

InfluenceHer Moss Adams believes in investing in the future. As such, when we saw a gap in the resources focused on a large segment of our future, adolescent girls, we felt compelled to do something about it. In 2010 Moss Adams linked arms with the Boys & Girls Club of King County to found a new community program called InfluenceHer. The mission of InfluenceHer is to develop a comprehensive programming strategy for girls that addresses three core program areas: academic success, leadership and health. The reality is, girls have unique needs, and, for many of them, navigating adolescence and visualizing successful adulthood is overwhelming.

“Women gain leadership experience and, in turn,

reap the altruistic rewards of helping our community, one girl at a time.

In addition to an initial $50,000 investment, partners and employees have volunteered their time and talent to invest in girls’ futures. Support from the top of the firm has also been vital to success. Tammy Young, the leader of the program, was named a “Woman Worth Watching” last year. In April 2010, a group of Moss Adams women joined forces with 85 of Seattle’s top women leaders in the first annual InfluenceHer Summit. Groups of Moss Adams women played a role in developing programming aimed at helping girls find their voice, tap into their passion, see themselves as leaders, become life-long learners, and make positive choices about their health. Who better to develop the strategy than a strong network of women leaders who have navigated their own challenges? These efforts align with our efforts to increase the advancement of talented women through Forum W, the Moss Adams Forum for Women. It also provides synergy with one of our Forum W focus areas, leadership development. Women gain leadership experience and, in turn, reap the altruistic rewards of helping our community, one girl at a time. In just over a year we are gaining meaningful traction. In the past year, we have awarded three full college scholarships, and scheduled a week long summer camp for 108. Moss Adams is thrilled to have the opportunity to expand our focus on women outside the walls of our office to influence and shape the women leaders of tomorrow. PDJ 30

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Marsh & McLennan Companies has partnered with Heidrick & Struggles to create a unique recruiting concept, the “Inclusion Network”—an innovative recruitment initiative designed to attract a broader and more diverse senior level candidate pool to Marsh & McLennan to ensure we identify the best talent for the job. A familiar approach within senior level recruitment consists of hiring managers reaching out to their contacts to identify candidates for positions. Unless a manager has a diverse network, this outreach does not produce diverse candidates or lead to diverse hires. The Inclusion Network combats this by engaging a select group of women-, minority-, and LGBT-owned boutique search firms in any recruiting that Marsh & McLennan awards to Heidrick. These boutique firms purposefully cultivate robust networks, contacts and involvement in diverse talent pools. The seriousness of the program is underscored by a financial commitment. At least 10 percent of the recruiting fees Marsh & McLennan Companirs pays to Heidrick goes to partners in the Inclusion Network. Under the Inclusion Network program, when Heidrick receives an assignment from the company, it selects Inclusion Network partners to bring into the transaction. This may include sourcing, full search engagement, or execution of market scans and networking events. The Inclusion Network provides opportunities for each of the participating parties. For Marsh and McLennan, the strong industry knowledge and global network of Heidrick & Struggles, combined with the specialized networks and expertise of the Inclusion Network firms, make this an ideal program for identifying and attracting a broad senior talent base to compete effectively in today’s dynamic and changing world. The Inclusion Network also increases brand awareness of Marsh & McLennan Companies in diverse communities and contributes to the company’s supplier diversity efforts. The Inclusion Network program, part of the Diversity Advisory Services Practice at Heidrick, further solidifies Heidrick’s position as a diversity leader in the search industry who is serious about helping all clients identify, recruit and hire diverse talent. All the partners agree that they have found a richness within this relationship that they would not have expected given traditional tensions between large and small and competing firms. PDJ


2 0 1 1 international innovation in diversity awards

Finding Life/Work Balance in a Results-driven Environment

Advocate for the Advancement of Women

Ecolab has been on a path of culture change since 2008. With its Culture & Inclusion initiative, it committed to creating an environment where associates at every level feel valued, respected, and seen for who they are so that they can do their best work.

For CDW, the development and retention of women is a major contributor to business results. The CDW Women’s Leadership Network (WLN), open to both men and women, is an internal resource and advocate for the advancement of women.

One way that the company demonstrates this commitment is through its FlexWork program, which offers Ecolab associates the flexibility to meet both work and life responsibilities. Launched across the United States in August 2010, the program provides tools and resources that are designed to support each associate as he or she pursues a flexible work situation. A focus of the FlexWork program was to create a mindset open to flexibility and to challenge the thinking that productivity is linked to time in the office. Through a series of education sessions, the program helped managers learn more about work flexibility and dispel the illusion of “face-time” being indispensable to top performance. “Measure performance by results, not presence,” is one of the principles that guide the program. The FlexWork program has two components: Formal Flexible Work Arrangements, like telecommuting and job sharing, and EveryDay Flexibility for occasional needs. The more formal arrangement calls for a thorough application process that reflects the second guiding principle— a “consistent process with individual outcomes.” An essential element of this application process is that associates are never asked why they want a more flexible work arrangement. “What matters to the company is that I’m a good employee and I can handle my work responsibly,” said one associate. The principles assure that the FlexWork program is performance-focused, consistent, fair in its allocation of responsibilities, and reason-blind. The principle, “Focus on business objectives,” acknowledges that work flexibility must be as good for Ecolab’s business as it is for its employees. Recently, Ecolab associates took the 2011 Your Voice Matters survey that gauges employee satisfaction. When the results are in, Ecolab hopes that they will reflect the impact of the FlexWork program and support its belief that the success of its associates and the success of the company go hand-in-hand. PDJ

The WLN provides career development opportunities to strengthen leadership and business skills and enables members to utilize their talent to develop women across the company, build confidence by presenting at events and learn innovative ways to motivate and retain other leaders. The WLN focuses on three areas: development, engagement and retention. Yearly themes have included “Building Effectiveness/Influencing,” “Sharpening Your Leadership Edge,” and, most recently, “Building Business Acumen.” Events vary from guest speakers, to hands-on seminars, to panel discussions in order to keep events fresh and relevant to members. The CDW WLN also works with local organizations in order to provide mentorship for young women in the community. The WLN worked with the WNBA Chicago Sky Foundation “Sky Cares” to host a booth at their yearly fitness festival. The event was Chicago Sky Fitness Festival - July 2010. centered on the Sky’s mission of building girls’ self esteem and providing girls and young women with positive mentors and role models. The Festival was attended by over 800 girls and focused on health and fitness as well as an in-game experience designed to show girls 10-16 ways to get active. The WLN members worked with several other organizations to show the girls how to “get moving” through jumping rope and dance. Feedback provided both verbally and, more importantly, through written surveys, shows that the CDW WLN is making an impact on members and, in doing so, contributing to the overall success of CDW. The CDW WLN’s efforts continue to expand and will branch not only to members’ mentees, but also to other organizations in 2011 in order for us to continue to be a driving force in the development of our future women leaders and the overall success of CDW. PDJ

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2 0 1 1 international innovation in diversity awards

Marriott’s Supplier Diversity Program

Impact — Taking Bright Minds Further

At Marriott International, our vision is to integrate our global diversity and inclusion efforts within every facet of our organization. This transformation is led by the company’s Executive Global Diversity and Inclusion Council, chaired by President and Chief Operating Officer Arne Sorenson and Jimmie Paschall, global diversity officer.

“Impact opened my eyes to possibilities that I wasn’t sure existed. It not only broadened my awareness of academic options, provided me the knowledge and support to navigate the application and financial aid process, but it also helped me to learn more about myself and challenged me to reach for my fullest potential.” — Jelisa Grant, NYC Impact Alum attending Dartmouth College

The council is charged with ensuring that managers “own” the achievement of diversity and inclusion outcomes and understand the importance of cultural competence in doing business globally. Thirty-six percent of our rooms pipeline is outside the U.S. With two-thirds of our 42,000 rooms under construction outside the U.S., we see an opportunity to utilize the value-added goods and services provided by diverse suppliers. In 2007, we set a diverse spend goal of 15 percent of discretionary spend by 2010, and we have exceeded that goal. We have a fully-integrated supplier diversity strategy for all hotel and corporate business units; we have supplier diversity champions around the globe to lead our efforts; and we closely monitor our progress with quarterly reports to our board of directors’ Committee for Excellence. We also include supplier diversity as a component of all management performance reviews. Additionally, we’ve added specific supplier diversity language in requests for proposals (RFPs) and vendor contracts to include participation in our growing Tier 2 program. Other efforts include networking luncheons between top executives and diverseowned suppliers, facilitation of meetings between prime suppliers and potential second-tier diverse suppliers and one-on-one informal supplier mentoring and coaching. Finally, we have forged strategic partnerships with organizations like The National Minority Supplier Development Council, The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, The National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce, WEConnect International, the Australian Indigenous and Minority Supplier Council (AIMSC), and the Canadian Aboriginal and Minority Supplier Council. Our supplier diversity program has been a real success, and we are gratified to have been recognized with numerous industry awards since the program was launched. PDJ

PwC’s Impact program provides college prep and career mentoring to academically accomplished African-American high-school juniors. The program is part of PwC’s commitment to motivate, educate and develop the next generation. In 2007, PwC launched Impact in New York and Washington, DC. The program now reaches six cities (Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Philadelphia, New York and DC), reaching over 450 students to date. Impact scholars are selected through a competitive application process that includes an in-person interview. Scholars attend monthly workshops to navigate the college admissions process and enhance their career acumen. Over the course of 15 months, participants learn how to target the right schools, preparing for the SAT/ACT, planning application essays and negotiating the best financial-aid package. Impact is designed to equip our scholars with mentoring support to help them create education strategies, exposure to careers in the accounting profession, a broader awareness of academic and professional options and information for navigating the college-planning and financial-aid processes. We’re proud to report that in 2010, each graduating Impact scholar received an average of $42,776 in scholarships and grants from the school he or she selected. Impact’s 2010 graduates were collectively offered more than $4.5 million from all accepted schools. Impact helps PwC forge meaningful relationships with young people while developing the next generation of diverse leaders. Through Impact, PwC plays a crucial role in expanding the talent pipeline by providing students with exposure to career role models and mentors. Of the colleges that accepted Impact’s 2010 graduates, 51 percent are recognized as “most and more selective” by U.S. News & World Report. Collectively, they been offered more than $5.4 million in scholarships and grants from all accepted schools—and we expect these numbers to continue to develop. PDJ

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FRESH

PERSPECTIVES, CREATED

DAILY. © 2010 Lockheed Martin Corporation

THIS IS HOW Diversity is more than a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, every idea counts. Every viewpoint matters. That’s why, at Lockheed Martin, we not only believe in diversity. We embrace it. Because diversity is the “how” that delivers the most innovative solutions to some of the most complex problems imaginable.

lockheedmartin.com/how


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A continuing series designed to bring you perspectives and ideas from leading diversity professionals. Do you have a question for our thoughtleaders? Send your suggestions to damianjohnson@diversityjournal.com.

Walking the Long and Bumpy Road to Success as a Diversity Supplier By Sonu Ratra

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ecoming a certified minorityowned business is a big step. But as I learned through the years, it is only the beginning of a journey. Certification does not necessarily bring in new contracts. In fact, it took three years for my company, Akraya Inc., a minority- and women-owned IT staffing and managed solutions firm, to acquire new business with the help of its minority status. After we received our NMSDC MBE certification at the end of 2007, we found ourselves facing a big question: Now what? Success didn’t fall into our laps with the MBE status. In fact, we didn’t even know how to put our certification to good use. How do we find the opportunities in our industry? What is the business etiquette in terms of approaching diversity procurement? We needed answers to questions like these. The local Northern California Minority Supplier Development Council (NCMSDC) was more than helpful, offering webinars, meet-the-buyer meetings, trade show opportunities, etc. Their mentorship and the help of the free tools they offer can help you hit the ground running. However, to be considered for contracts, you have to be proactive. We developed a target list of companies with strong diversity programs. We started researching the professional needs of each client and where our services could fit in. It is important to know that the diversity status only opens the door; your service offering and competitive pricing is what actually gets you the business. Pro f iles in D iversit y Journa l

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President, Akraya Inc.

“We started researching the professional needs of each client and where our services could fit in.”

Registering in the online supplier database of your target companies and updating your marketing collateral to reflect your diversity status is also crucial. With the ground work done, we looked at how we could approach corporate diversity teams to introduce Akraya and start building relationships. We found it most useful to simply ask for help from corporations. We were pleased by the willingness to help and the support we received. In fact, Akraya is proud to have found diversity mentors from several corporations, such as Chevron, Wells Fargo, PG&E, Cisco, and AT&T. Our diversity strategy brought results after three years. In 2010, Akraya acquired two new major accounts through our diversity status and capabilities. I have learned that the road to becoming a successful diversity supplier can be long and bumpy. However, with perseverance, your diversity status can become an important differentiator and the base on which the success of your company is built. PDJ

Sonu Ratra is the founder and president of Akraya Inc., an IT staffing and managed solutions firm in Sunnyvale, California. Sonu also serves as the vice chair of the Northern California Minority Supplier Development Council’s MBE Input Committee and is a dedicated advocate and mentor of women in technology.


