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Featuring 124 Mentoring Essays from Senior Women Executives • 27 Profiles from Hispanic Leaders

CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

Volume 12, Number 5 SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2010

25.00 U.S.

$

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2010 • VOLUME 12 NUMBER 5

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

www.diversityjournal.com

And the 9 Annual Award Winners Are... th


Diversity & Inclusion A t

W A s t e

M A n A g e M e n t

Anais Meza

Enrique Juarez

Mario Sagastume

Financial Analyst

Table Designer, Direct Marketing

Manager, Reseller Strategy

A company that is making a difference in your Together, we’re in the business of done.

world and the world around you. Elizabeth Valdez

Joseph Morales

Rudy Mendez

Executive Assistant

Diversity Specialist

Human Resources Director

We’re proud of the Hispanic team members who have made a world of difference at Grainger. Their hard work and commitment have helped our 1.8 million customers around the globe get their jobs done. We invite you to join us, because there’s more to be done.

Waste Management is a Fortune 200 company that is changing the world for the better. We are strongly committed to promoting diversity and inclusion and empowering our employees. We are working with the communities we serve Gloria Ysasi-Diaz Frank Lopez

Cynthia Medina

President, Latino Business Resource Group to fuel innovative

Vice President,

Logistics Management change—and we need your help. www.wmcareers.com

Branch Manager, Florida

From everyday collection to environmental protection. Think Green.® Think Waste Management. www.thinkgreen.com


Anais Meza

Enrique Juarez

Mario Sagastume

Financial Analyst

Table Designer, Direct Marketing

Manager, Reseller Strategy

Elizabeth Valdez

Joseph Morales

Rudy Mendez

Executive Assistant

Diversity Specialist

Human Resources Director

Cynthia Medina

Gloria Ysasi-Diaz

Frank Lopez

President, Latino Business Resource Group

Vice President, Logistics Management

Branch Manager, Florida


from the publisher notebook N editors notebook

Honoring and Rewarding Achievement and Participation

James R. Rector

PUBLISHER / MANAGING EDITOR

Now in our 9th year publishing the WomenWorthWatching® feature, we continue to be inspired by the significant achievements of women in their professional lives. The 124 women executives profiled in this issue reveal a dynamic that is all too clear. Each has a vision for her future and responds in unique ways to bring her vision of the future to the present. In many cases, these women are pioneers, blazing new trails that will lead them and those who follow to their destination and destiny. We honor them for their fortitude and the organizations that employ them for providing a wholesome environment for growth, achievement and contribution. To formalize and honor the outstanding achievement of this year’s executives and their employers, we designed a special logo: The Company and Executive 2011 WomenWorthWatching® Award Logo. It was developed to further honor those companies that demonstrate a commitment to advancing women into leadership by participating in our WomenWorthWatching® feature. The logo will also be presented to all of the women executives in this issue for their determination to achieve their goals and provide mentoring, whether one-on-one or by example, for those seeking growth and opportunity. We want to thank Sharon Allen, chairman of the board for Deloitte LLP for providing the preface for this year’s WomenWorthWatching® feature. Deloitte LLP has the distinction of participating in every WomenWorthWatching® feature since its beginning in 2002...a fine example of commitment! You will also find in this issue our annual Hispanic Heritage feature that we thoroughly enjoy sharing with you. The more we share our heritage and learn about others, the more understanding and synergy we gain. It has always been our hope that by sharing the profiles of diverse and dynamic professionals and the companies that employ them, others will benefit from their leadership and example. The Diversity Journal team works diligently on each issue to provide rich, informative and inspirational messages for our collective growth and development. To all of the above, I am very much indebted. James R. Rector Publisher

2

Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

Damian Johnson

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Paul Malanij

ART DIRECTOR

John Murphy

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Laurel L. Fumic

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Alina Dunaeva

O v erseas C orrespondent

Jason Bice

WEB MASTER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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contents

table of contents

Volume 12 • Number 5 September / October 2010

features

14

F  rom Boise to the Boardroom Introduction by Sharon Allen, Chairman of the Board, Deloitte LLP.

17

S  PECIAL FEATURE: WomenWorthWatching® in 2011 Take a look at this year’s class of influential women. A corporate profile and personal profile accompany each woman’s mentoring essay.

17

200 Hispanic Heritage Month

The rich culture, shared values, and strong work ethic of Hispanic people should be celebrated with great appreciation throughout the country. The individuals profiled in this section provide an interesting perspective.

200

DEPARTMENTs 10 Momentum

Diversity Who, What, Where and When

11 Viewpoint

by Edie Fraser Senior Consultant, Diversified Search, Odgers Berndtson

12 Catalyst Pipeline’s Broken Promise 219 C  orporate Spotlight Web Sites of our Featured Organizations and Advertisers

9 th Annual Women Worth WAtching in 2011 18

Janna Adair-Potts

19

Kate Adams

20

Christine A. Amalfe

22

Rebecca C. Amoroso

23

Melissa Anderson

24

Catherine (Cathy) Avgiris

26

Stacey Babson-Smith

Target Honeywell Gibbons P.C. Deloitte Domtar Corporation Comcast Corporation Terex Corporation

4

27

Shari Ballard

30

Barb Baurer

31

Birgit A. Behrendt

32

Pamela M. Berklich

33

Lisa Bisaccia

34

Susan L. Blount

36

Carolynn A. Brooks

Best Buy Co., Inc. Country Financial Ford Motor Company Kelly Services CVS Caremark Corporation Prudential Financial, Inc. OfficeMax, Inc.

Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

37

Sally Brooks

38

Susan M. Brownell

39

Tina Brown-Stevenson

42

Sandra D. Byra

43

Carolyn Caldwell

44

Hollie Castro

Kindred Healthcare United States Postal Service Ingenix, a UnitedHealth Group business Salt River Project Centerpoint Medical Center, subsidiary of HCA, Inc. BMC Software, Inc.


contents

table of contents

Volume 12 • Number 5 September / October 2010

9 th Annual Women Worth WAtching in 2011 46

Sharda Cherwoo

48

Joan K. Chow

50

Kathleen Colwell

51

Jane Connell

52

Karen Dahut

53

Yolanda Daniel

56

Gladys DeClouet-Mims

Ernst & Young ConAgra Foods Highmark Inc. Johnson & Johnson Booz Allen Hamilton W.W. Grainger, Inc. Burger King Corporation

57 Robyn Denholm

Juniper Networks, Inc

58 Karen Deogracias 60

74

Colleen Goldhammer

75

Jasmine Green

76

Maria C. Green

78

Adele Gulfo

80

Chris Hackem

81

Wendy M. Hambleton

84

Suni Harford

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company Illinois Tool Works Inc Pfizer Inc ARAMARK BDO USA, LLP Citi

86 Christine Heckart NetApp, Inc.

Textron Marine & Land Systems

87

Michelle DiGangi

88

Bank of the West

Genworth Financial

Mary Heger Ameren Corporation

Ci Ci Holloway UBS

62 Lillian Dukes

90 Janet M. Holloway

63 Diane K. Duren

92 Mary Humiston

64 Elise Eberwein

93 Cheryl L. Janey

American Eagle Airlines Union Pacific US Airways

66 67

Maureen Ehrenberg CB Richard Ellis

Applied Materials, Inc. Northrop Grumman Information Systems

94

Mary Falvey Wyndham Worldwide

70 Ellen B. Friedler

Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP

71

Deborah Gillis

72

Ruth Ann M. Gillis

6

Monsanto Company

Catalyst Exelon Corp.

Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

100 Lisa Klauser Unilever

102 Maria G. Korsnick

Constellation Energy Nuclear Group, LLC

104 Heather Kos

Navistar International Corporation

106 Bridget Lauderdale Lockheed Martin Corporation

107 Patricia Lawicki

Pacific Gas and Electric Company

108 Jill Lawrence

Pitney Bowes Inc.

109 Christine Leahy CDW LLC

112 Kathryn Leisses Sodexo

113 Kenyatta Lewis

MGM Resorts International

114 Janice Lindsay

Harris Corporation

116 Connie L. Lindsey Northern Trust

117 Cathy Martine AT&T

Randy Meg Kammer

118 Gaye Adams Massey

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida

120 Jeannie Maul

95

Patricia Kampling

98

Laura K. Kennedy

99

Caroline King

Alliant Energy Corporation SAIC Chubb Group of Insurance Companies

September/October 2010

UnitedHealth Group CSC

122 Jeanette McCarty

Ryder System, Inc.

123 G. Penny McIntyre

Newell Rubbermaid

124 Judy M. McNamara Ecolab


can you honor a legend in law for helping ensure legendary service?

Copyright Š 2010 CA. All rights reserved.

Congratulations to Amy Fliegelman Olli, executive vice president and general counsel at CA Technologies, for being honored as a Profiles in Diversity Journal Woman Worth Watching in 2011. Whether leading our Law Department in software licensing, intellectual property, litigation and acquisitions or touting our business practices and compliance, Amy has proven her leadership value across the business spectrum for CA Technologies. Beyond this, Amy was a recent recipient of the Legends in the Law Award by the Burton Foundation for exceptional accomplishments as a legal adviser to top technology companies. But what really distinguishes her in our eyes is her integrity, honesty and overall affability — which truly makes her someone worth watching. www.ca.com

you can


contents

table of contents

Volume 12 • Number 5 September / October 2010

9 th Annual Women Worth WAtching in 2011 125 Arpana S. Mehra

151 Joanne Pietrini-Smith

ACS, A Xerox Company

AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company

128 Alison H. Micucci

52 Sanita L. Pinchback 1

New York Life Investments

Waste Management, Inc.

129 Sandra (Sandy) Miller

54 Vivian Polak 1

WellPoint, Inc.

Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP

130 Patricia Milligan

176 Kim Stratton

Novartis International AG

177 Mara E. Swan

Manpower Inc.

178 Laura Tameron

Perini Building Company

180 Teresa Taylor

Mercer (a Marsh & McLennan Company)

155 Jennifer Pollino

132 Lorraine Mitchelmore

158 Billie K. Rawot

133 Eileen Moore

159 Jorunn Saetre

34 M. Catherine Morris 1

60 Cindy M. Sanborn 1

36 Brenda J. Mullins 1

62 Kristi A. Savacool 1

137 Marilyn Nagel

163 Marsha Schulte

187 Kelli Valade

138 Melissa Nassar

164 Louise Scott

188 Frances M. Vallejo

Goodrich Corporation

Royal Dutch Shell

Eaton Corporation

Harrah’s Entertainment, Inc. Arrow Electronics, Inc.

Halliburton

CSX Corporation

Aflac

Hewitt Associates, LLC

Cisco

Rockwell Collins

Vanguard

Georgia Power Company, a Southern Company

139 Connia Nelson

66 Kim Sentovich 1

Verizon

Walmart

142 Jennifer Yuh Nelson

67 Dr. Charlita Shelton 1

DreamWorks Animation SKG

University of the Rockies

143 Annita Nerses

168 Dawn Siler-Nixon

144 Amy Fliegelman Olli

169 Deborah A. Skakel

46 Katherine A. Owen 1

72 Margaret W. (Meg) Skinner 1

ITT Corporation

Ford & Harrison LLP

CA Technologies

Dickstein Shapiro

Stryker

The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America

48 Colette Phillips 1

173 Janet Crenshaw Smith

Colette Phillips Communications, Inc.

150 Maureen Phillips

Ivy Planning Group LLC

Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America

8

Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

174 Ann Yom Steel

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

September/October 2010

Qwest Communcations

181 Susan Tousi

Eastman Kodak Company

182 Nancy R. Tuor CH2M HILL

183 Mary E. Tuuk

Fifth Third Bancorp

186 Joyce L. Ulrich

Legg Mason Global Asset Management Brinker International ConocoPhillips

190 Lisa VanDeMark

Bausch + Lomb

191 Leila Vespoli

FirstEnergy Corp.

192 Kelly J. Watson

KPMG LLP (the U.S. firm)

193 Pamela A. Wickham

Raytheon Company

194 Tujuanna B. Williams Freddie Mac

196 Christine Wilson

O’Melveny & Myers LLP

197 Tammy Young

Moss Adams LLP

198 Mary Zimmer

RBC U.S. Wealth Management


Creating a Better Future Every Day 速

Embracing differences, creating possibilities, growing together -that's what diversity is all about. Unilever understands the importance of diversity and that's why it is a critical component of our business strategy and an integral part of everything we value and do. www.unileverusa.com


momentum momentum who…what…where…when

McMillan Joins Diversity Practice At Diversified Search Odgers Berndtson PhiladelphiA – Diversified Search Odgers Berndtson, one of the top executive search firms in the U.S., is pleased to announce that Tracy McMillan McMillan has joined as Managing Director in the New York Office. Throughout his 15-year search career, McMillan has focused on the placement of women and people of color at senior levels, across all functional areas and industries. He will leverage his considerable expertise and diverse candidate placement track record to grow the firm’s Diversity Practice. “For the past decade, he has owned and operated The McMillan Group, Inc., a boutique retained executive search firm specializing in diversity executive search, retention consulting and candidate agency. McMillan has conducted successful searches for clients in the financial services, manufacturing & consumer packaged goods, retail, healthcare, professional services, life sciences, oil & gas, energy and non-profit industry sectors. McMillan is a graduate of University of Virginia’s (UVA) McIntire School of Commerce and is the immediate past Board Chairman of Ridley @ The University of Virginia, the Alumni Association’s scholarship endowment and Black Alumni engagement organization. He also serves as a member of UVA’s prestigious Jefferson Scholarship Foundation National Selection Committee. 10

P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

“Tracy’s significant expertise and outstanding track record of senior level diversity placements will be a great addition to our Diversity Practice and to the clients we serve in this important area,” according to Judith M. von Seldeneck, Founder, Chairman and CEO of Diversified Search Odgers Berndtson, the largest woman-founded and -owned executive search firm in the U.S.

Soto-Harmon Takes Helm at the Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital WASHINGTON – President of the Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital (GSCNC), Diane Tipton, announced the appointment of Lidia Soto-Harmon as Soto-Harmon the organization’s CEO. Soto-Harmon will lead the non-profit leadership organization for girls, which serves 90,000 members, (including 62,000 girls ages 5-17) in the Greater Washington Region, covering the District of Columbia and 25 counties in Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. She will take on her new role immediately. “Lidia has been instrumental in the growth and success of our Girl Scout council for the past six years,” said Tipton. “Her leadership skills, her outstanding work as our Chief Operating Officer, her passion for Girl Scouting and the girls of our Council make her the perfect Chief Executive Officer to lead the Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital into our next 100 years of girl scouting.”

September/October 2010

In her new capacity, Soto-Harmon will develop strategies to achieve the organization’s vision and mission; directing a $14 million operating budget with 115 employees located in eight offices, and a volunteer structure with over 25,000 adult volunteers. Of greatest importance to Soto-Harmon is the development of a strong membership, inclusive of all girls and reflective of the racial and socio-economic diversity in our region.

Williams Awarded 2010 Diversity Stella Award Sherry D. Williams, senior vice president and corporate secretary, Halliburton, was awarded the 2010 Diversity Stella Award by the Texas General Counsel Williams Forum. The award recognizes the work of in-house counsel who has successfully promoted diversity within his/her organization and within the profession at large. Each year the Texas General Counsel Forum accepts nominations for its Magna Stella Awards, which recognize outstanding in-house counsel in Texas. “We are thrilled to congratulate Sherry for being named the 2010 winner of the Diversity Stella Award,” said Bert Cornelison, executive vice president and general counsel, Halliburton. “This is a significant honor for Sherry, the Law Department and the company to receive recognition for our commitment to diversity and inclusion in the legal profession.” PDJ


viewpoint

Celebrating Success Stories of Achievement By Edie Fraser Senior Consultant, Diversified Search, Odgers Berndtson

C

Congratulations to Profiles in Diversity Journal in its WomenWorthWatching® (WWW) annual editions – nine years of WomenWorthWatching® and 11 years when Profiles introduced its leading women in the Glass Ceiling issue. (I am proud to have been on the side of Jim Rector when his vision was to do WomenWorthWatching®). It is special to go back and read the breath of who were selected and what they wrote, what they read and what they think. Celebrate these women of 2010; read and reread the messages. Good news is reflected in their selection by the companies. Good news is demonstrated by their success stories of achievement. Good news is part of their mentoring and support of others along the way. As we celebrate another WWW issue, let’s reflect on certain progress over a decade though many would say that there are still “miles to go before we sleep.” We are cracking the glass ceiling and putting a sledge hammer through the concrete. To the women executives profiled, we all are proud. These are the “good news” women in leadership being celebrated, role models recognized by their organizations and their colleagues. Women are supporting women, and men are supporting women to insure that we have women worth watching and women business leaders, as mentors and in professional advancement. Organizations are

endorsing women of color. Talent officers and executives alike are advocating women advancement. Success is best represented in these stories. I find it intriguing to also read more than 70 of the advertisements in this issue. They tell stories of promoting women, of the women worth watching and of business pride in these women’s advancement. Women are closed to 14% executive officer positions. Approximately 52% of management professional and similar positions are held by women. Read these profiles again and realize that these women are worth watching for movement to the executive suite. We applaud their success and their support of other women along the way. We review the studies about the strong correlation between shareholder return and a higher proportion of women executives. We know these women profiled each year are exemplary of the financial success they help bring to their companies and organizations. It is with a sense of reflection after reading these annual issues of WomenWorthWatching®, that they bring us inspiration and a sense of accomplishment that makes us all proud. With WomenWorthWatching®, think success and good news and circulate this particular issue to many of your colleagues and friends. To the companies who nominated these women as role models in the pipeline of success, you make it easier to recruit women into your organizations. You make us all proud. PDJ

Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

11


www.catalyst.org

J

Pipeline’s Broken Promise By Catalyst

Just give it time. Not yet, but soon. When women get the right education, training, work experience, and aspirations to succeed at the highest levels of business, then we’ll see parity. So go the refrains justifying why more women aren’t well represented at the helm of global companies, in boardrooms, and in C-suites. The premise of the promise is that the pipeline for women into senior leadership is robust. After all, over the past 15 years, women have been graduating with advanced professional degrees in record numbers often equal to or even surpassing the rates for men, swelling women’s representation in managerial ranks. Concurrently, companies implemented diversity and inclusion programs to eliminate structural biases and foster women’s full participation in leadership. Given these accomplishments, who would question whether the pipeline for women to senior leadership is lacking? While women represent just 2.8% of Fortune 500 CEOs, 15% of board directors at those companies, and less than 14% of corporate executives at top publicly traded companies around the world, overall they represent 40% of global workforces, with growth in some parts of the world projected to reach double digits. Surely, with this vigorous pipeline and the competitive focus on talent, women are poised to make rapid gains to the top. If only that were true. In The Promise of Future Leadership: A Research Program on Highly Talented Employees in the Pipeline, Catalyst set out to explore how the “best and the brightest” – high potential women and men MBAs from whom much was expected – have fared post-MBA. Companies pinned hopes on these highly trained graduates from elite MBA programs to help navigate through the global economy. One would expect these women and men with the same prestigious credentials to be on equal footing in the pipeline and their career trajectories gender-blind. What emerged, however, is evidence that the pipeline, for women, is not as promising as expected. Among this highly talented group, women lag men in advancement

12

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September/October 2010

and compensation from their first professional jobs and are less satisfied with their careers overall. Furthermore, women are more likely to have left their first post-MBA job because of a difficult manager and to have paid a penalty for pursuing a nontraditional career pathway such as working in the nonprofit, government, or education sectors; being self-employed; or working part-time before returning full-time in a company or firm. What accounts for these career outcome differences? What are the implications for companies failing to level the playing field to fully utilize this highly talented group? Below is a brief summary of the surprising results: • Men were more likely to start their first post-MBA job in higher positions than women. • Women’s first post-MBA salary was, on average, $4,600 less than men’s. • After starting from behind, women don’t catch up: Men were more likely to be at a higher position at the time of the survey than were women, even after taking into account total experience, time since MBA, first post-MBA job level, industry, and global region of work at the time of survey. • Regardless of differences in women’s and men’s starting salaries, men experienced higher salary growth post-MBA. CEOs and other senior leaders were surprised and disappointed by the findings, and agreed that to succeed, organizations must better develop and fully leverage the highly talented women in the workforce. Now – not tomorrow, next week, or next year – is the time for renewed efforts to uncover and combat systemic gender inequity. Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive workplaces and expand opportunities for women and business. With offices in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and more than 400 preeminent corporations as members, Catalyst is the trusted resource for research, information, and advice about women at work. Catalyst annually honors exemplary organizational initiatives that promote women’s advancement with the Catalyst Award. Visit our website at www.catalyst.org.


© 2010 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. 22666NSS

The power of you.

Empowered by us. KPMG values the powerful contributions of women. There are no limits to where insight, innovation and leadership can take you. We congratulate KPMG’s Kelly J. Watson, and all of the women featured among Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 9th Annual WomenWorthWatching®. kpmgcareers.com

KPMG. A great place to build a career.


9 t h Annual women worth watc h i n g i n 2 0 1 1

From Boise to the Boardroom By Sharon Allen | Chairman of the Board, Deloitte LLP

W

hen I began my career in 1973, women who were watched for their leadership potential were somewhat rare in corporate America. It’s not that they weren’t “worth” watching – it’s just that there weren’t many of them.

With that as background, I am honored to write this introduction for the Profiles in Diversity Journal’s special issue known as “WomenWorthWatching” – and I’m pleased to report that I was not asked to check with Rich first before sharing my thoughts here with you.

Consider my chosen field. Back then, women made up only 5 percent of accounting graduates. However, it wasn’t until I began to look for a job during my senior year of college that I began to understand just how differently I would be perceived in the workplace.

So much has happened since I began my professional life as an auditor 37 years ago. The year that I so proudly wore my cap and gown, women accounted for about 40 percent of all college graduates. Today, women are earning close to 60 percent of all college degrees. But that’s not the only demographic trend that is altering the perception of women. In the workplace, women now outnumber men for the first time. In the marketplace, women wield purchasing power in excess of more than $14 trillion.

The managing partner of one firm was very direct. He told me that he wanted to hire me because his firm was interested in hiring minorities. I didn’t accept that offer. My self-image had been cultivated on an Idaho farm where I walked the fields with my Dad each night after supper to check the crops. Upon my college graduation, I didn’t consider myself a minority but rather a well-trained and hard-working accounting professional – who, by the way, just happened to be a woman. I chose to accept an offer from Touche Ross, a predecessor firm of Deloitte, at its office in Boise, Idaho. With that acceptance came other not so subtle hints that I would certainly be watched. For example, my offer letter pointed out that I needed to work as many hours as the men and travel just as much – and that I should review these requirements with my husband, Rich, to make sure they were okay. Unimaginable in our organization (or any organization for that matter) today.

So where do women go from here? To a place where women rightfully belong and in far greater numbers: the C-suite and the board room. The business case for women in leadership has never been stronger. A variety of studies confirm that companies with more women in leadership outperform those companies with fewer (or no) women in leadership – and, across several measures, often by double-digit margins. While there is still much progress to be made, there have been some significant milestones, such as the first woman succeeding another as the CEO of a major corporation when Ursula Burns recently took over from Anne Mulcahy at Xerox. Today’s reality is that there are many women worth watching for their ability to lead and create value. With that comes an exciting new sense of possibility. What was once considered notable – journeys such as the one I made from Boise to the board room, for example – will become increasingly common. In the future, these journeys will

“Today’s reality is that there are many women worth watching for their ability to lead and create value.” 14

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September/October 2010


A

n important contribution women can make along the way is sharing knowledge of what it will take to help others continue to move forward. When I was profiled in the 2004 edition of “WomenWorthWatching”, I shared some things that I had learned along the path of my own career. Here are some additional lessons that can help both women (and men!) make their way forward in the workplace:

• Lesson One: Find something you love, and do it. My studies took me to Moscow – Moscow, Idaho, that is. I started out as an education major at the University of Idaho. That’s what a lot of women did in those days. But my roommate studied accounting and she thought I might enjoy it. I took a course, and was hooked for life. For me, accounting allowed me to combine my technical and analytical skills with my desire to work closely with people, and I’ve never looked back. So do what you love. A recent survey found that just 45 percent of Americans – a record low – have job satisfaction. I urge you not to be one of them. Your career is more than a paycheck. • Lesson Two: Look out for your own career! You can’t assume that the people you work for are aware of all of your “good work.” Early in my career, I remember being passed over for a promotion. I went to my boss, expressed surprise, and shared with him a list of all of the things I had accomplished. He told me that he didn’t know that I had done all of those things! That taught me a valuable lesson. I learned that you need to take personal responsibility for assuring that those

around you recognize the contributions you’ve made – and you can find ways to do that without being a braggart. • Lesson Three: Embrace change and be willing to step outside of your comfort zone. You’ll find it difficult to grow if you stay entrenched within your current boundaries. But while the decision to venture out can be difficult, it can also be exhilarating. I learned this when in the span of just a few short years I became the first woman to serve on the Deloitte board of directors, moved from my home office in Boise, and eventually became Managing Partner of our Pacific Southwest practice in Los Angeles, with more people reporting to me than lived in my home town. Still, a little bit of time and familiarity can go a long way – and before you know it, each new place will start to feel comfortable. That’s when you know that it’s time to raise the bar again – and look for a new challenge. • Lesson Four: Be true to yourself. There’s no one right way to be a professional or serve as a leader to others. While every professional needs certain prerequisite skills – chief among them being a strong moral and

ethical foundation – it is the combination of what you offer and how you can provide it that makes each of us unique. As I progressed in my career, I knew that I had to use my skills and experiences in a way that was natural for me – or I wouldn’t get very far. It is only by being true to yourself that you can develop your “personal brand,” or what others think of when they hear your name. When you think about it, each of us really has no other choice. Oscar Wilde, the 19th century Irish novelist, said it this way: “Be yourself. Everyone else is taken.” • Lesson Five: Have a mentor – and be a mentor. Your technical skills can help you advance only so far. There’s judgment to be honed and leadership to be developed. Mentors can be instrumental in helping you fill in the gaps. I know. Mentors who passed their success forward to me have been absolutely critical in shaping my career. What’s important in finding a mentor is that he or she cares about you as a person, is interested in your success, and will help you think in ways that you may not have previously considered. Conversely, you can offer those same attributes to others as well. Your accomplishments and experiences have been made in a rapidly changing professional landscape. Be a mentor and help others benefit from them now and in the future.

be applauded not for the history they make, but for the achievements along the way that make them possible.

zations with nearly $11 billion in revenues – and, more than 1,000 partners, principals, and directors who are women.

Fortunately, the guidance and support I described has been an integral part of our culture at Deloitte for some time. Our groundbreaking Initiative for the Retention and Advancement of Women has helped to create an environment conducive to the growth of women as leaders. When our Women’s Initiative began in 1993, I was one of about 100 women who were partners, principals, or directors in an organization with about $2 billion in revenues. Today, Deloitte is the largest of the U.S. professional services organi-

As you’ll see in the pages of this special issue, the leadership of women at many organizations is generating immense value. These “WomenWorthWatching” are truly women worth following – in every sense of the word – and I congratulate Profiles in Diversity Journal for bringing you their inspiring stories of leadership. Sincerely,

Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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energized by

Diversity

With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Christine A. Amalfe, Gibbons P.C. • Melissa Anderson, Domtar • Janna Adair-Potts,Target • Shari Ballard, Best Buy Catherine (Cathy) Avgiris, Comcast • Kate Adams, Honeywell • Rebecca C. Amoroso, Deloitte • Stacey Babson-Smith, Terex ®

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Janna Adair-Potts Target

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Store Operations EDUCATION: BS, in Fashion Merchandising from Texas State University FIRST JOB: In high school, sold tickets at a movie theatre. Bonus – free movies, free popcorn! WHAT I’M READING: The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak; also, my weekly subscription to The Week MY PHILOSOPHY: Choose your attitude because you can’t always choose your circumstance. FAMILY: An amazing husband, Steve, and two very cool stepchildren – Sydney, 15 and Nolan, 12. INTERESTS: Hiking in the mountains, golfing, reading, biking, Pilates. FAVORITE CHARITies: Jeremiah Program: The program provides low-income, single mothers with safe, affordable housing, empowerment and life skills training, and on-site child care. COMPANY: Target HEADQUARTERS: Minneapolis, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.target.com BUSINESS: Retail. ANNUAL REVENUES: $65.4 billion (2009) EMPLOYEES: 351,000

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s a college student interested in design, I never imagined I would build a career on the retail side of the runway, but more than 20 years later, I still love what I do. What started for me as a way to pay off student loans quickly became a passion. The chaotic pace and constant change of retail were invigorating, and I was hooked! I had leadership responsibilities with Target from my first day on the job. Leading a team early turned out to be the most important experience in shaping my career. There have been many times when Target offered me opportunities even before I thought I was ready for them. My leaders took chances on me and taught me to see possibilities instead of obstacles, and that’s what I have tried to do with my teams over the years. Today I lead a team that oversees the processes and projects supporting all businesses within each of the more than 1,740 Target stores. I am surrounded by talented and amazing people and we collectively attain higher levels of success through continuous improvement and collaboration.

I’m not afraid to fail. Fear of failure inhibits the intellect, dampens curiosity and invariably leads to bad decisions. I tell my teams and mentees that if they are afraid of voicing their opinion and giving real-time feedback, it’s going to do more harm than good. A healthy team is one where people challenge each other and bring their diverse perspectives and experiences to the table. I am authentic and transparent with my teams and try to create an environment where they can be authentic too. I always prescribe a healthy dose of mental sparring to enhance teamwork and spark innovation! I feel fortunate to work for a company like Target that has many women in top leadership positions. They have helped shape a culture where team members are able to attain a good work-life balance while still progressing in their careers. For me this balance is a choice – both at work and at home. I try to role model it for my team so they are empowered to work toward that balance, too. Ultimately, my advice to emerging leaders is to pave your own path and have the courage to stay true to it.

I have been successful because

“Fear of failure inhibits the intellect, dampens curiosity and invariably leads to bad decisions.” 18

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Kate Adams Honeywell

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ithin Honeywell’s legal department, we see diversity as the foundation of a culture that promotes respect, understanding, and appreciation of different perspectives, backgrounds, and experiences. Since more than 50 percent of the leaders within Honeywell’s legal function are women and minorities, diversity is an important factor that has led to our successful track record. Honeywell’s legal team has won or resolved the vast majority of its major litigation and helped secure more than 29,000 patents or pending patent applications worldwide. The team has also contributed to the successful integration of more than 60 acquisitions throughout the past eight years. Diversity has enabled our team to generate new and better ideas faster and to collaborate and innovate more effectively. In all its forms, diversity has provided the energy to fuel our performance culture and helped Honeywell achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. We also believe it’s important that leaders be evaluated on what they accomplish and how they do it. Each year, members of Honeywell’s legal

team are assessed on their ability to foster diversity and teamwork. This makes our work environment more productive, more dynamic, and more positive. It enables us to come together and deliver the kind of outstanding results our company has come to expect.

TITLE: Senior Vice President and General Counsel

Customers choose Honeywell because they know our employees, technologies, and solutions can help them face the challenges of a world that’s getting more complicated every day. We hire the best people, give them every possible opportunity to learn, grow, and develop, and reward them for their contributions. Our size, industries, and portfolio breadth enable people to have long and dynamic careers, progress into leadership positions, and explore diverse opportunities across businesses, functions, and regions.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Find something you love to do and work hard at it.

EDUCATION: BA from Brown University and JD from the University of Chicago FIRST JOB: After college I began working with repeat offenders in the Bronx criminal court system. It was in this position that I became really interested in the intersection between law and society. WHAT I’M READING: Too Big to Fail, by Andrew Ross Sorkin

FAMILY: Married with two children. INTERESTS: Horseback riding, working in the family orchard, and spending time with family. FAVORITE CHARITies: The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Catskill Mountainkeeper COMPANY: Honeywell HEADQUARTERS: Morristown, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.honeywell.com BUSINESS: Technology and manufacturing ANNUAL REVENUES: $31 billion EMPLOYEES: 122,000

No matter where you go or what profession you choose, diversity will always play an important and positive role in your career too. Embrace it as an opportunity, use it to your advantage, and enjoy all the possibilities it will bring to you and your team.

“Diversity has enabled our team to generate new and better ideas faster and to collaborate and innovate more effectively.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Christine A. Amalfe Gibbons P.C.

TITLE: Director and Chair, Employment Law Department; Co-Chair, Gibbons Women’s Initiative EDUCATION: Syracuse University College of Law (JD, magna cum laude, 1985), Seton Hall University (BS. magna cum laude, 1982) FIRST JOB: Associate at Gibbons P.C. WHAT I’M READING: Lately, mostly newspapers MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t worry about things until you really have to worry about them. FAMILY: Three children – ages 8, 13, and 16 – and my husband, who is a judge. INTERESTS: Watching my kids play sports; gardening; the beach; travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: There are many. Rutgers Center for Women and Work is one of them. COMPANY: Gibbons P.C. HEADQUARTERS: Newark, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.gibbonslaw.com BUSINESS: Legal services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $110 million EMPLOYEES: 373

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s a mother of three who also happens to chair a department of a large regional law firm, I practice work-life balance every day. And it is hard. As illustrated by a recent study by the New Jersey Council on Gender Parity, it is particularly difficult for women to successfully maintain that balance in the legal profession, where success is often measured in billable hours. The Council reported that over 70 percent of survey respondents who changed employers in the last five years indicated their former employers did not support flexible work arrangements (FWAs) and work-life balance. How, then, do you truly achieve career success and family happiness? Clearly, work-life balance does not happen on its own. Women need to be responsible for carrying out the work of their employers. Employers need to support their women employees. Ultimately, women need to be viewed as productive contributors to the firm’s bottom line for management to “buy in” to the concept that diversity and work-life flexibility are essential to the overall business case. At Gibbons, our Women’s Initiative has been a driving force

“I practice work-life balance every day. And it is hard.” 20

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behind the firm’s policies and benefits that ensure women professionals remain accessible to clients as they attend to busy personal lives. These benefits include technology that allows attorneys to connect seamlessly, from anywhere, to the firm’s network, phone, and voicemail systems; emergency childcare; paid childcare leave for men and women; and a policy allowing reduced and/or flexible hours without impacting an attorney’s path to promotion. Over the years, with the support of my firm, I have arranged my schedule to accommodate clients and family. I sometimes put in Gibbons time in early mornings, late evenings, or weekends, to be available for midafternoon softball games. At the same time, success means being committed and accessible to clients even during family events. It is not unusual for me to email clients during a baseball game. The work has to be done. Clients have to be serviced. I need to be a mother to my children. With support, you can do it all. A workplace can support worklife balance only if it applies key best practices, such as ensuring flexible work arrangements are available to men and women, customizable to meet individual needs. Flexible work arrangements must be promoted and monitored and should include the necessary tools to ensure employees are successful in their professional and personal lives.


Can a diverse team make a company

stronger?

Yes, when you hire the best people for the job. That’s what ARAMARK does and that’s why Fortune magazine named us the Most Admired in our industry. We are one of the largest private companies in the United States and we have a global presence that spans 22 countries.

Read more about us at

www.aramark.com. Equal Opportunity Employer


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Rebecca C. Amoroso Deloitte

TITLE: U.S. Insurance Leader EDUCATION: BA, Mathematics, Lehman College, FCAS, MAAA FIRST JOB: Insurance Service Office (ISO) WHAT I’M READING: Mary Higgins Clark MY PHILOSOPHY: Diversity among people brings diversity of thought, which leads to well-rounded solutions for our clients and our people. FAMILY: I often say “insurance is my life,” as I have many good friends and family (husband, brother, niece and aunt who is retired) all in the insurance business. Having said that I also enjoy spending time with my immediate and extended human and feline family. INTERESTS: Boating, Reading, Spa. FAVORITE CHARITies: RSDSA COMPANY: Deloitte HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.deloitte.com BUSINESS: Professional services organization. ANNUAL REVENUES: $10.72 billion in U.S. revenues, FYE May 30, 2009 EMPLOYEES: 42,367

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was fortunate to have a mentor right after I joined Deloitte as a senior consultant over 24 years ago. A senior partner in my division reached out and took me under his powerful wing. I guess he saw potential in me.

exams. Today my original mentors have retired, and I find myself with a portfolio of mentors, people I go to for different things. I am also a mentor to many and am reminded that often it is the little things we do that can make a big difference for someone.

With his guidance, and those of another partner, I was able to navigate our very complex organization, advance, and stay grounded. In addition to providing priceless knowledge, their mentoring was a powerful morale builder and motivator for me. Having their ear and their support bolstered my self confidence significantly; it also made me want to prove I was worthy of their attention.

Not long after I first started at Deloitte, I was rethinking whether I wanted a career at the firm. A simple phone call from my mentor (who was also a senior leader in the firm) one Friday night to thank me for my good work was all I needed to hear and made all the difference in the world for me. I had the privilege of building my career in a highly supportive culture. And today, as a mentor to many professionals at Deloitte, I make a great effort to foster that culture.

Fulfilling this goal took a lot of work; one hurdle I remember in particular was passing my actuarial

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Melissa Anderson Domtar Corporation

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entoring, to me, means having a positive impact on the life and career of another. I entered the HR field thanks to two of my professors. When I entered college, my declared major was math and computer science. After class one day, one of my math professors commented that I was more “socially oriented” than most of his other students and inquired whether my major was the best match for my personality.

to negotiate a promotion rather than leave the company. She was also the first to encourage me to share my experience in career development and work-life balance, something I happily continue to do with current and past colleagues.

Shortly thereafter, I was enrolled in a labor economics course, and caught the professor’s interest by being the only one in class to correctly interpret a particular exam question. Both professors took the time to ask me questions, and our conversations changed the course of my studies, laying the foundation for a career that I love.

I eventually left IBM to join The Pantry, where the stage was smaller but my role was much broader. I interacted regularly with the board of directors, making for a very different dynamic than at my previous job. Today, I am part of a terrific team at Domtar, working for a president and CEO who is committed to people and developing a nurturing culture for our talent. Although I travel a lot for my job, my employer is sensitive to my need for balance between my professional and family lives, and tries to accommodate me as a mother and wife.

At IBM, I was privileged to work early on with a manager who saw potential in me. He granted me opportunities and authority incommensurate with my age and experience because he was confident I could do the job. As my career progressed, I benefited from the guidance of many other mentors. I once received invaluable advice from another boss on how

This is an important issue for today’s career women, and my advice to them is to remember that both are important. If you are content in your job, that will be reflected at the end of the day with your loved ones. You don’t have to choose one or the other. The key is to be happy in both facets of your life, and the balance will follow.

TITLE: Senior Vice-President, Human Resources EDUCATION: MA, in Industrial Labor Relations, Cornell University FIRST JOB: Recruiter for IBM WHAT I’M READING: Patriotic Grace, by Peggy Noonan MY PHILOSOPHY: Being adaptive to change is critical to one’s personal and professional success. “It’s not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” – Darwin FAMILY: Husband, Daren; son, Zachary, 11; daughter, Zoe, 9; one older and one younger sister. My father is the person I admire the most in the world. INTERESTS: Reading about health and fitness, early childhood education, psychology, politics, change management, travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Cancer Society, the local food bank COMPANY: Domtar Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Montreal, Quebec, Canada WEB SITE: www.domtar.com BUSINESS: Pulp and paper manufacturing. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 9,000

“If you are content in your job, that will be reflected at the end of the day with your loved ones.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Catherine (Cathy) Avgiris Comcast Corporation

TITLE: Senior Vice President and General Manager for Communications and Data Services EDUCATION: Baruch College FIRST JOB: Accountant WHAT I’M READING: The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson MY PHILOSOPHY: “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” – Aristotle FAMILY: Husband, two sons. INTERESTS: Food, cooking, music, travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: Career Wardrobe COMPANY: Comcast Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.comcast.com BUSINESS: Provider of entertainment, information and communication products and services. Comcast is principally involved in the development, management and operation of cable systems and in the delivery of programming content. ANNUAL REVENUES: $35.8 billion in consolidated revenue; $13.7 billion in consolidated operating cash flow; $7.2 billion in consolidated operating income EMPLOYEES: Approximately 107,000

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s you go through life, you don’t realize who will be a mentor and how important their advice will be to you. My parents were uneducated immigrants who made a life using the creativity of their hands. My mom was a talented seamstress who could take a picture from Vogue and recreate it perfectly. My dad, a master carpenter, could turn a piece of wood into a work of art. Education was not a part of their lives, and so it became a critical part of mine. My dad sat me down before I went to college and said, “I have given you all I have to give, it’s not much, but I’ve tried to set the good example. Make the most of it, study hard, learn all you can, go out, do more, be more than me.” I wanted to be in the creative arts in college, an interior designer perhaps. However, my father encouraged me to get an accounting degree. I never really became the accountant my father thought I would, but his advice set my career in motion. At the forklift manufacturing firm where, at 28, I was CFO, the president of the company knew I didn’t have a lot of experience. He

said to me, “you will make mistakes. It’s okay. Just don’t make the mistake that will cost the company.” Those words have stayed with me. He taught me not to be afraid of decision making, and yet know the impact of the decisions I make. That is also where I learned not to be afraid to ask the dumb questions, to really understand what lies underneath the product sold to a consumer. And that advice I pass on to everyone I work with. I’ve never thought of myself as a mentor, and I’ve never really had formal mentoring relationships. But I try to learn something from everyone I meet and pass on the lessons learned to those who come after me. Probably the best mentor I had is someone I have never met. Aristotle, who wrote, “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.” These are words I strive to live by every day. I hope to be a good mentor to my kids and pass along to them the same message my father gave to me going off to college all those years ago. And I will be right there behind them.

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Diversity powers innovation. Innovation powers Comcast. We power dreams in our communities. And we live and breathe innovation every day. By embracing diversity of thought, philosophy and experience, we have become the nation’s leading provider of entertainment, information and communication products and services. By embracing diversity of communities, we have become an employer and a provider of choice. Comcast congratulates our own Cathy Avgiris for being featured in the 9th Annual WomenWorthWatching® Issue. Here’s to her fortitude and ability to be a natural mentor to those around her. To learn more about our commitment to diversity, go to www.comcast.com/diversity, and “Comcast dream big” on Facebook and Twitter.


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Stacey Babson-Smith Terex Corporation

TITLE: Vice President, Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer EDUCATION: The Ohio State University, BS; Benjamin Cardozo School of Law, JD FIRST JOB: Employee at a stationery store in Queens NY, where my job duties included scooping Italian ices WHAT I’M READING: Little Bee: A Novel, by Chris Cleave MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t sweat anything that will not make a difference one or five years from now. Always be respectful and truthful. Welcome feedback. Give back to your community. FAMILY: 2 sons, Remy (14) and Justin (12); Husband, Craig (married 20 years), 3 dogs – Baci, Mac and Toby. INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, traveling, walking/running, cooking. FAVORITE CHARITies: Pro Bono Partnership COMPANY: Terex Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Westport, Connecticut WEB SITE: www.Terex.com BUSINESS: Construction and industrial products manufacturer. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4 billion in 2009 EMPLOYEES: 16,000 (Year End 2009)

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y parents encouraged me to break from the local status quo and prepare to go to college outside of New York State. At 16, I enrolled at The Ohio State University. Attending one of the largest universities in the United States, I studied and interacted with people from all over the country and all over the world. This first exposure to Diversity and Inclusion opened my eyes to the global community and valuing people for who they are. Although I was different coming from Queens, New York, and younger than most other students, I felt accepted and valued. Early in my career, I met my mentor, Peter Panken. As my boss, he guided, supported and coached me (painfully at times). He provided stretch opportunities by assigning work on challenging matters and, at times, with more difficult law firm partners and clients. Looking back, those challenges provided the greatest opportunities, honed the skills necessary to be successful and developed my confidence. At Terex, I have had the opportunity to take on challenges and responsibilities outside of a traditional legal position. Working hard – with man-

“Always act with integrity. It will inspire trust and confidence.” 26

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agement support and confidence – has allowed me to grow from a U.S.focused employment lawyer to the Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer of a multinational company, taking on challenges and achieving results I could never have imagined. My success has been a team effort. I could not have achieved what I have without the love, support and patience of my husband and children. Recently, Terex Chairman and CEO Ron DeFeo spoke at the Terex Women’s Summit, where he encouraged us to be the “CEOs of our own careers.” This brought clarity to me as I continue to reflect on my future career progression. It is up to each of us to determine where we want to be, what we need to do to get there and make it happen. My advice to others: 1. Be yourself and believe in yourself. 2. Be courageous and take risks. Don’t fear the challenges. 3. Work hard. Stretch yourself. Roll up your sleeves. 4. Always act with integrity. It will inspire trust and confidence. 5. Make things happen. Don’t wait for opportunities to come to you. 6. Respectfully challenge the status quo and look to improve. 7. Mentor others and find mentors for yourself. 8. Follow up and follow through. 9. Be a good listener. 10. Embrace criticism.


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Shari Ballard Best Buy Co., Inc.

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entoring has always been an important part of my professional life, but the way I’ve interpreted and utilized the term has evolved throughout the course of my career. I used to follow the traditional definition and guidelines of what a mentor should be: someone a position or two higher in the company who is able to impart their knowledge and guidance based on their personal success and advancement. When I took on my first general manager position at a Best Buy store in Michigan, I realized my personal definition of what a mentor should be was distorted. I was focused solely on finding answers from above; neglecting to see all that was going on around me and missing the opportunity to learn from others. As I look back, some of my greatest mentoring and learning experiences have come from people at all levels of the organization, regardless of title or position. This realization has helped instill in me the belief that if you move past the titles and jobs, you can learn from everything and everyone. My view of mentorship is tied to what I can learn, not how much I know. Once I stopped focusing on trying to know everything and became comfortable in the reality that I never would, I became a better

mentor and a great deal happier. I make this a fundamental part of my role as a leader by continuously engaging with others throughout the company, whether it be through attending meetings with store managers, getting insight from customer service representatives or spending time in the field with retail employees. I believe that every individual has unique views and talents that play a pivotal role in the advancement of my own knowledge and success as an executive. That fact remains vital in the personal responsibility I feel as a leader of Best Buy, as I believe it’s my job to not only understand the talents and perspectives of others, but also to help leverage them in strategic and inspiring ways that will help both the company and the employee reach his or her goals.

TITLE: President, Americas; Enterprise Executive Vice President EDUCATION: University of Michigan-Flint FIRST JOB: Mowing lawns in my neighborhood at 16. My first real employment was at MC Sporting Goods WHAT I’M READING: The Sistine Secrets, by Benjamin Blech MY PHILOSOPHY: Do your job in a way that makes people around you proud, even if you think they’re not watching. I try to always behave in a way that accurately reflects who I am and what I care about, remembering that what I do for a living is just one component of my life. FAMILY: I grew up in Michigan. The majority of my family still lives there, including my parents, sister and Grandparents. My partner has two children. FAVORITE CHARITies: Paint-A-Thon, focuses on improving homes for the elderly and disabled. COMPANY: Best Buy Co., Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Richfield, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.bestbuy.com BUSINESS: Consumer electronics. ANNUAL REVENUES: $49 billion globally

“...Some of my greatest mentoring and learning experiences have come from people at all levels of the organization...” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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© Eastman Kodak Company

Diversity &Inclusion Celebrating achievements makes us smile.

Kodak salutes Susan Tousi, General Manager, Consumer Inkjet Systems and Vice President – recognized by Profiles in Diversity Journal as a 2011 “Woman Worth Watching.” Your dedication to business achievement, community involvement and mentoring others are true hallmarks of leadership and commitment. You are a coach, role model and champion, both in our business and in your many contributions that enrich our community.

www.kodak.com/go/diversity


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Sally Brooks, Kindred Healthcare • Birgit A. Behrendt, Ford Motor Company • Susan M. Brownell, U.S. Postal Service • Lisa Bisaccia, CVS Caremark Tina Brown-Stevenson, Ingenix • Barb Baurer, COUNTRY Financial • Carolynn A. Brooks, OfficeMax • Pamela M. Berklich, Kelly Services • Susan L. Blount, Prudential Financial ®

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Barb Baurer COUNTRY Financial

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer EDUCATION: BA in Mathematics and Master’s degree in Business Administration, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL; CPCU, CLU, ChFC FIRST JOB: Summer corn detasseling while in high school WHAT I’M READING: How the Mighty Fall: And Why Some Companies Never Give In, by Jim Collins MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, have fun and care about others. FAMILY: My husband, two brothers and their families, and lots of wonderful friends. INTERESTS: Travel, reading, golf, wine and shopping with friends. FAVORITE CHARITies: Susan G. Komen for the Cure (my mother died from breast cancer) and the local United Way as I serve on its board COMPANY: COUNTRY Financial HEADQUARTERS: Bloomington, Illinois WEB SITE: www.countryfinancial.com BUSINESS: Insurance and financial services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 5,067

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hroughout my life, I’ve had a long list of great mentors starting with my parents. My dad died following a farming accident when I was 10. I still remember the important life lessons he taught me. • Be happy in your work. He began his career as an accountant and became a farmer in his late 30s. • Stand up for what you believe. • Be someone that others know they can rely upon. • Gain support through your deeds, not by threats. My mom became a schoolteacher after my father’s death. She led by example, treating everyone fairly and living life in a strong ethical fashion. She often told me, “losing your reputation is easy, gaining it back is hard – so protect it always.” At COUNTRY Financial, I became our first female vice president after moving through the ranks of our information technology area. I then ran one of our business lines and later became COO, overseeing all of our busi-

“I have been very blessed in my life and believe it is important to give back to others.” 30

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ness operations. During my years at COUNTRY, I have had exceptional mentors who showed me the importance of:

– hiring on potential and hiring tough so managing becomes easier. (Hiring decisions are one of the most important aspects of management.)

– ensuring teams reflect diversity of thought and express a wide range of views on any issue so the best decisions can be made; – creating and experiencing mini-crises along the way so a major crisis can be prevented in the end;

– knowing people often remember the little things we do every day more than the big things we do once in awhile;

– and understanding that others watch what we do more than what we say.

I have been very blessed in my life and believe it is important to give back to others. For me, giving back means mentoring others, volunteering in our church or community, providing industry leadership, and being there for our families. It is a joy to be in a position where I can now help mentor others so they can attain the same degree of satisfaction from their careers that I have realized.


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Birgit A. Behrendt Ford Motor Company

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started with Ford of Germany straight out of school. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do – you could say I was a late starter. I began as an apprentice and spent five years as an administrative assistant before joining the purchasing team. I pursued an economics degree by taking classes at night. This was an invaluable experience, teaching me organization, discipline, focus and persistence. Over time, I advanced through the organization to become vice president of purchasing for Ford of Europe. One of the biggest lessons I learned as a woman and as a professional is that you need to know what you want. Clarify where you want to get in your career, and what you want to achieve five years in the future, both professionally and personally. Identify how much you want to invest in your growth, the responsibility you want and where in the organization you want to be. Next, say what you want, particularly to those who make decisions about your career. Don’t be bashful about your achievements. Too many women think if they work hard, others will notice and a promotion will follow. If you don’t speak for yourself, your contributions will be extremely welcomed – while others get the promotions.

Many women believe they have to fulfill 95 percent of a job description before they can apply, while men are convinced they “fit the bill” if they meet more than 50 percent. Don’t let your pursuit for perfection get in the way of great opportunities. I know from my own experience that having mentors is of immense importance. They are promoters, advisers, and sounding boards. They can use their experience, and yours, to help you see things more clearly. I was lucky to have several valuable mentors. If your business doesn’t have a formal mentoring program, look to the leaders in your company that you admire and talk to them. Most leaders are willing to share their experience and knowledge. My industry has been through challenging times, but my best advice is to always be true to yourself. I found that by being open, respectful and fair, I was able to deliver tough but necessary messages to turn things around. Most of all, I am convinced you can only be at your best if you are passionate about what you do, and if you – most of the time – enjoy the ride!

TITLE: Executive Director, Global Programs and The Americas Purchasing, Ford Motor Company EDUCATION: Business degree from the Administration and Business Academy, Verwaltungs- und Wirtschaftsakademie in Cologne, Germany FIRST JOB: Commercial apprentice at Ford-Werke in Cologne, Germany WHAT I’M READING: Jane Austen, Mystery & Suspense; I’m currently discovering Stieg Larsson MY PHILOSOPHY: Always stay true to yourself and never lose your sense of humor! FAMILY: Happily married with lots of nieces and nephews. INTERESTS: Boating, running, reading. FAVORITE CHARITies: Breast Cancer Organizations in Germany and in the U.S., Animal Shelters COMPANY: Ford Motor Company HEADQUARTERS: Dearborn, Michigan WEB SITE: www.ford.com BUSINESS: Automotive. ANNUAL REVENUES: $118.3 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 178,000 worldwide

“Don’t let your pursuit for perfection get in the way of great opportunities.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

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Pamela M. Berklich Kelly Services

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Global Solutions and Services EDUCATION: MA, Career Counseling, Oakland University; BS, Political Science/ Psychology, Central Michigan University FIRST JOB: Babysitter, Waitress WHAT I’M READING: Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Be the very best you can be...always. FAMILY: Husband (Tony), Son (Anthony II), Daughter (Natalie). INTERESTS: Family, Travel, Beach home in Florida. FAVORITE CHARITies: HAVEN (Help Against Violent Encounters Now), Forgotten Harvest, and my children! COMPANY: Kelly Services HEADQUARTERS: Troy, Michigan WEB SITE: www.kellyservices.com BUSINESS: Kelly Services, Inc. is a leader in providing workforce solutions. Kelly offers a comprehensive array of outsourcing and consulting services as well as worldclass staffing on a temporary, temporaryto-hire and direct-hire basis. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 7,900 worldwide; 480,000 temporary employees worldwide

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believe the path to leadership is created one step at a time. Along my path, I have realized my learning and professional growth is attributable far more to the mistakes I’ve made and less to the successes I’ve achieved. This is an important lesson for those who aspire to leadership; you must be willing to take (calculated) risks and learn from failure in order to strengthen your probabilities for greater levels of success. I built a recruitment/outsourcing business that I sold after 20 years and then joined Kelly Services five years ago. As I reflect on my career and the path I chose to senior leadership, I am very grateful to a handful of key mentors who served as my champions – and challengers – and enhanced my success along the way. My mentors have been the role models, coaches, and critics who provided me opportunities to stretch my capabilities to advance to each level of leadership. It’s because of their influence that I take mentoring others so seriously, and invest a tremendous amount of time and energy to help others grow, personally and professionally. As a leader, you must be very passionate about your work and about

mentoring others and challenging individuals and teams to strive for excellence. To have a positive impact on others, you must learn to deliver constructive feedback and be willing to have the tough conversations that lead to awareness, acceptance, and positive change in others. I trust I have mastered these skills along the way. Leaders also accept responsibility for modeling the behaviors they expect from their team. You must be fair, honest, empathic, genuine, professional, and committed. You also should be humble when occasions arise that call for this behavior; don’t feel the need to take credit. Instead, allow others to be recognized. Be satisfied taking a back seat when celebrating success. I’ve learned to be a great listener, and to build strong and collaborative relationships with individuals at all levels of the organization. These relationships have had a direct impact on my growth and success as a leader. Many individuals I have mentored over the years have grown into leadership roles themselves, and have shared with me that my influence on their career path was significant. For me, this is the greatest measure of my success as a leader: to impact others in being the very best they can be.

“You must be fair, honest, empathic, genuine, professional, and committed.” 32

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Lisa Bisaccia CVS Caremark Corporation

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hroughout my career, the inflection points for change have included two themes: a senior mentor who simultaneously challenged and supported me, and my willingness to push myself to tolerate more risk than my comfort zone would normally allow. This combination provided the tension that served as the change catalyst which has molded my success and management style. As such, I’ve learned the importance of never saying “no” to the offer of a big challenge, even when I had enormous doubts about my ability to pull it off. Trusting your ability, skills, track record and creativity is the key to convincing others that you are up to the task of leading them. As my career has evolved, I find that my management style has also evolved. Along with encouraging those I mentor to bite off that big challenge and have confidence in themselves, I spend less time directing and more time listening and responding. This truly helps people grow, and I’ve seen this by observing successful leaders that I admire. The key to coaching and motivating people is to facilitate their own insights and learnings. And of course, that does not happen if you are the

one doing all the talking. Effective leaders create communities to provide connections, support and shared experiences for their members. My most meaningful career experiences have been as a participant in these communities. Therefore, as a leader, I always include the creation and sustaining of such a community. Often, I am approached by people about how to obtain work-life balance. This balance does not always come naturally to me. I have to expend energy to ensure that I stay in balance. I do believe that women can successfully balance a fulfilling career and a dedicated family life. For me it is a question of priorities and sequencing; you can have it all, but not all at once. Maintaining this balance in partnership with a spouse or significant other through commitment to the primacy of family and mutual support of each other’s career makes the journey much more rewarding and a lot less lonely.

TITLE: Senior Vice President & Chief Human Resources Officer EDUCATION: BA, MBA FIRST JOB: Recruiter at a hospital WHAT I’M READING: Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, by Daniel Pink; The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, by Michael Lewis MY PHILOSOPHY: “To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under heaven.” Ecclesiastes 3 FAMILY: Married, 2 college-aged children. INTERESTS: Classical music, Spanish and Italian languages. FAVORITE CHARITies: Women’s health COMPANY: CVS Caremark Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Woonsocket, Rhode Island WEB SITE: www.cvscaremark.com BUSINESS: Pharmacy. ANNUAL REVENUES: $99 billion EMPLOYEES: 215,000

Balance is something I want for all, but I’ll remind them that this goal, as with all goals, takes focus and drive to achieve. In the end, I hope I too can become that mentor who challenges and supports people and puts them on their own road to success and fulfillment.

“The key to coaching and motivating people is to facilitate their own insights and learnings.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

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Susan L. Blount Prudential Financial, Inc.

TITLE: Senior Vice President and General Counsel: Law, Compliance, and Business Ethics EDUCATION: BA, JD, University of Texas at Austin FIRST JOB: Page in children’s library WHAT I’M READING: Age of Wonder, by Richard Holmes; When Everything Changed, by Gail Collins FAMILY: Married, 3 children. INTERESTS: Reading, skiing, knitting. FAVORITE CHARITies: Educational institutions whose missions interest me COMPANY: Prudential Financial, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Newark, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.prudential.com BUSINESS: Financial services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.791 billion as of December 31, 2009 EMPLOYEES: 40,000

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hen I was growing up, every evening at 5:50 p.m. my father walked up the street and into our house. By 6 p.m. we all sat down together as a family for dinner. And then the learning began. My father was a theoretical physicist and amateur scholar in many other fields. Under his guidance, our dinner table conversation ranged across the momentous events of the world we lived in – civil rights, the Vietnam War, the environment and Earth Day. He never accepted platitudes or the conventional wisdom. He tested our thinking and made us defend our ideas. When dinner was over, we sat at the dining room table and began our homework – writing assignments always provided another excuse to push our analytics. There were mathematics flashcards for those who needed them and stories to be read to the members of the family too young to read for themselves. And when the chores were done and the younger children put to bed, my parents sat in the living room and read from the pile of library books they kept on the tables by the sofa. From this background I learned the value of education, the impor-

tance of crisp thinking, the art of writing, and the importance of discipline. Most importantly, I observed role models of continuous learning and punctilious honesty. I was humbled by the knowledge that whatever I might accomplish would not be an individual achievement – a whole team had stood behind me to help me on my way – and that it was my responsibility to do something with these enormous gifts. Over the years, I have tried to hold myself open to learning from a whole constellation of mentors and experiences. I learned the wisdom of “running out every base” when I played intramural sports in law school. When I began skiing for the first time 10 years ago, “leaning into my skis” taught me the importance of committing to whatever you do. I learned that there is “more than one way to get to the other side of a mountain,” when a wise woman suggested I tone down some of my intensity. Along the way I have tried to incorporate the guidance that has been so generously given to expand the person my parents sent out into the world. And understanding the great gifts I have been given, I aspire to “lift as I rise.”

“...I learned the value of education, the importance of crisp thinking, the art of writing, and the importance of discipline.” 34

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Congratulations to our own Susan L. Blount for her selection as one of Profiles in Diversity Journal’s Women Worth Watching. As Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Prudential, Susan helps guide one of the world’s most successful corporations through a complex legal landscape. We proudly support the work of leaders who—like Susan L. Blount— elevate the aspirations and performances of everyone around them.

prudential.com

©2010 Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. 0183772-00001-00


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Carolynn A. Brooks OfficeMax, Inc.

TITLE: Vice President, Chief Diversity Officer EDUCATION: Attended Howard University FIRST JOB: Youth Counselor at a Residential Treatment Center WHAT I’M READING: Cracking the Corporate Code, by Price M Cobbs; Blink, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Believe in your dreams, decree them and then boldly pursue them. And when your time comes push through the fear, never letting anyone else define you. FAMILY: Three adult sons, Preston, Canthon and Clinton and three granddaughters. I live with my husband Jimmie and our Standard Schnauzer, – Shaq, and our Cock-a-poo, – Chance. INTERESTS: Reading, writing, traveling and helping others pursue their dreams. FAVORITE CHARITies: My church and others in need COMPANY: OfficeMax, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Naperville, Illinois WEB SITE: www.officemax.com BUSINESS: Office products – retail and B2B. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 30,000

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hen I began my career in the mid ’70s, there weren’t a lot of mentors that looked like me to provide advice on how to navigate the uncharted waters of corporate America. The advice my parents shared sustained me through the ebb and flow of my career. My stepfather told me, “Don’t let anyone tell you what you can’t do.” And my mother’s advice was, “You’ll have to learn to hold your head erect and command all men’s respect.” When there is no clear path, you have to forge your own. When you are doing things that have never been done before, there is no right or wrong answer, even though I was often told what I couldn’t accomplish or shouldn’t pursue. I wanted to make a good living to support my family, so I boldly pursued the opportunities I was offered. I set my sights on what I wanted, and before I reached the desired position I would tell people I was already in that position. I found if walked confidently in the direction I was seeking, doors opened. I wasn’t afraid to try things I’d never done before.

I didn’t have a straight upward trajectory. Every time I took a step back I fought hard to regain the ground I’d lost while I waged an equal battle to hold on to my dignity and faith through the process. I worked through divorce and single parenthood, juggling business travel and daycare issues; deciding between being present at a business meeting or attending my son’s sports events; relocations and downsizing. It wasn’t easy, but I set goals and continued to see myself growing so it was worth it. I also hoped I was teaching my sons life lessons along the way. My resume speaks to the risks I’ve been willing to take and the opportunities I have been given. I have never had a job that I had prior experience in, but each position was a stepping stone to the next. As my career has advanced my mentors have mostly come from the men I work with. I feel I have an obligation to ask questions, listen to learn and to share what I’ve learned. I also feel a strong sense of responsibility and commitment to perform well so the doors I came through stay open for the next woman or minority.

“I feel I have an obligation to ask questions, listen to learn and to share what I’ve learned.” 36

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Sally Brooks Kindred Healthcare

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he key to forging a successful career path is to know your strengths and leverage them when life takes you in unexpected directions. If you know what drives you, you will wake up most mornings with energy, focus, and passion. Medical training is focused on improving weaknesses, but I have found that surrounding yourself with a team that balances strengths and weaknesses is the best approach. My professional life has been devoted to improving the care for older adults and educating their personal and professional caregivers. I grew up in a rural community, attended pharmacy school and decided to continue my training in medical school. During my pharmacy internship program, I worked in my hometown drugstore. Through home delivery of medication it was evident that the healthcare system fails to provide ongoing support for chronic care needs contributing to poor quality for many of our most vulnerable Americans. It is second nature to me to care for older adults because of fabulous female role models, my grandmother and godmother. Before the term work-life balance was in our vocabulary, they both successfully demonstrated this balance through some extremely dif-

ficult times. Despite personal financial hardship, they sacrificed to share their resources with others. I strive for worklife balance; however, remembering I am a work in progress helps me to accept my shortcomings. In addition to personal mentors and friends, I have been fortunate to find professional mentors. Having the courage and humility to accept their guidance is difficult at times, but worth it. I continue to connect with mentors, not only because of our shared professional interests but because we lift each other up. Life has taken me in unexpected directions. The demographic age wave has allowed me to work to improve the care for older adults in a variety of roles – pharmacist, physician, clinician educator, and now VP for a large company providing residential services, rehabilitation and end-of-life care.

TITLE: Vice President, Medical Director, Health Services Division EDUCATION: Geriatric Medicine Fellowship, University of Cincinnati; Internal Medicine Residency, The Christ Hospital, Cincinnati, OH; MD, Marshall University; BS, Ohio Northern University FIRST JOB: Dairy Queen – waitress; First job after graduation: The Christ Hospital, Section Director of Geriatric Medicine. WHAT I’M READING: Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen; and the Journal of the American Geriatric Society MY PHILOSOPHY: Choose your attitude (positive) and make someone else’s day. FAMILY: Husband, Dan; three daughters, Gwen, Tess, Lydia; and dog “Bitzy.” INTERESTS: Skiing, Hiking and Cooking. College Football is my individual passion. FAVORITE CHARITies: Alzheimer’s Association and my county Senior Citizens group COMPANY: Kindred Healthcare HEADQUARTERS: Louisville, Kentucky WEB SITE: www.kindredhealthcare.com BUSINESS: Diversified post-acute healthcare services. ANNUAL REVENUES: More than $4.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 53,500

Most of these positions have been acquired through personal and professional relationships, which demonstrate the importance of investing the time to know colleagues on a personal level. I am also a wife, mother, and supporter of other women who have so much to offer. My advice is to surround yourself with your circle of supporters, stay true to your passion and invest in and care for yourself.

“Life has taken me in unexpected directions.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

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Susan M. Brownell United States Postal Service

TITLE: Vice President, Supply Management EDUCATION: Bachelor of Arts, Catholic University of America; Masters of Business Administration, Florida Institute of Technology FIRST JOB: Camp Counselor WHAT I’M READING: Gift from the Sea, by Anne Morrow Lindbergh MY PHILOSOPHY: Be authentic. FAMILY: My husband and I live in Virginia with our two children. INTERESTS: Travel, family time, sports, cooking and entertaining. FAVORITE CHARITies: So Others Might Eat (SOME) COMPANY: United States Postal Service HEADQUARTERS: Washington, DC WEB SITE: www.usps.com BUSINESS: Government agency. ANNUAL REVENUES: $68 billion EMPLOYEES: 596,000

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s far back as I can recall, my parents encouraged me to go after my dreams and to always do my very best. Our family placed a high value on faith, love, hard work, and perseverance. These values are woven into my DNA. In high school and college, I played sports where I learned firsthand the importance of working as a team, focusing on the positives, and building resiliency. I’ve learned equally important lessons by contributing the best I have to offer to both winning and losing teams. If you are a young professional just starting out, I recommend that you take time to reflect on what’s important to you and get a firm grasp on your inner compass to chart your course. Building a career is a journey filled with many people and a wide variety of experiences that shape you along the way. My professional career started at the U.S. Department of the Navy where I entered their contracting intern program right out of college. I learned from one of my earliest supervisors to seek out how to do things from those with experience. I sought out the experts in the group when I needed assistance, and found that an

appreciative attitude was often met with generosity of time and a willingness to share. When I graduated from the intern program and was advancing to more challenging assignments, I recall feeling pressed to use aggressive tactics in negotiations with suppliers to extract concessions. I sought the counsel of a respected woman leader on developing my negotiation style. She encouraged me to identify my unique strengths and use those to my advantage, knowing that I would achieve better results by being myself and not by trying to act like someone else. She reminded me to be genuine and true to my values – valuable advice that has stuck with me to this day. After joining the U.S. Postal Service, I continued to seek out opportunities to learn as much as I could by obtaining assignments in various areas. Cultivating a broad network of supportive relationships is important to being an effective leader and developing mentor relationships with experienced managers provides a nurturing place to explore your potential. By knowing yourself and drawing on your strengths, you not only bring out the best in yourself, but also the best in those around you.