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Accountability — The Linchpin for a Successful Diversity and Inclusion Strategy By Elizabeth A. Campbell Partner and Chief Diversity Officer, Andrews Kurth LLP

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orking with organiI joined Andrews Kurth in 2007. While we rapzations on diversity and in- idly moved forward with developing a vision, busiclusion strategies, I have learned ness case, focus areas and training, my suggestions that accountability can be critical about accountability took longer to be embraced. in achieving success. At Andrews Kurth, we have To me, the caution about accountability meant to found a way to manage accountability. proceed slowly, but proceed, nonetheless. In 2006 I was intrigued by the opportunities in I began by explaining the importance of getting as the legal industry for an attorney, many people engaged as possible. “While we rapidly human resources professional, and We first added staff department diversity practitioner like myself. leaders to the diversity committee. moved forward with The call to action for corporations Next we developed firm billing developing a vision, through their general counsel was numbers so that attorneys could business case, focus taking hold and law firms should report their time spent working on areas and training, have been eager to answer the call. diversity and inclusion matters; I my suggestions about included firm billing numbers in However, few firms in my home geography were interested. I was our diversity orientation training accountability took contacted by a recruiter conductmaterials and talking points for longer to be ing a search for a Partner and Chief attorneys attending diversity-related embraced.” Diversity Officer for Andrews events. Our managing partner Kurth LLP. To my knowledge, no updated our performance review other law firm in the country had a partner devoted process to create the opportunity for attorneys to exclusively to the development and implementa- report on their efforts to contribute to our diversity tion of a comprehensive diversity and inclusion strategy. In less than one year, we implemented this strategy. I was honored to join the firm. full array of accountability measures. There were a few hurdles in the beginning, Today, diversity and inclusion components are though; the most significant of which was account- integral parts of the firm’s overall strategic business ability. During my screening process, I had men- plan and our 400 attorneys are spending in excess tioned the key elements of a diversity and inclusion of 6,200 hours per year on our diversity and inclustrategy: vision, business case and accountability. sion efforts. The recruiter cautioned me that attorneys might Accountability achieved! PDJ not appreciate such an ultimatum-like approach to this new strategy. As an attorney with over 25 years’ experience, I Elizabeth A. Campbell is an attorney with a successful record of working with have worked with scores of lawyers. Yes, account- corporate executives and teams to accomplish organizational goals. As partner ability might be a problem. But if I were going to be and chief diversity officer for Andrews Kurth, she is responsible for the diversity and inclusion components of the firm’s strategic business plan. Elizabeth received successful in this new Chief Diversity Officer role, her BA from American University and her JD from the University of Michigan Law School. then accountability would have to be addressed. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Pride Month: Employee Resource Groups Providing Value Beyond Cultural Awareness By Mark McLane Director of Diversity and Inclusion, Booz Allen Hamilton

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mployee resource groups (ERGs) or affinity groups and the constituencies they represent will only continue to drive value for an organization if: 1) The ERG objectives align with the diversity and inclusion strategy 2) Senior leader sponsorship/ participation exists as part of talent management 3) Employees leading the ERG are recognized and rewarded for their effort 4) Progress is measured and communicated enterprisewide. These expectations set the framework for impact at all levels of the organization. ERGs should be managed within the same business constructs as other organizational entities. The idea of allowing a business unit to operate independently of the enterprise would prove chaotic to the organization, and the same holds true for ERGs. To be able to demonstrate the value of an ERG, clear expectations must be set, through concise annual plans that drive impact and awareness simultaneously. This will drive positive impact year over year, while minimizing the organizational fatigue Pro f iles in D iversi t y J ourna l

that comes from inconsistently communicating results. For example, ERGs that are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and allies based traditionally organize to provide awareness of the experience and value of being out in the work place, providing employees a collective voice to leadership and having a positive influence on the engagement of employees. But transformational change is about more than just the awareness. It should also have substantive organizational impact, such as ensuring the use of inclusive language in company documents. For example, the firm might use spouse and partner inter changeably and provide domestic partner health care benefits, actively positioning the organization as an employer of choice and building brand awareness in this lucrative consumer market segment. Years of cultural awareness education without examples of organizational impact can cause fatigue for both the participants within the ERG and the organization. That is not to say that awareness education should be abandoned, but rather that it should be seen as a catalyst for moving the organization toward positive action. The ERG must

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continue to build on the foundation of awareness to bring about any significant change. To actively guard against fatigue and provide true impact within the organization, expand the ERG’s role beyond diversity brown bag and heritage month planning to include such opportunities as: 1) Partnering with HR to identify the use of dated or noninclusive language in internal documents 2) Using the group’s members to act as an internal advisory group, pulsing them on employee engagement, current market trends, etc. 3) Building strategic partnerships that drive professional development opportunities, recruitment of superior talent, and the sharing of benchmarking data. These examples apply to all ERGs and their constituencies. Not leveraging what ERG members bring to an organization is ignoring the innovation and talent that the group represents. Recognizing this value will foster improvement in cultural inclusiveness, organizational positioning as an employer of choice and overall enterprise value. PDJ


At Bank of the West, we value the individual.

Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. We’ve grown stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees that keep us a step ahead of the rest. For career opportunities, visit us online at bankofthewest.com.

© 2011 Bank of the West. Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V


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Blazing new trails in realizing the value of inclusion: Could your Chief

Information Officer play a key role? By Shari Slate Chief Inclusion and Collaboration Strategist, Cisco

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nnovation. Collaboration. Value. Key priorities in my company and also with our customers and partners. In the midst of rising to meet the challenges of contemporary realities—globalization, shifting economies, changing demographics, and rapidly advancing technologies—we’re all seeking new and better ways to create tangible value and drive sustainable growth. At Cisco, we’ve engaged in an extensive inquiry with our customers and partners, exploring the role that inclusion plays in enabling true collaboration and in fueling innovation. Together, we’re exploring an intriguing hypothesis that identifies relationships between inclusion, collaboration and technology, and points toward the key factors that will make it possible to fully realize the potential of the diverse mind sets, skill sets, experiences, and perspectives within our organizations. What we’re observing is what can best be described as a transition point in the evolution of the classic approach to inclusion and diversity. We believe we now have an opportunity to create new conversations and powerful next practices that will move us beyond the objective of compliance into a new level of engagement within our organizations in which the objective of inclusion is to drive value. In the process of exploring this hypothesis, one thing is becoming clear: creating a relationship between diversity and inclusion leadership and the chief information officer is an essential step on the evolutionary path. From the viewpoint that inclusion has a direct impact on the people, processes, and technologies that ultimately enable an organization to survive—and thrive—powerful new alliances are critical. Interested in creating a relationship with your

“What we’re observing is what can best be described as a transition point in the evolution of the classic approach to inclusion and diversity.”

CIO? Having a conversation about key organizational priorities and the role that both inclusion and technology can play in fulfilling them is a great place to start. Invite your CIO to envision and articulate the impact that a highly inclusive environment could have on technology adoption and ROI. Ask the question: How can we align both inclusion and technology goals to enhance the way we collaborate across our workforce and with our customers globally, remotely, virtually, and cross-culturally? Next, explore the role that technology plays in advancing inclusion. What tools and technologies are we employing now, or should we employ, to ensure that everyone feels welcome and able to fully participate, leverage diverse perspectives, and add value? For those willing to deviate from the beaten path by engaging in these conversations, new realms of possibility in realizing the potential of inclusion and diversity await you. Take the first step today. Reach out to your CIO and begin the inquiry. Seek support from your fellow “evolutionary” I&D professionals. Reach out to me and share your experiences (sslate@cisco.com). Together we can blaze a new trail! PDJ

Shari Slate is Chief Inclusion and Collaboration Strategist within Cisco’s Americas Sales Organization. She is responsible for making inclusion relevant in the revenue generating arm of the business and leveraging inclusion to create value for Cisco, our partners, and every customer we sell to.


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Education: The Competitive Imperative By Tammy Klugh Vice President, Diversity and Inclusion, Kelly Services, Inc.

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y business is to help build a diverse pipeline of talent for our clients in areas such as science, IT, engineering, and healthcare. Given the recent recession, one would think that finding qualified talent for these positions would be easy. Wrong. Persistently high unemployment masks a widening gap between the skills required by the marketplace and the skills available. Consider that in the U.S., in computer and mathematical sciences occupations, there are over four advertised vacancies for every unemployed job seeker, and that ratio never dropped below 2:1 even in the depths of the recession. Education is key to closing these skill gaps for future generations. U.S. children will be competing for jobs on a global scale, and our country loses competitive ground each year we fail to address this reality. We’re all familiar with studies showing that U.S. students score lower in math and science than their global counterparts. What I find even more troubling is the educational divide within the U.S. when it comes to race and ethnicity. 2009 NAEP scores show that 12th-grade Black and Hispanic children are struggling much more than their White counterparts in reading, math, and science. They’re struggling not because of their race, but because they rely disproportionately on urban schools for their K-12 foundation. Yet these Black and Hispanic students will make up almost 50 percent of the U.S. workforce by 2050. If we refuse to acknowledge and correct the consequences of allowing our urban schools to fail, how do we

“Education is key to closing these skill gaps for future generations. U.S. children will be competing for jobs on a global scale, and our country loses competitive ground each year we fail to address this reality.”

expect to have a competitive workforce in the decades ahead? I know a short op-ed and a few statistics can’t begin to scratch the surface of this issue. But I also know that as a nation, we cannot turn a deaf ear to the business leaders around the world who question the preparedness of the U.S. workforce, and who wonder whether they will have to look elsewhere for the talent that will keep their companies competitive. We need to commit to America’s children that we will equip them with the building blocks to compete in the 21st century: hard skills of math, science, and technology, coupled with intricate skills of creativity, self-discipline, strategic thinking, and teamwork. They need to know their access to these skills won’t depend on being born in the right ZIP code. It’s time to rally as one United States of America to develop the skills and talents of all children regardless of race, ethnicity, or economic access. That is a commitment we simply cannot afford to break. PDJ

Tammy Klugh is Vice President, Diversity and Inclusion for Kelly Services, Inc., a leader in providing workforce solutions. She holds a JD from Wayne State University Law School in Detroit, Mich. and a bachelor’s degree in English and political science from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Targeted Mentoring Program Keeps Pipeline Full By Henry Hernandez, Jr. Vice President, Director of Diversity & Inclusion, SAIC

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In an industry still struggling to implement diversity and inclusion, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) is something of a rarity: women make up 32 percent of the workforce and a little over 20 percent of senior leaders. Three of the 13 members of the executive leadership team are women, as are three of the members of its 13-person board of directors. The company ensures a healthy pipeline of female talent through a vertically integrated portfolio of programs that support and sustain women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers. SAIC expanded its relationship with Women in Technology (WIT), a regional organization of entrepreneurs and professionals in science, engineering and information technology, to underwrite its flagship mentor/protégé program. The program selects 30 protégés—entry- to mid-level women who are considering a career in technology or are re-entering the field after an absence, who would like to build their leadership skills and advance in their career or start their own business. Each is paired with a senior professional woman with at least 20 years of experience. Many SAIC female

“These efforts are paying off. Targeted mentoring is expanding across the company and it reinforces that women are appreciated at SAIC.”

employees have or will serve as mentors. SAIC hosted five sessions in 2011 at SAIC’s headquarters in McLean, Va. “We went from a limited relationship with WIT to a highly engaged, strategic partnership to encourage outreach and development via our employee resource groups and the organization,” says Henry Hernandez, Jr., SAIC vice president, director of diversity & inclusion “It’s a win/win.” In addition, SAIC sponsored and hosted WIT’s inaugural launch of Girls in Technology, a high school initiative to encourage teenage girls to consider STEM careers. Twenty-five SAIC female junior professionals in the first stages of their careers volunteered to be mentors. They, in turn, received guidance and advice from SAIC female senior leaders. The program has multiple layers of benefits by providing a natural environment for nurturing networks among early career and senior level women. SAIC employees not only serve as role models for the next generation of women in STEM, but also for each other. Ultimately,

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the program brands SAIC in the wider community as an employer of choice for women. Within SAIC, senior female employees have an opportunity to forge powerful relationships and explore future career paths at the Women’s Business Forum, a quarterly networking breakfast hosted by board member Dr. Anita K. Jones. A different group of between eight and ten participants from different business units, functions and geographies, is selected each quarter. “These efforts are paying off,” says Hernandez. “Targeted mentoring is expanding across the company and it reinforces that women are appreciated at SAIC. PDJ Henry Hernandez, Jr. is vice president, director of diversity & inclusion at SAIC. Hernandez provides thought leadership and strategic direction for diversity and inclusion processes enterprise-wide. Prior to joining SAIC in 2009, Henry was managing director for diversity & inclusion at Executive Consulting, chief diversity officer at American Express, executive director for global diversity leadership at Pitney Bowes, and intelligence officer for the Central Intelligence Agency. Henry is co-founder and first President of the National Society of Hispanic MBAs (NSHMBA). Henry holds a BA degree in Mechanical Engineering from Rice University and an MBA from the Anderson School at UCLA.


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Developing Diverse Leaders By Sandy Price Senior Vice President – Human Resources, Sprint

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mployee diversity is a focus In February 2009, Sprint launched the ERG for many companies. This is certainly Officer Development Program. The two-year protrue for Sprint, where diversity is a key gram is managed by Sprint’s Office of Diversity and part of how we do business. By being Inclusion with Human Resources, for the 24 ERG representative of the diverse markets we serve, officers that lead Sprint’s ERGs. This program prowe are better at serving our customers. At Sprint, vides ERG officers the opportunity to lead groups we take great pride in our inclusive workforce of employees from various business units and benmade up of talented people where efit from mentoring with senior “At Sprint, we take all employees’ backgrounds, talents executives, as well as leadership great pride in our and contributions are valued. We development training. inclusive workforce support programs that encourage I have the privilege of serving as diversity and cultural viewpoints, a mentor to the ERG officers, and made up of talented such as Employee Resource Groups people where all em- they certainly serve as teachers to (ERGs), mentoring programs and me. We discuss such meaningful ployees’ backgrounds, career development tools. topics as what it means to be an talents and contribuERGs are an important part of emerging leader in times of great tions are valued.” Sprint’s commitment to diversity and change, the importance of develinclusion. Sprint has six ERGs in the oping high-performing teams, how following focus areas: African-American, Hispanic, to strengthen personal leadership characteristics, Asian/Pacific Islander, Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/ leadership in the community, and the importance of Transgender (LGBT), veterans and women. These building a strong support system. We also discuss groups each focus on a different diverse audience, Sprint successes and challenges and how we can, and they help employees learn about cultural heri- together, continue to build a strong company. tages, understand the importance of diversity and While the ERG Officer Development Program inclusion, develop themselves personally and profes- is relatively new, we are confident that the parsionally, obtain insights into new areas of the business ticipants will immediately benefit from what they and network with diverse groups of people. About learn from their experiences as ERG officers. 4,800 Sprint employees belong to an ERG, and the Likewise, we are excited about their current and ERGs are open to all Sprint employees, regardless of future contributions to Sprint, our customers, and the employees’ background, heritage or location. the community. PDJ We are continually looking for opportunities to further our commitment to develop and maintain a Sandy Price is senior vice president of human resources for Sprint Nextel, a position she has held since May 2006. She is responsible for all initiatives relating diverse workforce. One area that we identified as an to human resources, such as compensation and benefits, staffing and employee opportunity for growth was building a talent pool relations, training and development, and talent management. Ms. Price also of diverse leaders. Hence, we began to focus even manages flight operations. Her academic credentials include a Bachelor of Arts degree in special education and a Master of Arts degree in learning disabilities more on the development of employees who serve and school administration. Ms. Price completed doctoral coursework in policy and administration at the University of Kansas. as leaders in the ERGs. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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Opening Minds and Doors By Tisa Jackson Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion, Union Bank, N.A.

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espite the progress we’ve made toward greater diversity and inclusion, many companies still struggle to fill gaps in their workforce and in the marketplace they serve. Diversity professionals can help by asking questions such as: What stops people from walking through the doors we work so hard to open? Are some women and people of color unconsciously passing up opportunities that fall outside their comfort zone? There may be few, if any, role models for women and minorities, so they may need extra encouragement to pursue job opportunities that are open to them. Oprah Winfrey gets how important role models can be. She took a camping trip to Yosemite National Park last year after learning that of some 280 million visitors to national parks each year, only one percent are African American. Oprah’s presence was a powerful way to get across the message that times have changed and it’s safe to explore opportunities outside our comfort zone. The challenge for our national parks—and many other organizations that want to appeal to a more diverse market—includes luring young people away from their computer games and attracting the aging population as well as various racial and ethnic groups. This is partly a branding issue—with a better understanding of the cultural norms that people in different market segments have been wedded to, we can capture the imaginations of consumers with messages that motivate them to take a risk and try something new. We need to do the same for employees who may have unconsciously opted out of certain ca-

“Oprah’s presence was a powerful way to get across the message that times have changed and it’s safe to explore opportunities outside our comfort zone.”

reer paths, therefore contributing to the shortage of women and minorities in senior management, revenue-generating, decision making careers. Young people are particularly passionate about their values. The 9/11 generation grew up with the Enron scandal, and some who distrust corporations as a result are attracted to organizations with strong social responsibility efforts and jobs within the nonprofit sector where they feel they can make a difference. We also see too many women and people of color settle for support or back-office roles in the business world rather than pursuing higher-profile positions. They may not realize how much they could accomplish—without losing their integrity—as executives whose leadership reflects a strong sense of corporate social responsibility. The late business leader Darwin P. Kingsley once said: “There are no limitations in what you can do except the limitations of your own mind.” We can grow the talent our country needs for the future in part by helping women and minorities into career paths historically less traveled by those who look like them. We must follow First Lady Michelle Obama’s advice and think BIG. PDJ Tisa Jackson, vice president of Diversity and Inclusion for Union Bank, N.A., is founder of the Professional & Technical Diversity Network (PTDN) of greater Los Angeles. Union Bank, N.A., is a full-service commercial bank providing an array of financial services to individuals, small businesses, middle-market companies, and major corporations. Visit www.unionbank.com for more information.


YOUR INDIVIDUALITY

>

YOU KNOW

UNLEASH YOUR IDEAS, AND MAKE YOUR MARK. At UnitedHealth Group, diversity isn’t just a corporate buzzword. It’s the way we work, and it comes through in everything we do. From the high-performing people we hire, to the health care services we provide, we advocate the possibilities of unique thinking. Our mission is to help people live healthier lives and every day, our efforts bring the advantages of the largest single proprietary network of physicians, hospitals, health facilities and caregivers in the United States to millions worldwide. Our employees have diverse cultural backgrounds, beliefs, perspectives, and lifestyles but they all have one thing in common - their ability to excel. UnitedHealth Group is a diversified health and well-being company whose 80,000 + employees are helping to heal the healthcare system every day with a greater dedication to Integrity, Compassion, Relationships, Innovation & Performance. A goal with this kind of magnitude requires the brightest, most forward-thinking minds around. We have them here. And they’re making a difference. Make your mark of distinction at greaterthancareers.com or from your mobile phone at workatuhg.com.

Connect with us: facebook.com/uhgcareers

twitter.com/uhgcareers

bitly.com/uhglinked

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V.UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment.© 2010 UnitedHealth Group. All rights reserved.

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lexicon THE LANGUAGE OF DIVERSITY: Effective Communication About Race and Ethnicity Introduction: By Jeremy Hein, PhD Department of Sociology University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire

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ost teachers can give examples of “a great class discussion.” That’s often when we feel at our best. We asked the right questions. Students participated without any prodding. They used information and terms we helped them learn. And we felt a type of civic pride that comes from people exercising freedom of speech and making their voices heard. Diversity is definitely one of those topics which can lead to “a great class discussion.” But talking about diversity in the work place can be challenging. This LEXICON is here to help. PERSONAL + FACTUAL + CONTROVERSIAL = CHALLENGING Understanding what diversity means starts with our personal experiences. A lot of what makes us unique as individuals is our special relationships with family, friends, neighbors, teachers, co-workers, congregations, and the other people who shape our lives. We weren’t born who we are now. We became that person by interacting with significant others. So when we talk about diversity we often describe experiences involving people we are close to. That’s why saying “I really like strawberry ice cream” is a lot different from saying “My parents are immigrants.” 44

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extra “ The essential guide

for every employee participating in a diverse work place.” James R. Rector, Publisher/CEO It takes courage to communicate personal experiences to people we don’t know very well. But diversity talk is also challenging because it is much more than personal opinion. There are a lot of facts, too, so what you say could be true or false, accurate or inaccurate. Facts are important when discussing diversity because there are so many misconceptions. For example, if you hear someone say, “Immigrants take jobs from Americans,” you may feel the statement is wrong but not be able to explain why. If you knew some facts, however, you could respond: “Actually, working immigrants create jobs because as consumers they spend their earnings to buy houses, cars, and other goods and services.” It is important to have valid and reliable information before discussing a topic related to diversity. But if you think you have to “be smart” in order to say something, then many people will feel too inhibited to talk. Fact, rather than opinion, shapes communication about diversity in two ways. First, diversity issues almost always involve a long his-

tory of inequality, struggle, partial success, and disappointments. When people talk about diversity they correctly feel that they are continuing a pre-existing discussion or debate, not starting a new one. We don’t want to simplify or trivialize an aspect of diversity because we don’t know something about history, such as key dates, events, and laws. Second, globalization is constantly reshaping what diversity means. According to the U.S. Census, the U.S. has become the first country in world history to be literally made up of people from every part of the world. But all countries are impacted by globalization. Diversity inside one country affects the culture, economy, and politics of other countries. If you don’t know something about these countries and the people in them, such as their holidays and religious events, you may feel too uninformed to talk. People may have personal stories about diversity and know some facts but still feel that communicating about it is challenging because the topic is often controversial. People feel that others listening to what they say are likely to express support or disapproval in some way. There is a big difference between saying “It’s a nice day” in public and “I’m proud of my immigrant ancestors” or “Racism is a problem in the criminal justice system.” When we talk about diversity, we are taking a stand. When we take a stand, we are taking a risk since most people will have a positive or negative reaction to what we say rather than feeling neutral. Because diversity is challenging to talk about, the result is often miscommunication. COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES: MISCOMMUNICATION In the work place, miscommunication has four main sources. First, employees’ vocabulary for communicating about diversity comes from popular discourse, primarily entertainment and the media’s coverage of controversial events. Workers therefore rely on a tiny lexicon to communicate about a very complex subject. Learning a larger vocabulary from a lexicon is essential for workers to effectively communicate about diversity. Second, many terms that employees use—such as “racism” and “affirmative action”—actually have a different meaning than they think. Unlearning the meanings of key terms is just as important as learning the meanings of new terms. w w w.d ive rs ity jo u r n a l.c o m

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lexicon Third, many ordinary words that people use—such as “ignorant,” “uneducated,” and “opinionated”—are vague. They either exaggerate a problem or underestimate the seriousness of a problem. Fourth, fields such as medicine and law have precise terms in order to accurately diagnose a health problem or a possible legal violation. The field of diversity has similar terms that employees can learn. Instead of “ignorant” they can learn to make more accurate statements, such as: “He is prejudiced toward immigrants because he has stereotypes about them. But I don’t think he would ever discriminate against them at work because that’s illegal. Actually, he’s the type of person who could learn multicultural relativism if he attended an ethnic event.” As the above passage suggests, nobody is born with the ability to effectively communicate. It is something learned and relearned. Of course, we need teachers to help us learn and this Lexicon is designed to do that. HOW TO USE THE INTERNATIONAL DIVERSITY & INCLUSION LEXICON™ Employees quickly understand that “doing something about diversity” first requires effective interpersonal communication about diversity. You need to know how to convey your ideas and feelings to other people if you want to reduce prejudice, learn the value of multiculturalism, or avoid discriminatory actions. Effective communication about diversity requires some consensus on the meaning of basic vocabulary terms. You can think of this Lexicon as a specialized dictionary on what we call “the language of diversity.” We have selected the most important terms one needs to know in order to have a meaningful and rewarding discussion about the ways race, ethnicity, inequality, and social change shape our lives. The meanings of the terms are derived from a wide range of sources, including: social science research; court decisions and law; corporate best practices experience; ethnic community traditions and organizations. The Lexicon is divided into sections that can be incorporated into a series of discussions or used as discussion plans. The section on NAMES is a good place to begin. Effective communication about diversity can only start when we know and feel comfortable naming different groups. The section THE MELTING POT covers the key terms for 46

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extra describing what many people agree is a distinctive feature of the U.S.: it has always been a place where different cultures interact and to varying degrees form new cultures. Globalization in general, and international migration in particular, make it very important to have a vocabulary for talking about different cultures and how they change. The so-called American melting-pot, however, sometimes boils over. Along with diversity we also have adversity. The section ADVERSITY covers terms that describe different types of problems, conflicts, and inequalities. The section SOLUTIONS contains the vocabulary for talking about a wide range of ideas for preventing or reducing adversity. One of the best ways to help employees feel more comfortable with diversity and to eliminate adversity is to learn about, or actually participate in, events of special significance to an ethnic community or country. The sections CULTURAL EVENTS and RELIGIOUS EVENTS list secular and sacred holidays, celebrations, and rituals under broad geographic or religious headings. Most employees feel they should be able to review a calendar and identify the dates in each month that hold significance for a wide range of cultures, religions, and nationalities. It can be surprisingly effective and rewarding to have employees, individually or in small groups, research one of these events and then make a presentation to their peers. Celebrating diversity is both fun and educational, but it is also easy to convince employees that diversity is important for their professional careers. First, we have the right to be free from discrimination when we look for jobs and work in them. Second, we have the responsibility not to engage or condone discrimination in our work place. The Lexicon, therefore, has a section entitled LAW that reviews significant court cases, legislation, and federal agencies. Finally, diversity is a resource that can increase productivity and achievement in the workplace. The section RIGHTS AND RESOURCES covers the main terms relevant to affirmative action and equal employment opportunity. The more of the terms in these sections you and your employees know, the more effective your communication about diversity will be. Get ready from some great discussions! PDJ

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Corporate Philanthropy 26 Unique Ways Organizations are Enhancing Their Corporate Image

The following pages contain snapshots into the organizations giving back to their communities; the ways are as unique and varied as the companies themselves. We are honored to share these examples of their generosity and volunteerism with you.

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It would be easy for a company to jump off the philanthropy bandwagon these days. After all, market conditions have generally been poor and margins are squeezed like never before. That’s exactly why the companies showcased in this feature deserve our praise and recognition. Their commitment to the communities they serve is unshakeable. They are like a rock to the individuals who receive the benefit of their corporate giving. Read through these profiles, and you’ll see creativity at its best. Many companies display an inventiveness in their giving that likely reflects the creativity and innovation they bring to their respective markets. We applaud these generous firms that collectively give millions of dollars to serve their neighbors in need. If you’re employed by one of these companies, you should be proud. If you’re looking to join a firm that values giving back, then here is where to focus your career search. You couldn’t find a better group of companies to work for!

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Corporate Philanthropy

3M STEP Program Helps Launch Tech Aide’s Career Dr. Robert Finocchiaro

Executive Sponsor of STEP Program, 3M Company

By Edem Sessou, Technical Aide, 3M

I have always enjoyed science, especially physics and astronomy, and how they relate to the physical world. What I lacked was a connection from my enthusiasm and curiosity with science to a long-range career path. The 3M STEP Program ended up being the link I needed. I have spent two summers in the 3M STEP Program and am currently employed at 3M as a technical aide. As a junior in high school, I spotted a posting looking for students interested in careers in science, and decided to apply. I was one of the lucky 15 students out of over 100 who had applied who were selected for the 2007 STEP Program. Through the STEP Program I worked with 3M engineers, technicians, and scientists where I got first hand exposure to careers in science. The program helped me improve my communication skills, boosted my confidence and really fed into my inquisitive nature.