“Our family placed a high value on faith, love, hard work, and perseverance.” 38

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Tina Brown-Stevenson Ingenix, a UnitedHealth Group business

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knew from age five that I wanted to devote my life to health care and this passion and commitment has been a driving force in my career. As a child, I contracted a lifethreatening infection in my right tibia and spent several years in and out of the hospital, frequently undergoing surgery. When I was two years old, I underwent one of the first successful bone-grafting operations in history. This experience sparked a deepseated fascination with medical research and as an adult, I decided to become an RN. I learned many valuable career and life lessons from bedside nursing, where to me, a good day meant no one died on my watch, and where I found many opportunities to give real, meaningful help to those in need. While I loved nursing, I felt I could only effectively help one person at a time, and I wanted to do more. It was not long before I made the transition to a career in health information technology and data research. Now, my profession allows me to help whole populations and I feel great about the direction I decided

to take. Every day is an exciting challenge, and by conducting research and working to innovate the way health data and technology are used, I am able to contribute more broadly to help the health care system work more efficiently.

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Healthcare Innovation and Information

An important piece of career advice is to never try to be something you’re not. I’ve always felt we can each use our own personal interests and experiences to make meaningful contributions, and that we should never feel we must hide or change these unique assets. When in doubt, follow your instincts.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Put coins in your relationship bank frequently because we all have to make ‘withdrawals’ at some point in life.

As I’ve grown in my profession, I’ve served as a mentor to others at various stages in their careers, which has been a truly rewarding experience. At Ingenix, I make it a practice to meet with every associate on my team at least once every two weeks. I tell them that people never just get lucky in life; but that the people who can take advantage of “luck” or favorable circumstances are those who are prepared. If you are prepared to be the best you can be, you will be ready to handle interesting challenges and opportunities. Every success will enable you to take advantage of even greater opportunities.

EDUCATION: BS, Nursing, University of Massachusetts at Amherst; MA, Health Administration, Framingham State College FIRST JOB: Local nursing home during high school WHAT I’M READING: Innovation X, by Adam Richardson; Good to Great, by Jim Collins

FAMILY: Married and 13-year-old son and 10-year-old daughter. INTERESTS: Health care, gardening, reading, biking, relaxing at our vacation home on Cape Cod, kayaking, hiking, cooking. FAVORITE CHARITies: Make-a-Wish Foundation; The Smile Train COMPANY: Ingenix, a UnitedHealth Group business HEADQUARTERS: Eden Prairie, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.ingenix.com BUSINESS: Health care information and technology. ANNUAL REVENUES: $1.8 billion (2009) EMPLOYEES: More than 10,000

“An important piece of career advice is to never try to be something you’re not.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

39


Thanks to You,

A generation of stories is just another part of growing up.

WellPoint congratulates all of the WomenWorthWatching®, including our own recipient Sandy Miller.

Sandy Miller Senior Vice President and President, Federal Government Solutions WellPoint, Inc.

WellPoint is proud of our dedication to diversity. Still, with all that we've achieved, we will always strive to better attract, retain and develop top diverse talent. One way is through Associate Resource Groups like Women of WellPoint (WOW), where employees work to develop and sustain our culture of inclusion, enhance and maximize customer relations, and create and leverage leadership opportunities for all of our associates. Through these groups, we're able to better address our customers' needs, and ensure that our workforce is as unique as our wide range of health benefits products. At WellPoint, diversity is more than just the 'right thing to do.' It's the way we approach business, how we interact within our communities, how we mobilize our employees and, more than anything, why we appreciate moments like this. For more information, visit: www.wellpoint.com

® Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. © 2010 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved. EOE. ® Profiles in Diversity Journal. ® Registered Trademark, Diversity Inc Media LLC.


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Jane Connell, Johnson & Johnson • Hollie Castro, BMC Software • Joan K. Chow, ConAgra Foods • Kathleen Colwell, Highmark Sandra D. Byra, Salt River Project • Carolyn Caldwell, Centerpoint Medical Center (HCA) • Sharda Cherwoo, Ernst & Young • Yolanda Daniel, W.W. Grainger • Karen Dahut, Booz Allen Hamilton ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

annual

in 2011


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Sandra D. Byra Salt River Project

TITLE: Manager, Land Department and Papago Park Center, Inc. EDUCATION: BA, math education; MA, counseling; MS, Industrial Engineering, Arizona State University FIRST JOB: High School math teacher WHAT I’M READING: Anything related to kitchen and home remodeling MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is a journey, not a destination. Enjoy the venture or, better yet, make it an adventure. FAMILY: Husband, John Bourque; 3 stepchildren and 3 beautiful grandchildren. INTERESTS: Travel, hiking, scuba diving, music/dance, yoga, family time. FAVORITE CHARITies: Those supporting family, women and children and those that enrich lives through the arts COMPANY: Salt River Project HEADQUARTERS: Phoenix, Arizona WEB SITE: www.srpnet.com BUSINESS: Largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix area, providing electric service to more than 935,000 customers. Phoenix area’s largest supplier of water, delivering about 1 million acrefeet to agricultural, urban and municipal water users. ANNUAL REVENUES: $2.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 4,374

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ver the last 35 years, my career has taken me from the classroom where I taught high school math to the university where I earned an advanced degree in industrial engineering to the utility industry where I direct and provide real estate services for the third largest public utility in the country. I had always wanted to be a teacher, but discovered that my real passion was helping others. After 27 years and a variety of roles at SRP, I think my success has come from pursuing that passion through servant leadership, which is achieving results for my company by attending to the needs of my colleagues, employees and those we serve. Through servant leadership I saw the value of mentoring. Not only did I benefit from those who took the time to recognize my strengths and nurture them, I also learned from others by sharing experiences, conveying knowledge, and opening doors. Mentoring was so important to me that I helped develop and implement a formal mentoring program at SRP. After working with management, peers and the human resourc-

“Through servant leadership I saw the value of mentoring.” 42

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September/October 2010

es department, we unveiled the SRP Mentoring Program in 2002. The growth of the program is a testament to its success, and both mentees and mentors have shared how much they have learned from one another. As the program has evolved, we try to provide the right amount of structure and guidance to support mentoring relationships and develop employees to assume roles with greater leadership responsibilities. As I work with others, I share what I’ve learned through the years: • Be genuine and kind to yourself and others. • Always act with integrity and honesty. • Be a good communicator. • Be willing to ask for help and accept the advice of others. • Never be afraid to ask for someone’s time, although be aware of their time constraints and deadlines. • Prepare for any opportunity. • Get out of your comfort zone – help others and show what you know. Lead by example. • Don’t wait for a tap on the shoulder to take a risk and seek feedback; then really listen and involve others in the process. Finally, remember: “If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always gotten.”


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Carolyn Caldwell Centerpoint Medical Center, subsidiary of HCA, Inc.

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ecoming a CEO has been one of the greatest professional accomplishments that I have achieved. I made the decision to go back to graduate school and obtain my master’s degree in health care administration. I took three years to complete my degree while working full time and raising my children. Without the support of my husband, I would have never been able to achieve something so momentous. Today, as the CEO of Centerpoint Medical Center, I look back over my career and realize that there were wonderful individuals who helped craft my career. I’ve been mentored by some of the brightest minds in the industry who have continued to monitor my career and give me advice. The most important thing about having mentors is making sure that they care enough about you to be honest with you and give you constructive feedback. James Warren, who promoted me to COO when I was a laboratory director, really spent a lot of time coaching me and teaching me that things were very different once you decide to move into the C suite. I remember his patience with me as I made rookie mistakes. He made sure that he was correcting me without discouraging me.

I spend a lot of time mentoring young executives. I think it is so important to give back because people were willing to spend time with me early in my career. The best advice I can give to leaders is to surround yourself with good people and make sure you have people in your life that will give you good and honest advice, not just advice that you want to hear. It is equally important to continue to learn and educate yourself, not just in your industry, but also about what is occurring in the world. Lastly, make sure that God and family are the cornerstones in your life. Integrity is vital to being a great executive and leader. People must know that they can trust you and that you genuinely care about them. I always say that I would like to be recognized as a mother, wife, friend, neighbor and chief executive officer. I’m very proud of my title, but being a great mother and wife are the two most important things in my life.

TITLE: President & CEO EDUCATION: BS from Alabama A&M University (in Zoology/Chemistry); MHA from Texas Woman’s University FIRST JOB: Medical Technologist with Crestwood Hospital in Huntsville, Alabama WHAT I’M READING: Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime, by John Heilemann and Mark Halperin MY PHILOSOPHY: Integrity is the most important virtue an executive should have. FAMILY: Husband – Daniel, Son Jonathon (19), Daughter Monique (24). INTERESTS: Reading and traveling. FAVORITE CHARITies: Kansas City Free Health Clinic COMPANY: Centerpoint Medical Center, subsidiary of HCA, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Nashville, Tennessee WEB SITE: www.centerpointmedical.com BUSINESS: Hospital. ANNUAL REVENUES: $275 million EMPLOYEES: 1,155

“I think it is so important to give back because people were willing to spend time with me early in my career.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Hollie Castro BMC Software, Inc.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Administration EDUCATION: MBA, Thunderbird School of Global Management FIRST JOB: Marketing and Sales Manager – Start-up in Italy WHAT I’M READING: The 4-Hour Work Week, by Timothy Ferriss – to better understand the mindset of Generation ‘Y’ MY PHILOSOPHY: Know what you value at different points in life. Align your life accordingly, no matter what other people think. FAMILY: The most cherished dimension of my life, husband of 17 years, Dan; daughter, Isabella; mom, Judi; dad, Stan; and mother-in-law Zinha. INTERESTS: World Cup, Formula One, gourmet cooking and global travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: 2 orphanages in Brazil and Haiti COMPANY: BMC Software, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEB SITE: www.bmc.com BUSINESS: Technology – software. ANNUAL REVENUES: $2 billion EMPLOYEES: 6,000

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rowing up in Colorado, my parents provided me with the strength to do whatever I put my mind to do. They helped me become fearless in my life adventures. They taught me to live life according to my core values and to take risks. They coached me to look at opportunities and find the positive rather than the negative. They taught me to be curious of things I am not familiar with, and to look at other cultures with an open mind and with a keen interest in seeing how others view the world. As an exchange student in high school, I spent one year in Switzerland perfecting my French and learning Italian, followed by undergraduate studies in Italy studying their language and lifestyle. I received my MBA at the Thunderbird School of Global Management where I realized learning languages would be just a small part of understanding more about our world. For 20 years I have had the opportunity to work in global companies. I have also shaped and run several startup companies. I learned

“The best mentors are those who see what you cannot see in yourself and call you to step into your greatness.” 44

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that my passion is helping people reach their full potential by mentoring and coaching. I became a founding member of a nonprofit charter school helping to shape children’s futures by opening doors to global communities, and helping them see how much the world has to offer. All of these experiences have helped shape the executive I am today. The biggest challenge I have faced was being younger than my peers. At times this was intimidating. It was important for me to balance confidence and humility when dealing with people who were more experienced than myself. The best mentors are those who see what you cannot see in yourself and call you to step into your greatness. They question the status quo and are not afraid to show vulnerability or admit they’ve made a mistake. They readily give credit to others. My advice to young women is to look at life as a series of chapters. Be clear about what you want in each chapter of your life. By doing this, you remove the pressure of having to figure out your “life” plan and you allow yourself the flexibility to take advantage of opportunities that present themselves. Be disciplined and persistent. Know what you value. Be flexible enough to change as needed. I believe it is a great time for women in careers.


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Sharda Cherwoo Ernst & Young

TITLE: Partner, Private Equity Services EDUCATION: BS, Accounting, Sacred Heart University; Passed the 1982 CPA Exam FIRST JOB: A “lifer” at Ernst & Young, started in 1982 right after college WHAT I’M READING: It’s Not How Good You Are..., by Paul Arden; Interpreter of Maladies, by Jhumpa Lahiri; and Guy de Maupassant’s short stories MY PHILOSOPHY: Inspired by Tagore’s Gitanjali and the Bhagavad Gita: Have the courage, face and rise up to challenges, and be open to where the road leads. FAMILY: Husband, Satish (34 years); Mother who lives in India; Brother, Ajay and his wife; Sister, Aparna and her husband. Nieces: Ilina, Medha and Uma INTERESTS: Bollywood movies, designing clothes, painting, shopping for bargains, entertaining friends and family, and more! FAVORITE CHARITies: Apne Aap, Pratham, The Woman’s Cancer Foundation, and The Shankara Eye Foundation COMPANY: Ernst & Young HEADQUARTERS: London, UK WEB SITE: www.ey.com BUSINESS: Professional services. ANNUAL REVENUES: U.S. $21.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 144,441

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hen I arrived in New York in 1977 as an 18-year-old bride from Kashmir, India, the product of an arranged marriage, I never imagined that I would become the first Asian woman partner at Ernst & Young nationwide, and the first woman of Indian origin to become partner in the United States in any Big Eight professional services firm. My life has presented me with many unexpected challenges, which only now can I appreciate as opportunities. In my youth, my grandfather used to read and explain Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore’s “Gitanjali” verses to me – especially the poem that began, “Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high…” The passage about breaking narrow domestic walls found a home deep inside me. Often the greatest impediments on our path are the walls we place around ourselves through our own imaginations and fears. From my earliest days in this amazing country, I have been spurred to conquer fear, rise up to challenges and be open to where the road leads me. In this

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most unexpected journey, I have been guided by the philosophy in the Bhagavad Gita, a central book of Hinduism, of focusing on the right actions and doing the right thing without regard to the consequences. In 1982 I received an offer to work at Ernst & Young (then Ernst & Whinney). I have since been involved in many strategic client, leadership and entrepreneurial roles. These opportunities, combined with incredible mentors and mentees at the firm and an inclusive and flexible environment, have helped me to grow and have meaningful experiences along the way. One particularly significant milestone in my career occurred right after 9-11. I was asked to launch and lead Ernst & Young’s Global Shared Services Center in India. For someone who loves entrepreneurial challenges, this was a dream come true. I am incredibly proud that our center has been recognized as an awardwinning, inclusive and progressive work environment. In the 21st century, we must forge new global communities with basic universal values and yet with respect for differences. I am both humbled and energized by the realization that much of my journey lies before me still, and that I have many social contributions yet to make – to encourage others, as I have been encouraged, and to break down narrow walls.


www.cisco.com/go/diversity

Who you are shapes who we are. Meet Lauren: Super manager, super mom, and community builder extraordinaire. In 2002, Lauren established the Cisco-sponsored Senior Women’s Forum. Her efforts not only helped position Cisco as a trusted resource within the business community — they helped make us a stronger company inside and out.


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Joan K. Chow ConAgra Foods

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer EDUCATION: MBA, from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and BA, in linguistics from Cornell University FIRST JOB: Summer temp at the World Bank during college WHAT I’M READING: The Art of Racing in the Rain, by Garth Stein; The Unit, by Ninni Holmqvist MY PHILOSOPHY: Never stop learning and growing; be curious; always give your best effort. FAMILY: Single. INTERESTS: Exercise; dining with friends and family. FAVORITE CHARITies: Feeding America COMPANY: ConAgra Foods HEADQUARTERS: Omaha, Nebraska WEB SITE: www.conagrafoods.com BUSINESS: One of North America’s leading food companies, with brands in 97 percent of America’s households. ANNUAL REVENUES: $12 billion in net sales for FY 2010 EMPLOYEES: 24,400

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hen I joined ConAgra Foods, the objective I was given was quite simple – raise the bar on marketing. I gathered input from my peers across the organization, our CEO, agencies, and my team as to what they felt was working, not working, and missing. The robust feedback, along with my own observations, led me to create a marketing vision that formed the basis for how I wanted my team to work, how we should be organized, and the skills and capabilities I wanted to develop for the team. From a people perspective, we had no training, no common brand language, and didn’t encourage risk taking and curiosity. We had a lot of consumer knowledge but lacked deep insights that were actionable. We had only a few people supporting our sales organization and our retail customers. I engaged my team to help accomplish our vision. What I asked of them was not perfection. I encouraged them to seek excellence,

to make sure they were adding value with everything they touched, to do the best they can. And if we tried our best and it didn’t work the way we planned, we learned from it, and we shared the learning with others. As I look back on our journey over the past few years, we’ve made a great deal of progress. We established marketing competencies and have a Marketing Academy. We have crossfunctional rotation assignments and talent management. My folks are encouraged to try new marketing ideas and vehicles. Our consumer insights are deep and are driving actionable results. And we have an integrated shopper-customer marketing organization that is mostly based in the field with our sales teams and our customers. All of these things have contributed to our business results. And our employee engagement scores are the strongest they’ve ever been. Our journey continues; there’s still more to be done. That’s what makes what I do so fun and interesting!

“I engaged my team to help accomplish our vision. What I asked of them was not perfection.” 48

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© ConAgra Foods, Inc. All rights reserved.

With an honor like this, we can’t help but smile. Congratulations to Joan Chow for being recognized as a Woman Worth Watching

At ConAgra Foods, we serve a very broad base of customers and consumers. To best serve them, we’ve created an organizational climate that values the diversity and the unique qualities of our employees, customers and consumers. Congratulations to Joan and to all the honorees. conagrafoods.com


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Kathleen Colwell Highmark Inc.

TITLE: Vice President, Corporate Strategic Programs Office and Chair, Corporate Diversity Council EDUCATION: University of Pittsburgh, MBA; Robert Morris University, BS FIRST JOB: File Clerk, City of Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire Prevention WHAT I’M READING: Micromessaging, by Stephen Young MY PHILOSOPHY: If it’s important enough to do, it’s important enough to do your best. It is up to you to use your talents and abilities to their full potential, never settling for less. FAMILY: My husband, Conrad Hooge, and our daughter Sierra. INTERESTS: Spending time with family, skiing, golf, bicycling, running, reading, volunteer work, gardening. FAVORITE CHARITies: Center for Victims of Violence & Crime, and National MS Society COMPANY: Highmark Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.highmark.com BUSINESS: Largest health insurance company in Pennsylvania. ANNUAL REVENUES: $13 billion EMPLOYEES: 19,000

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hen I reflect on my career at Highmark, I am reminded that success is a winding journey consisting of hard work, lifelong learning opportunities and developing interactions with others inside and outside the workplace. Mentoring relationships can propel your career to the next level, but they don’t need to be in the traditional formal sense. They can develop anywhere and with anyone who can offer constructive feedback and who genuinely wants you to succeed. My mother helped me at one point in my career by providing insight on how I could react effectively to challenges in learning how to manage others. As a result, I am a big believer that all of us can learn something from anyone. In 1981, there was a visible lack of women in leadership positions at Highmark. Over time however, things changed, and as the company changed, I had to learn things that would eventually take my career to the next level. For starters, it’s important to be open and honest with yourself in terms of abilities. Look for opportunities to stretch and grow your

“Look for opportunities to stretch and grow your skills.” 50

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skills. Do what you can to develop those skills, including taking training programs and public speaking opportunities. I still read businessoriented and leadership books and apply the concepts to my workday. Every day is an opportunity to reflect upon our interactions by reviewing what we’ve learned and what we might want to change. It’s also important to develop a broad background. Sometimes people will not move throughout a company unless it’s for a promotion or bigger salary. I believe it’s good to consider a lateral move in order to gain exposure and build competencies. The key is to recognize your skills and surround yourself with others whose strengths and perspectives are different than yours. The combination is better than being on your own. Remember to give back as well. One of the most rewarding things at this stage in my career is looking at how others I may have influenced have grown and risen through the corporation. I am fortunate to work for a progressive company such as Highmark. The lessons I learned growing up with five siblings provided me with a strong work ethic built on determination, trust and hard work while having fun along the way. I hope to build on these same principles for years to come.


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Jane Connell Johnson & Johnson

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y career at Johnson & Johnson started 19 years ago – an exciting journey towards the executive ranks of a Fortune 500 company full of challenging and enriching encounters. I owe much of my success to the supervisors and mentors who shared their time and wisdom with me, let me take chances, and allowed me to learn from both mistakes and successes. Five years after joining Johnson & Johnson, I enrolled as a parttime student to receive my bachelor’s degree. My commitment to my education would not have been possible without support from my mentors and family. My mentors taught me to go beyond the selfmade limits I created. As a life-long mentor and advocate of women in the workplace, I enjoy sharing these lessons with others who have the abilities and aspirations to travel this road, but may not have had the right guidance to turn their aspirations into reality. Over the years, I have summarized these lessons into my personal ‘top three strategies for success in the workplace’. Focus. One of the best predictors of high performance at the executive level is the ability to remain focused and deal with ambiguity and change. This skill is a strong indicator of how well individuals will be able to

evolve in today’s business environment. I attribute much of my success to my ability to remain focused and simplify complex business situations.

TITLE: Vice President, Global IT Operations and Strategic Sourcing

Versatility. A second key characteristic of successful leaders is versatility, or the ability to recognize and adapt to your surroundings. A manager must be able to reach into her toolbox to find a different way to attack a problem or deal with a situation. Lack of self-awareness and adaptability almost instantly impose limitations on an individual’s development and longterm career opportunities.

MY PHILOSOPHY: If you don’t like it, challenge it; change it – but don’t be a victim.

Leadership. A third lesson, imparted from my first mentor, is a simple quote which still resonates today: “Be the change you want to see in the world.” This statement has been the basis for my attitude in business and life and has allowed me to positively face adversity that I could not have overcome otherwise. It is a call to stand up and take charge, to grab the courage to lead. It is my proudest moment when I see one of my mentees embracing their conviction and passion to lead the organization and overcome roadblocks which were previously viewed as impenetrable.

ANNUAL REVENUES: $62.5 billion

EDUCATION: BA in Management, Rider University FIRST JOB: Bank Teller WHAT I’M READING: Family Ties: A Novel, by Danielle Steel

FAMILY: Husband, Tom; and two sons: Tommy Jr. (16) and Tyler (12). INTERESTS: Family, beach, travel, Rutgers University Football. FAVORITE CHARITIES: March of Dimes, American Red Cross COMPANY: Johnson & Johnson HEADQUARTERS: New Brunswick, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.jnj.com BUSINESS: Healthcare. EMPLOYEES: 117,000

“Be the change you want to see in the world.” P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

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Karen Dahut Booz Allen Hamilton

TITLE: Senior Vice President EDUCATION: BS, Mount St. Mary’s University (Maryland); MS, University of Southern California FIRST JOB: Ensign – U.S. Navy WHAT I’M READING: D-Day: June 6, 1944, by Stephen Ambrose MY PHILOSOPHY: Every day, I try to balance the four cornerstones of my life – my family, my work, my own well-being, and my commitment to my community. FAMILY: Husband, Bill Dahut; daughters, 16-year-old Maddie and 13-year-old Francesca. My dad lives nearby. INTERESTS: My kids are my number-one interest. I also love the Pittsburgh Steelers! I’m an avid runner, and I love traveling with my family. FAVORITE CHARITies: National Cancer Society COMPANY: Booz Allen Hamilton HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEB SITE: www.boozallen.com BUSINESS: Strategy and technology consulting for U.S. government agencies, corporations, institutions, and not-forprofit organizations. ANNUAL REVENUES: Over $5 billion EMPLOYEES: 23,000

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’ve always enjoyed adventure. Growing up as a Navy brat, I liked knowing I could reinvent myself every time we moved. Think about it – I never was saddled with the reputation of something dumb I had done back in third grade. Every new place was an opportunity to create a new and improved me.

been raised “in the Navy,” that was an unconventional choice for a young woman in the early 1980s. But to me it made perfect sense. Many of my college friends headed to New York for careers in banking. But I thought that was boring; I wanted adventure. I wanted to see the world, meet different people, and experience new things.

My parents were both ItalianAmericans (my dad came to this country when he was six), highschool sweethearts who grew up in Western Pennsylvania’s coal-mining country. Their families didn’t have much, but that didn’t matter – they grew up strong, proud, and profoundly committed to their family. My dad tells my daughters, “The best luck a person can have is who their parents are.” And I echo that. I was blessed to have parents who came from little, but who made a wonderful life for their family. They instilled in us the belief that the American Dream was absolutely real, and completely within our grasp. And to them, that dream was a twoway street – building a better life for yourself and giving back to others.

My Navy adventure was one of the most important things I’ve ever done – not only did I meet my husband, but also I found that serving my country made me feel very proud and very fulfilled. Consulting has allowed me to continue that adventure – no two workdays are alike, and I’m continuing to serve my country by working with Navy clients.

I surprised my parents (and myself ) when I decided to join the Navy after college. Although I had

Being adventurous doesn’t mean I do crazy things. It means I’m open to new experiences and possibilities – something my husband and I are trying to teach our daughters. Having balance in my life gives me the perspective – and the strength – to try something new. Every day, I take a few minutes and think about how I’m engaged on four key dimensions: my family, my work, my community, and myself. Of course, I don’t have this balancing thing down perfectly, but I’ll keep trying until I get it right.

“...I found that serving my country made me feel very proud and very fulfilled.” 52

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Yolanda Daniel W.W. Grainger, Inc.

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have always viewed mentoring as a two-way opportunity. It’s a chance for you to gain the knowledge you need to meet your objectives, and it’s a way for you to help others. The value of a mentoring relationship is understanding where you want to go and what you want to gain from the experience. One of my first mentors inspired me to do well by helping me understand that we all have the ability to be successful if you can define what success means and then execute on the job. More recently, a mentor helped me appreciate the value of adaptability, one of the most important attributes to help you succeed in a large, complex organization. Being adaptable means having the ability to engage with people, and being authentic and ethical in the way you deal with them to achieve company goals. I had three criteria that brought me to Grainger three years ago from CVS Caremark: I wanted to work for a global firm, I sought an opportunity to lead a functional area, and I was looking for a role as a launching pad for my career. I am delighted to report that Grainger is delivering on all three of those criteria. And I still see so many opportunities to

continue to grow on the job and add value to the organization. I was delighted to find that Grainger values diversity and have been fortunate to lead teams that are not only diverse, in terms of culture and gender, but also generational and experiential. This gives us the ability to meet the company’s objectives while understanding the differences within our customer base and various geographies that we serve. Everyone has a role to play, and the more diversity we enjoy, the more successful we are. While we have made progress over the years in creating more diverse workplaces, I believe we have many more opportunities to do better in recognizing the leadership potential of women and minorities in the future – in our companies, in other organizations, and in society as a whole.

TITLE: Vice President, Finance EDUCATION: MBA, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University; BS, Accounting, University of Alabama, Birmingham FIRST JOB: Department Store Sales (high school); Management trainee, Saks, Inc. (post graduate) WHAT I’M READING: The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell; Freakonomics, by Steven D. Levitt MY PHILOSOPHY: Bring value to everything you do, work hard, understand objectives, and most important, build your team around those objectives. FAMILY: One sister. INTERESTS: Tennis, training for Chicago marathon, music (piano). FAVORITE CHARITies: Children’s Home and Aid, YWCA COMPANY: W.W. Grainger, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Lake Forest, Illinois WEB SITE: www.grainger.com BUSINESS: Distributor, facilities maintenance products. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 18,000

In my experience, meeting obstacles and overcoming challenges on the job is a matter of maintaining a laser-like focus on the objectives you are responsible for achieving. When you show up every day, have a passion for what you do, and add value to the organization, then you are enjoying the true measure of success. Everything else falls into place.

“Everyone has a role to play, and the more diversity we enjoy, the more successful we are.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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[ Bank of the West ]

WANT TO WORK FOR A TRULY GREAT BANK?

AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED. Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Michelle DiGangi, Bank of the West • Elise Eberwein, US Airways • Robyn Denholm, Juniper Networks • Mary Falvey, Wyndham Worldwide Maureen Ehrenberg, CB Richard Ellis • Karen Deogracias, Textron • Lillian Dukes, American Eagle Airlines • Diane K. Duren, Union Pacific • Gladys DeClouet-Mims, Burger King ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

annual

in 2011


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Gladys DeClouet-Mims Burger King Corporation

TITLE: Senior Vice President, North America Company Operations EDUCATION: MBA, Finance and Investment Banking, University of Wisconsin at Madison; BS, Mechanical Engineering, Tuskegee University FIRST JOB: Administrative work at a naval base as a high school student WHAT I’M READING: Made to Stick, by Chip Heath MY PHILOSOPHY: Maintain your integrity and ethics at all times. This is the only way to truly gain the respect and support of others. With God and this, all things are possible. FAMILY: Married with a son and daughter; a grandchild and one grandchild on the way. INTERESTS: Music, dancing, physical activity, walking on the beach. FAVORITE CHARITies: HAVE IT YOUR WAY® Foundation COMPANY: Burger King Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Miami, Florida WEB SITE: www.bk.com BUSINESS: Fast food. ANNUAL REVENUES: $2.509 billion EMPLOYEES: More than 27,100 North America corporate- and company-owned restaurant employees

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y favorite quote, but also my philosophy for my life and career is “You can’t make footprints in the sand if you’re always sitting down.” I have worked hard throughout my career, and I would never have gotten to where I am today without the unfaltering support of those around me or by simply “sitting down.” I had to make my own “footprints in the sand” and be more determined to succeed than those in the “old boys club” who were, at times, determined to see me fail. I began my career in the maledominated oil industry in the early 1980s as an engineer in offshore oil and gas exploration. Being a young, black female professional in the oil industry was stressful, and I was challenged every day, constantly having to prove myself and my abilities and even encountering physical threats to my safety. I could write a book about the things I experienced, the challenges I overcame and what I accomplished during those years. My mentors have also been a great sup-

port system throughout my career, providing me with sound advice and guidance. I refer to and apply those lessons to this day, as I continue to evolve my career, encounter new challenges and achieve my goals. My professional journey and the many bumps I’ve overcome along the way have taught me that great leadership comes from undeniable determination and a passion for what you do. Throughout this journey, I’ve learned that it is not just what you reap, but what you give back to others that makes a difference. I believe that sharing my life lessons with others and providing guidance as a mentor can help cultivate leaders who have strength, courage, character and integrity. It is also my philosophy that great mentors are also staunch advocates for their people; spotlighting the good attributes that others may not see. It is a rewarding experience to coach someone and watch that person apply your lessons and grow both personally and professionally.

“My professional journey and the many bumps I’ve overcome along the way have taught me that great leadership comes from undeniable determination and a passion for what you do.” 56

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Robyn Denholm Juniper Networks, Inc

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areers can be planned, but a willingness to take risks opens doors for you in ways you never thought possible. In high school I was convinced that I had a calling to go into the medical field. However, a work experience program in a hospital made me realize I should pursue an alternative course, fast! So I turned to another area of interest – economics and business. Learning to adapt early and quickly taught me that I could make choices and follow my interests with confidence. While confidence is good, you need to back it up, so gather as much experience and knowledge as you can. I’ve always challenged myself to do more, and a healthy dose of curiosity helps! Whether it’s learning about products, visiting customers, or discovering new uses for technology, there is always more you can learn. I know more about routers and operating systems and the technology innovation process than I ever imagined. Now, when we discuss strategy, market needs, and organizational structure, I have a deeper understanding of the business which enables me to be the best business partner possible. And it is imperative that we practice global partnering by building

organizations reflective of the diverse nature of our business landscape. While there may be challenges in managing a global organization, the opportunities it offers make for rich personal experiences and a much better business outcome. Having the skills to manage and partner across borders is key to success in today’s environment. Finally, it’s important to seek out mentors along the way, and it’s equally important to be a mentor. Finding the courage to take risks is difficult and having the support and guidance of a mentor can help. I’ve been fortunate to have several in my life. As I lead my organization, I believe a key focus of my role is to encourage everyone to grow beyond their expectations. My career plan did not specifically call for leaving Australia and becoming the CFO of a large corporation; however flexibility and the willingness to take a few risks has led to an incredible career. Be open to all possibilities, and intentional about your choices. Along the way, you will gather experiences, relationships and knowledge that combine to open paths that were unexpected and yet, when you look back, were exactly right for you at the time.

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree, Economics, University of Sydney; Master’s degree, Commerce, University of New South Wales FIRST JOB: Pumping gas at the family gas station WHAT I’M READING: The House of Mondavi, by Julia Flynn Siler; The Economist magazine and Businessweek magazine MY PHILOSOPHY: Living life to the fullest means there may be intense periods in any one facet but it is part of a spectrum of things that I have passion and enthusiasm for, and I wouldn’t have it any other way! FAMILY: Two children: Matthew, 22, and Victoria, 17. Fabulous life partner, David. INTERESTS: Business, sport, travel, theater. FAVORITE CHARITies: Education scholarship fund at the University of New South Wales COMPANY: Juniper Networks, Inc HEADQUARTERS: Sunnyvale, California WEB SITE: www.juniper.net BUSINESS: Networking software, silicon and systems. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.3 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 7,500

“Be open to all possibilities, and intentional about your choices.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Karen Deogracias Textron Marine & Land Systems

TITLE: Vice President, Finance & Administration EDUCATION: MBA from University of New Orleans; BA in Business Administration from University of New Orleans FIRST JOB: U.S. Census Bureau WHAT I’M READING: Good Is Not Enough, by Keith R. Wyche MY PHILOSOPHY: Set peace of mind as your highest goal and organize your life around it. FAMILY: Husband Rodney, daughter Cory, son Brandon, grandson Brennan. INTERESTS: Reading, exercising, swimming, shopping. FAVORITE CHARITies: New Orleans Children’s Hospital, St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, Slidell Memorial Hospital Foundation COMPANY: Textron Marine & Land Systems HEADQUARTERS: Slidell, Louisiana WEB SITE: www.textronmarineandland.com BUSINESS: Defense & specialty marine craft design & manufacturing. ANNUAL REVENUES: $500 million EMPLOYEES: 1,100

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his summer marks the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina for those of us at Textron Marine & Land Systems. To many, August 29 is a day to celebrate our perseverance. If ever leadership was required, it was in Katrina’s aftermath. As part of a team charged with rebuilding both a business and the lives of many families, it proved to be my proudest and most humbling moment. Never before in my personal life or career had I been faced with so many obstacles to overcome and so many people counting on me. Overnight, a large stretch of the Gulf Coast turned into a third-world country. There was little or no communications, no electricity, water, supplies or passable roads. We were among thousands left homeless. Textron Marine & Land Systems was at a critical juncture, having won a contract to increase production of the Armored Security Vehicle (ASV). We needed to get the business back online while our employees were scattered. All of Textron stepped up. Decisions were made quickly to start clean-up and continue payroll for

“If ever leadership was required, it was in Katrina’s aftermath.” 58

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our employees. Textron has always said its employees are its biggest asset, and during this crisis, they proved it. The decision to maintain payroll gave people hope in a situation that offered little. People were trying to come to terms with losing everything, and we believed if you had a job you had a chance to rebuild your life. My priority focused on getting my family settled in a temporary home and my children back in school. Providing some sense of security was paramount to family and co-workers. Working together, we showed our employees a way forward. Our team was proactive in rebuilding the business while being mindful of our employees’ personal circumstances and did whatever was necessary to make things work. There were days I was as overwhelmed as anyone, but I couldn’t let anyone see that. I felt our management team had to be strong, focused and committed to show our employees we could all get through this. With our hard work, ASV production resumed within two months. Now, five years later, I look back, amazed at what we were able to accomplish while dealing with so much. We moved back to our community and rebuilt home for Thanksgiving 2006. Without Textron’s support and the leadership it provided, I’m not sure any of us would have ever truly made it back home.


Congratulations

Empowering women. Inspiring innovation. Raytheon applauds this year’s “Women Worth Watching” for their leadership, success and commitment to diversity in the workplace. As one of the world’s foremost technology leaders, we rely on the vision and dedication provided by the women on our teams to meet today’s toughest challenges, and value the innovation that stems from a diversity of talent, ideas, backgrounds, opinions and beliefs. Here’s to the positive change and empowerment you inspire.

www.raytheon.com © 2010 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. “Customer Success Is Our Mission” is a registered trademark of Raytheon Company.


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Michelle DiGangi Bank of the West

TITLE: Executive Vice President, SmallMedium Enterprise Division EDUCATION: UCLA, BS, Psychology; USC, MsEd, Special Education; UCLA, MBA FIRST JOB: Wrapping Christmas packages at a shopping mall WHAT I’M READING: Murder mysteries: “I terrify myself!” MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t be afraid of who you are or what you have to offer. FAMILY: Married, one stepdaughter. INTERESTS: Active lifestyle, including skiing, hiking, biking, and golfing. FAVORITE CHARITies: Leukemia Foundation, Tahoe Rim Trail, Tahoe Hospital Foundation COMPANY: Bank of the West HEADQUARTERS: San Francisco, California WEB SITE: www.bankofthewest.com BUSINESS: Banking. ANNUAL REVENUES: $1.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 9,000

I

was mentored from the beginning of my life by a strong, independentminded mother who taught me to take care of myself, go out, and get things done. Mom quit college to have kids but returned to school to get her bachelor’s degree while her three children were in school. She instilled in me a drive and focus that has served me well in every stage of my career. After earning my master’s degree in education, I ran a school for teens in a psychiatric hospital. The experience was perfect management training. I learned how important it is to be consistent and direct – and today I urge my colleagues, and especially those I mentor, to do the same. I transitioned from education to business through a management training program at Wells Fargo Bank. For the next twenty years, I worked my way up, from credit administration to divisional head. I learned about relationship management and business banking, which I loved because of the entrepreneurial spirit of the people whose businesses I helped to support. I left Wells Fargo for an opportunity at a smaller bank and then moved to Bank of the West for

a role that I believe truly fits my skills, knowledge, and interests. I’m involved in driving strategy, managing sales, and building new businesses. From my perspective, success is all about ensuring you work with the right people. How you support them matters enormously. This support includes mentoring at every stage of someone’s career. I’m touched when people who’ve worked for me in the past want to work with me again. They saw what I did as leadership and as making a difference in their careers. I saw it as mentoring and partnering. I believe mentoring is really a two-way street. The people you mentor are the people you turn to now and in the future. Banking is still a male-dominated industry. Women in high positions are rare but I applaud what I see at Bank of the West in promoting and supporting women in key roles. No matter what obstacles you have to overcome, the advice I offer is simple: Don’t be afraid to be who you are or about what you have to offer. Don’t be afraid to share your opinions. Don’t be concerned so much with being right all the time – it’s more important to show that you are really thinking. That’s mentoring by example.

“From my perspective, success is all about ensuring you work with the right people.” 60

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Lillian Dukes American Eagle Airlines

TITLE: Vice President of Technical Services at American Eagle Airlines EDUCATION: BS, Electrical Engineering and Mathematics at Carnegie-Mellon University; Master’s degree, Electrical Engineering, Villanova University FIRST JOB: Referee for girls’ volleyball WHAT I’M READING: Financial Peace, by Dave Ramsey MY PHILOSOPHY: Integrity is not negotiable. FAMILY: 17 brothers and 3 sisters. INTERESTS: Involved in medical missions to Haiti. FAVORITE CHARITies: Medical Wings International COMPANY: AMR Corporation – American and American Eagle Airlines HEADQUARTERS: Fort Worth, Texas WEB SITE: www.aa.com BUSINESS: Airlines/Aviation. ANNUAL REVENUES: $20.93 billion EMPLOYEES: 86,765 total employees

I

do not consider myself to be a traditional mentor. In my view, mentoring develops over time through an established relationship. A mentoring relationship cannot be achieved without mutual trust. Trust is accomplished through sharing ideas, building confidence and maintaining a connection. It is crucial to have trust, especially when constructive criticism needs to be provided to help people along their career paths. Mentoring is essential to a person’s professional growth because, while accomplishments get you “to the door,” relationships help you get “through the door.” A mentor can become extremely important, particularly as challenges occur. While mentors cannot predict what lies ahead, they can provide guidance to turn challenges into opportunities. I have had opportunities that presented themselves at inopportune times. For example, I have relocated several times. It is never easy, but you must go where the opportunities are – opportunities do not come to you. One of the best pieces of advice

“One of the best pieces of advice I can offer is to take a big-picture approach.” 62

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I can offer is to take a big-picture approach. My career started at General Electric (GE), where I had to do rotational assignments before I could be placed in one specific job. While this is not a traditional way of getting placed into a job, the program allowed me to better understand my division. Because of that program, my curiosity has led me to many roles with my employers. Grasping the larger view provides improved perspectives and helps avoid becoming complacent. I spent 11 years with the American Airlines Maintenance and Engineering organization, where I held leadership roles in purchasing, inventory control, engineering, component maintenance and production control. In 2001, I left American to become the Director of Technical Services at Midwest Airlines. I then went to Independence Air to be Vice President of Maintenance. Each role was challenging, but it kept me constantly learning new things. My positions at other airlines helped me hone my skills and eventually led me back to American Eagle. If I had not been willing to move, I would have missed out on some great learning experiences. I am thankful that my mentors taught me to move out of my comfort zone, embrace obstacles and follow my passion. I hope someone in your life challenges you to do the same.


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Diane K. Duren Union Pacific

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y career began as a certified public accountant with Deloitte, Haskins & Sells. I was assigned to audit Union Pacific Railroad at a period when the railroad industry was experiencing dramatic change and growth. I recognized the career opportunities that Union Pacific presented and joined the company in 1985.

new and better products and services. We need to find more efficient ways to conduct business. We need to focus on what is important and eliminate processes that don’t provide value. I believe we must support and encourage innovation. Fear of failure should not be a deterrent and taking some measured risk can yield great rewards.

During the last 25 years, I have held a variety of positions in finance and marketing and now work at establishing and implementing the strategy, as well as managing customer relationships, for our Chemical business. Following are a few things I have learned.

Mentors are important. In my early years in business, my mentors typically were my supervisors. As I progressed, my mentors were executives in other parts of the company, successful businesswomen within my community and industry and my husband. These people provide encouragement, support and very direct feedback about my strengths and opportunities to improve. Taking this feedback and acting upon it has helped me become a better leader, business person and mentor. I also have learned a great deal from observing other leaders, what they do well and what they don’t. I try to incorporate those positive attributes and always work to avoid the negative ones.

Trust and teamwork are critical. You can accomplish very little by yourself in the business world. To be successful, you must be part of an effective team. Teamwork requires members to trust each other. You need to have strong communication skills and be open and honest in those communications. As a team member, it is important to live up to your commitments and perform at a high level. As a team leader, you need to set expectations, show respect and value the contributions of your team. Be an innovator. In these challenging economic times and the evolving global economy, the status quo won’t cut it. We need to develop

TITLE: Vice President & General Manager – Chemicals, Marketing & Sales EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Creighton University (Major in Accounting), May 1981 FIRST JOB: Detasseling corn WHAT I’M READING: The Speed of Trust, by Stephen M. R. Covey; Half the Sky, by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn MY PHILOSOPHY: Always treat others with respect and honesty and live up to your commitments. FAMILY: Husband, Drew Collier; Sons Devin, Drew, Derek and Dustin. INTERESTS: Hiking, cooking and reading. FAVORITE CHARITIES: American Red Cross COMPANY: Union Pacific HEADQUARTERS: Omaha, Nebraska WEB SITE: www.up.com BUSINESS: Transportation. ANNUAL REVENUES: $14.1 billion in 2009 EMPLOYEES: 42,000

Lastly, I have learned to celebrate successes, learn from failures and enjoy my work.

“I believe we must support and encourage innovation.” P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

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Elise Eberwein US Airways

TITLE: Executive Vice President, People and Communications EDUCATION: BA, Mass Communications, Lindenwood University; MBA, Colorado State University FIRST JOB: Lifeguard WHAT I’M READING: Too Big to Fail, by Andrew Ross Sorkin; Life is What You Make It, by Peter Buffet; Lost Girls, by Jennifer Baggett MY PHILOSOPHY: When you’re right and you’re rude, you’re still wrong. FAMILY: Married to Capt. Russ Webber. INTERESTS: Motorcycle riding, snowboarding, hiking. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Heart Association, Suicide Prevention COMPANY: US Airways HEADQUARTERS: Tempe, Arizona WEB SITE: www.usairways.com BUSINESS: Aviation/transportation. ANNUAL REVENUES: $10.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 31,000

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didn’t know what I wanted to do growing up but I remember being drawn to storytelling. I did a stint in radio, but went back to writing and did really well in those classes in school because it came naturally to me. In college, I picked a major that I had a passion for, mass communications, and I think that’s been vital. If you figure out what you’re drawn to and like to do, and find a company where you can use your talents, you can pretty much write your own ticket. And often, it won’t even feel like work. When I was in my early 20s, I was halfway through college and still didn’t have a clue about where I’d end up. I began as a flight attendant at TWA, and although that job didn’t call for writing, there were volunteer opportunities that did. Management saw my efforts, and I was asked to do more, including paid assignments and new job opportunities at the airline. After I graduated, my degree, those extra experiences, and the self confidence I had gained as a flight attendant and by learning the business from the ground up served me well. Employees don’t care how many degrees I have or how long my title

is. When I talk to our employees from the perspective of a former flight attendant, it gives me credibility. On the flip side, when I am interacting at the executive level, I never forget where I came from and the challenges line employees face, and I work hard to make sure the company always considers that point of view. I’ve had women say to me, “I wish I would have had the choices you had but our choices were more limited when I was growing up.” While that’s a poignant statement, today’s young women have even more choices than I did, and we’re making progress in ensuring that today’s young girls have even more yet. Today, women can make all the choices they want. There was a time I had higher aspirations than what I’m doing now, but a work-life balance is very important to me. I spent the first half of my career focused on education and career growth, but now I can enjoy more balance with my family and all I’ve worked for. If you figure out what you’re drawn to, use your talents, and surround yourself with people who value your talents, other opportunities will follow.

“If you figure out what you’re drawn to ... you can pretty much write your own ticket.” 64

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We are ITW. We are a leading diversified manufacturer that prides itself on decentralization and innovation. Our talented professionals drive our success, and helped us earn a spot on FORTUNE magazine’s list of Most Admired Companies (Industrial and Farm Equipment). ITW is looking for entrepreneurial individuals to join our growing team. For more information about employment opportunities at ITW, please visit www.itw.com.

A Fortune 200 company with nearly 100 years of history, ITW’s 840 business units manufacture an array of innovative components, as well as systems and consumables, for customers worldwide.

ILLINOIS tOOL wOrkS INc. 3600 West Lake Avenue Glenview, Illinois 60026

www.itw.com


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Maureen Ehrenberg CB Richard Ellis

TITLE: Global Director of Facilities Management EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science with joint honors in Economics and Accountancy, City University, London, England FIRST JOB: Commercial Financial Analyst WHAT I’M READING: The Big Short, by Michael Lewis MY PHILOSOPHY: Manage your business with passion and your team with compassion. FAMILY: Eldest of 10, I have a wonderful spouse and 5 children and 30 nieces and nephews. INTERESTS: Fine art and the performing arts, volunteering with organizations that serve a mission of social justice. FAVORITE CHARITies: Anti Defamation League (ADL) COMPANY: CB Richard Ellis HEADQUARTERS: Los Angeles, California WEB SITE: www.cbre.com BUSINESS: Commercial real estate. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.1 billion (globally) EMPLOYEES: 29,000 (globally)

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ssert yourself, work hard, stay focused and keep learning – I offer this advice to any young woman looking to launch a successful career. When I began my career, I knew I wanted be in a leadership role. That choice required me to devote time and make a serious commitment to that aspect of my life by making tough choices about what was important to me, sharing these priorities with those around me, and sticking with clearly defined goals to realize my vision. If you aspire to be in a leadership role, make it clear to your supervisor and colleagues that you are willing to put in the time and hard work to earn that role. Women, especially, should define and be proactive about their career and not allow others to make unwarranted assumptions about them. Communicate and realize your career goals effectively so you can establish your own track towards success. Having a mentor is very important, but sometimes you have to find them – they do not always find you! Don’t assume others will take a special interest in you or propel you upward. Be assertive and clear about

“Differentiate yourself by being the “go-to” person in your organization.” 66

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your mission; however don’t forget to ask for guidance when necessary. Utilize your resources wisely and always remember to acknowledge those who contribute to your success and take responsibility for your mistakes. Be known as a person of integrity and accountability. Differentiate yourself by being the “go-to” person in your organization. Clearly set yourself as someone always available, accessible, and inspired for the betterment of the organization. Be known for consistently delivering high quality work with creative approaches. Demonstrate your drive by arriving early and staying late. Develop great ideas and turn them into measurable results. Be a strong communicator, collaborator and leader. Think about your style of communication and the message that you convey to those around you about who you are as a person, a colleague and a manager. Continue to learn about subjects that are may be unfamiliar. Most importantly, be honest with yourself and your vision as well as what you’re willing to sacrifice to achieve it. Succeeding at your career takes time, the support of others, personal dedication and a lot of effort. Manage your career choices as you do your work, and you will begin to realize similar results for yourself as you deliver for others.


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Mary Falvey Wyndham Worldwide

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hen asked who my role models are, it’s without hesitation that I say my parents. I’ve always been inspired by my mother’s passion for learning, intellectual curiosity and her drive to be a leader in education. It was through her sheer tenacity that she received her master’s and doctorate while raising two children. She is currently an elementary school principal. She always told me you can achieve anything if you set your mind to it, which continuously echoes in the background as I move through my career.

I took a position at Cendant where I lead the human resource team for the hotel group and call center organization. With my mother’s tenacity in my blood, I knew in order to grow my career I needed to gain international experience. I made the move within Cendant to RCI where more than half of their employees were based outside of the United States. It was from there that I spring boarded into my current role as chief human resource officer for Wyndham Worldwide, the world’s largest hospitality company. And I love every minute of it.

My father gave me my spirit, courage, and gift of laughter. His “pick yourself by your bootstraps” philosophy resonated with me and is the catalyst to get me moving when things become more challenging. His motto of “do something you love and success will follow” are the same words of encouragement that I now share with my two children. I was blessed to have worked with my father at Nabisco where I learned valuable leadership lessons from him.

There is still so much more I want to accomplish, and I know my drive and fortitude will get me there. Recently, I have been making a larger effort to participate and give back to the community. I’m involved in a mentoring program that helped a veteran navigate from the military to corporate America. I also serve on the board of Starlight Children’s Foundation and Big Brothers Big Sisters. I have had a very fortunate career, and I’m committed to passing on what I have learned to others.

My career path began at Nabisco where I moved from working in human resources in a manufacturing environment to specializing in diversity, staffing, and ultimately a senior generalist position. After a successful early career, I had the drive and passion to apply my skills to another company and industry.

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer EDUCATION: BA, English Literature from Ramapo College FIRST JOB: H.R. Coordinator for Nabisco WHAT I’M READING: The Fountainhead, by Ayn Rand MY PHILOSOPHY: Get out of your comfort zone and wondrous things will happen. FAMILY: Husband, Ryan; son Justin and daughter Jordan. INTERESTS: Travel, skiing with my family, 5:30 am Boot-Camp with Chris. FAVORITE CHARITies: Starlight Children’s Foundation and Big Brother, Big Sister COMPANY: Wyndham Worldwide HEADQUARTERS: Parsippany, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.WyndhamWorldwide.com BUSINESS: One of the word’s largest hospitality companies. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 25,000

“There is still so much more I want to accomplish, and I know my drive and fortitude will get me there.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Accountants and Consultants www.bdo.com

“We’re bringing in the partner. She’s already on it.” For 100 years…People who know, know BDO.

The diverse and dedicated professionals at BDO honor the contributions of women like Wendy Hambleton, Partner and National SEC Director, who have helped place us among the world’s leading accounting and consulting firms.

© 2010 BDO USA, LLP. All rights reserved. www.bdo.com


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Ruth Ann M. Gillis, Exelon • Jasmine Green, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company • Adele Gulfo, Pfizer • Chris Hackem, ARAMARK Wendy M. Hambleton, BDO USA • Ellen B. Friedler, Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg • Maria C. Green, Illinois Tool Works • Colleen Goldhammer, Genworth Financial • Deborah Gillis, Catalyst ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

annual

in 2011


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Ellen B. Friedler Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP

TITLE: Partner and Department Chair – Commercial Leasing Practice Group EDUCATION: BA, University of Wisconsin-Madison; JD, Harvard Law School FIRST JOB: Waitress at pizza restaurant WHAT I’M READING: The Help, by Kathryn Stockett MY PHILOSOPHY: Always live by the golden rule. FAMILY: Married with 3 daughters. INTERESTS: Reading, hiking, exercising, theater. FAVORITE CHARITies: Planned Parenthood, Jewish United Fund COMPANY: Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEB SITE: www.ngelaw.com BUSINESS: Law firm. EMPLOYEES: 340

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wanted to be a lawyer from the time I was a little girl. This goal was reinforced by my mother who always told us that it was important to “be someone, before you marry someone.” While it is certainly not necessary to have a job in order to “be someone,” I have always valued the independence that having a career has afforded me. As a lawyer, wife and mother to three children, I am in two customer service businesses that demand significant time commitments. In the law firm business, it is critical to be available and responsive to clients, but I am also the primary care giver in my family. Starting early in my career, I dealt with the difficulties of balancing my work and home life by structuring a commercial leasing practice that allowed a more flexible schedule. I wanted to be at my children’s school events and to handle the most challenging and exciting work assignments in my area. As a result, flexibility meant that I could choose to work into the night after my children went to bed. Although it was very challenging, this worked for me. It is important to be realistic about

your goals and what you are willing to do to achieve them. Once you have found a job that fits your needs and goals, try to be an advocate for yourself and for other women. Some people hesitate to work with women on a flexible schedule, but when they do, they are often surprised by the dedication and work ethic of these women. Many will go to extraordinary lengths to ensure that neither clients nor family suffer. It is important to give these women an opportunity to demonstrate their abilities. I was fortunate to be afforded such opportunities, and as a result I have been able to advance to my current position as head of the commercial leasing practice at my firm. I also have been able to help other women at the firm through my role in the Women’s Network Leadership team. I am still not certain if I have achieved the right work-life balance, but when I asked my teenage daughter if she thought my working had an adverse effect on her or our family life, she told me that she viewed me as a capable and strong woman and that she respected me and was proud of me.

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Deborah Gillis Catalyst

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everal years ago, a friend gave me a copy of an inspiring book, What I Know Now: Letters to My Younger Self. In it, a group of accomplished women reflected on a crucial moment in the past when they could have used some advice from their older and wiser selves. I thought of this book when sorting through an old box of mementos from high school. In it I found notes for my twelfth grade debate: be it resolved that women earn the same as men. My 17- yearold self would never have guessed that almost thirty years later, my work and career would be focused on creating a world where women have equal opportunities in the workplace. Finding that report reminded me of the advice I received from one of my first mentors – look for work that you’re passionate about, work for an organization that you are proud to be part of and with people you respect and can learn from.

If I were writing a letter to my 17- year-old self, I would tell her that she was embarking on a journey that would be driven by her passion to make change in the world. I would tell her to never be afraid to ask for help or for a new challenge. I would tell her that having the confidence to take risks would lead to career opportunities in government, consulting and nonprofit sectors. I would tell her that the greatest satisfaction she’d experience in life and work would come from the times when she was true to herself and the things that mattered most to her at that very moment. I would tell her that there would be some difficult times ahead, but that she’d grow stronger by facing her challenges head on. And finally, I’d tell her that she would have the great fortune of building a support system of friends, family and mentors who would offer the encouragement and wise counsel that she needed to achieve her dreams.

TITLE: Vice President, North America, Catalyst EDUCATION: MA, in Political Science, York University FIRST JOB: A dream come true: policy advisor to the Government of Ontario during historic constitutional negotiations in Canada WHAT I’M READING: Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard, by Chip Heath MY PHILOSOPHY: Be the change you seek in the world. FAMILY: I live with my husband close to his mother, sister and her family. We enjoy visiting our cottage which gives us the chance to spend time with my parents, grandmother, sisters, nieces and nephews and many aunts, uncles and cousins. INTERESTS: Travel, hiking, politics, cooking for friends and family. FAVORITE CHARITies: Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation COMPANY: Catalyst HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.catalyst.org BUSINESS: Nonprofit. ANNUAL REVENUES: $10 million EMPLOYEES: 70

“I would tell her to never be afraid to ask for help or for a new challenge.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Ruth Ann M. Gillis Exelon Corp.

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative and Diversity Officer, Exelon Corporation; President, Exelon Business Services Company EDUCATION: Smith College, BA, Magna Cum Laude, Economics; University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, MBA, Finance FIRST JOB: Summer office manager and bookkeeper, U-Wrench It Automotive Workshop (New Rochelle, N.Y.) WHAT I’M READING: In the Woods, by Tana French MY PHILOSOPHY: Bring high energy to everything you do. FAMILY: Husband, Michael; sons Edward and Alexander. INTERESTS: South American travel and Spanish history. FAVORITE CHARITIES: University of Chicago Cancer Research Foundation; The Goodman Theatre of Chicago COMPANY: Exelon Corp. HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEB SITE: www.exeloncorp.com BUSINESS: Electric utility. ANNUAL REVENUES: $17 billion EMPLOYEES: 19,500

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here is no perfect recipe for building a successful career. Rather, a career must be approached as an investment – it needs to be planned, nurtured and protected. This is one of the many lessons I’ve learned during my 33-year career. Some others that I can share are: Learn from others; then deliver results. All professionals can benefit from being taught and guided by a mentor. My own mentors have helped me consider career goals, new opportunities and my portfolio of skills. I also feel strongly about mentoring others, particularly those in the middle of their career. Many of these budding leaders tell me they want to take on that next promotion to learn something new. My advice for them is that learning should not be the sole objective. Of course, take away learnings and always build knowledge. However, applying the knowledge and expertise you own to deliver results is the ultimate measure of success in the workplace. Realistically consider both the future and the present. I’ve had the pleasure over the last dozen years of working for Exelon Chairman and

“My advice for them is that learning should not be the sole objective.” 72

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CEO John Rowe. He introduced me to the Stockdale Paradox: “You must retain faith that you can prevail to greatness in the end, while retaining the discipline to confront the brutal facts of your current reality.” This philosophy is how U.S. Navy Vice Admiral James Stockdale survived being held as a prisoner of war for more than seven years in North Vietnam. I embrace this philosophy, recognizing the importance of being confident yet realistic about the challenges facing you. Embrace new opportunities. When I was in high school, I spent a year in Barcelona. The experience taught me to embrace new opportunities, be tolerant of differences and listen. I’ve worked as a chief financial officer in three different industries, and lead the business services, administrative, and diversity and inclusion functions at Exelon. Along the way, I broke through the proverbial “glass ceiling” a few times as the only female member of senior management. Choose wisely. Exelon operates in a world rich in diversity in race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, experience and thought. I am fortunate to work at a company where the commitment to diversity and inclusion is an essential part of our culture and values. I encourage others to seek out similarly minded organizations to grow and develop professionally.


When we’re all equals, things really start to add up. At Chevron, we believe great ideas don’t have a color or gender. That’s why we’re forming partnerships with minority- and women-owned businesses around the world. These relationships add to the depth and strength of human energy that drives our company. To learn more about our partnerships, visit us at chevron.com.

9.75"

CHEVRON, the CHEVRON Hallmark and HUMAN ENERGY are registered trademarks of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC. ©2010 Chevron U.S.A. Inc. All rights reserved.

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Colleen Goldhammer Genworth Financial

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Financial Services Distribution, Genworth Financial EDUCATION: BS, in Business Administration, Black Hills State University, Spearfish, SD FIRST JOB: At the local newspaper in grade school WHAT I’M READING: Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert MY PHILOSOPHY: “What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson. FAMILY: Husband, Keith; my stepson Cooper, and our dog Hercules, in Richmond, VA. We have family in Wyoming, South Dakota and in Buffalo, New York. INTERESTS: Good food and wine. Watching sports – football, baseball and hockey. International travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: National Board Member of the Alzheimer’s Association. National Kidney Foundation COMPANY: Genworth Financial HEADQUARTERS: Richmond, Virginia WEB SITE: www.genworth.com BUSINESS: Insurance. ANNUAL REVENUES: $9.069 billion consolidated revenue in 2009 EMPLOYEES: 6,000

I

grew up and graduated from high school in a small town in Wyoming. Even though I had less than 50 people in my graduating class and the nearest McDonald’s was over two hours away, the benefit was that I was able to do everything – participate in sports, play in the band and engage in multiple academic groups. I loved the breadth of opportunity I experienced and the sense of belonging that a small town offered. I attended college in South Dakota, where I worked to put myself through school. After school I moved to Las Vegas to begin my career as an accounting supervisor with GE. Acceptance into GE’s financial management program provided me the foundation that lead to various accounting and financial management roles over the next several years. Life events can often provide the impetus for us to act on our dreams. After a significant change in my personal life, I sought out the opportunity to work overseas in GE’s global consumer finance business. Moving to Tokyo, then to Sweden, and finally to London, I experienced both personal and professional growth during my five years living abroad.

Returning to the United States with GE was pivotal for me professionally, as it opened up an opportunity to change my career path from finance to sales and marketing. There I found a passion in educating consumers and financial advisors about the importance of planning for the risks associated with retirement, including the need for long term care and the impact of Alzheimer’s disease. Throughout my life, I have had a number of mentors encouraging me along the way. My mother is still the strongest woman I have ever known. My high school basketball coach, various teachers and managers have all contributed to the person that I have become. But mentors aren’t always our elders; as an American living in another country, I had to work harder to find informal networks. I found mentors in my peers, who were the other expatriates and consultants with whom I worked and traveled. My experience has been that when life throws you curveballs – and it will – it’s up to you to figure out what you do with them. And that no matter where you are in life, there are always extraordinary people that you will meet and learn from along the way. Mentors are everywhere if you just look.

“...As an American living in another country, I had to work harder to find informal networks.” 74

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Jasmine Green Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company

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hen I think of mentoring and what it has meant to me, I feel that it is my personal obligation to offer counsel and guidance to help others achieve their goals. When I look back over my life, I am proud to say that so many provided me with insights, words of wisdom and a tug on the suit coat when I needed it—even when I didn’t think I did. My mother and father continue to be my role models. They instilled in me my life’s philosophy of giving of yourself so others can succeed. I call it servant leadership, leading to serve. In doing so, I realize that I grow exponentially! It’s interesting, too, in terms of what I learn from my children. They have taught me patience, they remind me to appreciate the little things in life and they challenge me to keep it real. They mentor me in ways I could never imagine. I have had many mentors who guided me through tough waters, helped me make career decisions,

advocated for me, told me when I was right and when I was wrong, and helped me find solutions to overcome obstacles along the way. I have learned that you don’t have to be an executive or the CEO to mentor others. From recent college graduates who are entering the workforce to executives in the C-suite, everyone has something to offer. It is a great journey. So whether it’s supporting family, friends or work colleagues, mentoring is about helping others reach specific goals, and it’s a two-way experience. The mentoring does not have to be formal; it can be for a moment in time or for a lifetime. It’s about providing feedback and doing so in a way for the greater good of people. It’s about personal development for others and self.

TITLE: Chief Customer Advocate and Vice President Nationwide Insurance EDUCATION: BS, University of Memphis FIRST JOB: Claims Associate, Nationwide Insurance WHAT I’M READING: The Black Swan, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb; The Resilience Factor, by Karen Reivich MY PHILOSOPHY: When you get, give – when you learn, teach. FAMILY: My husband and I are blessed with three wonderful children, Reuben, Caleb and Amber. We love traveling, learning about other parts of the world, reading, and my entire family is active in the church. INTERESTS: Activities in which our children participate, reading, family, traveling, horseback riding, and sports. FAVORITE CHARITies: the United Way because they help such a cross section of organizations and diverse people COMPANY: Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company HEADQUARTERS: Columbus, Ohio WEB SITE: www.nationwide.com BUSINESS: Insurance and financial services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $20.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 33,000

I encourage us all to make mentoring part of our DNA. Advocate for others as you help them along the way. When we help others, we all succeed, and that’s being a leader is all about.

“I have learned that you don’t have to be an executive or the CEO to mentor others.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

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Maria C. Green Illinois Tool Works Inc

TITLE: Deputy General Counsel EDUCATION: BA, University of Pennsylvania; JD, Boston University School of Law FIRST JOB: Counsel – Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation WHAT I’M READING: What the Dog Saw, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: To those whom much is given, much is expected. FAMILY: Husband, Greg Lewis; Sons – Brian (24) and Jordan (18). INTERESTS: Jogging, reading, museum docent. FAVORITE CHARITies: DuSable Museum of African American History COMPANY: Illinois Tool Works Inc HEADQUARTERS: Glenview, Illinois WEB SITE: www.itw.com BUSINESS: ITW is a multi-national manufacturer of a diversified range of value-added and short-lead time industrial products and equipment. ANNUAL REVENUES: $13.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 59,000

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am the only child of first generation immigrants. My parents emigrated to the United States from Kingston, Jamaica; at the time my mother was nine months pregnant. My parents were professionals in Jamaica but were not able to work in their chosen fields in the United States. My mother worked as a nurses’ aide for 35 years and my dad worked as a mechanic. Although they were trained professionals, I never once heard my parents complain about the work that they were forced to do in this country. They instilled in me that all work is honorable if it is honest and done well. Also, because my parents came from a country without free public education, they viewed the ability to get an education as a privilege instead of a right. There were dire consequences for bringing home any grade lower that an “A.” Two adages explain my career philosophy: “There is no excuse for anything less than excellence,” and “Showing up every day is half the battle.” All of the successful people that I have met throughout my career share that commonality. They

were tenacious and they refused to accept anything less than excellence from themselves and those around them. I have been fortunate to be mentored by people who saw potential in me that I did not see in myself. When I joined ITW 12 years ago, I had never worked on an acquisition. In the last 12 years I have completed over 100 acquisitions with acquired revenues in excess of $ 4 billion. This is possible because I had a mentor who was willing to take a chance on me. As a mentor I have tried to do the same for others by helping them realize their full potential. Some of my best mentoring experiences have been hiring and working with people who did not appear to be a perfect fit for a job but who worked hard and grew beautifully into a “stretch” position. Those of us who have been blessed with opportunity have a duty to reach back and help others. I am also passionate about social and civic causes. Despite the demands of career and family, it is imperative that we share our time, energy and financial resources with the less fortunate.

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Different perspectives inspire innovation. At ConocoPhillips, the future promises to be very exciting. We believe a diverse work force drives creative solutions to tomorrow’s challenges by looking at opportunities in different ways. Fran Vallejo embodies the core values of our company and her vision, innovation and leadership inspire all of our employees. We join Profiles in Diversity Journal in honoring Fran Vallejo for her

Frances Vallejo, Vice President and Treasurer, ConocoPhillips

achievements, and we congratulate Fran and all of the women recognized in the 9th annual WomenWorthWatching® Issue.

www.conocophillips.com © ConocoPhillips Company. 2010. All rights reserved.