By the end of the program my goals and career decisions had solidified, and I am now attending the University of Minnesota. My selection of college majors, computer science and computer engineering, was definitely influenced by courses I attended in the STEP Program. I am now a junior at the university and am employed part-time at 3M as a technical aide in the optical systems division. I am also able to expand my network of mentors and friends, while gaining exposure to the business world. Often when classmates, professors and acquaintances discover that I have a position at 3M, I am met with expressions of fascination and amazement. I would have to agree, my experiences at 3M have been both fascinating and amazing! I am lucky to have had the opportunity to participate in the STEP Program and I hope to some day have the opportunity to share what I have learned with others. PDJ TPDC process development engineer Don Alston (far left) with STEP students and Edem, back row.

Company: 3M Company headquarters: St. Paul, Minnesota website: www.3M.com Primary business: Manufacturing & Technology

Edem Sessou, Technical Aide, 3M Corporate R&D

Employees: 80,000 worldwide, operations in 60 countries

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Corporate Philanthropy

Peace Through Business Mentorship Program Sonu Ratra

President, Akraya Inc.

Sonu Ratra has always been passionate about supporting women professionals. Her dedication developed at an early age thanks to the guidance and positive reinforcement her own mother provided. While Sonu leads Akraya’s charitable initiatives, her best success has been mentoring Rwanda businesswoman Joy Kabera through the Institute of Economic Empowerment for Women’s Peace Through Business Program. The institute is a nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering women to grow their busi- “Having been brought up in a developing country nesses, pursue greater en(India), I understand the trepreneurial ventures, and challenges and struggle become more active public that women entrepreneurs policy advocates. in developing countries Women entrepreneurs face. Mentoring another in war torn countries like business woman, from Afghanistan and Rwanda another country no less, gives me an opportunity to spend three weeks in class give back to the commulearning business basics, nity and make a difference and then take that infor- in the world.” Sonu Ratra, mation and transfer it into President, Akraya Inc.

‘real’ life under the guidance of American women entrepreneurs. Sonu Ratra became the mentor of Joy Kabera, a female business owner from Rwanda who founded her fledgling promotion merchandising business only a few years earlier. Joy applied to Peace through Business to learn how to grow and market her business. Sonu brought Joy to the Akraya office for a full week’s training on how to successfully brand, market and grow her business. Joy learned accounting, HR, sales and marketing best practices. Akraya’s marketing team even helped Joy register her own website and build a professional presence on Facebook. Sonu initiated conversations with the marketing departments of companies like Google, Safeway and Chevron, and explained her involvement in the PTB program. They invited Joy and Sonu to their offices where they discussed how to export her products to the United States and the importance of branding. Joy continues to be a role model for other Rwandan women and pass on the knowledge that she learned from her time with Sonu. PDJ LEFT: Sonu Ratra and Joy Kabera at Chevron. BOTTOM: Sonu Ratra with her mentee, Joy Kabera.

Company: Akraya Inc. headquarters: Sunnyvale, California website: www.akraya.com Primary business: Professional Staffing and Managed Solutions Employees: 300

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energized by

Diversity

With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.


Corporate Philanthropy

Improving Communities with Solar Mark Walker

Managing Director, Global Community Affairs, Applied Materials, Inc.

Moving into a new home is an exciting day for any family but especially for Habitat for Humanity families in Silicon Valley, California, who are not only getting their first home but a cutting-edge solarpowered residence that will save them 75 percent or more on their electricity bills. Since 2009, Applied Materials has supported a partnership between Habitat for Humanity Silicon Valley and economic and environmental sustainability nonprofit GRID Alternatives. GRID Alternatives’ flagship Solar Affordable Housing Program trains and leads teams of job trainees and other community volunteers to install solar electric systems for lowincome families throughout California. With the help of 200 Applied Materials employees contributing 1,700 volunteer hours, plus community investment grants from Applied Materials, GRID Alternatives has installed 14 rooftop solar panel power systems on Habitat homes in the South Bay area over the past two years. These projects will offset basic power needs with solar power by providing an estimated 1.8 million kilowatt hours of energy, which will generate savings of $311,000 for all of the families over the 30-year lifetime of the systems. The installed solar panels will also prevent Company: Applied Materials, Inc. headquarters: Santa Clara, California website: www.appliedmaterials.com Primary business: Semiconductor, LCD display and solar equipment manufacturing and services Employees: 13,000 worldwide

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1,250 tons of GHG emissions – the equivalent of planting 970 trees in the neighborhood. For GRID Alternatives, the program generates “triple bottom line” results: measurable, long-term financial benefits for low-income families struggling to keep up with monthly expenses; real-world, handson experience for local employers such as Applied Materials whose employees are able to see the end result of the solar technology; and environmental benefits through the elimination of greenhouse gas emissions and support for solar power as a mainstream solution for our local communities. For Applied Materials, the world’s largest supplier of photovoltaic solar manufacturing equipment, the program reflects its commitment to making a positive social contribution by leveraging the company’s resources to improve people’s lives. PDJ “I am proud of our global workforce’s commitment to our business, to the environment and to the communities where we live and work as it is essential to our success – both now and in the future.” Mike Splinter, Chairman and CEO, Applied Materials, Inc. Applied Materials employees install rooftop solar panels on houses for low-income families.


Corporate Philanthropy

Body & Soul Blue Bridget G. Hurd

Director of Community Responsibility, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan invests in community initiatives that focus on health, wellness and prevention. In 2009, in partnership with the American Cancer Society, BCBSM launched the Body & Soul Blue program in African-American faithbased communities to encourage participants to practice good nutrition and engage in physical activity. “Health disparities in diverse communities are significant. Blue Cross is committed to improving the health of African-Americans by educating and engaging them in healthier lifestyles. Working with the faith-based community is a great platform for educating people about good nutrition and healthy habits,” said Bridget G. Hurd, Michigan Blues director of Community Responsibility. Body & Soul Blue combines pastoral leadership, educational activities and incentives for various levels of physical activity during the timeframe of the program. Implementing this within the church environment where participants are comfortable and among people they trust, the information, tools and physical

activity opportunities empower church members to take charge of their health. Body & Soul Blue also incorporates ACS’s “Tell-AFriend” program to promote mammography screenings and breast self-exams. BCBSM provides its free online physical activity tracking tool to participating churches to accurately record the physical activity component of the initiative. Health appraisals are used to measure improvements in health. The program was implemented in Grand Rapids and Flint Michigan in 2009 and 2010. Last year, 11 Grand Rapids-area churches participated in the 2010 Body & Soul Blue challenge; in Flint, eight churches completed the challenge. Currently, Body & Soul Blue is underway in Southeast Michigan, and planning has begun for the third installments of Body & Soul Blue in Flint and Grand Rapids. Receiving notable statewide interest in the program, the partners hope to expand in 2012 to include Michigan’s Great Lakes Bay area, serving residents in the Saginaw and Bay City communities. PDJ Helping to kick off the Body & Soul Challenge in Grand Rapids were: Voncile Brown-Miller, manager of health disparity programs for the American Cancer Society; Pastor Nathaniel Moody and wife, Laura, of Brown-Hutcherson Ministries; and Cle Jackson, Community Responsibility, BCBSM.

Company: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan headquarters: Detroit, Michigan website: www.bcbsm.com Primary business: Health insurance benefits Employees: 7,100

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Corporate Philanthropy

Burger King® Scholars Program Jill Granat

President, Have It Your Way® Foundation

Last year, the Have It Your Way Foundation® celebrated the 10th anniversary of the BURGER KING® Scholars program, established in honor of BURGER KING® cofounder and philanthropist, Jim McLamore. The HAVE IT YOUR WAY® Foundation has awarded more than $15.4 million in scholarships since the program’s inception. This year alone, the foundation awarded $1.45 million dollars in scholarships to 1,258 students. This year, the foundation is helping to make higher education a reality for many students throughout the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. One exciting enhancement includes our inaugural $50,000 James W. McLamore WHOPPER® Scholarship Awards, made possible thanks to the generosity of the McLamore Family Foundation. James W. McLamore WHOPPER® Scholarship Award winners must be exceptional high school graduates with a minimum 3.3

GPA, substantial work experience and an active leadership role in community service, athletics, and/or a similar co-curricular activity. To apply, visit www.haveityourwayfoundation.org. In 2011, one of the first James W. McLamore WHOPPER® Scholarship Awards went to Jie Jane Chen, a student from California, who plans attend the University of California at Berkeley this fall to study molecular biology and biochemistry. Chen is a top student, described as dedicated and enthusiastic by her teachers and extremely hard-working by her swimming coach. Upon learning that she had received the scholarship, Chen said: “I’ll be able to focus more on studying and participating in school and community events. I hope that I am able to help others with my education and better be able to contribute to society.” We wish Jie Jane Chen and all of our other scholarship recipients the best of luck in their future endeavors. PDJ

“I’ll be able to focus more on studying and participating in school and community events. I hope that I am able to help others with my education and better be able to contribute to society.”

Company: Burger King Corporation headquarters: Miami, Florida website: www.bk.com www.haveityourwayfoundation.org Jie Jane Chen

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Primary business: Quick Serve Restaurant Employees: 22,000


Corporate Philanthropy

Supporting Those Who Keep Us Safe Paul Cofoni

President and CEO, CACI International Inc

The nearly 14,000 people at CACI share a common goal of supporting men and women in our Armed Forces. The help CACI provides for veterans is part of Project Philanthropy, a company-wide program to provide opportunities to support worthy initiatives. For Cause (Comfort for America’s Uniformed Services), an organization that brings comfort and recreation into the lives of wounded warfighters, we were there at its inception with financial support, expertise, and many volunteer hours. For hundreds of hospitalized veterans separated from family, Cause helps lift spirits with organized activities and gift packs. CACI is a primary sponsor of the USO lounge at the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport that serves as a “touch of home” for military travelers. Company volunteers also helped renovate two apartments for the USO Emergency Housing Program. These dwellings serve as temporary housing for troops and their families who are experiencing medical emergencies or have loved ones at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Over four days and 150 hours, numerous volunteers cleaned, painted, and worked on the apartments as if they were their own homes. Groups of CACI volunteers also regularly Company: CACI International Inc headquarters: Arlington, Virginia website: www.caci.com Primary business: Government Contracting Employees: 13,700

gather to pack USO gift bags “We honor the men and destined for troops overseas. women in our Armed The crews put together Forces who help keep thousands of care packages our nation free and secure. And through our filled with snacks, lip balm, corporate and volunteer tissues, razors, calling cards, efforts, we will continue to and messages of support. support them in-theatre, CACI does more than at home, and throughout support front-line troops. their careers.” Paul Cofoni, Our funding helps the President and CEO, CACI International Inc Special Operations Warrior Foundation provide free college scholarship grants, financial aid, and educational counseling to the surviving children of personnel killed in training accidents or operational missions. CACI provided dedicated volunteer support and was the primary sponsor of the annual Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing 2-Fly Tournament, which raises money and helps disabled service personnel readjust to daily life. Learning the fine motor skills required in fly fishing is effective in helping these veterans regain use of their bodies. CACI’s support for the military is also demonstrated by our Deploying Talent - Creating Careers program, which helps qualified disabled veterans transition into meaningful careers. The program disregards physical limitations and hires people based on mental agility. It is CACI’s way of giving back to the people who serve our country and growing our business with the best talent available. PDJ

Team CACI takes a break after apartment makeover as part of the USO Emergency Housing Program.

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Corporate Philanthropy

CSC Supports Hispanic College Fund Jose Jimenez

Chief Diversity Officer, CSC

CSC has been a long-term supporter of the communities in which we do business. We find that philanthropy helps build a strong and vibrant environment while enhancing diversity, equity and inclusion. Education and multiculturalism have a positive impact on society and community foundations are acutely attuned to the needs of their populations. One example is the Hispanic College Fund (HCF), which helps to develop the next generation of Hispanic professionals. CSC has provided scholarships to the HCF and, as seen below, the success stories are abundant, heartfelt and diverse. Student A: “My mother raised me and my brother on her own. My father was mentally abusive and made my whole family believe we were awful and worthless people. I just want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for sponsoring me this year. With your help and support I will be able to continue achieving the goals I have set

for myself. Just like my mother is proud of me, I hope you will be too.” Student B: “I want to thank CSC for their financial contribution and emotional support and commitment to the Hispanic College Fund and the Hispanic community. It feels great not only to be acknowledged for your hard work, but also to have such a great corporation believe in you! In my future as a researcher, educator and community leader, I will be able to impact Latin America by developing and deploying initiatives of progress.” Student C: “You have given me the resources necessary to pursue my future dream—to promote the advancement of computer science research. I hope that I will be able to develop something that can change the lives of everyone for the better—something that could never have been possible without people like you who generously contribute their financial support.” PDJ

Company: CSC headquarters: Falls Church, Virginia website: www.csc.com Primary business: Information Technology Services Employees: 94,000

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Corporate Philanthropy

“In School and On Track” Gets CSX Support Tori Kaplan

Director of Corporate Citizenship and Special Events, CSX Corporation

“Be a positive influence on communities and the environment” is a part of CSX’s core values. CSX is the largest National Team Sponsor of City Year, a nonprofit which aims to unite young people of all backgrounds for a year of full-time service to enact change in the world. Through philanthropic donations and employee volunteerism, CSX supports City Year programs including the “In School and On Track” youth empowerment program. Through this program, City Year and its supporters are planning to reach 50 percent of the most at-risk students in 20 cities around the country within five years. At the end of 2010, CSX hosted a City Year event, engaging more than 2,000 employees—from “CSX is how tomorrow moves, so we’re proud to work with City Year to encourage children to strive for success in school and become tomorrow’s leaders.” Michael Ward, Chairman, President and CEO, CSX Corporation

rail yard masters to the corporate leadership—to help change the lives of more than 7,000 students targeted by the “In School and On Track” program. CSX helped to purchase and assemble 57 bags full of gym equipment, 110 Scrabble board games, 22 bulletin boards, and 6,400 backpacks full of school supplies. CSX employees then delivered these supplies to schools in communities where they live and work and spent time with the students and teachers, seeing the impact of their contributions firsthand. In addition to the supplies employees delivered, they wrote more than 1,100 letters of encouragement to students, reminding them that school is important to their future and they have the ability to succeed. Giving back at CSX means taking the time to ensure that students at schools with some of the highest dropout rates have the supplies and encouragement they need to succeed. The hardworking men and women at CSX believe that being committed to what really matters is more than just donating to worthy causes—that’s why CSX’s leaders have made volunteerism a way of life for all CSX employees. PDJ

Company: CSX Corporation headquarters: Jacksonville, Florida website: www.csx.com Primary business: Freight Transportation

More than 2,000 CSX employees worked together to prepare and package school supplies and letters of encouragement for students and teachers around the country.