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Adele Gulfo Pfizer Inc

TITLE: President and General Manager, U.S. Primary Care EDUCATION: BS, Biology, Seton Hall University; MBA, Marketing, Fairleigh Dickinson University FIRST JOB: Molecular Biologist, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey WHAT I’M READING: Lucid Intervals, by Stuart Woods MY PHILOSOPHY: Take the lead and make a difference. FAMILY: Husband, Joseph and large extended family. INTERESTS: Fitness and fashion. FAVORITE CHARITies: The Children’s Fund (formerly The Christian Children’s Fund) COMPANY: Pfizer Inc HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.pfizer.com BUSINESS: Pharmaceuticals. ANNUAL REVENUES: $50 billion EMPLOYEES: Approx. 100,000

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’ve never thought of myself as someone who takes risks. However, as I look back on my career, I’ve noticed a pattern: I’ve been at my happiest and most effective when I’ve taken chances, stepped outside my comfort zone, and thrown caution to the wind. When I was in global marketing for Warner-Lambert (now Pfizer), I was approached by their marketing organization to lead Accupril, one of the company’s most important brands. It was a brand I knew well, and it would have been a promotion and a very comfortable move for me. Simultaneously, Warner-Lambert was putting together a small team to better understand the potential of the statin drug Lipitor, which was in trials at the time. They approached me about a lateral move to the Lipitor team, to begin strategizing its potential launch into an already very satisfied and crowded statin market. So I had a choice: take the promotion and an easy transition to Accupril, or make a lateral move to join the Lipitor team, an unapproved drug facing some daunting odds. I took the chance on Lipitor,

“...Taking a risk isn’t just about taking a chance, it’s also about innovation.” 78

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which became the best-selling medicine in the history of the pharmaceutical industry. This move gave me the foundation to succeed beyond my wildest imagination. But taking a risk isn’t just about taking a chance, it’s also about innovation. By definition, innovation is about risk because you’re striking out into uncharted territory. In the data-driven pharmaceutical industry, the unknown can make us uncomfortable, and I’m no exception. But the doctors and patients we serve are counting on our innovation and our ability to challenge orthodoxies. It’s not always easy to be innovative in today’s complex healthcare environment, and it’s a real demand that out-distances the capacities of any one individual. As a result, it’s my job as a leader to harness the talents, expertise, and insights of my team to truly drive the innovation physicians and patients expect. I seek team members who are bold, hold disparate points of view, and are comfortable bucking conventional wisdom. Someone once said that the world is changed by people who say yes. Although I have never used that phrase, I feel I’ve lived it. My advice to someone young and hungry to make his or her mark in the pharmaceutical industry is to go with your gut, embrace risk and take a chance.


An aggressive supplier diversity program. Not just the right thing to do—the smart thing to do.

At Halliburton, we’ve found that putting significant trust—and business—in the hands of minority and woman-owned businesses is a win-win proposition for us all. Vendors win by partnering with one of the world’s leading companies. Halliburton wins by receiving first-class service from these quality-driven firms, and our customers win by having the very best and most diverse suppliers devoted to making Halliburton the best oil and gas services supplier in the world. For more information, contact us at supplierdiversity@halliburton.com. H e l p i n g

b u i l d

s u c c e s s

t h r o u g h

s u p p l i e r

d i v e r s i t y.

HALLIBURTON © 2010 Halliburton. All rights reserved.


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Chris Hackem ARAMARK

TITLE: President, ARAMARK Higher Education EDUCATION: BS, Michigan State University, School of Hospitality Management FIRST JOB: Management trainee, ARAMARK WHAT I’M READING: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, by Doris Kearns Goodwin MY PHILOSOPHY: The Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have others do unto you. FAMILY: Husband, David and two grown children, Eric and Kelsey. INTERESTS: Hiking, gardening, traveling. FAVORITE CHARITies: City Year, ASPCA, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society COMPANY: ARAMARK HEADQUARTERS: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.aramark.com BUSINESS: Professional services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $12.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 250,000

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consider myself an ordinary person living an extraordinary life. As a college senior in Michigan State University’s Hospitality Management program, I interviewed with ARAMARK for a management trainee position. I was intrigued by the company’s vision and the confident, yet humble, leadership style of the people who interviewed me. The people and their values truly distinguished ARAMARK from the other companies I considered. And, more than 30 years later, the people are the reason why I am still with the company today. I have been truly fortunate to work alongside so many exceptional people throughout my career at ARAMARK. I am so proud of and continue to be inspired by our 35,000 plus employees who work tirelessly every day to make a difference for our Higher Education clients and customers. I never set any grand career goal to be a company president. I truly believe if you do your job well and to the best of your ability, opportunities will emerge and doors will open. Very early on in my career, I was challenged to take risks and told that

“Do what you want to do and do it well; don’t waver.” 80

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every challenge brings opportunity. I embraced this theory and have faced many challenges along the way, first working as a catering director, assistant food service director and operations director. These positions required an incredible investment of time and energy, but ultimately yielded invaluable perspective, as I moved into senior management roles. It gave me great insight into what it takes to develop people to be the best they can be and how each employee contributes to the overall success of the company. The humble confidence that attracted me to ARAMARK 30 years ago fuels my leadership style today. I feel strongly that leadership is measured by the success and development of each team member. By positioning others for success, you will succeed. While this can be counter-intuitive for some people, many embrace the opportunity and understand that if the team wins, everyone wins. My advice to young professionals is to decide what is important to you and don’t be afraid to take risks. Do what you want to do and do it well; don’t waver. If you waver, you don’t end up doing anything well. Above all, enjoy what you do. If you really enjoy what you do every day and stay true to yourself, you will find life balance and career success.


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Wendy M. Hambleton BDO USA, LLP

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hen I look at where I am today in my career, where I have come from and where I hope to go, there are hundreds of small decisions and opportunities and a bit of luck that got me to the place I am and that will also help me going forward. Among all of those choices and opportunities, there are a few that in retrospect have made the biggest impact on my success and my satisfaction. First, everything stems from a first impression. The transition from school to work can be challenging. It is important in every job to start off with a good impression. Determining how to make that positive first impression is critical. A good place to start is by modeling your approach after others around you that are successful. In most environments it is easy to see the true stars. Modeling their approach always involves a strong work ethic and will start you on the road to success. Early in your career the first impression is an unspoken contributing factor to the assignments and projects you get. Second, the key to career longevity is finding passion for what you do and keeping that passion alive. Given the time we all spend focused on our career, whether fulltime, part-time or flex-time, if you aren’t passionate about what you are doing, or an aspect of what you are doing, then your career will become

just work. Passion is contagious! Working with someone who is passionate about their job creates an atmosphere of energy and excitement and opportunities for success. The aspects of my job that I am most passionate about have changed over the 25 years that I have worked for BDO, but there has always been the opportunity to seek out new challenges and new passions. Finally, I know I would not be where I am today without the support of people who encouraged me to take chances and helped me to succeed. As I have become more senior in my field, I have gained equally as much from mentoring others. When I talk to someone about what I do or opportunities for them, I inevitably find that I am re-energized after the discussion and have benefitted as much from the conversation as the other person.

TITLE: Partner, National SEC Director EDUCATION: BBA, College of William and Mary FIRST JOB: Working on the farm WHAT I’M READING: Deadliest Sea: The Untold Story Behind the Greatest Rescue in Coast Guard History, by Kalee Thompson MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t take anything for granted. FAMILY: Married with two children – a 16 year-old daughter and 12 year-old son. INTERESTS: Hiking, sports and travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: LadderUp and my church COMPANY: BDO USA, LLP HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEB SITE: www.bdo.com BUSINESS: Accounting and consulting. ANNUAL REVENUES: $620 million EMPLOYEES: 2,700

As I look to the road ahead, with all of its twists and blind curves, new challenges, new opportunities and, most importantly, working with a wide variety of people, it leads to an exciting future.

“The key to career longevity is finding passion for what you do and keeping that passion alive.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

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Our doors are

open.

Join us as we play a key role in Making Home Affordable. We’re a vital part of President Obama’s initiative to stabilize the housing market. For you, that means exciting challenges and an opportunity to have a real impact on our nation’s economy – and your neighbors’ lives. We’ll provide a solid platform for your career and the tools to assist your professional growth.

Audit | Compliance | Single-Family Portfolio Management | IT When you join the Freddie Mac team, you’ll discover an inclusive, empowering culture with an equal opportunity employer who recognizes the value of diversity. You’ll also find a total rewards package that supports your success both at work and in your personal life. We encourage you to visit us at upcoming diversity conferences, which are listed on our career site. Visit us online at:

FreddieMacDiversity.jobs careers with impact


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Christine Heckart, NetApp • Mary Heger, Ameren Corporation • Mary Humiston, Applied Materials • Cheryl L. Janey, Northrop Grumman Infomation Systems Patricia Kampling, Alliant Energy • Randy Meg Kammer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida • Ci Ci Holloway, UBS • Janet M. Holloway, Monsanto • Suni Harford, Citi ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

annual

in 2011


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Suni Harford Citi

TITLE: Managing Director and Citigroup’s Regional Head of Markets for North America EDUCATION: MBA, Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College; BS, Denison University, physics and math FIRST JOB: A life guard and swim coach. First professional job was as an Actuary WHAT I’M READING: My Kindle shows I am halfway through The Lion, by Nelson DeMille; Too Big To Fail, by Andrew Ross Sorkin, and Twilight Series, by Stephanie Meyer. MY PHILOSOPHY: Whatever you do, give it your best. No one can ask for more. FAMILY: Husband, Woody and three children: Devon (12) Jenna (9) and Liam (6) plus lots of siblings, nieces and nephews. INTERESTS: Painting, photography, running, Wii. FAVORITE CHARITies: The Wall Street Warfighters Foundation, provides financial services training, jobs for disabled veterans COMPANY: Citi HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.citi.com BUSINESS: Financial products and services. ANNUAL REVENUES: Full year 2009 – $80.285 billion EMPLOYEES: 265,000

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’m often asked about my mentor, or how I used a mentor during my career, or whether or not I found a mentor helpful. My answer is always that I have decided that there is no single approach to mentorship and that it is an amorphous concept. I have worked with organizations, including my own, which have struggled with the implementation of various mentor programs, whether formal or informal, forced or voluntary, self-selecting or assigned, web-based or personally vetted. I believe there has been more discussion around the role of mentorship in the course of increasing diversity, particularly at senior levels of an organization, than about any other program or tool used to that end. It is truly a unique situation when someone can point to a single mentor from whom they garnered support, advice and advocacy throughout their career. Just as personalities, skill sets and career paths alter over time, so do the ways in which mentors are helpful to an individual. In retrospect, it is no surprise to me that I have not had one mentor during my career, but many. Each had

“…I have not had one mentor during my career, but many.” 84

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his or her own unique ability to provide insight, guidance or counsel, and each did so at a unique point in time over the course of my 23 years in this business. Notably, there was little in common among them. They were of both genders and of all backgrounds, levels, and skills. Some were as helpful for the things they showed me not to do, as for the things they did that I have emulated. Some of them were in my reporting chain, and others were far removed from it. They dispensed advice that ranged from professional to personal, from the smallest suggestions to the grandest plan. And yet each made a permanent impression on me and in my career. I do not believe I have ever declined when asked to be a mentor to someone. I have, however, always noted that the course of the mentoring relationship would likely take any number of forms and that neither of us should go in with any specific expectations. Some have lasted through the years and others were intense for a time and have since faded. But each provided some value to both the mentor and the mentee. I will continue to say yes to any who ask, and look forward to watching the evolution of those relationships, just as I enjoy watching the evolution of my new mentee’s career.


Suni Harford Managing Director and Regional Head of Markets for North America

Women who lead.

Women who inspire. Congratulations, Suni Harford, and all the extraordinary women honored in Profiles

in Diversity Journal ’s annual WomenWorthWatching® Issue. At Citi, we believe our strength lies in the diversity of our people, and we work hard to promote a workplace that emphasizes inclusion and respect. We aspire to be a company where the best people want to work, and Suni is proof that we have the right idea.

© 2010 Citigroup Inc. Citi and Citi with Arc Design are registered service marks of Citigroup, Inc.


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Christine Heckart NetApp, Inc.

TITLE: Chief Marketing Officer EDUCATION: Economics, University of Colorado at Boulder FIRST JOB: WilTel, marketing and launching the world’s first Frame Relay service, starting the trend to cloud computing. Mentored by Joe Zell and Roy Wilkens WHAT I’M READING: Quantum Physics, Science Fiction, business publications, industry trends and news, ancient history, and personal development MY PHILOSOPHY: Appreciate the luxury of simple tasks and the beauty around you. Wealth is not measured in dollars. FAMILY: Three wonderful teens and a husband of 24 years who has the difficult job of staying home living “Groundhog Day” while I play at work. INTERESTS: Painting, reading, time with family. FAVORITE CHARITies: Girls for a Change COMPANY: NetApp, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Sunnyvale, California WEB SITE: www.netapp.com BUSINESS: Data storage and management provider. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.93 billion FY10 EMPLOYEES: 8,300 employees worldwide

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uccess is 99 percent luck and 1 percent of what you make of an opportunity. I am fortunate to be born in a country where people’s rights are respected and children receive an education. I had supportive parents and have never lived through horror or trauma. Phenomenal companies in the fast-paced, high-tech industry have hired me. My journey has been about learning more, and knowing less. At 22, I knew everything. At twice that age, I listen more and talk less, to the relief of all. Many women struggle to find the right style in business and I am among them. Good leaders commit to continuous improvement. One insightful mentor told me, “positive energy is passion, negative is emotion.” My best role models have mostly been peers, people within my organization and my subconscious. You can learn from every person and in every situation. I have collected from those wiser than me a few sayings that I live by and lead me because they inspire, provide direction and evoke dialog. Think big; start small and move fast can be a methodology for everything. Be different and not just better will

“Good leaders commit to continuous improvement.” 86

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help create breakthrough ideas and value. Answers are easy and questions are hard is an idea that releases preconceived assumptions and provokes unconventional thinking. Good strategy tells you when to say no. Leadership is how you behave, not a title. Anyone can be a leader. Strength of character is tested in times of stress, not times of success. Lead by example. It’s worth 1,000 words. Feigning perfection is harder than being honest and committed to continual improvement. Manage your personal brand; every conversation builds or diminishes it. It’s not just what, but it’s also how. Guess mom was right. I have been fortunate to work with and for some of the smartest people in the high-tech industry. Wiltel gave me a great education and industry visibility. TeleChoice hired me to build a global consulting practice and later I became company president. The CEO of Juniper gave me the opportunity to lead worldwide marketing and participate in corporate strategy. Microsoft gave me the opportunity to help redefine entertainment. And today NetApp allows me to learn what it takes to build a great company and culture. But as much as I love work, home is the real world and the primary place where I’m regularly reminded: “mom, you are such a dweeb!”


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Mary Heger Ameren Corporation

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eflecting over my career and how mentoring has played a role in my personal and professional development once again gives me an opportunity to appreciate my good fortune in working with and for fabulous people. When I started at Ameren 34 years ago, I had no idea how my career would progress. I have made many job moves throughout my career. With each new job came technical and inter-personal challenges and opportunities. No doubt it’s the people I have worked with who have influenced many of my decisions and helped shape me. My move from the secretarial job track to computer programmer began with a simple conversation with a co-worker. How different things would have been for me had that person neglected to mention the opportunity to me! I am forever grateful for his mentoring. When I moved into first-line supervision, I was given the chance to manage people and to work with internal business customers on information technology solutions. I remember talking through work issues and challenges with other supervisors as I worked to become effective as a supervisor. Mentors have a way of pushing us into new areas of responsibility that are way outside our comfort level. This is exactly what hap-

pened when I moved from IT to investor services. A senior executive trusted me to take on an entirely new assignment as assistant treasurer and manager of the investor services department, which was my first middle-management position. When I returned to IT, I was wiser for that experience. I was able to expand my knowledge and experience in operations and eBusiness before returning to application development. In 2009, I became vice president of Information Technology and my company’s chief information officer. With each of these moves, I have had fabulous support and mentoring from supervisors, peers, and fellow employees. But none of this would have been possible without an extremely supportive husband and two great kids! Being a working mother and raising two sons called for a constant balance between work and home. When they were young, I was involved with my sons’ school and extra-curricular activities. Now that both boys are out of high school, I have returned to college in pursuit of an MBA, a long-term personal goal.

TITLE: Vice President, Information Technology and Ameren Service Center EDUCATION: BS, in Business Administration, Maryville University FIRST JOB: Clerk-Stenographer WHAT I’M READING: The Future of Management, by Gary Hamel; plus various business textbooks related to the Executive MBA program at Washington University MY PHILOSOPHY: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. (Golden Rule). FAMILY: Husband, Bob: sons, Joshua and Daniel. INTERESTS: Travel to tropical places and cooking dinner with my husband. FAVORITE CHARITies: I’m currently on the boards of the International Institute and Craft Alliance in St. Louis COMPANY: Ameren Corporation HEADQUARTERS: St. Louis, Missouri WEB SITE: www.ameren.com BUSINESS: Electric and natural gas utility. ANNUAL REVENUES: At 12/31/2009: $7 billion EMPLOYEES: 9,400

“Mentors have a way of pushing us into new areas of responsibility that are way outside our comfort level.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Ci Ci Holloway UBS

TITLE: Managing Director, Investment Bank, Diversity and Inclusion, Americas EDUCATION: BS, Business Administration, Syracuse University FIRST JOB: Viacom International, Compensation Coordinator WHAT I’M READING: OPRAH! The Unauthorized Biography, by Kitty Kelley MY PHILOSOPHY: “When I Master Believing, I Master Life.” FAMILY: Two children, one boy and one girl. INTERESTS: Sports; traveling globally; and collecting international cookbooks. FAVORITE CHARITies: Save the Children COMPANY: UBS HEADQUARTERS: Zurich, Switzerland WEB SITE: www.UBS.com BUSINESS: Financial services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $21.3 billion (2009) EMPLOYEES: 65,000

A

sk any successful leader how they got to their ideal position and most would say they had help. We reference bosses, mentors, role models, and, in some cases, someone who just opened a door to access key opportunities and decision makers to ensure our ideas are heard. If ideas are our most valuable commodity, then we have the ability to use those ideas to change the world – with help, that is! As a senior executive in entertainment, former president of Women in Film, a current Managing Director at UBS and a mother of two, I personify the challenges inherent in navigating and transforming various roles. And yet, I didn’t achieve success alone. Along the path someone provided support and encouragement. In one of my more high profile roles in entertainment, I launched our diversity strategy with oneon-one executive meetings. They were mostly men, mostly white and mostly white men who were content with the status quo. There were few

“If ideas are our most valuable commodity, then we have the ability to use those ideas to change the world…” 88

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outspoken critics; however, some displayed bravado, courage, fear, and even resistance. But what I had on my side was commitment from the top, a chairman who lived diversity in his everyday life. Having the chairman’s involvement and being able to demonstrate the business impact of the initiative ensured success. As president of Women in Film, I recognized that entertainment and the media are a common thread that ties our world together. It’s the media’s willingness to push the envelope that produces brave and controversial programming that binds us together, regardless of race, gender, etc. In family life, our children don’t mind sharing their mom. Even at their young age, they know that we all have important work to do to influence change and make a difference in our community. I’ve spent my career creating a rainbow and eliminating the glass ceiling, making sure equal talent gets equal spotlight. Like the many who have helped me, I’ve been blessed with the ability to give back and mentor others through what can be an unfair process. So, as we continue to soar in our own careers, we all have the responsibility to mentor the generation behind us. It is their generation who have the potential to create an opportunity-filled world worth living in.


Diversity is fundamental to our success

UBS knows what people can achieve by working together with mutual respect and understanding, and by leveraging our differences. It’s an approach we strongly believe in and a powerful way to achieve success. We’re proud to honor Ci Ci Holloway for her exceptional contribution to our organization and for her nomination as one of Profile in Diversity Journal’s “Women Worth Watching”.

UBS is an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity in its workplace.

www.ubs.com/diversity © UBS 2010. All rights reserved.


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Janet M. Holloway Monsanto Company

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Chief of Staff and Community Relations EDUCATION: Master’s degree in Computer Science, Washington University FIRST JOB: Teacher’s aide WHAT I’M READING: The Help, by Kathryn Stockett MY PHILOSOPHY: Never accept no as the answer. INTERESTS: Reading, puzzles, cooking and watching sports. FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way of Greater St. Louis COMPANY: Monsanto Company HEADQUARTERS: St. Louis, Missouri WEB SITE: www.monsanto.com BUSINESS: Agriculture. ANNUAL REVENUES: $11.7 billion in fiscal year 2009 EMPLOYEES: 27,000

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uring my 26 years with Monsanto, I’ve been fortunate to have many opportunities to do good work, both for the company and in the community, while building diverse skills and growing professionally along the way. I credit much of this to the support of strong mentors. Mentors have always been important in my life, and from the very early days of my career I have sought their advice, shared challenges and celebrated milestones with them. Mentors encouraged me to set bold goals, step up to challenging assignments and recognize that growth comes in many forms: learning, broadening experiences, stretching oneself and giving back to others. I began my career as an information technology programmer and over the years benefited from many different roles in that discipline, including serving as information systems manager and eventually chief information officer. But through the support of my company and mentors, my career path has taken me into different areas of business as well. Roles that I have performed outside of what I considered my traditional career path have allowed me to learn and grow the

most, including a temporary assignment leading human resources. Today, in addition to my primary role as chief of staff, I have the opportunity to oversee our community relations activities and our business services organization. I am able to share my passion for giving back by helping shape our charitable giving and volunteer programs and as a mentor in my company. Each of us can give by sharing our talents, ideas and time. We can make a tremendous positive impact both in our workplaces and in our communities. In addition to volunteering externally, I encourage people to volunteer internally for special projects or assignments. These opportunities provide a chance to work with other people, explore new business areas and allow your colleagues to see you in a different light. You might see your own capabilities differently or discover talents that can lead to new opportunities you may never have thought of pursuing. At the end of the day, I firmly believe that results really matter. No matter what you do personally or professionally, give your all and go above and beyond whenever you can.

“Each of us can give by sharing our talents, ideas and time.” 90

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SEE IN US WHO YOU ARE

At New York Life we believe that people’s differences can be their greatest attributes. We recognize that employees’ unique qualities often lead to innovation, positive change, and a more productive and dynamic workplace. If you are looking for a new company or career, choose one that is committed to providing a challenging and rewarding experience, where every individual has the opportunity to succeed.

For more information about a career with New York Life visit us at www.newyorklife.com/diversity NEW YORK LIFE. THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.® © 2010 New York Life Insuranace Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010 EOE/M/F/D/V


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Mary Humiston Applied Materials, Inc.

TITLE: Group Vice President, Global Human Resources EDUCATION: BS, Psychology from Siena College; MBA and MS, Industrial Psychology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute FIRST JOB: At 10 years old, produced and acted in a neighborhood show and earned $50 WHAT I’M READING: There Are No Accidents, by Robert H. Hopcke MY PHILOSOPHY: You never know what life will bring your way, so be open to new adventures that will change the way you look at yourself and the world. FAMILY: Single, Great Aunt. INTERESTS: Photography, sports, film, interior design. FAVORITE CHARITies: All charities focused on education and removing ignorance COMPANY: Applied Materials, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Santa Clara, California WEB SITE: www.appliedmaterials.com BUSINESS: World’s leading semiconductor, flat panel display and solar photovoltaic equipment maker. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5 billion EMPLOYEES: 13,000 worldwide

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orking in human resources is exciting because it allows me to be involved in hiring the best talent, developing people and enabling managers to excel. People are the ultimate competitive advantage, especially within innovation-driven businesses like Applied Materials. They are the ones who dream up the next big idea for our customers, drive technology innovation to make it a reality and execute on our company’s strategy. As a member of the executive staff at Applied Materials, I take great pride in the fact that my team plays a significant role in executing on our strategy. As a female leader at the company, I’m also proud to bring a unique perspective to how we need to attract, retain and engage the best talent to move our business forward. I bring great passion to what I do, which is a universal trait that benefits anyone who wants to make a significant impact in their career. When you’re just starting your career, it’s important to pinpoint the contribution you want to make and why. In the course of my career, I’ve participated in many interviews to

“Feedback from someone who believes in you allows you to become that much better.” 92

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recruit talent and found that people are sometimes influenced by external factors and others’ expectations. It’s important to know what you want and to be flexible and open to possibilities that come your way so you can learn about your true passions. For me, this resulted in the opportunity to live in another country and experience different cultures and business challenges. I was able to work in a completely different function outside of human resources – finance on GE’s corporate audit staff, which was like an MBA on steroids. The experience greatly expanded my business acumen and allowed me to gain global experience and cross-functional, cross-business understanding. Mentors have also been an important part of my success along the way. Great mentors are so valuable because they tell you when things are going well, where you can improve and just listen when you want to explore ideas. Feedback from someone who believes in you allows you to become that much better. One of the biggest challenges I’ve faced in my career is balancing my work with my personal life. I love to work, as my friends will tell you, but finding that balance between your profession and your other interests allows you to gain a unique perspective from a rich and fulfilling life. Follow your passion, mix it up and have fun!


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Cheryl L. Janey Northrop Grumman Information Systems

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entors can come into your life in unpredictable ways. My mentor and adviser of 25 years was someone I worked for at the beginning of my career. He was also someone I disliked. Over time, though, I gained intense admiration and respect for him and now proudly call him my friend. He taught me many invaluable lessons that I continue to live by and pass on to the future generation of leaders. One lesson he taught me was to make my own impressions. You gain valuable insight from spending time in the ranks with your employees, getting feedback and understanding their point of view and opinions, not just from management’s perspective. Another lesson was to never be the highest-level person with bad news. When times get tough surround yourself with many people of different viewpoints to achieve creative ideas and approaches. Sharing challenges up and across the organization helps build support, resources and focus to resolve difficult problems. During my rise to the executive suite I have encountered challenges both personally and professionally that have helped me gain the essential perspective, skills and balance needed to be an effective employee at the office and wife and mother at home. The philosophy I subscribe to is to accept gifts in unusual pack-

ages. What may seem like a bad situation often turns into a positive outcome. It’s all about attitude. My professional goal was to run a business and I committed myself to that objective early on. The path was not always straight or predictable. I started a family and confronted two serious medical issues along the way. These gifts taught me important lessons of responsibility and conviction. The advice I give aspiring leaders is to have a solid plan of what you want to accomplish, but be flexible to the dynamic nature of a professional career and life events. Rather than designing a master plan to perfection, prepare plans B and C. Adjusting to competition, but prioritizing and handling crisis events unemotionally, is the foremost role of a leader.

TITLE: Vice President of Communications EDUCATION: Carnegie Mellon University, Bachelor’s Degree FIRST JOB: Marketing representative for IBM WHAT I’M READING: John Adams, by David McCullough; and New England White, by Stephen Carter MY PHILOSOPHY: Look at events in absolute terms, neither good nor bad. Be open to “gifts” that may come in unusual or unexpected packages. FAMILY: Married to my college sweetheart; Son, age 12. INTERESTS: Family, gardening and water aerobics. FAVORITE CHARITies: Food & Friends – Provides meals to those living with HIV/ AIDS, cancer and other life-challenging illnesses COMPANY: Northrop Grumman Information Systems HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEB SITE: www.northropgrumman.com BUSINESS: Global provider of advanced solutions for defense, intelligence, civil agency and commercial customers. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 24,000

I’m fortunate to work in such an environment at Northrop Grumman that supports mentoring, encourages professional development and embraces diversity. I advocate for every employee to take responsibility for their own career and life path and seek opportunities to grow as an individual, step outside your comfort zone and balance your personal and professional life.

“Rather than designing a master plan to perfection, prepare plans B and C.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Randy Meg Kammer Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida

TITLE: Vice President, Regulatory Affairs and Public Policy EDUCATION: BA, from Northwestern University; JD, from the University of Florida College of Law FIRST JOB: Staff Attorney, Three Rivers Legal Services, Gainesville, FL WHAT I’M READING: The Girl Who Played with Fire, by Stieg Larrson MY PHILOSOPHY: Do a Mitzvah (good deed) each day. FAMILY: Husband, Jeffry Wollitz; daughter, Allison Phillips (28); grandson, Milo (18 mos.). INTERESTS: University of Florida sports – Go Gators! Knitting, travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: Marilyn Kammer Bestseller Collection of the Shaker Heights Public Library, OH; charities that support Jewish, LGBT, and Native American causes COMPANY: Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida HEADQUARTERS: Jacksonville, Florida WEB SITE: www.bcbsfl.com BUSINESS: Health insurance. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 5,800

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have always believed that I live a charmed life and that I must acknowledge my good fortune by paying back to those who have less or suffer from prejudice or misfortune. I usually root for the underdog and try to lend my support to overcoming their challenges. To me, mentoring is designed to give an advantage to those who might not have one. In high school, I was a candy striper. I was honored to spend precious time with children who suffered from terrible illness and injury. I learned so much from their strength and courage. After graduation from law school, I chose to work for our local legal services (legal aid) office. I realized that my freedom to spend countless hours on my cases presented many of my indigent clients with one of the few experiences in which they had an advantage over those with much more and that often provided a bit of self-esteem to help improve their lives in the future. I am being honored by this publication, primarily for my work as the executive sponsor of our Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) employee resource group. However, the real honor in my mind is to have the privilege to stand arm

in arm with members of the LGBT community in their struggle for their civil rights. The courage and resilience I have seen demonstrated is truly inspiring. People often ask why I am such a passionate ally. As a liberal, Democrat, Jewish feminist, in a conservative southern town, I know how it feels to be in the minority. I am often asked how I can continue to live in such a conservative environment. It is much easier to live in a like-minded environment, but how will we ever change narrow-minded and bigoted individuals if we do not make the case every day? My employer for the last 24 years, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, has continued to demonstrate its commitment to the LGBT community by providing continually expanding benefits to LGBT employees and their families. They have empowered me to make a difference! My passion comes from my spiritual belief that we are put on earth to do good things and what could be more important than to help people get the fundamental rights and respect that they deserve? My goal is to help create an environment where people are free to be who they are without fear.

“…Mentoring is designed to give an advantage to those who might not have one.” 94

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Patricia Kampling Alliant Energy Corporation

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rowing up in New York, I still remember the massive blackouts that impacted the area in 1965 and 1977. I thought there had to be a better way and I knew I wanted to be a part of keeping the lights on. That was one of the reasons I pursued an engineering degree and certainly a contributing factor for my 30-year career in energy and utility services. I’m enjoying a very rewarding career and have the pleasure of working with many kind and dedicated people. To wholeheartedly commit your time, energy and talents to the success of an organization, you must believe in its mission and values. So I have been deliberate in choosing the companies I’ve worked for, as well as the people I’ve wanted to work with. Luckily, I’ve also had the insight to recognize great opportunities and the prudence to know when it’s time to move on to a new challenge. I attribute my personal and professional accomplishments to the strong work ethic instilled by my Irish family. As a second generation American, my parents encouraged me to take advantage of our great education system and to push myself every step of the way. I am truly living the American dream.

As an executive in a male-dominated industry, I would be remiss if I didn’t pay homage to the generations of courageous women and supportive men who helped pave the way before me. Undoubtedly, situations of injustice and inequity still occur today. So I would encourage the next wave of aspiring leaders not to dwell on circumstances beyond your control, but instead, concentrate your efforts on what is within the realm of your influence. In other words, stay focused on your goals, choose your battles and lead by setting a positive example.

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

Most importantly, make candid communication, humanity and humility the hallmarks of your leadership. The most effective leaders seek knowledge and ask a lot of questions. Empower your team to provide input, even if it means sharing conflicting opinions or unorthodox ideas. Valuing diversity, creativity and an array of perspectives will not only enrich you as an individual, but will inevitably prove beneficial to your organization.

WEB SITE: www.alliantenergy.com

EDUCATION: BA, Economics, Swarthmore College; BS, Engineering, Swarthmore College; MBA, Finance, University of Chicago FIRST JOB: Grocery store cashier in high school WHAT I’M READING: The Greatest Generation, byTom Brokaw MY PHILOSOPHY: Where there’s a will, there’s a way. FAMILY: Husband of 28 years; 12-yearold son and 11-year-old daughter. INTERESTS: Gardening, traveling to visit friends and family. FAVORITE CHARITies: Special Olympics and Easter Seals COMPANY: Alliant Energy Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Madison, Wisconsin BUSINESS: Utility services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.4 billion EMPLOYEES: 5,000

In working to keep the lights on, I’ve learned the real power in leadership comes from the ability to inspire others. I hope you will find, as I have, that motivating and encouraging those around you to reach their potential is the ultimate reward.

“…I’ve learned the real power in leadership comes from the ability to inspire others.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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© 2010 Lockheed Martin Corporation

BETWEEN THE CHALLENGE AND THE SOLUTION, T H E R E I S O N E I M P O R TA N T W O R D : H O W.

Diversity is more than a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, every idea counts. Every viewpoint matters. That’s why, at Lockheed Martin, we not only believe in diversity. We embrace it. Because diversity is the “how” that delivers the most complete answers to some of the most complex problems imaginable.