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Employees: 30,000


Corporate Philanthropy

Unwavering Commitment to Communities Nationwide Rosie Allen-Herring

National Director, Office of Community and Charitable Giving, Fannie Mae

Giving and service are embedded in the fabric of Fannie Mae’s Office of Community and Charitable Giving (OCCG). The office spearheads Fannie Mae’s philanthropic investments by identifying nonprofit partners that provide support to keep working families in their homes and stabilize communities. “We are committed to creating long-term value to help build a stable, sustainable housing market for the future,” said Michael J. Williams, Fannie Mae President and Chief Executive Officer. “The work that we do affects families and neighborhoods across the country, every day.” Fannie Mae’s investments with its partners support foreclosure prevention, sustainable homeownership, and neighborhood stabilization. The company’s partners also revitalize communities by connecting new home buyers with available foreclosed homes to protect neighborhoods from decline, and preserve permanent supportive housing to eradicate chronic homelessness. “Connecting our strategic corporate priorities to build thriving communities across the country is a rewarding professional experience, Company: Fannie Mae headquarters: Washington, DC website: www.fanniemae.com Primary business: Secondary Mortgage Market Employees: 7,000

especially during this critical time,” said Rosie AllenHerring, National Director of Corporate Giving. Over the next 12 months, Fannie Mae’s philanthropic investments will help more than 112,000 families avoid foreclosure; recycle over 9,600 foreclosed properties to help stabilize neighborhoods; preserve over 7,500 affordable housing units nationwide; develop over 11,400 units of permanent supportive housing, and produce more than 4,000 affordable housing units nationwide. Among the nonprofit partners working with Fannie Mae to help families is CredAbility (formerly Consumer Credit Counseling Services of Greater Atlanta), a national nonprofit consumer credit counseling agency. Since 1964, CredAbility has helped people in financial distress move from crisis to control by providing compassionate service with innovative, yet practical solutions. Last year, more than 1.7 million people facing financial difficulty have reached out to CredAbility for help. CredAbility provides housing, budget, credit and debt management counseling and education to families, in both English and Spanish, online, and by telephone. It also offers in-person counseling at 25 offices across the southeastern U.S. PDJ “We are committed to creating long-term value to help build a stable, sustainable housing market for the future. The work that we do affects families and neighborhoods across the country, every day.” Michael J. Williams, President and CEO, Fannie Mae

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Corporate Philanthropy

“Bounce Back Program” Gets Freddie Mac Support Charles E. “Ed” Haldeman, Jr.

CEO, Freddie Mac

Single Mother Anitra Byers nearly lost her home to foreclosure after falling behind on her mortgage payments and becoming the victim of a scam. Today, Byers is in her home, on top of her bills, and building a better future for her family—thanks to Freddie Mac’s partnership with HIP (Housing Initiative Partnership, Inc.) in Prince Georges County, Md. HIP counselors were able to stop the sale of her townhome just days before it was scheduled to be sold, report the scam to law enforcement, and finally help Byers get a mortgage modification from her bank so she and her two children could stay in their home. Byers is now enrolled in HIP’s Bounce Back program, a unique financial education program for borrowers who received a modified mortgage. Bounce Back’s counseling and monthly workshops are helping Byers and other participants reduce their debt, build their assets, and get back on the path to financial stability. When Byers came to Bounce Back she was barely able to pay all of her monthly bills. But after Company: Freddie Mac

Anitra Byers was able to keep her home with help from a Freddie Mac partnership with HIP.

headquarters: McLean, Virginia website: www.freddiemac.com Primary business: Mortgage Finance Employees: Approximately 5,400

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meeting with her coun- “Freddie Mac is committed selor, she was able to end to stabilizing neighborhoods the paycheck-to-pay- and strengthening commucheck cycle by creating a nities. We’re helping more families keep their homes spending plan that allows and become financially her to pay all her bills on stable by teaming up with time, pay off her debt, community organizations and save for her family. “I like HIP and other stakehave two children, nine holders.” Charles E. “Ed” and 13, and this program Haldeman, Jr., CEO, Freddie Mac has made me much more hopeful and confident about our future,” said Byers. Freddie Mac invests in nonprofits that help prevent foreclosures, create and preserve affordable housing, and strengthen communities. HIP is part of the Capital Area Foreclosure Network that Freddie Mac helped launch in the Washington region so that agencies can better serve struggling borrowers and renters affected by the foreclosure crisis. These philanthropic investments in the community complement Freddie Mac’s mission to support the housing market, and to help borrowers avoid foreclosure. PDJ

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SEE IN US WHO YOU ARE

At New York Life we believe that people’s differences can be their greatest attributes. We recognize that employees’ unique qualities often lead to innovation, positive change, and a more productive and dynamic workplace.

For more information about a career with New York Life visit us at www.newyorklife.com/diversity NEW YORK LIFE. THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.® © 2010 New York Life Insuranace Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010 EOE/M/F/D/V


Corporate Philanthropy

Volunteer Effort Teaches Life Lessons Kelly George

Senior Community Relations Representative, Halliburton

When JR Irvin, a senior manager for Halliburton, decided to volunteer during a recent corporate activity, little did he know that it would be a life lesson for him and his children. Along with 50 other volunteers, JR and his three children helped to make 2,000 sandwiches and 1,200 lunches for a Houston-area charity called Kids’ Meals. The charity delivers meals to the homes of 1,400 pre-school-aged children who are in need of food. The meals are delivered Monday through Friday, yearround, and are free to each family. “My whole family enjoyed volunteering to help make these sandwiches,” said JR Irvin. “My children felt really good about it, but, at the same time, they felt sad for the kids they were helping. Since then, they’ve been asking me, ‘When can we do that again?’ So, as a family, we now volunteer for Kids’ Meals as often as we can. “This project was a great

way for my wife, Vivien, and me to teach our children the concepts of sharing and giving back to the community,” he said. Ruth Burrell, director of Kids’ Meals, said, “Without the help of volunteers like the Irvin family and other Halliburton employees, our program would not be successful. The need for Kids’ Meals is ever-growing due to the increase of food and gas prices as well as the slowing economy. Layoffs have more families finding themselves in need of food. Kids’ Meals has hundreds of children on their waiting list ready to be fed. We hope to be the first city to have no hungry children.” Community involvement reflects Halliburton’s core values and helps the company to build and maintain trusting relationships, allowing Halliburton to be an employer of choice. It starts at the grassroots level—with employees. Each year, Halliburton employees clock thousands of volunteer hours across the globe. PDJ Company: Halliburton Company

JR Irvin’s daughter Hailey adds colorful decorations to paper bags waiting to be filled with lunches for young children in the Houston area.

headquarters: Houston, Texas and Dubai, United Arab Emirates website: www.halliburton.com Primary business: Energy Services Employees: 60,000

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Corporate Philanthropy

IBM’s Reading Companion Program Boosts a Career STANley S. Litow

Vice President for Corporate Citizenship and Corporate Affairs, IBM

“Carlos,” currently a 20-something Dominican-American living in the Washington Heights section of New York City, had dropped out of high school at the age of 17. For the next several years, he spent many of his days on local street corners, playing dominoes and drinking beer. At 20, unemployed and without a high school diploma or GED, Carlos came to Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation to study in a pre-GED class. At the beginning of the program, Carlos was reading at a 4th-grade level. Initially, progress was slow. He felt lost in a large classroom as he was not receiving the feedback that he needed. To provide Carlos with more intensive support, he was introduced to IBM’s Reading Companion. Reading Companion is IBM’s Web-based literacy grant initiative that uses voice recognition technology to help children and adults learn how to read in English. This program is available for free to public elementary schools (for children ages 5-7) and nonprofit organizations such as public libraries, community

Company: IBM headquarters: Armonk, New York website: www.ibm.com

colleges, and agencies that offer adult literacy services. Reading Companion is an effective and easy-touse technology that assists individuals as they learn to read. This innovative software ‘listens’ and provides feedback, enabling emerging readers to practice reading and their English pronunciation as they acquire fundamental reading skills. Approximately 1,100 schools and 1,100 nonprofits serving 85,000 users in 36 countries are participating in the IBM grant program which provides this technology. Practicing with Reading Companion for 90 minutes a day, Carlos demonstrated marked reading improvement in just 18 months. He stated that the Reading Companion program gave him the confidence to read independently. His reading score improved six grade levels and he passed the GED test. Carlos found a job as a construction worker, one that he could not have gotten without his GED. Carlos insists that his progress was due to the Reading Companion program. He has encouraged many of his classmates to become regular users of the program. PDJ

Kids use IBM's Reading Companion to improve their literacy skills. IBM's philanthropic arm provides software and expertise to organizations like Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation to help people achieve secure and prosperous futures.

Primary business: Technology Employees: 400,000

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Corporate Philanthropy

JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s The Fellowship Initiative (TFI) Kimberly Davis

Managing Director of Global Philanthropy, President, JPMorgan Chase Foundation

While dozens of research reports provide statistics that challenge our nation’s young men of color, Mynor, a Bronx native and sophomore in high school, is breaking barriers to beat the odds against him. As the eldest of five children born to a Puerto Rican native who works in the local Laundromat, Mynor is committed to becoming the first college graduate in his family. “I have learned the hard way that even one poor choice can jeopardize my future,” said Mynor. “Being a part of a program like The Fellowship Initiative (TFI) provides the motivation I need to realize my potential.” Through JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s investment in TFI, Mynor has the opportunity to excel. TFI takes corporate responsibility to a new level as a firm-based initiative which leverages the best practices of JPMorgan Foundation grantees and employees committed to helping to improve the academic and professional outcomes for young men of color. TFI students are able to take advantage of opportunities that would not traditionally be

provided to them. In addition, they benefit from the support of a brotherhood of other young men and JPMC mentors from all levels across the firm. “Mentoring has opened my eyes to the complexities and difficulties of being a young adult in our society today,” shared Larry Holodak, a managing director with JPMorgan Chase & Co., who mentors Mynor. TFI represents one of JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s key investments in education. According to Kimberly B. Davis, president of the JPMorgan Chase Foundation, “If a company is really in it to win it, we must identify effective ways to expand the pipeline of talented people of color.” By providing access to a variety of opportunities, The Fellowship Initiative is committed to helping young men reach their potential and establishing them as the next generation of global leaders. PDJ

Company: JPMorgan Chase headquarters: New York City website: www.jpmorganchase.com Primary business: Financial Services Employees: 200,000

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New York Stock Exchange Awards Dinner in celebration of the Summer Business Camp program hosted by TFI partner Youth About Business.

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Corporate Philanthropy

Opening Lives and Minds through the Magic of Reading Kathy Hopinkah Hannan

National Managing Partner, Diversity and Corporate Responsibility, KPMG LLP

In a place where nearly 80 percent of the population lives at or below the poverty level, employees and partners from KPMG LLP are helping to make a difference. For the past four years, volunteers for KPMG’s Family for Literacy (FFL) have traveled to Park Brook Elementary School in Brooklyn Park, Minn., to visit students, talk about the future, and provide some encouragement and hope. At every visit, each child receives a gift that means more to them than most people can understand: a brand-new book—in many cases, their first book—that they can take home, read, and always call their own. Working with First Book, a nonprofit delivering more than 80 million new books to children across the country, FFL provides children with their own new books. What happens as a result is nothing short of magical, according to Principal Scott Taylor. “The children feel encouraged to read the books, since they are a gift,” he says. “One teacher started a girls’

book club and the students are now spending their recess discussing the books they’ve read.” But KPMG’s volunteers are providing much more than access to books. “They encourage the students to dream about their future by sharing things about themselves—their education, where they went to college, things about their work and position,” Taylor says. “Through this program, we know we’re putting books in the hands of children who need them most,” says KPMG’s Chairman and CEO John Veihmeyer. “We’re incredibly proud of the positive feedback we’ve received from our employees, partners, and their families, on the impact that KPMG’s Family for Literacy has had on them personally.” Since its inception in 2007, FFL has established programs in more than 30 U.S. offices, and volunteers have distributed more than 1.5 million books to children in more than 90 communities. PDJ KPMG’s Family for Literacy volunteers share their own love of reading with children across the U.S.