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Heather Kos, Navistar International • Laura K. Kennedy, SAIC • Bridget Lauderdale, Lockheed Martin • Patricia Lawicki, Pacific Gas and Electric Company Lisa Klauser, Unilever • Jill Lawrence, Pitney Bowes • Maria G. Korsnick, Constellation Energy Nuclear Group • Christine Leahy, CDW • Caroline King, Chubb Group of Insurance Cos. ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

annual

in 2011


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Laura K. Kennedy SAIC

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Ethics and Compliance EDUCATION: Cornell Law School (JD, 1979); Oberlin College (BA, Government 1976, Phi Beta Kappa) FIRST JOB: Seyfarth Shaw Law Firm WHAT I’M READING: Cutting for Stone, by Abraham Verghese; The Shadow of the Wind, by Carlos Ruiz Zafon MY PHILOSOPHY: Make the most of the opportunities that present themselves and build on them. FAMILY: Husband of 32 years; two sons, ages 24 and 21. INTERESTS: Daily exercise, gardening, classical music. FAVORITE CHARITies: CARE COMPANY: SAIC HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEB SITE: www.saic.com BUSINESS: A FORTUNE 500® scientific, engineering and technology applications company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $10.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 45,000

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arely does a career follow a straight path. Opportunities present themselves and lead you in directions you never anticipated. I have found that making the most of those opportunities and building upon them create the most successful and rewarding careers. I am one of those people who went all the way through school without taking a break. After my second year of law school, I began working at a law firm in the field of government contracts where I planned to stay a year or so in private practice, but ended up staying 22 years. In 2000, I joined a client, Honeywell, as vice president of Global Compliance, where I used my background in government contracts to expand my scope in the field of regulatory compliance. Five years later, I was recruited to join SAIC, where I serve as senior vice president of ethics and compliance. Each of these positions challenged me in different ways and broadened my skills. At Honeywell and SAIC, I worked with senior

management and the board of directors, which deepened my appreciation for the business and operational approaches to solving problems. I met my husband my freshman year of college and we married after my second year of law school. I had two sons when I was a young partner in my early 30s, and began the supreme juggling act of balancing the demands of a busy private practice and a young family. I am extremely fortunate to have a rich experience in both my personal and professional life. I have found that my family makes me a better professional and vice versa. I did not set out to be where I am today, but I did try to make the most of opportunities that came my way and took on new challenges to build on my earlier foundation. While it is important to know what you want to do, it is also important to remain open-minded and flexible. If not, you may lose out on experiences that could lead you to new heights.

“Opportunities present themselves and lead you in directions you never anticipated.” 98

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Caroline King Chubb Group of Insurance Companies

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mentor, by definition, is a trusted counselor, tutor or coach; in reality, a mentor is anyone you can learn from. While the advice of an executive level mentor or sponsor is invaluable, I’ve found the wisdom of trusted colleagues to be a critical complement to my formal mentoring relationships. It’s important to build peer-to-peer networks and cultivate an openness to learning from those around you, regardless of their level in the organization. I’ve found that sometimes the people who can offer the most practical advice, or will provide the most honest feedback, are those who are currently facing the same challenges on a day-to-day basis. I know the conventional wisdom is that mentors and protégées should have a lot in common; however, some of my most productive matches began as mismatches. One of the greatest gifts a mentor can give is clearer understanding of how you are perceived by others, both the positives and negatives. It’s been my experience that someone who challenges my thinking, and whose strengths and perspective are different than mine, can bring those qualities into sharper focus. Above all, it’s

important that feedback is honest, even when it’s difficult to hear. In return, you need to be just as honest with your mentors. The more contexts you can provide them, the more insightful their advice is likely to be. In short, it’s important to know what you want and to seek out constructive feedback from multiple sources. A mentoring relationship is a career investment, and it makes sense to diversify your portfolio of mentors. More often than not, a theme will begin to emerge. No matter how good you are there is always room for improvement. It’s restrictive to think that you’re either a mentor or a protégée. Everyone needs a mentor, even senior managers.

TITLE: Senior Vice President EDUCATION: Cornell University BA, Columbia University MBA FIRST JOB: Mother’s helper at age 11 WHAT I’M READING: Profit from the Core, by Chris Zook; Make Your Contacts Count, by Anne Baber MY PHILOSOPHY: “Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.” – Confucius. FAMILY: 2 daughters. INTERESTS: Tennis, kayaking, opera. FAVORITE CHARITies: Summit Supports Our Troops COMPANY: Chubb Group of Insurance Companies HEADQUARTERS: Warren, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.chubb.com BUSINESS: Property and casualty insurance. ANNUAL REVENUES: $13 billion EMPLOYEES: 10,300 (worldwide)

My way of re-paying the mentors who have been so generous with me is to model the behavior they taught me. When one of Chubb’s most senior executives retired last year, among her parting advice to other women managers was to “find a mentor, be a mentor.” Her advice confirmed what I’ve already learned: the experience gained on both ends of that equation is transforming.

“It’s important to build peer-to-peer networks and cultivate an openness to learning from those around you…” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Lisa Klauser Unilever

TITLE: VP Consumer & Customer Solutions, North America EDUCATION: University of Connecticut FIRST JOB: Receptionist at Lender’s Bagel Bakery Head Offices WHAT I’M READING: Strategic Acceleration: Succeed by the Speed of Life, by Tony Jeary MY PHILOSOPHY: Never Settle. FAMILY: By far the most important thing in my life. Married to Rick for 18 years; daughter Casey, 15, and son Griffen, 11. INTERESTS: Tennis, running, boating, attending children’s sporting events. FAVORITE CHARITIES: American Cancer Society COMPANY: Unilever HEADQUARTERS: Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.unileverusa.com BUSINESS: Global consumer goods company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $10 billion in sales (2009) EMPLOYEES: 13,000 in North America

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s I reflect on my 20-plus years in the consumer packaged goods industry and the leadership lessons I have learned, I realize how blessed I’ve been to have so many wonderful role models and mentors. I have worked with some of the most talented, committed people and continue to learn from them every day. I believe that in life anything can be accomplished with a positive attitude and hard work. My parents instilled a strong work ethic in me from the time I was young and taught me to never take anything for granted and to always strive for more. These principles have helped me to persevere and to figure out solutions in the most challenging situations. Love what you do or make a change I believe to be successful your work must make you happy. We all have our bad days and challenges, but at the end of the day, you have to enjoy what you do to be good at it. I love my career and my work and I feel blessed to have the opportunity to work for a wonderful company with smart, passionate people.

Focus on where you can make a difference Unfortunately, there are only 24 hours in a day and only you can decide how to spend them. It is very important for me to prioritize daily, weekly and monthly the things that mean the most to me and to make sure I focus my energy on the right things. Create your legacy As you think about your career, ask yourself what impact you want to make, both in business and on the lives of people you touch, everyday. The idea that I am contributing and creating ideas that will be around long after I’m gone, or that have the potential to make a mark on the industry, is exciting to me. Leading the Women’s Interactive Network at Unilever is something that is very fulfilling to me and enables me to help women be the best that they can be. I also try to invest in the relationships I have with people and always take time to coach and build the team. Those coaching experiences, or watching someone I’ve mentored get a big promotion, are highlights for me and are some of my best moments.

“I believe that in life anything can be accomplished with a positive attitude and hard work.” 100

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010


WE’RE PROUD OF OUR DIFFERENCES. ALL 120,000 OF THEM. Commissioning a new aircraft carrier. Launching a space telescope. Building the IT infrastructure of tomorrow. Success stories like these are why Northrop Grumman is a leader in global security. We foster a wide range of perspectives to power our world-class aerospace, information technology, and defense projects. Perspectives like yours. At every level, we’ve made strong commitments to workforce diversity, because we know that greatness is often the product of bringing fresh perspectives to the table. So, if you’re interested in a career as vast as your ambitions, take a look at everything we have to offer.

Achievement never ends. For all current engineering and other opportunities, please visit our website:

careers.northropgrumman.com

©2010 Northrop Grumman Corporation. Northrop Grumman is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to hiring and retaining a diverse workforce. U.S. Citizenship is required for most positions.


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Maria G. Korsnick Constellation Energy Nuclear Group, LLC

TITLE: Chief Nuclear Officer & Chief Operating Officer EDUCATION: BS, Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland FIRST JOB: Associate Engineer in the Nuclear Analysis Group at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant WHAT I’M READING: Mayflower Treasure Hunt, by Ron Roy (a chapter book I read with my daughter Lauren – in each chapter there is a picture and you have to find the hidden letter. It is a big hit!) MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, laugh often! FAMILY: Husband, Michael; Lauren, 8, and Nicholas, 6. INTERESTS: Finding and then appreciating a nice Bordeaux; golfing and gardening. FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way COMPANY: Constellation Energy Nuclear Group, LLC HEADQUARTERS: Baltimore, Maryland WEB SITE: www.cengllc.com BUSINESS: Operator of five reactor units at three nuclear power plant sites. ANNUAL REVENUES: $1.6 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 2,800

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have learned several lessons throughout my life that have served me well, personally and professionally. These lessons, along with the wonderful people who have encouraged and supported me, have helped shape the person I am today. I believe in accountability and honoring your commitments. If you say you are going to do something, do it. If you cannot do it, let people know why. I do not always make the popular decision. I make the decision I believe is best for the situation. I commit myself to what it takes to make the best decision and see it through regardless of how hard it is. It is my job to help make the team successful by moving things forward. If I know the obstacles that are in people’s way, I will get them the resources they need to be successful and get the job done. Respect is a two-way street. You must show respect as well as earn it. Lead by example and your actions must always be consistent with your message. You must respect the individual, the team and the uniqueness of the technology you work with.

To truly appreciate and respect people and the work they do, you must spend time with them and listen to what they have to say, whether it is good or bad. When you listen to others, you have the opportunity to hear new perspectives, which are often eyeopening and valuable. Understand and learn about the technology firsthand from the experienced personnel because they have the insight and could help you make a more informed decision. Always have an open door policy and be willing to coach and be coached. This is all part of earning respect and helping people be successful. Enjoy what you do. If you enjoy what you do and do it well, your enthusiasm will motivate those around you. Have a sense of humor and be able to laugh at yourself or the situation. Not only does laughter reduce stress, it may open you up to a different perspective and help you make the right decision. Be true to yourself and those around you.

“If you enjoy what you do and do it well, your enthusiasm will motivate those around you.” 102

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Constellation Energy is proud to support the many achievements of leading women executives such as Maria Korsnick. Maria is the Chief Nuclear Officer and Chief Operating Officer for Constellation Energy Nuclear Group, LLCSM (CENG), a strategic joint venture of Constellation Energy and the EDF Group. Maria’s leadership style demonstrates her strong commitment to accountability, integrity and respect for others. Her enthusiasm and drive for excellence motivates people to work together to achieve personal and professional success. Embracing diversity and inclusion is a guiding principle of Constellation Energy, helping us to become one of America’s leading energy companies.

constellation.com


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Heather Kos Navistar International Corporation

TITLE: Vice President, Investor Relations and Financial Communications EDUCATION: BA, in accounting, Michigan State University; MBA, DePaul University FIRST JOB: CPA at Pricewaterhouse WHAT I’M READING: Born to Run, by Christopher McDougall MY PHILOSOPHY: “There is only one thing that makes a dream impossible to achieve: the fear of failure.” (from The Alchemist, by Peter Coelho). FAMILY: Husband Andy and three children: Grace, Ethan and Hunter. INTERESTS: Competing in marathons and Ironman and watching my three children compete in their sports. FAVORITE CHARITies: Susan G. Komen (breast cancer) COMPANY: Navistar International Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Warrenville, Illinois WEB SITE: www.navistar.com BUSINESS: Producer of commercial trucks, school buses, motor homes and diesel engines. ANNUAL REVENUES: $11.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 15,000+

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ver the years, I have been fortunate to be blessed with many skilled mentors. However, out of all of them, my mother remains the best. She’s always shown kindness to others, strength in times of adversity and actions grounded with integrity. When I asked for advice I was never given an answer. She would only listen to my problem and then tell me I had to decide what to do. As a child that was somewhat frustrating, but not a day goes by that I do not thank her for giving me the ability to make decisions on my own and be accountable for those decisions.

age their cost accounting group. I then joined Navistar, where I have been for 14 years in roles of increasing responsibility. I started in our internal consulting group and was quickly promoted to manager.

I pass this lesson on to my employees and those I mentor. Being a mentor is a privilege. By providing the right support and tools, you are teaching mentees how to focus their passion and provide a framework to help them reach their potential. For every position I have held throughout my career, I have prided myself on providing exemplary service, getting results, being an effective leader and having a passion for what I am doing.

At this stage in my career, it is critical that I feel good about the value I am contributing to the organization, while at the same time making sure I am still challenged and growing as a person. But, of the utmost importance is being the best mom I can be to my three kids. There are great days, good days and days I wish I could have handled better. However, every failure brings a lesson for improvement. My advice to young women is to pull the lessons from the failures, lean on your mentors for guidance, and have a passion for what you are doing. This will lead you to your highest potential.

I started my career path as a CPA in public accounting at Pricewaterhouse. From there I left for Bimba Manufacturing to man-

The goal was profitability maximization while keeping with our core values. Within two years I moved to controller of our Inline Engine business and was then promoted to Director of Finance and Strategy before being promoted to vice president of investor relations and financial communications. The greatest challenge for me has been balancing work and life.

“…Pull the lessons from the failures, lean on your mentors for guidance, and have a passion for what you are doing.” 104

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Diversity

Making a Difference at navistar

At Navistar, we value a workplace where all individuals can grow, succeed and contribute to the overall success of the business. Congratulations to Heather Kos, VP of Investor Relations, for making a difference at Navistar.

To learn more about joining the Navistar family, visit www.navistar.com/Navistar/Careers today. ŠNavistar, Inc. 2010 All rights reserved.


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Bridget Lauderdale Lockheed Martin Corporation

TITLE: Vice President and General Manager for the F-16, F-2 and T-50 programs EDUCATION: BS, in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University FIRST JOB: Electronics Engineer for General Dynamics Corporation WHAT I’M READING: Leading With Questions, by Michael J. Marquardt; The Titan’s Curse, by Rick Riordan (with my daughter Alexandra) MY PHILOSOPHY: Rely on your integrity to define you and deliver on your promise. FAMILY: I reside in Texas with my husband, Michael; two children, Jacob and Alexandra; and the canine member of our family, Annie. INTERESTS: Travel, sports, a good restaurant and spending time with my family. FAVORITE CHARITies: A local parochial school COMPANY: Lockheed Martin Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Bethesda, Maryland WEB SITE: www.lockheedmartin.com BUSINESS: Aeronautics. ANNUAL REVENUES: $44.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 136,000

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s a child, I always enjoyed math and science and naturally gravitated to engineering, following my father’s advice and also in my brother’s footsteps. The pursuit of an electrical engineering degree was a challenge for me. I realized it was less about the subject matter and much more about the gratification I’d get from the achievement. That parallel has been true of my career. I didn’t necessarily set out to reach a particular position or level but rather to be fulfilled in my achievement. Early on, I connected my happiness with delivering value to others. Like most people, there has been no set path to success, but rather a series of opportunities and choices to be thoughtfully considered. My greatest achievements are not those where I stood alone, but rather those accomplished by a team of unique perspectives and skills to make the remarkable happen. This happens when the standard is set high and the team believes it can be done. I learned from one of my greatest mentors that delivering excellence is power; not power over

people or organizations, but rather power to fuel people and organizations to achieve the impossible. He also taught me that I could reach much further than I thought if I simply set the bar higher and relied on the varied perspectives and skills to provide the how-to. He repeatedly demonstrated confidence in me and then set the bar high. This pushed me to think broader and drive further. In my career as well as in my personal life, I derive satisfaction from giving to others – my family in particular. The demands of a career can certainly challenge being all you want to be outside of a professional life. I have found that being deliberate about priorities and choices is the key. Just as I establish how to invest time at work, I also do the same at home. I’m not striving to be superhuman, but rather rely on people to help get it all done. Perhaps most important is to be present and thoughtful in the moment because you never get those moments back.

“I have found that being deliberate about priorities and choices is the key.” 106

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Patricia Lawicki Pacific Gas and Electric Company

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hroughout my career, I have had a number of valuable mentors who have contributed to my professional and personal growth. Looking back, each one has had a unique and lasting impact. Some have coached me to look for new opportunities and others have encouraged me to continually extend my capabilities and set my goals higher. While I enjoyed and learned from mentoring relationships, I found that informal relationships with my peers gave me a window into diverse perspectives and a deeper understanding of my own. Often times, having a simple cup of coffee with a colleague unearths a new way of looking at a situation and helps solve a complex problem with a simple idea. You should never miss an opportunity to leverage the expertise of your peers because establishing a level of personal comfort in your working relationships fosters the greatest collaboration. Ever since I was in high school, I wanted to work in a technologyrelated field. I started out as a programmer in college and I combined those skills with my entrepreneurial drive and became an independent consultant. Gaining credibility as a young woman in a field that at the

time was dominated by men wasn’t as challenging as one may think. It never bothered me to be the only female in the room. Having confidence in your work, maintaining a positive attitude and demonstrating that you are a team player can make a big difference in how you are accepted, in any situation. My career path has shown me how important it is to be flexible and to take on new opportunities. Prior to joining PG&E, I stepped outside of my traditional information technology role to pursue an opportunity in mergers and acquisitions. Having the opportunity to learn all aspects and functions of business operations has been invaluable to me today in my role of CIO and I’ve learned that sometimes you have to grow outward to grow upward.

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Pacific Gas and Electric Company EDUCATION: BS, in Management, Purdue University; MBA, Indiana University FIRST JOB: Intern/Programmer at local community college WHAT I’M READING: DRIVE, by Daniel H. Pink, and the latest technology journals MY PHILOSOPHY: Any situation can present an opportunity to learn something new. FAMILY: I live with my husband and my son. INTERESTS: I love to be involved in many different sports, from playing golf to helping coach my son’s basketball team. FAVORITE CHARITies: I’m on the board and volunteer at my son’s school; helping underrepresented schools; Habitat for Humanity COMPANY: Pacific Gas and Electric Company HEADQUARTERS: San Francisco, California WEB SITE: www.pge.com BUSINESS: Gas and electric utility. ANNUAL REVENUES: $13.4 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 20,000

As a leader, work-life balance can be a challenge. Flexibility is key to learning how to properly focus your attention on all the moving parts in your life. My advice to young women is to learn to be fully engaged with the present. I don’t like to be preoccupied with a work issue when I’m talking to my family, or vice versa. Making yourself completely available to the task at hand can help you move forward toward reaching your goals.

“…Sometimes you have to grow outward to grow upward.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Jill Lawrence Pitney Bowes Inc.

TITLE: Director of Accelerated Innovation EDUCATION: BA, Anthropology, Smith College FIRST JOB: Office assistant at a small computer company WHAT I’M READING: Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand MY PHILOSOPHY: What matters is not just what you do but how you do it. FAMILY: Daniel: Wonderful, supportive husband of 6 years. INTERESTS: Reading, dining out (especially regional and seasonal cuisine). FAVORITE CHARITies: Bridgeport Rescue Mission (Bridgeport, CT) COMPANY: Pitney Bowes Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Stamford, Connecticut WEB SITE: www.pb.com BUSINESS: Mailing & communications technology and services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.6 billion (2009) EMPLOYEES: 33,000 (2009)

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started in business in what some may consider as an unusual role – a workplace anthropologist. I was fortunate to encounter and be mentored early in my career by a woman with 20 years’ experience practicing anthropology and consulting for large companies. As an early-career anthropologist, I was inspired by how she applied the technical aspects of the field to real-world business problems. Throughout my career, I have experienced how valuable it is to have mentors. In particular, I have sought multiple mentors who have given me diverse perspectives and helped me develop the courage to take risks. I believe we all have personal power to create positive change, and it helps to have support from people you trust, whether you are challenging the status quo or working to affect a whole system. Today, I am using methods from anthropology to help drive culture change and innovation at Pitney Bowes. I lead an innovation program that provides all employees

with the opportunity to participate in identifying and shaping new ideas to drive organic growth. The program also provides a context where we enact new behaviors that transform our culture. In 2009, more than 650 ideas from the company’s online IdeaNet were committed to action as a result of employee contributions. These ideas come from across our global employee population, with colleagues in 23 countries participating. My success as an innovator at Pitney Bowes is due in part to my early mentor as well as others along each step of my career. IdeaNet couldn’t have achieved success without the team thinking big and taking risks. Taking risks brings growth. I believe a good mentor acts as a guide in helping you to navigate a career path. A great mentor challenges you to be a courageous leader who can positively transform the organizations and communities of which you are a part.

“Taking risks brings growth.” 108

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Christine Leahy CDW LLC

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ver the years I have found that having an entrepreneurial spirit is critical to advancing your career and along with that committing yourself to applying a positive attitude when it comes to learning from others. Young professional women must not only be proactive in identifying and pursuing the best opportunities for personal growth; but they must also not let personality be a barrier to a potentially great business coach or learning opportunity. In other words, we don’t have to be like everyone we work with. In fact, we won’t. However, there are likely several times in a career when some of the best stuff, the most brilliant negotiating skills or decision-making approach, or the best strategic thinking or operational process is exemplified by a person with whom you might not naturally socialize. Seize those opportunities and don’t be immobilized because of possible personality or style differences. Instead find and absorb the good stuff and incorporate it into your own repertoire of skills. It’s about being able to see through a person’s layers in order to better understand the mechanics of a particu-

lar strength that you may want to develop. You can do that while being true to yourself and at the same time keeping your own style. Over the years I have learned many hard skills from people whose soft skills I would not necessarily want to emulate! Seizing these opportunities is one way of taking ownership for one’s personal growth. I helped co-found CDW’s Women-to-Women Network, an organization that cultivates and supports female leadership within the organization. In the network we try to encourage the concept of owning your personal growth. Through networking and the sharing of key lessons we have found that this peer-topeer network provides an additional outlet for women to learn from each other and succeed as a group.

TITLE: General Counsel EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree from Brown University; JD, from Boston College Law School FIRST JOB: Caterer WHAT I’M READING: Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert MY PHILOSOPHY: Some of the best ideas don’t come from you, they come from your team. Even if you have an idea, getting your team to weigh in makes every idea stronger. FAMILY: Twin daughters Annika, Samantha (11). INTERESTS: Family, my daughters, travel, cooking, running. FAVORITE CHARITies: Children’s Home + Aid COMPANY: CDW LLC HEADQUARTERS: Vernon Hills, Illinois WEB SITE: www.cdw.com BUSINESS: Technology hardware, software and services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 6,150

Every opportunity counts for them to help each other guide their career paths. As we continue this program we will look for new and different ways to acknowledge the importance of female managers and their contributions to the company by providing access to tools and experts that promote professional development and growth.

“Over the years I have learned many hard skills from people whose soft skills I would not necessarily want to emulate!” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Bring It!

Your Talents. Your Ideas. Your Passion. Thu, Verizon, Marketing

At Verizon, we want you to bring your diverse talents, experiences, backgrounds, and viewpoints to work. It’s your smarter leadership, bolder innovations, and faster results that will move our business forward at the speed of FiOS! So, bring it in and bring it on – bring your diversity to work at Verizon!

Verizon Diversity Leadership. Innovation. Results.


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Gaye Adams Massey, UnitedHealth Group • Janice Lindsay, Harris • Jeannie Maul, CSC • Cathy Martine, AT&T • Kathryn Leisses, Sodexo G. Penny McIntyre, Newell Rubbermaid • Connie L. Lindsey, Northern Trust • Kenyatta Lewis, MGM Resorts • Arpana S. Mehra, ACS • Jeanette McCarty, Ryder • Judy M. McNamara, Ecolab ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

annual

in 2011


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Kathryn Leisses Sodexo

TITLE: Vice President Sales EDUCATION: UC Berkeley, BA, Psychology; UC Extension, Sodexo Management Institute FIRST JOB: Waitress (age 16) WHAT I’M READING: The Forgotten Garden, by Kate Morton; and re-reading Mavericks at Work, by William C. Taylor MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, give a lot, play hard and laugh a lot. FAMILY: I am a wife, sister, daughter, aunt and have a wonderful extended family of friends – and Tombu, our beloved Rhodesian Ridgeback. INTERESTS: Yoga, backpacking, gardening, exploring new places, photography and cooking with family and friends. FAVORITE CHARITies: Nature Conservancy, Sodexo Foundation COMPANY: Sodexo HEADQUARTERS: North America: Gaithersburg, Maryland WEB SITE: www.sodexousa.com BUSINESS: Designs, manages and delivers solutions that contribute to our clients’ organizations: people, processes, infrastructures and equipment. ANNUAL REVENUES: $19.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 380,000 worldwide

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feel fortunate to have learned a lot of meaningful lessons early on in my life, including what it really means when people say your mother is an alien and also the many benefits to multinational families. At 16, I started my first job waitressing and as the new hire was often assigned the difficult customers others didn’t want to serve. In the end, I discovered how nice those customers could be when I took the time to understand their needs and treat them with respect. What a difference it can make to have someone take an interest in you, challenge you and help you see your own potential and what is possible if you work hard and care. I had some other rather dramatic examples that were powerful in reinforcing what I absolutely didn’t want to become. These and a variety of other experiences eventually led me to five commitments. Seek first to understand and then form your opinion. I once heard the expression: you have two ears and one mouth and they should be used in that proportion. Master the art of listening as well as the art of ask-

“Keep learning and sharing and look for the lesson in every experience.” 112

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ing great questions and you will be amazed what you learn. Keep moving. Fitness, health and well-being are essential to a balanced life and to managing the many challenges and stresses that come along the way. Exercise will help you stay healthy, alert and happy and give you the energy you need to be effective. If you don’t believe this read Spark, by John Ratey. Be present and fully engaged in what you are doing whether at work, on vacation, walking the dog, etc., which is perhaps a controversial statement in this highly connected, multitasking and multi-generational world. However, as my 24-year-old niece Nicola recently said: “Being present at work helps you identify opportunities, avoid mistakes and make connections; and being present in your personal life fosters healthy relationships and keeps you happy and fulfilled.” Keep learning and sharing and look for the lesson in every experience. Read, take classes, talk to people, have a mentor, be a mentor, engage and stretch. Be flexible. It is important to have a plan and goals but stay open to the possibilities. Finally, choose your company well. By that I mean both your employer and your friends. I am proud to work with a great company and my life is rich because of my colleagues, friends and family.


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Kenyatta Lewis MGM Resorts International

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y professional foundation has been paved by individuals who purposefully or inadvertently imparted knowledge that helped me evolve into the leader I am today. Like a sponge, I eagerly absorbed the information which equipped me for each new season. Although many years have passed, the actions of my initial mentors are quite vivid. My late grandmother ensured our family’s name and public appearance was reflected well. She consistently told me, “Don’t dress for where you are; dress for where you are going.” I later understood Grandma was encouraging me to think like a leader, to dress my mind with the knowledge needed to seize the opportunities that lie ahead. It was during my tenure at Sandia National Labs as a high school work study that I encountered my first supervising nurturer who carved my character as she vigorously exemplified dedication, humility, confidence in completing tasks and a passion for helping others. These intangible nuggets outweigh the tangible skill sets I honed through the years. Leaders are not born or appointed by their socio-economic status or occupational title. They are developed by the influences and experiences demonstrated within their environment.

I have served in many capacities throughout my career: from a purchasing clerk at Sandia Laboratories, Johnson Controls, Bechtel, and UnitedHealthcare, to a soldier in the United States Army Reserves to the supplier diversity professional I am today. Along the way, I was encouraged, enlightened and inspired by my peers, supervisors, those I supervised, military officers, friends and family alike. Although I desired to remain in the presence of some leaders longer than others, I quickly learned that each had crossed my path with a purpose to move me through seasons for such a time as this. Recently, I looked around for my next guide and realized I was surrounded by those seeking guidance. I had become the leader. What an awesome responsibility to positively affect the lives of those around me by setting the example others would choose to follow.

TITLE: Director of Supplier Diversity EDUCATION: BS, Business Management, University of Phoenix FIRST JOB: Purchasing Clerk, Sandia National Laboratories WHAT I’M READING: Developing the Leaders Around You, by John C. Maxwell MY PHILOSOPHY: You were chosen for such a time as this. FAMILY: My family consists of my husband Jerome, our two sons Cedrick and Caleb, and one step-daughter Shanetra. INTERESTS: Family time, nature walks, reading, choral directing, ministering to the homeless with my husband, encouraging entrepreneurs to grow their business. FAVORITE CHARITies: Las Vegas Rescue Mission, Shade Tree Foundation COMPANY: MGM Resorts International HEADQUARTERS: Las Vegas, Nevada WEB SITE: www.mgmresorts.com BUSINESS: Hospitality & gaming. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 61,000

With gratitude, I stand upon the foundation formed by those who helped me. I now shed light along the path that guides the next generation of leaders. I encourage you to honor your mentors by leading others for such a time as this.

“Leaders are not born or appointed by their socio-economic status or occupational title.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Janice Lindsay Harris Corporation

TITLE: Vice President, Supply Chain Management and Operations EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree in accounting, University of West Florida FIRST JOB: Cost Accountant, WatkinsJohnson WHAT I’M READING: Switch, by Chip Heath MY PHILOSOPHY: Live your passion. FAMILY: Husband, Allen Lindsay; Children, Jaida, Jillian and A. Logan. INTERESTS: Family time, boating, cooking, outdoor markets, outdoors. FAVORITE CHARITies: Youth Program, First Baptist Church of Melbourne COMPANY: Harris Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Melbourne, Florida WEB SITE: www.harris.com BUSINESS: International communications and information technology company serving government and commercial markets. ANNUAL REVENUES: Approximately $5 billion EMPLOYEES: More than 15,000

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consider myself to be an average person with an extraordinary drive and passion to make a difference in this world. My parents raised me to value family, hard work and to respect others. I became a Christian as a teenager and God has been a priority in my life ever since. I learned early on that I had this thing referred to as a fire in the belly. It didn’t matter if my journey was about family, school, work, or anything else, I would pursue it with passion. My life’s mission has been about pursuing excellence and inspiring others to join me in the quest. Leadership comes naturally to me and I find work fulfilling. I feel it in my entire body when we are aligned for success and on a journey to do great things. I learned quickly that my passion to be a good wife and mother, while excelling in the workplace, could create conflict. I was determined to pursue both and it has become my life’s journey. I welcome the opportunity to encourage young professionals who have similar goals and aspirations. I want them to know you can have

both, but it takes a great support system, some conscious choices and a great deal of hard work. I am fortunate to have an amazing husband who is my biggest fan. Together we have two successful careers, three almost grown children and we give back to our community through our church’s youth program. One of my greatest lessons has been that everything has its time. You can have it all, just not all at once. I learned that it wouldn’t do me or those I love any good to excel at work at all costs, just to get the bigger job and title. I realized that if a promotion required me to travel more often away from my family, it was an unacceptable sacrifice when I had small children. They are now independent and pursuing their own dreams, so the time is right for me. I also learned that life is a series of choices and that I get to make them. Don’t allow someone else to control your life’s destiny. I have found that if I am clear on what I want, it is easier for those around me to support me in pursuing it. Visualize your future, crystallize your thoughts and communicate effectively.

“Don’t allow someone else to control your life’s destiny.” 114

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i see

© Johnson & Johnson Services Inc., 2010

giant bubble

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the better your view will be. We know that what makes you unique makes us a better company. That’s why we’re committed to promoting diversity in the community and within our company.

Diversity is inventive. Diversity is

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perspective on the world. And the more perspectives you have,

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At Johnson & Johnson, we know that everyone has a unique


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Connie L. Lindsey Northern Trust

TITLE: Executive Vice President – Head of Corporate Social Responsibility EDUCATION: BA, University of Wisconsin FIRST JOB: Accounting Supervisor, Wisconsin Bell-Milwaukee, Wisconsin WHAT I’M READING: A Whole New Mind, by Daniel Pink; Too Big To Fail, by Andrew Sorkin; The Bible MY PHILOSOPHY: The good deeds we do for others is the rent we pay for occupying space on the earth. FAMILY: My husband John Blackburn and I live in Chicago. My ‘sheroe,’ my mother, lives in Milwaukee, WI. She taught me perseverance, commitment and courage. INTERESTS: Music, reading, economics, the human condition, leadership. FAVORITE CHARITies: Girl Scouts of the USA and The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation COMPANY: Northern Trust HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEB SITE: www.northerntrust.com BUSINESS: A leading provider of investment management, asset and fund administration, banking solutions and fiduciary services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.8 billion – 2009 EMPLOYEES: 13,000

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he value and significance of having mentors has been a constant in my life. Much of what I learned about living and leading authentically was demonstrated by the individuals who nurtured my intellect and challenged me to defy the stereotypes of race and gender and to remember to lift others as I climbed. I began my business training while in college as an intern at Inroads, Inc., a program for talented minority high school students interested in careers in engineering and business. The Inroads principles of self-discipline, intellectual rigor and the requirement to give back to my community resonated and aligned with my own core values; values learned at home and supported by my faith. The mentors, coaches and sponsors lived the mission of Inroads and encouraged the students to excel. I started my professional career in telecommunications and moved to the financial services industry in 1993. I chose Northern Trust due to its demonstrated commitment to excellence and its core values of service, expertise and integrity, which

“…Net worth is not the same as self worth.” 116

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align with my own values. My current role as Head of Corporate Social Responsibility affords me the opportunity to leverage my varied business and community expertise to engage with our key stakeholders in demonstrating the strategic value of leadership in social, environmental and governance issues. My leadership journey began when I joined Girl Scouts as a young girl. My leaders and mentors helped me see a world beyond my inner-city neighborhood and to pursue my highest aspirations. I learned that net worth is not the same as self worth. My role as national president of Girl Scouts of the USA gives me the privilege of leading a 3.4 millionmember organization and myriad opportunities to mentor, advocate and make a difference in the leadership experience for girls. My commitment to mentoring is deeply ingrained in my leadership practices. Successful mentoring relationships require courage, conviction and commitment, realistic self-assessment, transparency and high levels of integrity. Shared values and a sense of purpose for the relationship will help ensure a mutually rewarding experience. I am grateful for the lessons, the leadership and the legacy my mentors have given to me.