Company: KPMG LLP headquarters: New York City website: www.us.kpmg.com Primary business: Audit, Tax, and Advisory Services Employees: More than 21,000 in the U.S.

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Corporate Philanthropy

4-H Science: Engineering a Bright Tomorrow for Youth Emily Simone

Director of Global Community Outreach, Lockheed Martin Corporation

Over the last five years, 4-H has cultivated a science program that seeks to engage one million young people in the fields of science, engineering and technology. This is a bold vision for the organization, whose roots are planted in agriculture. With rapidly growing project areas such as robotics, the 4-H Science program is well on its way to achieving this goal. 4-H has more than 60 robotics clubs and teams that compete in programs such as MATE (Marine Advanced Technology Education) and FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), where youth are challenged to build robots that can complete certain tasks and challenges in a sport-like atmosphere. Lockheed Martin provided a grant to support the development of a national 4-H Robotics curriculum to introduce youth from 4th to 12th grades to engineering. The comprehensive series can be used in 4-H clubs across the country. The 4-H Robotics Curriculum, developed in partnership with Lockheed Martin, is for all levels of expertise from beginning to advanced.

“Lockheed Martin recognizes the importance of inspiring the next generation of scientists and engineers,” said Emily Simone, director of global community outreach for Lockheed Martin. “Through our partnership with 4-H, we have an opportunity to work with talented students to inspire them.” An example of the success of the 4-H Science program is “The Original G-FORCE,” a FIRST 4-H Robotics Team from Garrett County, Md. In addition to being the national second-place winners of their division at the FIRST Robotics Championship games, G-FORCE is a leader in their community. They’ve used their experiences to provide more than 1,500 hours of robotics mentoring to other local youth. Using the new robotics curriculum, G-FORCE will be able to demonstrate the physical science and engineering concepts that will be the foundation for skills necessary to solve many other science projects they may encounter. G-FORCE is one of many 4-H robotics clubs preparing America’s next generation of great engineers. PDJ

Company: Lockheed Martin Corporation headquarters: Bethesda, Maryland website: www.lockheedmartin.com Primary business: Global Security and Information Technology

4-H youth in Montgomery County, Md., build a small robot using Legos. Robotics is one of the fastest growing program areas within 4-H.

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Employees: 126,000

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Corporate Philanthropy

Enhancing a Partnership with Nationwide Children’s Hospital CHAD JESTER

President, Nationwide Insurance Foundation

Nationwide Insurance’s partnership with Nationwide Children’s Hospital can be traced back decades through philanthropic support and the volunteer service of the company’s employees. In 2006, the Nationwide Insurance Foundation provided a $50 million gift to the hospital’s Child Safety and Injury Prevention, Neonatal Intensive Care and Heart Center programs. The grant also funded five endowed chairs to help the hospital recruit top physicians and scientists. In 2011, Nationwide found new ways to support its long-time partner. The hospital launched its Miracles at Play program in February, designed to help the public understand the miracles happening there every day. The program highlights the Miracle Kids—seven children who faced serious health challenges and received care at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Today, they are thriving and doing well, thanks in large part to Nationwide Children’s Hospital. The hospital’s goal is to build relationships with its supporters through social media or email by driving them to miraclesatplay.org to Company: Nationwide Insurance

Nationwide Children’s Hospital “Miracles At Play” wallscape looms large on a building in downtown Columbus for all to see.

headquarters: Columbus, Ohio website: www.nationwide.com Primary business: Nationwide offers a full range of insurance and financial services Employees: About 33,000

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learn about the Miracle Kids and other stories of courage. To help kick off this effort, Nationwide donated a 150-foot tall, 21,000 square foot wallscape billboard. The side of a prominent building in downtown Columbus was transformed into a giant-sized playground for the larger-than-life Miracle Kids, making Miracles at Play impossible to miss. Nationwide’s commitment to the hospital continues through its sponsorship of the PGA Tour’s Memorial Tournament. Nationwide became sponsor in 2011, enhancing the tournament’s already strong support for the hospital. The company partnered with tournament founder and golf legend, Jack Nicklaus, to create the Legends Luncheon, a premier event focused on generating financial support for the Hospital. The inaugural event raised $250,000. “Nationwide is proud of our history with Nationwide Children’s Hospital,” said Chad Jester, president of the Nationwide Insurance Foundation. “We look forward to finding new ways to enhance our partnership in the future.” PDJ

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Corporate Philanthropy

Relief to Earthquake and Tsunami Victims in Japan Kim F. Ebert

Managing Shareholder, Ogletree Deakins Law Firm

The employees and management of Ogletree Deakins Law Firm were greatly moved by the unimaginable loss of lives, homes and businesses to the people of Japan, resulting from the devastating earthquakes and tsunami. The rebuilding expense alone is estimated to be in the billions. Ogletree’s managing shareholder, Kim F. Ebert, led the firm’s initiative to match employee donations up to $50,000 indicating, “The Ogletree Deakins Law Firm has close and valued relationships with a large number of Japanese businesses and their employees. One of our shareholders, Michiharu Homma, is Japanese and has a practice which focuses on the Japanese business community. In view of the devastation experienced by our business partners and their families in the earthquake and tsunami, we made the decision very early on to be generous in our support of the relief effort.” Each of Ogletree’s 40 offices throughout

the country contributed to the cause, through either the American Red Cross or the JapanAmerican Society of Indiana (JASI). The firm has a long term relationship with JASI, with Kim Ebert serving on its board of directors, and Michi Homma serving on its advisory board. JASI’s Executive Director Theresa Kulczak acknowledged the contribution to Ebert. “Again, we so much appreciate Ogletree Deakins’ generous support of the Japan Earthquake Relief Fund,” she said. As you know, it’s one of the largest contributions to the fund. We greatly appreciate your leadership, especially in the earliest days, which I’m sure influenced the contributions of other companies. Again, thank you for all you’ve done to lead this effort.” It is the firm’s goal that its contributions will give much needed aid in restoring basic needs and services including food, shelter and electricity, as well as help businesses return to productive operations. PDJ

Company: Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. headquarters: Greenville, South Carolina website: www.ogletreedeakins.com Primary business: Law Firm Employees: 1,100

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Corporate Philanthropy

PNC KaBOOM! Playgrounds Help Children Eva Blum

Director of Community Affairs, PNC Bank, and President, PNC Foundation Group

The PNC Financial Services Group Inc., the nation’s sixth-largest bank, recognizes that investing in a child’s early years is essential for his or her long-term success. Last summer PNC employees came together to build a playground in the Homewood neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pa. The PNC Community Development group undertook the project, supported by volunteers from Grow Up Great, PNC’s 10-year, $100 million bilingual program to prepare children for success in school and life. It was the third of six planned KaBOOM! playgrounds funded by the PNC Foundation. The PNC Community Development Banking group had already established a relationship with Rosedale Block Cluster, the “Research shows there host neighborhood orga- is a correlation between nization, to bring financial the health and opportunieducation, economic revital- ties for children and the ization and other services to economic health of a community. Through this residents of all ages. But it playground build, PNC was determined that more demonstrated its commitcould be done for children ment to Homewood and in the community. The in- its children.” Eva Blum

vestment made sense because studies have shown that children who are physically active tend to advance socially, emotionally, physiologically and academically. Approximately 180 PNC employees volunteered to construct the equipment, spread hills of mulch and install fencing. Children in the Homewood community watched as the fun, safe place to interact with each other and their families came together. The new play area included Imagination Playground in a Box – a breakthrough play-space concept designed to encourage child-directed, unstructured free play. Through natural elements like sand and water, Imagination Playground in a Box allows children to constantly change their environment and design their own course of play. By tying together community development services and a new playground, PNC has helped provide children and families in an underserved area with prospects for a brighter future. Since then, playgrounds were completed in West Palm Beach, Fla., and Cleveland, Ohio. An additional playground funded by PNC is planned for Indianapolis, Ind., this summer. PDJ Company: The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. headquarters: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania website: www.PNC.com Primary business: Financial Services Employees: 50,000+ Employees

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Corporate Philanthropy

Baltimore Ravens Player Helps RBC WM Honor Students Pat Vaughan

East Regional Director, RBC Wealth Management

RBC Wealth Management (RBC WM) is committed to enriching the communities where its employees and clients work and live. Pledging a percentage of its pre-tax profits as charitable contributions, RBC WM demonstrates leadership in the communities it serves every year. In 2010, RBC WM gave more than $3.2 million to charitable organizations throughout the U.S. Last November, the RBC WM Baltimore and Hunt Valley complexes joined forces with Baltimore Ravens safety Ed Reed to host a night that eight students will never forget. When the Booker T. Washington middle school students arrived at the Hyatt Regency Baltimore for the event, they were welcomed and treated to a special pizza dinner. The students knew they were there to be honored for their academic and leadership achievements, but had no idea what the night would bring. Booker T. Washington Middle School students being honored by Ed Reed and Pat Vaughan were each surprised with a brand new bike.

Clients and friends of the “We were thankful to RBC WM Baltimore and enlist Ed’s help in creating Hunt Valley complexes were a special memory for these students. This is just invited to the event, entitled another example of our “A Night of Giving with Ed firm’s deeply-held belief Reed”, which also included a of making a difference in silent auction. Additionally, our communities.” RBC WM made a $15,000 Pat Vaughan donation to Reed’s Eye of the Hurricane Foundation (www.edreedfoundation.org), which is focused on helping, improving and expanding the lives of our nation’s youth. The culmination of the evening came when school community coordinator Scott Johnson spoke about why the eight students were chosen as the special guests of honor. He also explained the positive impact that the Eye of the Hurricane Foundation has made at the school. Following Johnson’s remarks, Reed elated the deserving students by surprising each with a brand new bicycle. PDJ

Company: RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, NYSE/FINRA/SIPC

Photos by Alison Stangle and Amy Vanicky

headquarters: Minneapolis, Minnesota website: www.rbcwm-usa.com Primary business: Full service investment, advisory and wealth management Employees: Over 5,000

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Corporate Philanthropy

Firm Wins Rights for LGBT Students Anne M. Lockner

Partner and Chair of the Firm’s Pro Bono Committee, Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P.

Being a teenager is not easy – bullying is a rampant problem plaguing American schools. A recent article in Columbia University’s Pediatrics found that LGBT youth are roughly five times more likely than their heterosexual peers to attempt suicide. The study also found that the risk of suicide among LGBT students is 25 percent greater in schools without gay-straight alliances and other supportive programs. Consistent with its commitment to the community’s most vulnerable, Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P. volunteered its time and resources to defend local LGBT youth against discrimination at school. The pro bono opportunity arose when a high school refused to recognize a group of students organized to promote tolerance and respect for LGBT individuals. The group, Straights and Gays for Equality (SAGE), was denied access to meeting facilities. They were refused an activities budget, prohibited from taking field trips, and were not allowed to fundraise. Disenfranchised, the

“Our system of justice is the foundation of the melting pot that is America. As officers of the court, it falls to us to guarantee the powerless access to the courts and fulfill the promise of the Constitution that all who are judged, regardless of station or status, stand on a level playing field under the law.”

Company: Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P. headquarters: Minneapolis, Minnesota website: www.rkmc.com Primary business: Law Firm

Martin R. Lueck; Chairman, Executive Board; Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P.

Employees: 650 total firm members (256 attorneys)

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members of SAGE turned to local lawyers. At the end of nearly five years of contentious litigation, SAGE secured a precedentsetting injunction entitling it to “the same access for meetings, avenues of communication, and other miscellaneous rights” afforded to other student groups. The case settled in spring 2009, and in the school year since, the firm continues to work with students to enforce the injunction. Proudly, SAGE has become a formidable force for change. In this 2010-2011 school year, the group sponsored five events with school-wide impact including a “Honk for Equality” and observation of the “Day of Silence.” Students note that reporting and discipline of LGBT bullying has improved. And to pay their hard-earned good-fortune forward, SAGE worked with a local junior high to establish a support group for younger LGBT and questioning students, so that they too can feel like safe and valued members of the community. PDJ

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Talent has no boundaries There is a place where ambitions are limitless. Where every professional can leverage their unique skills to realize their goals. It’s KPMG LLP. Where success can be achieved by all. kpmg.com

© 2011 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. 24252NSS


Corporate Philanthropy

Dress for Success Partnership Reesa Staten

Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications, Robert Half International

Since 1948, Robert Half International has helped job seekers find fulfilling employment and companies locate highly skilled workers. Our Leading by Example philanthropy program is focused on education and workforce development, two areas in which our expertise can make a difference in people’s lives at every stage of their careers. We are proud of our relationship with Dress for Success Worldwide, a nonprofit organization that provides disadvantaged women with professional attire, career-development tools and a network of support. Robert Half is the industry-exclusive sponsor of Dress for Success. “The support we have received from Robert Half “Dress for Success and our other nonprofit partners assist job seekers in a fundamental way, providing the confidence that comes from looking their best during the job interview. We are proud to assist their efforts.” Max Messmer, Chairman and CEO, Robert Half International

International is immeasurable. This is a company that understands the importance of providing careerdevelopment services, and, in doing so, our women have the tools needed to succeed,” said Joi Gordon, CEO of Dress for Success Worldwide. For nearly a decade, Robert Half has worked with Dress for Success on an annual suit drive to benefit low-income job seekers. For two weeks each year, employees in our offices across North America encourage their clients, candidates and each other to donate interview-appropriate clothes and accessories to job seekers looking to re-enter the workforce. More than 170,000 items have been distributed to Dress for Success and other organizations since the start of the suit drive. “Since 1997, Dress for Success has helped women build the confidence and skills they need for success,” said Reesa Staten, senior vice president of corporate communications. “We value the opportunity to be part of their mission to empower women to support themselves by finding meaningful new careers.” PDJ Robert Half employees participate in the annual Suit Drive.