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Cathy Martine AT&T

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uch has been written about how differently men and women communicate. I see the obstacles these differences can create in my role in supporting the development of women-owned businesses and when I mentor women who are new to the business world. Not being aware of diverse communication styles can lead to frustration, confusion and stress. When I began my career 30 years ago, I didn’t have any women mentors, so I learned about gender communication through trial and error. Some of my hard-learned lessons include: Generally men tend to communicate in headlines, while women tend to set up the situation by providing details. I’m a headline and soundbyte person who cuts to the chase. I’ve learned this approach can be very effective in business settings. I coach my teams to first deliver headlines and clear, succinct bullet points, and then fill in behind with interesting facts and anecdotes to provide context. Success is based on teamwork, individual hard work and, at times, good luck. But what and how we communicate dramatically affects how people perceive our success! Sometimes women don’t promote their accomplishments as much as is warranted. In general, women want to build relationships, so they tend to downplay their own role in their success.

As a woman, if I assert my authority, I may disrupt our relationship. I find it’s very important to develop and maintain collaborative leadership approaches with teams and colleagues. Here’s an example of how women build connections: In the middle of a business conversation one woman may say to another, “I love your suit.” The other might respond, “Thank you, I splurged when I went to Italy.” The second has shared information the first woman can use to build a connection, such as, “My in-laws are from Florence, have you been there?” Awareness of common gender differences helps increase understanding, decrease tension and improve teamwork. Women in the workplace should not try to imitate perceived male behaviors, but should instead focus on their own strengths and talents. Men and women alike can benefit by fine tuning communication skills so all people feel comfortable sharing diverse ideas and opinions. Differences are to be expected, celebrated and promoted as a strength, not a weakness, because they enhance our potential for success.

TITLE: Executive Vice President – AT&T Small Business Solutions & Alternate Channels EDUCATION: MS, General Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1994; MBA Marketing, New York University, 1986; BA, Economics, College of Mount Saint Vincent, 1980 (Summa cum laude) FIRST JOB: AT&T Operations Supervisor – Network Operations division. Hired into the AT&T Management Development Program at AT&T Long Lines. WHAT I’M READING: The Speed of Trust, by Stephen M. R. Covey MY PHILOSOPHY: Education – it’s the platform and key to professional success. FAMILY: Husband Ron, Daughter Lauren, Son John. INTERESTS: Running, golf, pilates. FAVORITE CHARITies: Rutgers University Future Scholars Program COMPANY: AT&T HEADQUARTERS: Dallas, Texas WEB SITE: www.att.com BUSINESS: Communications. ANNUAL REVENUES: $123 billion EMPLOYEES: 276,280

“I find it’s very important to develop and maintain collaborative leadership approaches with teams and colleagues.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Gaye Adams Massey UnitedHealth Group

TITLE: Senior Deputy General Counsel EDUCATION: BA, Wellesley College; JD, Harvard Law School FIRST JOB: Special Assistant to the President, Marian Wright Edelman; Children’s Defense Fund WHAT I’M READING: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot MY PHILOSOPHY: Of those to whom much is given, much is required. FAMILY: Husband, Harold; and three children: Amina, Kamau & Nyah. INTERESTS: Traveling, reading and history – but mostly traveling. FAVORITE CHARITies: Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and the United Movement to End Child Soldiering COMPANY: UnitedHealth Group HEADQUARTERS: Minnetonka, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.unitedhealthgroup.com BUSINESS: Diversified health and well-being company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $87.1 billion (2009) EMPLOYEES: 75,000

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here are many ways to define success in the way you live and work. An important piece of career advice is to be true to yourself and live your values. It’s not always easy, but it’s important to create your own definition of success and build a career that meets your own priorities. There are always challenges in every successful career. Among my biggest challenges were developing my own leadership style and learning to embrace mistakes and failures as valuable learning opportunities. Finding my own path was challenging at times, which is why the mentors in my life were so important. Throughout my career, I’ve benefited from the guidance of mentors who gave me candid feedback and helped me find opportunities to demonstrate my abilities. My parents were my first (and best) mentors, and I was fortunate to have other people who took an interest in my development. Having engaged and influential mentors made a tremendous difference for me, so I always look for opportunities to share what I’ve learned and to help guide others. I have always followed a few simple rules that my parents empha-

“…Do your best, make time for family and always give back.” 118

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sized: do your best, make time for family and always give back. My first professional job was with the Children’s Defense Fund, which works to protect the interests of some of our most vulnerable citizens – children. I was privileged to be part of a work environment where everyone was passionate and committed to the mission, and where an inspiring leader shaped that culture. It was the first time I saw what a difference engaged and passionate people can make. In every role I’ve taken since, it’s been important that I can engage fully in the work and that I have the opportunity for community service. In my current position, one of the things I’m proudest of is the UnitedHealth Group Pro Bono Program, which I helped establish to create opportunities for our lawyers to use their legal skills to help lowincome individuals and nonprofit organizations in need of legal counsel. During 2009, our lawyers provided more than 1,300 hours of pro bono legal services in their communities. So I would say that one key to success is pursuing a career that engages your passions and helps you live your values. Being engaged and excited about your work will help give you the drive to make a real difference in the ways that are important to you.


att.jobs

Talented. Dedicated. Diverse. Our people are the core of what we do. Why do diversity and inclusion play such a big role at AT&T? We make them a priority because we know that innovation and leadership thrive on multiple perspectives. AT&T serves a diverse world. So we seek the best from every background. For more information, go to att.jobs.

Š 2010 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T and the AT&T logo are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property.


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Jeannie Maul CSC

TITLE: Vice President, World Sourcing Capabilities, CSC’s Managed Services Sector EDUCATION: BS, Widener University; Project Management Institute (PMI), University of California, Irvine; ITIL Foundation Certification, EXIN Institute; Six Sigma Green Belt Certification, Juran Institute FIRST JOB: Benefits Representative, Human Resources WHAT I’M READING: Results that Last, by Quint Studer MY PHILOSOPHY: Think “pay it forward” in all we do; at work, at home, at church, etc. FAMILY: Husband John and two adult children, son John and daughter Amanda, living in close proximity. INTERESTS: Horse ownership and equestrian riding, fishing, baking and reading. FAVORITE CHARITies: Habitat for Humanity, and numerous areas for people with disabilities COMPANY: CSC HEADQUARTERS: Falls Church, Virginia WEB SITE: www.csc.com BUSINESS: Information technology (IT) services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $16.1 billion EMPLOYEES: 94,000

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hat legacy do you want to leave? For women and all diverse employees, having a mentor can be the keys to the kingdom for realizing one’s full potential. Mentoring has come for me not only in the form of formal programs with defined goals, but also in informal relationships. I’ve learned a lot since my early years of seeking out a sponsor. But, nothing has proven to be as potent as the power of mentoring, which is why I have become an outspoken advocate for mentoring. My mentors have been individuals whom I admire, respect and most importantly, feel a connection. Men can be some of the best advocates for parity in the workplace and have a keen knack for high impact mentoring. Mentors have taught and advised me on the value of networking, workplace politics, cultural norms and values, etc. It is these relationships that have been the key to successfully navigating and extending my personal career. I establish a mentoring environment as a natural part of my work family to engender trust, respect, mutual success and a good old-fashioned sense of fun. Enterprises today understand more the criticality of women in

the workforce and, significantly, in executive teams. We’re seeing an inevitable increase in the diversity of our population, our markets, and our workforce. Women and women of color in particular, represent the fastest growing segment of college graduates and now constitute 80 percent of the country’s consumer purchasing decisions. The result of mentoring has far-reaching impact on accelerating the advancement of careers. Don’t wait for someone to come to you to design a formal mentor program. Look inside and outside of your organization group and pick someone you connect with and get started. I have been extremely fortunate to have worked with talented individuals through formal and informal mentoring that have taught me the value of integrity, collaboration, tenacity, challenging the status quo and most importantly to have fun. I strive to be a mentor who can inspire all employees to never set limits in their career goals. Mentoring programs are core to accelerating workplace diversity and career advancement. Make a personal commitment to mentor. Paying it forward will touch the lives of others and your positive influence will be your legacy.

“…Having a mentor can be the keys to the kingdom for realizing one’s full potential.” 120

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September/October 2010


FOSTERING A DIVERSE AND

INCLUSIVE

CULTURE

JEANNIE MAUL: A WOMAN WORTH WATCHING We salute Jeannie Maul, VP, World Sourcing Capabilities, selected by the Diversity Journal for “Women Worth Watching” in 2011.

At CSC, we believe that diversity empowers creativity and fosters collaboration, openness and innovation. It brings together unique perspectives, fresh ways of thinking and new insights for solving our clients’ most intractable IT challenges.


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Jeanette McCarty Ryder System, Inc.

TITLE: Vice President of Maintenance Operations and Engineering EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree in accounting, with a minor in computers, Monmouth College, New Jersey FIRST JOB: Office Manager – CPA II Financial Services WHAT I’M READING: Anything I can find about technology in my industry MY PHILOSOPHY: Allow yourself to be a woman. Don’t be afraid to excel and to be heard. FAMILY: Husband of 22 years, Eugene; 21-year-old son Eugenio; 10-year-old son Robert; and 7-year-old daughter Jacquelyn. INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, coaching my kids’ sports teams, watching movies. FAVORITE CHARITies: Make-A-Wish Foundation COMPANY: Ryder System, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Miami, Florida WEB SITE: www.ryder.com BUSINESS: Commercial transportation and supply chain management solutions. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 23,000

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’ve been blessed with mentors throughout my career, most notably my parents. My mother, who was widowed at 40 with no previous career, began a business and ran it successfully for 20 years and put her three children through college. My father, who was a trained mechanic, decided to pursue accounting and went back to college in his late 30s. He worked hard and climbed the ranks at the company where he was employed. In fact, my father was instrumental in shaping my career interests. As the first-born and only daughter, I was exposed to maintenance at an early age. My father wanted me to be self-reliant and taught me many things, such as how to do oil changes and tune-ups and the importance of keeping things dependable. When he went back to school, I spent countless hours working with him on budgets and forecasts. Math was my forte and that paved the way to majoring in accounting at college. My career at Ryder has incorporated both my knowledge of maintenance and my knack for numbers.

“…Allow yourself to be a woman. Too often women fail because they try to be one of the guys.” 122

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September/October 2010

I have responsibility for all maintenance operations, training, R&D, engineering, continuous improvement, and our internal technical publications. It hasn’t always been easy being a woman in a male-dominated field. However, I’ve always had wonderful mentors who naturally are mostly men. When I first started at Ryder as a trainee, I was recognized for my ability with computers and asked to train others on using the new advanced systems in our shops. Later, when I became district controller, my boss challenged me to take on other areas of the business, including sales. I learned many aspects of our business and how to relate well to customers. As new opportunities have been presented to me at Ryder, my family and I have had to move several times. I’m very fortunate to have a spouse who has always supported me. My husband, Eugene, has been a key contributor to our success. He has encouraged me to pursue my dreams, while he has been at my side raising our three children. My advice to women wanting to advance is don’t be afraid to excel and be heard. Identify who can help you and learn from them. Also, allow yourself to be a woman. Too often women fail because they try to be one of the guys. Believe in what you have to contribute and be yourself.


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G. Penny McIntyre Newell Rubbermaid

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’ve been in business 30 years and have never had a mentor, or so I thought. I’ve never had a formal relationship with someone selected for me or by me with specific goals and routines. But does that mean I’ve never been mentored? Absolutely not. If you think about who a mentor could be – teacher, coach, champion, sponsor, trusted counselor or guide – I’ve had the benefit of a mentor throughout my career. Most often, it has been my boss. I’ve been fortunate to work for people I respect, who are respected in the company and industry and who have an innate ability to pass along wisdom. I’ve trusted their guidance and been able to openly discuss issues and opportunities without fear of untoward consequences. One of the most important impacts mentors have made on my career is encouraging me to take risks and follow my curiosity. I’ve spent much of my career in International and had unique experiences that positively impacted my career progression. I wouldn’t have been successful without my mentor helping me understand the new cultures, business situations and challenges. I’ve been a formal and informal mentor many times. At one point, I had 11 mentees. This didn’t work out well. It was impossible to form the understanding and trust critical to strong relationships. How could I

offer new perspectives, counsel, support and encouragement when I didn’t have time to get to know the person? It was less about mutual respect and more about matching schedules. From this, I learned what it takes to be a good mentor. It’s an art and a science. The science is fairly simple: set goals and boundaries, provide structure and visibility and insist on trust and confidence. The art is more nuanced. Finding someone you believe in, who believes in you, who shares common goals and is open and motivating can be difficult. The best relationships are reciprocal; that is, both people grow and flourish. Finding this isn’t done through a questionnaire. It’s through discussions, meeting a variety of people, being clear on what you are looking for and being open to someone who may not be the traditional role model.

TITLE: Group President – Office Products, Newell Rubbermaid EDUCATION: University of Western Ontario FIRST JOB: Bank Teller at the Royal Bank of Canada WHAT I’M READING: The New Yorker magazine MY PHILOSOPHY: You aren’t remembered by what you did for yourself, you are remembered by what you have done for others. FAMILY: Lives in Atlanta with husband Peter McKenney, daughter Sarah Austin, and son Jonathon. INTERESTS: Reading, fitness, travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way, Atlanta International School COMPANY: Newell Rubbermaid HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia WEB SITE: www.newellrubbermaid.com BUSINESS: Global marketer of consumer and commercial products. ANNUAL REVENUES: $5.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 19,500

Is it wise to simply trust in having a mentoring boss? No. A more deliberate approach is more predictive of success. With a mentor by your side, your journey is much richer and more fun. With that said, don’t overlook the most accessible mentor you can have – your boss.

“…Set goals and boundaries, provide structure and visibility and insist on trust and confidence.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Judy M. McNamara Ecolab

TITLE: Vice President of Tax EDUCATION: BS, Accounting, Michigan State University; JD, University of Michigan FIRST JOB: Associate lawyer, McBride, Baker and Coles, Chicago WHAT I’M READING: Of Human Bondage, by Somerset Maugham MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is short and it needs to be enjoyed. FAMILY: Single; brothers, sisters and parents. INTERESTS: Golf; canine agility training with Krissy, a Sheltie; travel and art history. FAVORITE CHARITies: Poverty and Social Reform Institute, Detroit, Michigan COMPANY: Ecolab HEADQUARTERS: St. Paul, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.ecolab.com BUSINESS: Ecolab is the global leader in cleaning, sanitizing, food safety and infection prevention products and services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 26,000

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y field in the tax industry is technical and specialized. Early in my career, I focused on developing technical expertise, exposing myself to different areas and different people, and learning new things. That’s what I suggest to people early in their careers. Be open and give yourself opportunities to accelerate your technical knowledge. Then, when you have a good technical foundation, explore areas that you love. Early in my career, I was exposed to a lot of different taxation issues. After I was exposed to international taxation, I never looked back. Building the technical foundation first was important, though. It enabled me to interact with my global tax peers, to understand and appreciate the different approaches they brought to taxation. I also tell young people once you find the area you love, enjoy it. Enjoy it for the fantastic new things that happen in your daily work and make the most of it. I’ve moved around quite a bit. Along the way, I’ve built a network of former bosses and peers that have supported me in so many ways.

They’ve helped me find new opportunities and good people to hire. I was given some advice that I now give to young staff members, especially in tax where problems are complex, much is at stake and discussions can get emotional. Let’s find a way to turn the volume down and resolve the issue by drawing on the consensus and relationships we’ve built. With the volume turned down, people think more clearly. They can slow down, work the problem and negotiate more successfully. I’ve had two influential mentors, one inside and one outside of work. I’ve learned many similar things from both, so maybe that means being at work is as much about being human as being outside of work. My mentors brought out the best in me. So now I try to bring out the best in my staff and teach them to bring out the best in their people. My outside mentor once said, “You work so hard to overcome weaknesses. Yet you have all these strengths. Why not enjoy them?” That’s when I discovered how much easier work is when you go with your strengths. So get out there, do what you’re good at and enjoy it.

“…Find the area you love, enjoy it. Enjoy it for the fantastic new things that happen in your daily work and make the most of it.” 124

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Arpana S. Mehra ACS, A Xerox Company

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entoring is all about strengthening the weakness and trusting the strengths of an individual. Mentors work in partnership and lead by example. Although I have had many mentors in different spheres, my father has taught me the most; to work hard and never look back has been his guru mantras. My mother has stood by me through thick and thin. The support from my family has motivated me to move forward. When I began my career 14 years ago with a start-up, the main lesson was to connect and I have carried that with me to this day. The more we connect, the more we find solutions and arrive at win-win situations. When I look back, the knowledge gained has been tremendous and rewarding. It comes full circle. What is gained is what you give so don’t keep it to yourself. Hardships are bound to follow, so don’t give up or else you will not mature. Moving up in the ladder has had its own set of challenges.

A woman in a crowd of men will not be taken seriously. It becomes all the more important to keep a positive attitude and remain focused, which I have done. This has helped me to achieve my goals and move on while learning valuable lessons along the way. Much of my current role in ACS is as a strategic advisor working to educate the senior management about cultural differences as I take on an international role. It’s a very fulfilling job that allows me to travel to different countries. Family support is a key ingredient to this success and I have been fortunate to be blessed with a very supporting family.

TITLE: Vice President Human Resources-APAC EDUCATION: Master’s in Human Resource Management & Industrial Relations from Lucknow University, India FIRST JOB: AlFalah Group of Companies, India WHAT I’M READING: The Leader Who Had No Title, by Robin Sharma MY PHILOSOPHY: We are born to live. FAMILY: My Husband Ratnesh and two daughters, Ridhi 8 yrs and Anushka 2 yrs. INTERESTS: Home interiors, coaching and shopping. FAVORITE CHARITies: Local NGOs in India COMPANY: ACS, A Xerox Company HEADQUARTERS: Dallas, Texas WEB SITE: www.acs-inc.com BUSINESS: Business process outsourcing and information technology services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $ 6.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 75,000

My advice to young women is to find the right mentor and trust the guidance, gain knowledge and share what you have gained. It is a very fruitful experience to be a mentor as mentoring expedites the innovation process and learning curve for our current talent and the next generation.

“Hardships are bound to follow, so don’t give up or else you will not mature.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Investing for the long term is important.

That’s why we need the right assets. At Vanguard, we invest for the long term—in the markets and in our talented employees, whose unique contributions energize our work. That is why we continue to be strong, and why we’re committed to providing opportunities for leaders like you.

Connect with Vanguard > www.vanguard.com/careers ®

Vanguard is an Equal Opportunity Employer. © 2009 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Patricia Milligan, Mercer • Sandra (Sandy) Miller, WellPoint • Eileen Moore, Harrah’s Entertainment • Marilyn Nagel, Cisco • Melissa Nassar, Vanguard Alison H. Micucci, New York Life Investments • Brenda J. Mullins, Aflac • Lorraine Mitchelmore, Royal Dutch Shell • Connia Nelson, Verizon • M. Catherine Morris, Arrow Electronics ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

annual

in 2011


women worth watching in 2 0 1 1

DeAnnaH.Allen Alison Micucci Dickstein New York Shapiro Life Investments LLP.

Head ofManaging Primary Director, Advisor Services TITLE: Senior Head of Guaranteed Products division EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree (accounting), University of St. Thomas; BA, Economics & Political EDUCATION: Master’s University degree (taxation), University–of Science, of Massachusetts MinnesotaJD, – Carlson of Amherst; WesternSchool New England Management College School of Law Waitress farm at Bridgeman’s FIRST JOB: Tobacco worker during high school summers WHAT I’M READING: Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortenson April 1865, WHAT I’M READING: by Jay Winik MY PHILOSOPHY: Open mind, open skiesPHILOSOPHY: – always focus on the hard; positives. MY Work always act with integrity; hold yourself to high FAMILY: Husband, Bill; sons Jon and performance standards; count your Tom; my parents; seven siblings. blessings. INTERESTS: Family, golf, basketball, FAMILY: Husband, Mark; and our travel, music and theater. 12-year-old son, Matthew. FAVORITE CHARITies: Greater INTERESTS: My family, sports, skiing, Minneapolis Crisis Nursery; The Morton piano, travel, logic and word puzzles. Cure Paralysis Fund (MCPF) FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way, Coalition for the Homeless, and our COMPANY: RBC U.S. Wealth church Management HEADQUARTERS: Minneapolis, COMPANY: New York Life Investments Minnesota is a wholly-owned subsidiary of New WEB Life SITE: www.rbcwm-usa.com York Insurance Company BUSINESS: Financial New Services: HEADQUARTERS: YorkProviding City investment advice, exceptional service WEB SITE: www.nylim.com and an unbiased, independent perspective to clients toAsset help them achieve their BUSINESS: management. financial goals. ANNUAL REVENUES: $1 billion ANNUAL REVENUES: 1.2 billion in 2009 EMPLOYEES: 1,300 EMPLOYEES: 4,900

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eflecting started my back career on my workcareer ing as an path enforcement reminds me of all thefor attorney peaks, the SEC. valleys, and curves When I took I have the job, experienced I turned over the years down an offer whichwith havea led private to where firm at I am today higher payininthe myworld originally of IT.chosen Much of mysocareer field that Ihas could been work spent in in New heavily male-populated York City. By takingindustries, this risk and which includesonIT. taking immediate I discovered responsibility early on, however for managing not early enforcement enough, that cases, Ibuilding discovered a community that I reallyofenjoyed colleagues who would securities law. provide Each subsequent guidance, supjob port, and change haslaughs meantwas leaving very important. a comfortThroughout zone for a broader opportunity my career, there have and increased responsibility. been many people who have This helped ultimately brought me to New me get to where I am today andYork Life Investments, eventually still help me as mywhere careerI continues. expanded role into the head of I selectivelymycultivate relationships legal and compliance. with other professionals, both men andInwomen, lookingand backtogether on the we pastserve 20 as trusted confidants years of myadvisors career, and I have followedfor each other. In addition being my some common guiding to principles friends and treasured they that have directed mecolleagues, on my career have been, stillI offer are, my path. Fromand these, thementors. followingIn advice: my opinion, mentoring does notKnow need to yourself. be formal, Think withabout an experienced your goals proand whounderstand is going tothe share the hidden secrets demands involved to climbing to achieve thethem oh-soslippery and be willing and able to make the corporatethat sacrifices ladder. mayTobeme, necessary. co-mentorAs a ing is themom, working term that I continuously best describes need how I view mentoring. I see it as an informal relationship that develops

organically builtforth on abetween founto prioritizeand backis and dationand of mutual work family. trust and respect. Additionally, have benefited from Never stopI learning. Approach mentoring experiences at many levels your job with a high level of inteland believe that trusting somebody lectual curiosity. Don’t just learn the and building a positive details, but also seek to relationship understand does not have to only be somehow your role fits into thewith bigger one at a higher level than myself, picture. but could also be with my peers and Work hard. Shortcuts will only those junior to me. It is because work in the short term. While there of these experiences that today I may be exceptions out there for the find myself serving as a mentor for fortunate few, I am a true believer that both my direct reports and several there is no success without hard work. colleagues at CA. Challenges and Set high personal opportunities come inperformance many forms. standards and always meet In our careers, as in life,strive theretowill be them. This is true evenlearned if you feel roadblocks, but I have that your work is under-appreciated through strong support from theor that you’re underpaid. Consistently networks you create, you can achieve holding yourself to a higher standard success. will help you establish yourself as I feel fortunate to be working at someone who can be counted on to a company like CA that has many produce high quality work. females serving in top leadership AlwaysThere act with integrity. positions. is truly a strong Incorporate ethics into each of sense of camaraderie among theyour decisions, it becomes women at until CA and I know Ihabit. can It will notononly you sleep count my help colleagues whenat Inight, need but an ethical decision will always them most. Additionally, CA has be theestablished right long-term decision, even an partnership with theif it seems difficult in the term. Anita Borg Institute for short Women in Technology, a preeminent Take some risk. There’sorganizasometion dedicated positively impactthing to be saidtofor being comforting IT.but Thisitorganization ablewomen in yourinjob, can impede

“If you are truly growth and promotion opportuniand is to notbe likely to be satisfying looking to move ahead, “…mentoring does nottiesneed formal, in the long run. If you are truly don’t for with settle an experienced pro who is going to settle looking to move ahead, don’t for secrets…” comfortable. comfortable.” share the hidden

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Sandra (Sandy) Miller WellPoint, Inc.

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y career is rooted in my need for variety. However, the same is not true in my personal life, where I will soon celebrate 40 years of marriage to my high school sweetheart.

WellPoint, transitioning from a staff role to an operations position as president of the Federal Government Solutions business unit. The change has been energizing and has allowed me to learn something new every day.

Throughout my career, there have been many people who have helped me get to where I am today and still help me as my career continues. I selectively cultivate relationships with other professionals, both men and women, and together we serve as trusted advisors and confidants for each other.

My career advice to others is to take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way. Volunteer to take on a new assignment, even if you don’t know much about it. Build your network of colleagues and ask for feedback. Once you receive feedback, listen to it and act upon it. Be yourself, and learn from the best and worst of others as you observe them. Work hard. Keep every single commitment that you make. If you do this, you will build enormous credibility among others and become known as a reliable person. Be a problem solver. Learn how to influence others. Have confidence and be positive. You will have to take some risk in your careers, but often it will generate a significant return.

My career began as a high school English teacher. I loved teaching, but after seven years I realized that I could not teach the same literature and grammar lessons for the next several decades. While looking for something different to do, I ended up going to law school. I taught English during the day and attended classes at night for the next four-and-a-half years. After law school, I obtained my first legal job clerking for an Indiana Supreme Court judge. Two years later, I began working in the legal department of a relatively small health insurance company that would eventually become WellPoint. In my 25 years at WellPoint, I have never had to seek variety because it has always come looking for me and I have thrived. About two-and-a-half years ago I made a major career change within

TITLE: Senior Vice President of Wellpoint; President of Federal Government Solutions EDUCATION: JD, Indiana University School of Law; BA, and MA, Indiana State University FIRST JOB: Babysitting at age 11 WHAT I’M READING: Innocent, by Scott Turow; Game Change, by John Heilemann MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard and help others succeed. FAMILY: Husband, Bernie; daughter Paige and son-in law Jon; son Blake, grandson Mason (age 2); Jake, the 120-pound Newfoundland; and a large extended family. INTERESTS: Reading, especially at the beach, travel, volunteering, cooking, gardening, learning new things. FAVORITE CHARITies: Susan G. Komen for the Cure COMPANY: WellPoint, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Indianapolis, Indiana WEB SITE: www.wellpoint.com BUSINESS: Health benefits. ANNUAL REVENUES: $65 billion EMPLOYEES: 39,000

What I enjoy most at this stage in my career is helping other people become more successful. Mentoring is an obligation and not just a nice thing to do.

“My career advice to others is take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Patricia Milligan Mercer

TITLE: President, Human Capital EDUCATION: BA, Georgetown University; MBA, Northwestern University FIRST JOB: Consultant at Hewitt WHAT I’M READING: The American Future, by Simon Schama MY PHILOSOPHY: Always seek out the good in other women. Take the time to boost another women’s self confidence and self esteem – it will come back to you over and over again. FAMILY: Married, two sons. INTERESTS: Gourmet cooking. FAVORITE CHARITies: Vital Voices – A global NGO that identifies, trains and empowers emerging women leaders around the globe COMPANY: Mercer (a Marsh & McLennan Company) HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.mercer.com BUSINESS: A leading global provider of consulting, outsourcing and investment services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.3 billion (MMC – $10 billion) EMPLOYEES: 18,900 (MMC – 50,000)

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f someone had asked me 25 years ago what I wanted to be remembered for professionally, I would have responded like every other graduate: to make a difference in the world. Looking back, I probably didn’t understand what that meant. Twenty-five years later, I’d like to think I do. On my way to a successful career in consulting, I’ve had the opportunity to mentor young women and men looking for their own paths and to make a tangible difference in their lives. In following the example my mentors set for me, my professional and personal life has also been greatly enriched. A good consultant is an educator, mentor and team builder. We listen. We are sensitive to the human dynamic and know how to work with very diverse groups of people to achieve common goals. I realized early in my career that a successful consultant employs these skills both with colleagues at their own firm and with the clients who engage them. Consultants can make the best suggestions in the world, but if clients aren’t engaged enough to execute them, we have wasted their time and money. Teambuilding,

mutual respect and a willingness to listen are essential. Solutions are only realized when ownership is shared and everyone takes pride in success. In my 30s I became the first female board member of the consultancy I was with. At that firm, my mentors, including Frank Loewald and Margaret Regan, provided me with opportunities and ensured that I was judged for my skills and abilities and never pigeonholed. I can vividly recall the first time Frank told me I would lead a major client assignment. I can also remember Margaret’s open door and the steady guidance she provided. Those relationships impressed upon me the importance of nurturing the careers of others while your own progresses at the same time. As the mother of two sons, the divide between work and home has always been a bit blurry when it comes to providing support and guidance. It’s sometimes hard to tell from which side of the work/ life divide that I’ve gained the most knowledge. I feel fortunate to have learned how the simple acts of listening and demonstrating confidence in a person can make a meaningful difference in their life and your own.

“In following the example my mentors set for me, my professional and personal life has also been greatly enriched.” 130

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September/October 2010


OUR COMPANY

>

THE SUM OF ITS PARTS

BE WHO YOU ARE. CREATE WHO WE’LL BE. UnitedHealth Group is working to create the health care system of tomorrow. One that will work better for more people in more ways than ever. A goal of this magnitude requires transformative ideas from a collective of diverse talent. At UnitedHealth Group, our commitment to diversity is clearly visible in the high-performing people we hire, in the health care services we provide, and in our dedication to social responsibility. We support and applaud the efforts of those who work to promote fairness, equality and opportunity. Uniting our individual efforts and abilities toward our common goal, we’re making a difference. Learn more about us at unitedhealthgroup.com

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V. UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment. © 2009 UnitedHealth Group. All rights reserved.


women worth watching in 2 0 1 1

Lorraine Mitchelmore Royal Dutch Shell

TITLE: President, Shell Canada Limited; Canada Country Chair and Vice President Onshore Gas Exploration and Appraisal EDUCATION: B.Sc., MSc (Geophysics), MBA FIRST JOB: Babysitting WHAT I’M READING: A Soldier First, by Rick Hillier MY PHILOSOPHY: Be true to your values and principles; focus on your strengths and be aware of your weaknesses; most of all have fun, life is a great journey. FAMILY: Husband, two daughters (5 and 9 years). INTERESTS: Skiing, camping, and general fitness. FAVORITE CHARITies: Mustard Seed and Food Bank COMPANY: Royal Dutch Shell HEADQUARTERS: The Hague, the Netherlands WEB SITE: www.shell.com BUSINESS: Global group of energy and petrochemical companies. ANNUAL REVENUES: $278.2 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 101,000

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omen wear many hats, both in their careers and in their lives. In my current role at Shell, I concentrate on motivating employees, influencing and driving organizational culture and serving as the public face for a global company in a specific country. Helping people feel empowered while helping Shell meet its business goals is an exciting job. Influencing broader energy and environmental strategies through the exploration of resources essential to sustain our lives is also part of my job. A number of significant events put me on the path to executive leadership. After 10 years as a geophysicist working on projects around the world, I realized I wanted to make a bigger impact. Opportunities that allowed me to expand my horizons globally presented themselves and allowed me to have an impact on the future exploration strategy. Later, I took another new direction when I decided to get my MBA. I found that business was my passion and when I joined Shell Canada, I also found a company that matched my values and principles. The working environment and my past experiences brought out the leader in me.

I have had many obstacles in my career, but I look back on them as my best learning experiences. It is not easy being a woman in a world where you are usually a minority. Never lose sight of who you are and you will always prevail. Having children, as I have, can present significant challenges, but there are ways to make it work. I wouldn’t be a happy mom if I didn’t have a rewarding job outside the home. So, I’m strategic in how I use my time and engage my colleagues. I take all holidays and book family events into my calendar. I sometimes incorporate my family into my work, such as business trips. I often work from home and maximize the use of technology to balance the mom hat and the career hat. You don’t have to be superhuman because there are many people willing to help. Many people have given me valuable advice or were simply good friends when I needed support and encouragement. Some of the best advice has been: keep your feet on the ground and your eye on the horizon while considering long-term goals; find the part of your role you love and you’ll excel in it; and be yourself and have fun.

“I have had many obstacles in my career, but I look back on them as my best learning experiences.” 132

Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010


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Eileen Moore Harrah’s Entertainment, Inc.

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feel very fortunate to have taken a diverse career path that has brought me to where I am today. Each choice has afforded me vibrant experiences and complex challenges that prepared me to run a large and dynamic 24-hour operation. For 11 years I have worked with Harrah’s Entertainment, Inc. and have blossomed as a professional in part because of its merit-based philosophy where individuals who introduce the best ideas and produce solid results are openly rewarded and recognized, no matter their level in the organization. This has allowed employees, including myself, to move up the ranks in a relatively short amount of time. When climbing the corporate ladder, I made a point to be very flexible in terms of relocating for lateral/ upward opportunities. I have worked in both our corporate offices and at several properties, allowing me to network company-wide and learn from the best. Additionally, I actively sought out new responsibilities, volunteered for extra projects and never turned down assignments. Knowing higher-level positions require varied experience, I looked for opportunities across different functional lines

to increase my knowledge base and value within the company. Seven years ago I decided that I could do even more to improve. At the time I worked directly with Harrah’s CEO, Gary Loveman, and wanted to return to school to obtain my MBA. I met with him and pitched the benefits Harrah’s would obtain if they sponsored my continued education. While it was a particularly easy sell, given the fact he is a former business school professor, it took considerable courage and self-awareness to know what I needed in order to grow and to contribute to the company at a higher level. While it was difficult to balance work and school, the real test for life balance began in 2006 when I had my son. At that point I had to determine what was best for our family and my career. I sought a position that did not involve significant travel in order to be the best employee, wife and mother. Within a year, I returned to property operations and it has been a perfect fit.