Company: Robert Half International headquarters: Menlo Park, California website: www.rhi.com Primary business: Professional Services Employees: 10,400 globally

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Corporate Philanthropy

Teaming Up to Inspire Reading Laysha ward

President, Target Community Relations and Target Foundation, Target Corporation

Schools involved with the Target School Library Makeover program always have a lot in common: renovated reading spaces, new technology, a buildup of excitement for books. But every library boasts something special, too. For George Peabody Elementary School in Dallas, it’s a connection to their community’s love of football. That’s why Target invited current and former NFL players to volunteer at the library as part of the NFL Day of Service held in conjunction with the Super Bowl in Dallas. Players came together with Target volunteers and The Heart of America Foundation to transform George Peabody’s library, which school officials previously described as a big, brown, ugly box. Target overhauled the space, then added new furniture and shelves, customized wall art, new computers, and 2,000 new books. Dez Bryant of the Dallas Cowboys and Ben Tate of the Houston

Texans even signed jerseys “At Target, we’re dedicatto hang above the book- ed to funding programs shelves. “Everyone loves that help children learn football in Texas; it was to read proficiently by the end of third grade, an imso special for the children portant milestone on the to see a football player in path to graduation. Our person,” said Dee Anne hope is to make reading Egan, George Peabody’s fun and help kids reach their full potential by creprincipal. Students each received ating libraries that inspire them.” Laysha Ward backpacks filled with books to keep. And because students who go to school hungry have a hard time focusing on their studies, a grant to a local Feeding America-affiliated food bank helped implement Target Meals for Minds, a school-based food pantry program. Once a month, more than 350 families at the school choose from a variety of staples and fresh produce to take home. PDJ

Students rallied around Bullseye the Target dog at the unveiling of the George Peabody Elementary library. This year, Target plans to complete 42 renovations as part of its School Library Makeover program.

Company: Target Corporation headquarters: Minneapolis, Minnesota website: www.target.com/hereforgood Primary business: Retail Employees: 355,000

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Corporate Philanthropy

Students Rising Above (SRA) Program Prepares Youth for College Julius Robinson

Executive Vice President and head of Corporate Social Responsibility, Union Bank, N.A.

Since 1998, Students Rising Above (SRA) has distinguished itself by offering young people a simple, but precious gift—opportunity. Students selected for the program are usually the first in their families to attend college, and they often lack the financial resources and support to achieve their educational dreams. These first-generation college students demonstrate a commitment to educational achievement and strength of character by overcoming tremendous poverty, homelessness and neglect. SRA works with each student to realize his or her potential. Students and graduates break the cycle of poverty within their own families, serve their communities, provide society with a new generation of employees and leaders from diverse backgrounds, and accelerate positive change. Union Bank has supported SRA for six years as part of its commitment to education, community economic development and corporate philanthropy. In 2007, with the bank’s support, SRA increased the number of students selected for the program by 75 percent, and the program continues to grow. Company: Union Bank, N.A. headquarters: San Francisco, California

“My background is not unlike those of many of the students who are part of the SRA program,” says Union Bank Executive Vice President, head of Corporate Social Responsibility and SRA board member Julius Robinson. “I appreciate the vision, drive, hard work and achievements of these students.” SRA students and graduates embody a perseverance and determination that is sure to inspire future generations. Surviving poverty stricken homes filled with abuse, drug- and alcohol-addicted adults and even witnessing murder, the students overcome many obstacles, and their success stories include giving back to their communities through service and example. Thanks to SRA and the support of companies like Union Bank, hundreds of students have attended and earned degrees from some of the most esteemed colleges and universities in the United States, including Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Harvard, Williams College, Berkeley and many others. PDJ “By guiding and supporting students through college graduation, and into the workforce, Students Rising Above empowers our youth, and we at Union Bank continue to applaud the organization’s efforts and the students.” Julius Robinson

website: www.unionbank.com Primary business: Financial Services Employees: 11,166

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Julius Robinson speaks during SRA’s 2011 Gala.

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Corporate Philanthropy

Union Pacific’s Military Support at Fort Riley, Kansas Robert W. Turner

Senior Vice President, Corporate Relations and President, Union Pacific Foundation

A unique part of Union Pacific’s historical involvement with the military was the railroad’s volunteer canteens, like the famous one in North Platte, Nebraska. There, Union Pacific hosted up to 10,000 servicemen and women a day between 1942 and 1945. The volunteers met every train with sandwiches and friendship for U.S. troops headed for war; not too different from the USO today. The mission of the USO is to enhance the quality of life of the U.S. Armed Forces personnel and their families, and to create a cooperative relationship between U.S. military communities and civilian communities. “We are proud to support the “No Dough for Dinners” program in 2011 as a way to express our thanks and appreciation to military members and their families, who do so much to support our country.” Jim Young, chairman and CEO, Union Pacific

Union Pacific Chairman and CEO Jim Young (second from right) presented a check for $12,000 to USO Fort Riley Director April Blackmon to support the organization’s 2011 No Dough for Dinners program. USO Fort Riley advisory council members Monte Miller (left) and Brett Allison also attended.

USO Fort Riley provides a home away from home for troops and their family members at Fort Riley, Kansas. Their volunteer-driven programs boost morale with entertainment and recreational and social activities. Union Pacific believes the USO is an outstanding way to support the troops and thank those who serve for their sacrifice. Union Pacific Foundation’s $12,000 donation funds the USO Fort Riley’s “No Dough for Dinners” program in 2011. “No Dough for Dinners” is a free meal program for 250 service members and families on the last business day before pay day, helping those who financially struggle to have a nice meal, as well as helping families of deployed soldiers get together in a positive environment. Union Pacific trains move military equipment today, but the company is most proud of supporting veterans as they seek private sector employment. Approximately 25 percent of Union Pacific’s 44,000 employees are veterans and more than 100 were hired in the last few years from Fort Riley. PDJ

Company: Union Pacific Railroad headquarters: Omaha, Nebraska website: www.up.com Primary business: Freight Transportation and Logistics Employees: Approximately 44,000

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Corporate Philanthropy

Grainger and Howard University Create Innovative Partnership Tim Ferrarell

Chief Information Officer, W.W. Grainger

What began as an idea to heighten the effectiveness of Grainger’s recruiting has blossomed into a partnership with Howard University, one of the world’s leading institutions for African Americans. “Howard is a diverse campus, and it excels in areas like supply chain, which is a perfect fit for us, but we were virtually unknown,” said Tim Ferrarell, chief information officer and executive sponsor for the effort at Howard University. Tim enlisted the assistance of Chere Nabor, Grainger’s director of inclusion and diversity, andJohn Lawson, director of learning and development, who brain-stormed to find ways to take the company’s involvement to the next level. “We looked at the campus and realized they had 120 buildings that could use sustainability upgrades,” Lawson says. “What if we used our expertise to teach the students about sustainability and give them an actual campus project to work on?”

The university agreed, and the result was an Action Learning Program that engaged about 100 students in the School of Business Executive Leadership Honors Program. The project focused on the School of Business building. Students were divided into 10 teams that included not only Grainger experts, but also outside speakers from the EPA and U.S. Green Building Council. “It was a mind-blowing learning experience,” says Shani Carter, a senior from Raleigh, North Carolina, who led one of the ten student teams. “It was very satisfying to have some of our recommendations accepted, including the creation of a student-led sustainability committee. PDJ

Howard’s honors program students visit Grainger’s New Jersey Distribution Center to learn about sustainability and operations.

Company: W.W. Grainger, Inc. headquarters: Lake Forest, Illinois website: www.grainger.com Primary business: Distributor, Facilities Maintenance Products Employees: 19,000

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Bringing unique talents together is what sets us apart. At CVS Caremark, we are able to achieve market-leading business results every day because we understand and truly value the power of diversity. Through genuine respect and by embracing everyone’s differences, abilities and complexities, we have created an all-inclusive work environment and a more innovative, creative and rewarding organization. Join us and add your unique voice, strength and character to our mission of improving lives daily.

We are proud to provide community grants and support to nonprofit organizations that reduce barriers and increase access to health care services ranging from routine exams to preventative care.

Join our team and experience a fulfilling career at CVS Caremark. Visit us at

www.cvscaremark.com/careers

CVS Caremark is an equal opportunity employer supporting a drug-free work environment.


Corporate Philanthropy

Working to Eliminate Unnecessary Preterm Births LANCE CHRISMAN Executive Director, WellPoint Foundation

Ensuring expectant mothers have access to prenatal care and education is the single most important step to reduce preterm births and eliminate unnecessary health care costs. This core belief unites the WellPoint Foundation and the March of Dimes in their efforts to give more babies a healthy start in life. The charitable arm of WellPoint, Inc., the WellPoint Foundation, is committed to enhancing the health and well-being of individuals and families. WellPoint has worked with the March of Dimes for decades to implement prenatal care and education programs that work to reduce unnecessary preterm births, with a particular focus on serving low-income and uninsured women. “The complications and costs associated with pre-term births impact individual families and the American health care system,” said Dr. Sam Nussbaum, WellPoint executive vice president and chief medical officer. “Our partnership with the March of Dimes is vitally important; we continue to work with the

“The complications and costs associated with pre-term births impact individual families and the American health care system. Our partnership with the March of Dimes is vitally important; we continue to work with the March of Dimes to improve prenatal care, to eliminate the harm of elective premature Caesarian sections, and to further the health knowledge of mothers to help ensure the birth of healthy babies.” Dr. Sam Nussbaum,

Company: WellPoint, Inc. headquarters: Indianapolis, Indiana website: www.wellpoint.com Primary business: Health Benefits

Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, WellPoint, Inc.

Employees: Approximately 37,000

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March of Dimes to improve prenatal care, to eliminate the harm of elective premature Caesarian sections, and to further the health knowledge of mothers to help ensure the birth of healthy babies.” In 2010, the WellPoint Foundation worked with the March of Dimes to expand its group-based prenatal care program, CenteringPregnancy, in six states, as well as to provide toolkits and education in two additional states. These CenteringPregnancy sites served approximately 800 women, resulting in significant reductions in preterm births among those mothers. In May 2011, the WellPoint Foundation announced a $1 million grant to the March of Dimes to support a total of 29 CenteringPregnancy program sites in 13 states—up from 11 WellPoint Foundation-supported sites in 2010, nearly tripling the Foundation’s financial support for the program overall. The grant will also provide a preterm birth toolkit to hospitals in California and support the Broadcasters for Babies awareness campaign in Missouri. PDJ

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It takes all of us to shape innovation As a global leader in packaging solutions, MWV understands that diversity fuels innovation. That’s why we’ve built a culture of inclusion in which people of all backgrounds are valued and multiple viewpoints are encouraged. Together, our talented workforce generates creativity that keeps us competitive in the marketplace. That’s the power of diversity.

mwv.com


catalyst

www.catalyst.org The Catalyst Canada Honors By Catalyst Leroux

C

Tory

atalyst Canada has announced The Catalyst Canada Honours 2011 champions of women in business: Monique F. Leroux, chair of the board, president and CEO, Desjardins Group; Jennifer Tory, regional president, Greater Toronto, RBC; and Michael Bach, director of diversity, equity and inclusion, KPMG LLP. The Catalyst Canada Honours recognizes three exceptional individuals who have demonstrated commitment, passion and results through their championship of women’s advancement in Canadian business. “This year’s champions are extraordinarily committed to advancing women in the Canadian corporate world. Catalyst research shows that companies gain when they have a greater number of women on their boards and in senior leadership roles, and that highly placed sponsors like this year’s champions are the key to women’s advancement,” said Deborah Gillis, senior vice president, membership and global operations, Catalyst. The Catalyst Canada Honours recognizes a company/ firm leader, a business leader and a human resources/diversity leader who champion progress by advancing women in their organizations, industries and communities. The Catalyst Canada Honours celebrates leaders who have made a critical difference in women’s advancement, while inspiring men and women leaders to step up, demonstrate foresight and leadership and become champions themselves. “BMO became one of Catalyst’s earliest members not only because of a shared conviction that workplaces must provide opportunities for everyone but also to serve as a constant reminder of the standard to which we hold ourselves as a company,” said Bill Downe, president and CEO of BMO Financial Group and chair of The Catalyst Canada Honours dinner. “The Catalyst Canada Honours is all about recognizing individuals who are setting the bar higher and understand that it’s the strength of Canada’s workforce that will define corporate Canada’s success and, in turn, our customers’ success in a rapidly changing world.” The selection process for The Canada Catalyst Honours is extremely rigorous. Champions are nominated, and Catalyst looks for clear indications of leadership that has had an impact on the advancement of women. The process is also supported by interviews with the nominated indi82

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Bach

vidual and references. This year’s recipients have demonstrated a commitment to advancing women that extends beyond their businesses and into their communities. As the first woman elected board chair, president and CEO of Desjardins Group and the first woman to lead a top ten financial institution in Canada, Monique F. Leroux has taken giant steps to increase diversity at Canada’s largest financial cooperative group. She implemented an unprecedented organizational restructuring, establishing ten multidisciplinary taskforces with equal numbers of men and women on each. Ms. Leroux is also a mentor and sponsor to many women, speaks regularly to the various Desjardins women’s networks and has established programs to build a strong pipeline of women in banking. Jennifer Tory, regional president of Greater Toronto at RBC, has worked tirelessly to advance women and visible minorities both at RBC and in her community. Her commitment extends beyond her role at RBC and into her work on the boards of the Toronto International Film Festival and the Toronto Board of Trade, and as the chair of the Sunnybrook Hospital Foundation’s capital campaign. In his four years as director of diversity, equity and inclusion at KPMG, Michael Bach has championed diversity both within Canada and on a global level. He authored the business case for dedicated resources for diversity and inclusion at KPMG and was instrumental in creating and implementing targets for women becoming partners at the firm, which has resulted in an increase in the proportion of women and visible minorities in new partner classes at KPMG from 40 percent in 2009 to 51 percent in 2010. This year’s champions will be celebrated at The Catalyst Canada Honours dinner on Tuesday, October 18, 2011, at The Fairmont Royal York in Toronto. To book a table, contact Jessica Dolmer at canadahonours@catalyst.org. PDJ

Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive workplaces and expand opportunities for women and business. Visit www.catalyst.org to learn more about our work and download Catalyst reports. Visit http://www. catalyst.org/page/82/catalyst-e-newsletters to begin receiving Catalyst C-News, our monthly e-newsletter.


We’re Committed to the Advancement of Women Leadership & the Organizations That Employ Them.

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momentum Ingersoll Rand Names Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion

Swords, Ireland—Ingersoll-Rand plc (NYSE:IR), a world leader in creating and sustaining safe, comfortable and efficient environments, has announced the appointment of Nereida “Neddy” Perez Perez as vice president, diversity and

continued from page 8

inclusion. In this newly created role, Perez will be responsible for developing the progressive, diverse and inclusive enterprise strategy that includes leadership commitment, employee engagement and implementation plans to support global growth and innovation. Perez will also partner with Ingersoll Rand’s global supply chain leaders to develop a supplier diversity program. She will serve as the company’s diversity representative. She joins Ingersoll Rand from

National Grid, a Fortune 500 gas and electric utility company, where she was vice president of inclusion and diversity. Perez has also worked with KPMG LLP as chief diversity officer, Sodexho North America and Royal Dutch /Shell. Perez received a master’s degree in human resources management and international business from Nova Southeastern University in Florida and a bachelor’s degree in public relations from the University of Florida. PDJ

advantage

corporate index BOLD denotes Advertiser

3M Company. . www.3m.com. . . . . . . . . . 49 Akraya Inc. . . www.akraya.com. . . . . . 34, 50 American Institute for Managing Diversity www.aimd.org. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 thru 17 Andrews Kurth LLP www.andrewskurth.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Applied Materials Inc. www.appliedmaterials.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Bank of the West www.bankofthewest.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan www.bcbsm.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina www.bcbsnc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Booz Allen Hamilton www.boozallen.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 87 Burger King Corporation www.bk.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 CACI International Inc www.caci.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Catalyst. . . . . www.catalyst.org. . . . . . . . . 82 CDW LLC . . . . www.cdw.com. . . . . . . . . . 31 Chevron. . . www.chevron.com . . . . . . . 55 Chrysler Group LLC www.chryslergroupllc.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover, 1 Cisco Systems, Inc. www.cisco.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Comcast Corporation www.comcast.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Communicating Across Cultures www.craigstorti.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 10 thru 11 CSC. . . . . . . . . www.csc.com. . . . . . . . . . 57 CSX. . . . . . . . . www.csx.com. . . . . . . . . . 58 CVS Caremark www.cvs.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Deloitte www.deloitte.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 84

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Desjardins Group www.desjardins.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Eastman Kodak www.kodak.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Ecolab. . . . . . www.ecolab.com. . . . . . . . . 31 Fannie Mae www.fanniemae.com. . . . . 59, Back Cover Freddie Mac www.freddiemac.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Halliburton. . www.halliburton.com. . . . . . . 62 IBM . . . . . . . . . www.ibm.com. . . . . . . . . . 63 Ingersoll Rand www.ingersollrand.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 JPMorgan Chase www.jpmorganchase.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Kelly Services, Inc. www.kellyservices.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 KeyCorp. . . . . . www.key.com. . . . . . . . . . . 8 KPMG . . . . . . www.kpmg.com. . 65, 73, 82 Lifetime Healthcare Companies, The www.lifethc.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Lockheed Martin Corporation www.lockheedmartin.com . . . . . . . . 33, 66 Marriott International www.marriott.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Marsh & McLennan Companies www.mmc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 MeadWestvaco. . www.mwv.com. . . . . . . 81 Moss Adams LLP www.mossadams.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 National Grid www.nationalgrid.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Nationwide Insurance www.nationwide.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 New York Life Insurance Company www.newyorklife.com. . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 61 Ogletree Deakins Law Firm www.ogletreedeakins.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

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PNC Financial Services Group, The www.pnc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 PricewaterhouseCoopers www.pwc.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 RBC Wealth Management www.rbcwm-usa.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 thru 25, 71, 82 RKMC . . . . . . . www.rkmc.com . . . . . . . . . 72 Robert Half International www.rhi.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Royal Dutch Shell www.shell.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 85 Science Applications International Corp. www.saic.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Sodexo. . . www.sodexousa.com. . . . 3, 28 Springboard Consulting LLC www.consultspringboard.com . . . . . . . . . . 86 Sprint. . . . . . . www.sprint.com. . . . . . . . . 41 Target. . . . . . . www.target.com. . . . . . . . . 75 TWI Inc.. . . . . www.twiinc.com. . . . . . . . . 14 Union Bank N.A. www.unionbank.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42, 76 Union Pacific Railroad www.up.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 UnitedHealth Group www.unitedhealthgroup.com. . . . . . . . . 43 University of the Rockies www.rockies.edu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Vanguard www.vanguard.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Verizon. . . . www.verizon.com. . . . . . . . . 9 W.W. Grainger, Inc. www.grainger.com. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Walmart . . . www.walmart.com. . . . 13, 29 Waste Management, Inc. www.wm.com. . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover WellPoint, Inc. www.wellpoint.com. . . . . . . 12, 15, 28, 80


CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive


My turn

Disability Employee Resource Groups By Nadine Vogel President, Springboard Consulting LLC

M

Most companies today have what is known as employee resource or affinity groups. ERGs can be a tremendous asset for a company as long as they are seen as a group that connects directly to business goals and objectives and not a corporate sponsored support group. Historically, these groups were organized by gender, race or culture but as the make-up of the workforce changes, so does the need for other types of ERGs such as those for employees with a disability or who have a dependent with special needs. Although ERGs are generally initiated by employees, often employees with disabilities, especially invisible disabilities, are reluctant to ask their employer to launch such a group. This is typically due to a fear of repercussions related to self-disclosure and especially so if there isn’t company support for this employee segment. As a result, a company may believe there’s either no interest in starting such a group or no need, considering the small number of employees who have a disability. Because of this, the employer may need to assist with the promotion and launch of such a group. A disability ERG can serve as a strategic partner that contributes to the organization’s success and profitability. Of course, it is important to remember that this segment of the employee population is really four distinct segments: employees who are born with or who have acquired a disability, maturing employees with age-related disabilities, veterans with servicerelated disabilities, and employees who have a child with special needs. Some companies have one Disability ERG to serve all four segments, others have multiple groups. It’s 86

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critical that the mission, vision, objectives and even the name of the group reflect the intended audience and outcomes. Here are a few of the ways these groups support their companies’ business objectives: • Review policies and business processes that affect people with disabilities. • Identify marketing opportunities for products and services tailored to people with disabilities. • Drive internal visibility of these employees from the standpoint of career development and progression. • Collaborate with internal teams on accessibility issues, from technology to physical space and overall work environment. • Raise awareness of workplace issues that affect people with disabilities. • Assist in the on-boarding of new employees with disabilities. So, does a company need to have an employee resource group for people with disabilities? Only if that company truly wants to successfully integrate disability into their corporate culture. PDJ

Nadine Vogel is President of Springboard Consulting LLC. Springboard (www.consultspringboard.com) is considered a global expert; working with corporations, governments and organizations on issues pertaining to supporting the disability community in the workforce, workplace and marketplace. She is also the author of DIVE IN: Springboard into the Profitability, Productivity and Potential of the Special Needs Workforce. Want to learn more about successfully starting a Disability ERG and/or growing an existing one? Contact Springboard Consulting LLC at 973-813-7260 x102 or email us at info@consultspringboard.com for on-site disability ERG strategy sessions, toolkits and more.


Work that makes a difference.

Opportunities that expand your horizons.

A culture that embraces diversity.

Are you ready for what’s next in your career? At Booz Allen Hamilton, our ability to help clients solve their most challenging problems and achieve success in their most critical missions hinges on our people. We also believe diversity of backgrounds contributes to more innovative ideas, which in turn drive better results for clients. Booz Allen’s commitment to an inclusive environment incorporates facilitating understanding and awareness, and creating initiatives to improve the quality of work life for our staff. From our long-standing relationships with organizations such as Girls Inc., Society of Women Engineers, and League of Black Women, to supporting events such as Women in Clearable Careers, we understand diversity is central to who we are and what we do. If you’re looking to do work that makes a difference at a firm that’s committed to helping you achieve your professional and personal goals, Booz Allen could be what’s next in your career. For more information, e-mail diversityrecruiting@bah.com.

Ready for what’s next. www.boozallen.com/careers We are proud of our diverse environment, EOE/M/F/D/V.


last word

Diversity Power in the Corporate Image By Marie Y. Philippe, PhD Chief Diversity Officer, Corporate Vice President The Lifetime Healthcare Companies

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Many diversity leaders are so focused on developing and sustaining the moving parts of a diversity and inclusion initiative that they lose sight of the important role they must play alongside public relations executives in building diversity power in the corporate image. The business case for diversity is well understood by most executives in corporate America. The choice to specifically maximize diversity and inclusion practices to advance business results depends on each company. However, when a company chooses—consciously or unconsciously—to refrain from integrating D&I as a priority in their operations, they underestimate the power diversity brings into building a strong corporate image. Here is food for thought when assessing the value-add of diversity in one’s corporate image. If we can agree on the simple definition that a corporate image is the mental picture that emerges in someone’s mind when the name of an organization is mentioned, then we can also agree that this mental picture is associated with the psychological impression and emotions created by what the media, employees and other credible sources say about that organization. A public commitment to diversity helps position the organization as a desirable place to work. This increases the organization’s ability to attract and retain a superior caliber of employees from diverse groups. What about the risk for long lasting memories of discriminatory practices? Even when the financial costs of lengthy court battles may not be a severe drain on

the organization, or when employee or supplier complaints do not reach the legal system, the stain on a company through word of mouth or published record could haunt it for years. The poor image may, in itself, prevent mergers or friendly acquisition deals, or create some unfavorable business outcome that a clean corporate image could have avoided. Can an organization build and sustain brand integrity and profitable growth without paying attention to the diversity component of its corporate image? In this 21st century, in this age of instantaneous news across the globe, it is doubtful. More than ever consumers are cognizant of firms endorsing child labor in foreign countries, of preserving homogenous board rooms, or of blatantly violating human and social rights. Brand loyalty is the direct result of favorable psychological and emotional impressions that the corporate image evokes. Without a positive corporate image, why would anyone pay a premium for essentially different packaging? It is absolutely critical to maintain an internal focus on creating a diverse and inclusive environment, but there should be strong credit given to the power that diversity and inclusion bring to the corporate image. Once this asset is fully valued and recognized by an organization, the executives focused externally will integrate the positive contribution of diversity, whether in building goodwill or reporting higher stock prices. PDJ

“A public commitment to diversity helps position the organization as a desirable place to work.”

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Marie Y. Philippe, PhD, is well known for her leadership contribution in corporate culture transformation through strategic diversity initiatives and organizational change management. She can be reached at marie.philippe@lifethc.com.


DIverSIty IS the WAy Diversity & Inclusion at Waste ManageMent

We Do

We are BuSIneSS.

Building a great career is like building great vehicles. It starts with

research, development, and experience. At Chrysler, our history of

technological innovation is matched only by our belief in the

progressive people that drive us forward. See how you can become part of a movement of the future. It’s as bright as you make it.

strong, a mosaic of experiences, ideas, and principles working together to pass our planet on to the next generation in better shape than we inherited it. It is diversity of thought that makes Waste Management North America’s leading provider of integrated environmental solutions. Apply today at wmcareers.com.

Building Great Careers www.chryslercareers.com


 JULY/AUGUST 2011

through diversity & inclusion

diversity into the very fabric of who we are and what we do. By building and developing an inclusive workforce across all levels, we’ve been able to

JULY / AUGUST 2011

At Fannie Mae, our company strives to weave

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Serving those who House America

12 Innovation awards, 8 ThoughtLeaders, 6 Perspectives PLUS: RBC Wealth Management

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create an environment that encourages and Ha ll ibu rt

embraces open communication, personal creativity,

helping to advance our nation’s housing recovery.

If you want to build a truly rewarding career with an organization that is actively improving the housing

VOLUME 13 • NUMBER 4

and professional excellence. Together, we’re

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www.fanniemae.com/careers. We are an equal opportunity employer.

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time to work at Fannie Mae. Apply online at

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ional

Target Corporation

W. W. Gr ai ng er

, In c.

nk , N. A. Un io n Ba

Un io n Pa cific Ra ilr oa d

Corporate Philanthropy

, In c. W el lP oi nt

26 Unique Ways Organizations are Enhancing Their Corporate Image www. d i v e r si ty j o u r n a l . co m

Diversity Journal - Jul/Aug 2011  

Corporate Philanthropy - 26 Unique Ways Organizations are Enhancing Their Corporate Image

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