TITLE: Senior Vice President and General Manager EDUCATION: BS, Hotel Management, Cornell University; Executive MBA, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University FIRST JOB: Pharmacist’s assistant WHAT I’M READING: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, by Thomas S. Kuhn MY PHILOSOPHY: It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. FAMILY: Married to Edward Moore and have a four year old son named Eddie. INTERESTS: Traveling, visiting the spa, golf, arts, gourmet food and wine. FAVORITE CHARITies: Horseshoe Foundation, Habitat for Humanity and Blessings in a Backpack COMPANY: Harrah’s Entertainment, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Las Vegas, Nevada WEB SITE: www.harrahs.com BUSINESS: Horseshoe Southern Indiana Casino and Hotel. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.9 billion Harrah’s; $290 million Horseshoe Southern Indiana EMPLOYEES: Harrah’s employs 70,000 with 1,700 of those employees located at the Horseshoe Southern Indiana

Continuous improvement and self-reflection are key contributors to success. By keeping myself open to new challenges and opportunities at Harrah’s Entertainment, I’ve been able to find success in business and life.

“Continuous improvement and self-reflection are key contributors to success.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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M. Catherine Morris Arrow Electronics, Inc.

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer EDUCATION: Colorado State University (BA, Finance); Harvard Business School’s General Management Program FIRST JOB: Office assistant WHAT I’M READING: Blue Ocean Strategy, by W. Chan Kim MY PHILOSOPHY: There is something to be learned in every situation. FAMILY: Married with four grandchildren. INTERESTS: Competitive horseback riding, golf. FAVORITE CHARITies: ASPCA – American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals COMPANY: Arrow Electronics, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Melville, New York WEB SITE: www.arrow.com BUSINESS: Global technology provider. ANNUAL REVENUES: $14.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 11,300

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y road to the C-suite in a Fortune 200 company was a combination of a defined plan, excellent mentors, timely advice and the ability to adapt to the opportunities and challenges that presented themselves. Early in my career, I identified the core competencies of leaders I admired. These competences included technical and interpersonal skills as well as embracing diversity and international experiences. The more experiences, the more effective the executive. I counseled with mentors on my shortcomings and pursued each next step in my career to round out my skill set. The route did not evolve as originally planned, but when taken off the path, I always remained focused on how each opportunity could be used to gain the experiences I needed for the end game. With each career move, it was important to be able to see the effort and work come to fruition so it could truly be a learning experience and, most importantly, to reflect on what was successful and what should have been done differently. Rounding out my skills did not always mean a promotion to the next level. With my eye on the end

game, I often made lateral moves to achieve the portfolio of skills that I have today. The path I took to a senior executive-level position started with my first goal to become a vice president. To get to my first vice president level title, I consciously sought out positions in each functional area that the vice president oversaw. Just as important was using my manager, mentors and 360-degree feedback mechanisms to develop leadership skills. This approach worked well, so I deployed the same strategy to get my first operating president role. This entailed pursuing lateral roles in areas in which I had no direct experience and included special assignments that gave me international exposure. This skills portfolio approach worked well again as I was named chief strategy officer for Arrow. The path to success will take many turns. The most effective way to navigate them is to be prepared with a diverse set of applicable experiences and always keep the end game in mind. This results in effective decision-makers that can lead with confidence.

“With my eye on the end game, I often made lateral moves to achieve the portfolio of skills that I have today.” 134

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Brenda J. Mullins Aflac

TITLE: Chief Diversity Officer EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree in human resources management from Troy University and an Associate of Science degree in liberal arts from Columbus State University FIRST JOB: License specialist at Aflac WHAT I’M READING: Their Eyes are Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston MY PHILOSOPHY: Treat people how they want to be treated. FAMILY: Family is very important to me. I live with my husband Edward and have three wonderful children: Tamara, John and Corey. I am also blessed with a son-inlaw, Greg, and a beautiful grandson, Bryce. INTERESTS: I enjoy spending time with my family and volunteering with my Church. FAVORITE CHARITies: GoodWill Industries International, Inc., and Big Brothers Big Sisters of America COMPANY: Aflac HEADQUARTERS: Columbus, Georgia WEB SITE: www.aflac.com BUSINESS: Guaranteed-Renewable health and life insurance company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $18.3 billion EMPLOYEES: Over 4,400 employees

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arly in my career I realized something that would shape the way I view life and those around me. This realization was the importance of establishing a network of supportive individuals. I began my career at Aflac as a license specialist and immediately saw an opportunity to grow. This opportunity, coupled with the encouragement and support from others, enabled me to scale the corporate ladder to my current role as chief diversity officer. My career was not the only area of my life that required support. As a single parent of two children, I decided to return to school, a decision that brought both major obstacles and significant rewards. If not for the support of friends, family and co-workers, I wouldn’t have survived this time in my life. In the end, the sacrifice led to a bachelor’s degree with honors. I now share my story with other women and share a few tips for success, which are build a strong network of professional and personal relationships, determine what’s most

important in your life and ask for feedback and direction. It is often difficult to ask for help from others. We fear that we may be judged for our weaknesses. Believing this thought, however, will only hinder our success. We must understand that there are people who are willing to help and want to see us succeed. We simply must find them, foster relationships with them and then confide in them. Relationships are the core of success; one cannot survive alone. As women, it is natural for us to bond with other women. We have an innate connection with one another. We must use this connection to develop relationships with leaders who can help guide us through our obstacles and celebrate achievements with us in our careers. The key to my success is my strong network of supportive individuals who are friends, family members and co-workers. My advice is to find individuals who will support and guide you and continue the cycle by assisting those who are brave enough to ask for help.

“The key to my success is my strong network of supportive individuals who are friends, family members and co-workers.” 136

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September/October 2010


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Marilyn Nagel Cisco

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our career can be a dynamic journey that is always evolving and morphing. But I have found that women often feel typecast into a particular role or specialty. During my career of nearly 40 years, I have learned that opportunities are borderless once you realize your skills are transferable and that investing in a professional network can be invaluable as you look to advance. My career has historically been focused on learning and development, so when I accepted the position as Cisco’s first chief diversity officer, I was not surprised that it was met with some skepticism. I needed to build my credibility across the company and demonstrate that the expertise I had accumulated in the field of learning and development, with a focus on leadership development, was in fact transferable to this role. I found that my master’s degree in social and systemic studies had prepared me well to lead the large-scale change management that this position required. The communication, learning and development skills that I had acquired during my tenure in IT prepared me to succeed in a complex,

fast paced, high-tech environment.

TITLE: Chief Diversity Officer

I learned the hard way the importance of building a wide network of people, beyond my immediate peers, who would support my career development. At a previous job, I had been tapped to be the successor to my vice president; however, when that vice president left, I found that many of my future colleagues were only moderately aware of my accomplishments.

EDUCATION: BA, Adelphi University – major Art, minor Education; MPA, Long Island University – Organizational Development; DPA, Nova Southeastern University – all but dissertation; MS, Nova Southeastern University – Master’s in Social and Systemic Studies

Unfortunately, I was passed over for that promotion because the other vice presidents did not know me personally and had limited exposure to what I could bring to the position. From that point on, I have made it a point to engage with people in other teams and other departments in order to build a professional network. I learned that it’s not only important to deliver results or be a strong leader, but equally important to build credibility and relationships with a wide variety of people who will support you as you strive to achieve your aspirations across the enterprise. I also recognized that while this supports my professional growth, it is just as critical to achieving results that will be sustainable for any enterprise-wide programs.

FIRST JOB: Mayor’s office of neighborhood government, NYC WHAT I’M READING: Who’s Got Your Back, by Keith Ferrazzi MY PHILOSOPHY: Life works so what you may initially see as a setback or problem in the long view probably serves you in some way. FAMILY: Married, 2 grown children who each have 2 children (4 grandchildren). INTERESTS: Hiking, theater, reading, jogging, listening to my husband’s band/music and being with family. FAVORITE CHARITies: March of Dimes, Family and Children Services COMPANY: Cisco HEADQUARTERS: San Jose, California WEB SITE: www.cisco.com BUSINESS: Networking. ANNUAL REVENUES: $40 billion EMPLOYEES: 70,714

“...Opportunities are borderless once you realize your skills are transferable and that investing in a professional network can be invaluable as you look to advance.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Melissa Nassar Vanguard

TITLE: Principal and head of strategic integration for Vanguard Financial Advisor Services™ EDUCATION: BA, LaSalle University; pursuing MBA at St. Joseph’s University FIRST JOB: Lifeguard. Did it for years! WHAT I’M READING: The Big Short, by Michael Lewis; The Red Tent: A Novel, by Anita Diamant MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is very short so fill each day with passion and fun, and try your best to give back more than you take. FAMILY: Very important to me. I have to balance 6 siblings, 20 nieces and nephews, loving parents, and a partner! INTERESTS: Cooking, wine tasting, playing racquetball, rowing, traveling, architecture & design. FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way and Chester County Futures COMPANY: Vanguard HEADQUARTERS: Malvern, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.vanguard.com BUSINESS: Financial services. EMPLOYEES: 12,500

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t’s always interesting to pause for a time and reflect back on how you came to be where you are and what values and philosophies you hold true. It’s all so personal and so unique to each person, but I’ve found I’ve learned so much from the experiences of others – sometimes what to emulate and sometimes what not to. So perhaps the tenets I outline here will be helpful to some. This too shall pass. This Persian proverb notes that all conditions, both positive and negative, are temporary. It reminds me that while there may be truly sad moments, disappointments, or elation in life, it’s still important to have perspective and remember that the moment, situation or feeling isn’t permanent. Be present. It’s very hard to strike and maintain the right balance of priorities. The inflection point is different for everyone and changes constantly. One thing that really works for me is to be in the moment at the moment. When I’m working, I’m highly focused on working and when I’m enjoying my friends and family, I’m present with them.

“One thing that really works for me is to be in the moment at the moment.” 138

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September/October 2010

Surround yourself with trusted advisors. I’m very fortunate to be surrounded by some truly amazing people. At work I’ve developed critical relationships across all levels, all parts of our business and with a diverse group of people. This community helps me avoid mistakes, understand the needs of others and provides terrific perspective. Never stop exploring. This is the company motto for The North Face and I love it. It means be open to opportunities, learn continuously, give 100 percent to that to which you commit and strive to reach full potential. I was given opportunities within groups I would have never considered, and I loved them all. Optimism is infectious. The world has endless possibilities and the glass is far more full than it is empty. Getting caught up in negativity or pessimism is draining, so I surround myself with people who are positive, energetic and solution-oriented. Don’t sacrifice your principles. There’s a difference between behaviors and actions and values and principles. I’m very open to adapting my actions and behaviors, but I don’t compromise my moral compass, particularly when it comes to ethics and integrity. Simply, I have to be true to myself and sometimes that requires challenging the firm or your peers in a respectful way.


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Connia Nelson Verizon

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erizon has given me the opportunity to work in a variety of leadership roles, from a first line supervisor in a call center environment to the senior vice president for Human Resources. My career climb has been an interesting journey with several winding turns and a few bumps in the road. Every opportunity and obstacle has provided essential growth and development for which I am extremely grateful. At the start of my career as a front line supervisor, I learned the heart of the business – customer service and the true meaning of putting the customer first. As I moved through the organization, business acumen, customer-focus orientation and a willingness to take on tough assignments served as significant differentiators. There’s nothing better than taking on a huge challenge or accepting a project that no one else wants and turning it into something great. When an undesirable project becomes an envied and valued success, the victory is beyond sweet. I grew up with the concept of all things are possible if you only believe. Believing is only the first step. Digging into the details and confidently exercising the power to influence people and processes will ensure the desired results every time. I’m often asked by early- to midcareer women what are the secrets

to success? The truth is there is no secret. It’s all about performance. In my quest for performance excellence, I learned to live by basic principles. First and foremost, lead with character steeped in core values. Values are important and should never be compromised. I am proud to work for Verizon where our core values are: integrity, respect, accountability and performance excellence. When you are known as someone who operates with integrity and honesty and performs with the highest ethical standards, people trust you. Second, be passionate about what you do. Passion and commitment will drive excellence. When you love it, performance soars to another level. Third, be true to yourself. Know who you are and what you stand for. Finally, invest in the lives of another. Investing in the lives of others provides great return. Just when I think I’m mentoring someone else, I find myself in the midst of a rich experience where I am learning and growing as well.

TITLE: Senior Vice President – Human Resources EDUCATION: MA, Dallas Baptist University; BA, Indiana State University FIRST JOB: Supervisor – Customer Service WHAT I’M READING: The Why of Work, by David and Wendy Ulrich MY PHILOSOPHY: Work is about people. If you connect with and invest in them, positive results will follow. FAMILY: Husband and Daughter. INTERESTS: Music has always been one of my passions. I also enjoy painting and reading. FAVORITE CHARITies: World Vision Child Sponsorship COMPANY: Verizon HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.verizon.com BUSINESS: Broadband, video, and communications provider. ANNUAL REVENUES: $107 billion EMPLOYEES: 217,000

“There’s nothing better than taking on a huge challenge or accepting a project that no one else wants and turning it into something great.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

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z- Pfl Sandry Nuñe

ugerville, TX

We believe in the words “Welcome to McDonald’s®.” We believe that making people glad they’re here is our business. And what goes for our customers goes for our employees. So we work hard to create jobs that satisfy on all levels. That’s why credits earned in our corporate and restaurant training programs can be applied toward 2- and 4-year college degrees. Because we believe that when we say “Welcome to McDonald’s,” that’s exactly what people should feel. Whether they’ve come in for a Happy Meal®. Or to serve one.

mcdonalds.com/careers © 2010 McDonald’s. McDonald’s and McDonald’s independently owned and operated franchises are equal opportunity employers committed to a diverse and inclusive workforce.


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Amy Fliegelman Olli, CA Technologies • Colette Phillips, Colette Phillips Communications • Vivian Polak, Dewey & LeBoeuf • Maureen Phillips, Allianz • Katherine A. Owen, Stryker Joanne Pietrini-Smith, AXA Equitable • Sanita L. Pinchback, Waste Management • Jennifer Yuh Nelson, DreamWorks • Annita Nerses, ITT • Jennifer Pollino, Goodrich ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

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in 2011


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Jennifer Yuh Nelson DreamWorks Animation SKG

TITLE: Director, “Kung Fu Panda 2” EDUCATION: BFA, Illustration, California State University at Long Beach FIRST JOB: Cleanup Artist, Jetlag Productions WHAT I’M READING: Odd Hours, by Dean Koontz MY PHILOSOPHY: There is no room for ego in a collaborative creative environment. People will do their best when they feel safe, appreciated, and inspired. FAMILY: Happily married to my best friend. INTERESTS: Video games, Anime, comic books, action movies. FAVORITE CHARITies: Volunteers of the Burbank Animal Shelter, Red Cross COMPANY: DreamWorks Animation SKG HEADQUARTERS: Glendale, California WEB SITE: www.dreamworksanimation.com BUSINESS: Entertainment – media/television/film/video. ANNUAL REVENUES: $750 million EMPLOYEES: 1,970

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hen people think of a movie director, they likely would not think of someone like me. I don’t chomp cigars, make virtual movie screen shapes with my hands or hang out at hot spots with even hotter celebrities. In fact, very few directors fit such stereotypes. They tend to be unassuming sorts who shuffle around half-asleep from trying to meet their release dates. They are all varied and unique. I for example am a soft-spoken, Korean-American woman who lives a very tame and settled life. But the one thing that binds us all is a love of film. I have been drawing since age three and making movies in my head for almost as long. In fact, drawing for me was a way to express those films when I had no other means of doing so. I had no idea what career could use such a weird skill as drawing movies. But I did it because it brought me joy.

When I was in college years later, a veteran storyboard artist came to talk to my class. He showed us how he drew movies for a living. My mind exploded. And that led to a career in animation. Now I have the pleasure of working among talented and inspiring artists of all kinds. Every day I am grateful for the opportunity to do what I love for a living and learn so much from the remarkable work of others. Recently I had a chance to pass forward what the veteran story artist did for me and speak at a college art class. It was wonderful to see the students’ excitement and passion for the medium and also their relief that they could pursue it in their own unique ways. My advice to them was to pursue what they loved to do. If you do what you love, the rest will follow.

“If you do what you love, the rest will follow.” 142

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Annita Nerses ITT Corporation

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inston Churchill characterized courage as the “first of human qualities because it is the quality that guarantees all others.” My journey to corporate leadership is steeped in the courageous lives of my grandparents, who survived the horrors of genocide and war. Through their epic life stories, they instilled in me the value of setting a purposeful vision and the power of hard work and discipline to succeed despite obstacles. Surviving mass deportations and exile, they had the wisdom to focus on the essential in the midst of uncertainty as their families perished and worlds collapsed around them. Rebuilding their lives with few, if any, material possessions in foreign lands, they continually adapted to make a difference in an ever-changing reality. Throughout these experiences, they maintained the humility to subordinate individual wants for a greater mission, whether that mission was wartime survival, raising a family, or serving their communities and profession. In this way, they modeled the art of leadership, of which courage is the foundation. These inspirational lessons have

guided me through pivotal milestones, such as my decision to leave academia for the corporate world with the goal of someday leading a business. With a background limited to research scientist, I needed to define a trajectory to achieve that goal. I summoned the courage to assume challenges beyond my experience, seeking roles of increasing breadth in engineering, program management and corporate strategy. In 2005, I became general manager, building and leading a team that turned an unprofitable acquisition into a profitable strategic business. This experience led to yet a greater opportunity to support ITT’s CEO as the director of CEO operations. While each new challenge thrust me into uncertainty accompanied at times by fear, I relied on these lessons to accomplish my goals. My advice to young women is to set an inspirational vision and boldly embrace the uncertainty of challenges that advance you toward that vision.

TITLE: Director, CEO Operations EDUCATION: PhD, in Applied Physics; MS, and BS, in Electrical Engineering FIRST JOB: Communications Engineer at ITT Corporation WHAT I’M READING: Losing Mum and Pup, by Christopher Buckley; Against the Gods, by Peter L. Bernstein; weekly editions of The Economist MY PHILOSOPHY: “Courage is rightly esteemed the first of human qualities, because it is the quality that guarantees all others.” – Winston Churchill. FAMILY: I belong to a close-knit family and am grateful that my fiancé and I are once again living near my parents, sisters, and their families. INTERESTS: Playing the piano, hiking, reading, international travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: ITT Watermark, Doctors Without Borders COMPANY: ITT Corporation HEADQUARTERS: White Plains, New York WEB SITE: www.itt.com BUSINESS: Multi-industry engineering and manufacturing. ANNUAL REVENUES: $11 billion EMPLOYEES: 40,000

Remember past lessons, while always looking forward. In doing so, you will inspire yourself and your teams to achieve beyond what you ever believed possible.

“My advice to young women is to set an aspirational vision and boldly embrace the uncertainty of challenges that advance you toward that vision.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Amy Fliegelman Olli CA Technologies

TITLE: Executive Vice President, General Counsel EDUCATION: JD, from Western New England School of Law FIRST JOB: IBM WHAT I’M READING: Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World, by Liaquat Ahamed MY PHILOSOPHY: Not only are you responsible for your life, but doing the best at this moment puts you in the best place for the next moment [taken from Oprah]. FAMILY: Married with 2 children. INTERESTS: Gardening, tennis and spending time with family. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Heart Association COMPANY: CA Technologies HEADQUARTERS: Islandia, New York WEB SITE: www.ca.com BUSINESS: IT management software & solutions. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.353 billion EMPLOYEES: 13,000 worldwide

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uring law school and early in my professional career, I was fortunate to have several mentors, in law and in business, who helped and influenced me to become the general counsel I am today. Now I have the privilege of mentoring others. Mentoring offers a unique opportunity to provide guidance to others who seek to expand their career horizons. At CA Technologies, we recently added a mentorship component to our worldwide law department. The mentorship program will help the participants identify and enhance professional skills that will assist in career and personal development, such as networking, negotiation and effective communication and gain relevant subject matter and organizational knowledge. I do not believe in a single path to success; however, I do feel that accessibility can lead to opportunity which can result in success. I personally recognize the power of mentoring and understand that guidance and advice can positively shape people. For more than two years I have been a member of the board of governors for Touro Law Center, a

division of Touro College in New York. I believe that success for many aspiring lawyers begins during law school, whether it’s transitioning into the law school mindset, during the many difficult decisions students face throughout, or with the preparation of resumes and the sharpening of interview skills. Fundamentally, I think it’s critical to provide guidance and best practices to future generations of law practitioners. Through my involvement with the board, I am able to help support a great learning institution, provide real life perspective to the types of curriculum offered, and to give back. I also had the privilege of being part of a terrific program called DigiGirlz that CA Technologies supported, which is designed to provide high school girls with a better understanding of what a career in technology is all about. In closing, my advice for women who are entering the workforce and for seasoned professionals is to always do your best and make yourself available to colleagues, regardless of their level, as we can certainly all learn from each other.

“…Always do your best and make yourself available to colleagues, regardless of their level, as we can certainly all learn from each other.” 144

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September/October 2010


Creative spark At Walmart, diversity is the doorway to creativity, opportunity, growth and excellence. Inclusion is the key that unlocks that door. Visit us at www.walmartstores.com/diversity to learn more.

The “Spark” Design (

), Walmart and Save Money. Live Better. are marks and/or registered marks of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ©2010 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., Bentonville, AR.


WOMEN WORTH WATCHING IN 2 0 1 1

Katherine A. Owen Stryker

TITLE: VP, Strategy & Investor Relations EDUCATION: BA, in Economics; MBA FIRST JOB: Chubb Insurance Company; underwriter for DFI (Dept. of Financial Institutions) WHAT I’M READING: Blind Side, by Catherine Coulter; Harvard Business Review; Architectural Digest MY PHILOSOPHY: Put family first, work second, laugh a lot, and try not to take things too seriously. FAMILY: Husband Grant, daughter Grace (2 ½) and son Callum (8 months). INTERESTS: Reading, spending time with my family. FAVORITE CHARITIES: United Way COMPANY: Stryker HEADQUARTERS: Kalamazoo, Michigan WEB SITE: www.stryker.com BUSINESS: Medical devices, orthopaedic implants, medical equipment. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 17,700

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y goal for my career was never to work for the CEO of one of the most successful medical devices companies in the world, but here I am. Rather, it seems my career path to the executive suite was really the result of a series of small decisions centered around at times a maniacal focus on being successful. How I defined success was fairly straightforward: to be viewed as someone whose opinion matters. I think it’s fairly rare that I’m the smartest person in the room, but I also think it’s rare that I don’t have something of value to offer. I think what it really boils down to is being viewed as someone you want in the room when you need to make important decisions. No matter what your career or what industry you work in or what role you play, to be someone people want on their team is a tremendous asset and transcends every organization. So, against this backdrop, I’ve developed four rules that work and make sense for me. Work hard. It sounds simple enough but there are a lot of distractions that can derail focus and give the appearance of productivity, but it’s just noise. Give yourself credit. As women,

it’s so easy to assume others are working harder, contributing more and play a greater role in the success of an organization. Don’t fall into that trap. Give yourself credit and don’t dismiss it when it’s given to you. It’s not necessarily harder, although it often is, but it’s certainly different for women. Others may disagree, but a working mom has more divergent responsibilities than just about anyone I know and it can feel like you’re drowning. It’s also a recipe for a lot of guilt. I don’t know what the answer is; I think it simply is what it is and sometimes just acknowledging that reality helps. Take a step back and prioritize. You don’t need to be at every work meeting and you don’t need to go to every school function. Sometimes work has to take precedence, and sometimes you have to let work take a back seat. Learn this early and your work-family balance will fall into place. One last thing: be nice to your spouse, because one day your career will end, the kids will be gone and it will (hopefully) just be the two of you. Better to enter that stage with nice feelings about the path that got you there.

“…What it really boils down to is being viewed as someone you want in the room when you need to make important decisions.” 146

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Ours is a changing planet, with an evolving population. We’re living longer. Expecting

more of our lives. And demanding more from medicine.

For Stryker, this is both an opportunity and an obligation.

We answer these challenges with diversity—in how we think, who we hire, where we do business and how we work. We’re there for medical professionals and patients worldwide—people who count on our technologies and services to perform at the leading edge of medicine and to restore quality of life.

In these moments, diversity makes all he difference in the world. Because multiple

and even competing perspectives help us drive breakthroughs that propel Stryker’s continuing growth. An inclusive workplace fosters engaged, innovative employees. And embracing differences allows us to explore and bring far-reaching solutions to life.

For Stryker, a world of opportunity is calling.

And diversity is how we’ll answer it.

Learn more at stryker.com


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Colette Phillips Colette Phillips Communications, Inc.

TITLE: President & CEO EDUCATION: BS, in Communications and MS, in Marketing, Emerson College FIRST JOB: Press Secretary for Prime Minister of Antigua WHAT I’M READING: Prosperity, by Charles Fillmore; and Presumption of Guilt, and Race, Class and Crime in America, by Charles Ogletree MY PHILOSOPHY: “You make a living by what you do, you make a life by what you give.” – Winston Churchill. FAMILY: My mother, sisters, brothers, nieces and nephews and my extended family of friends, mentees, and mentors. INTERESTS: Travel, theater, volunteerism, spirituality, issues impacting people of color, women, and children. FAVORITE CHARITies: Whittier Street Health Center, Mass General Hospital for Children COMPANY: Colette Phillips Communications, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Boston, Massachusetts WEB SITE: www.cpcglobal.com BUSINESS: Communications. ANNUAL REVENUES: $900,000 EMPLOYEES: 10

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entoring will always be an important avenue to the executive suite. It’s a sad but real fact that hard work, education and talent are not enough to take a person to the top. That is why it is so critical to forge connections and contacts in and out of the corporate corridors. I believe that organized corporate mentoring programs can be one of the most successful ways to not just shatter but eliminate the glass ceiling in corporate America. This mentoring takes the form of guidance, counsel and, in many cases, access and exposure to the kinds of positions that will help women and people of color develop the desired management skills required to succeed in business. Women and people of color in particular must be willing to reach out across cultural and gender lines to cultivate mentors. Ask any successful person about their career and most will tell you that while they certainly worked hard to get to where they are, a few people have been instrumental

in helping them achieve success. I am a big proponent of mentoring. I have been blessed in my life to have a group of loving, supportive, and encouraging people whom I affectionately call “my council of wise people.” These are the people that you can bounce ideas off of, both professionally and personally. I know that I can count on these people to tell me the truth about anything that I am going through, and I value their advice. Both as an employee for various companies and now as an entrepreneur, there are seven basic principles by which I have conducted my personal and professional life: 1) Think positive. 2) Create a council of wise people. 3) Make yourself an indispensable employee. 4) Keep your spiritual balance. 5) Maintain your sense of humor. 6) Learn from your mistake. 7) Be grateful for all you have. A quote by Winston Churchill sums up my thoughts on mentoring: “You make a living by what you do, but you make a life from what you give.”

“I believe that organized corporate mentoring programs can be one of the most successful ways to not just shatter but eliminate the glass ceiling in corporate America.” 148

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Strong values.

Unique opportunities. ong values. “At Domtar, we respect the dignity, rights and aspirations of all our employees. We offer a work environment in which our people can be themselves; where they can grow and make a difference.”

MELISSA ANDERSON Senior Vice-President, Human Resources

www.domtar.com


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Maureen Phillips Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America

TITLE: Chief Counsel EDUCATION: Macalester College, St. Paul, BA, in Psychology; Law School, University of Southern California, graduated in 1981 FIRST JOB: Private practice, Mitchell Silberberg and Knupp, Los Angeles, Calif. WHAT I’M READING: Patriotic Grace, by Peggy Noonan; Warren Buffet Speaks, by Janet Lowe; A People’s History of the United States, by Howard Zinn MY PHILOSOPHY: Make frequent checks with the moral compass you carry inside and you will move through your days with peace of mind and comfort. FAMILY: 2 daughters, Ashley (28), and Alexis (21) INTERESTS: Reading, music, travel, family. FAVORITE CHARITies: Charities that advance education for children and adults that don’t have access to traditional educational opportunities COMPANY: Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America HEADQUARTERS: Minneapolis, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.allianzlife.com BUSINESS: Life insurance, annuities. ANNUAL REVENUES: $9 billion EMPLOYEES: 2,080

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y father was a feminist long before it became a household word. A lawyer and a parent to several daughters, he took deep pride in our achievements and loved to see us compete. My mother, after raising seven children, completed a journalism degree and started her professional career as a newspaper reporter at age 55. She found each story a new adventure and continued in her role at the paper until she was nearly 80. Their examples shaped my perspective, teaching me to pursue what I love and to pay little attention to traditional boundaries. Achieving my goals through hard work is an attitude that helped me as an attorney in my first job out of law school and one that stays with me today in my role as General Counsel at Allianz Life. The business world has changed significantly since the early ’80s. Many hurdles women encountered in traditionally male-dominated professions no longer exist. For example, I was the first attorney at my law firm to have a child. The mere “novelty” of such an event at times attracted more attention than I

“…My accomplishments would not have been possible without the guidance from strong mentors.” 150

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wanted. But I did my best, loved it, and quite frankly, I didn’t have much time to think about it. The lessons taught by my mother gave me the confidence that hard work and focus could produce both professional opportunity and healthy, well-balanced children. With the help of a few incredibly forwardminded bosses and mentors, and an amazingly supportive and confident husband, I was able to achieve a level of balance that allowed for success at home and at work. Even then, I understood that my accomplishments would not have been possible without the guidance from strong mentors. One thing that stood out was the give-and-take nature of those relationships. When mentoring is regarded as a two-way street, it becomes as much about listening and taking as it does about giving. And so today, I focus on building that connection with young people, whether male or female, so I can better understand their unique perspective, and continue to learn from them in the process. Whether it’s something I have direct experience with, such as the challenge of raising children while remaining in the workforce, or something where I can only lend a supportive ear, the key is sharing equally, and continuing to learn together. Truly sharing our experiences is the most effective way to pay it forward.


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Joanne Pietrini-Smith AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company

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y parents instilled in me, my three sisters and brother a tremendous work ethic. They supported us and challenged us to always give our very best. I have felt their influence throughout my career. Mentoring comes in many forms, like from the bank officer who helped me open my first checking account before I left for college. He didn’t just open the account. He took an interest in where I’d attend college, what kind of student I was, and what I thought about applying for a bank teller position the following summer. My conversation with him may not have been unique for him, but it made a lasting impression on me. It taught me to take an interest in others, to always be open to opportunities and that it’s my responsibility to turn opportunities into realities. Another mentor taught me that confidentiality is paramount to any job. I cannot stress this enough to young people. In an age where information is available 24/7 and disseminated at light-speed, exercising good judgment remains a core staple in any career. The best mentor I have I’ve consulted with for just about every critical career decision I’ve made. “JDO” (you know who you are) has taught me to look at myself as

an individual with unique skills and a strong drive. He listens and offers feedback based on experience, with the business perspective to understand what I am talking about and the wisdom to know that I’m not asking him to tell me what to do. He taught me to think strategically and execute practically. By example, he has taught me the importance of life balance and how to be a mentor. Being a mentor is one of the most rewarding aspects of my career. It comes in two forms for me – being a sounding board and being a sponsor. As I strive to master the second, I’m still learning from two amazing individuals at AXA Equitable. One I’ve known for more than 20 years and the other I had the great fortune of working for a few years ago.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Financial Protection and Wealth Management EDUCATION: MBA, Babson College, Massachusetts; BA, Saint Anselm College, New Hampshire FIRST JOB: The restaurant of the North Shore Music Theater in Beverly, MA WHAT I’M READING: Conscious Business, by Fred Kofman; A Colossal Failure of Common Sense, by Lawrence G. McDonald; Moneyball, by Michael M. Lewis, and more MY PHILOSOPHY: Always take the high road and always do the right thing! FAMILY: Husband of 20 years, Jeffrey; sons: Cameron, Ian & Colin; a very large extended family. INTERESTS: All the time I can spend with my husband, boys, family and friends; reading. FAVORITE CHARITies: Saint Anselm College, and the Lions Club because of the work they do for the visually impaired COMPANY: AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.axa-equitable.com BUSINESS: Life insurance, annuity and investment products and services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.24 billion EMPLOYEES: More than 9,300 including sales personnel

I’ve watched them use their influence to positively impact careers, as well as help individuals who otherwise might not have been able to change their economic situation. I am in awe of how their actions directly change lives for the better! I’m glad I can continue to learn from such great role models.

“…Mentoring comes in two forms for me – being a sounding board and being a sponsor.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Sanita L. Pinchback Waste Management, Inc.

TITLE: Group Vice President, Human Resources EDUCATION: BA, in Accounting, Furman University; MA, in Human Resources, University of South Carolina, Columbia FIRST JOB: Human Resources Analyst, Continental Airlines WHAT I’M READING: Integrity, by Dr. Henry Cloud MY PHILOSOPHY: When you make it easy for people to do the right thing, they usually will. In a contest between the rock and the river, the river eventually wins. FAMILY: I live with my husband, Scott. I visit my parents James and Mary Paul in Anderson, SC often. My brother, James has my only niece, Marisa. INTERESTS: Reading, traveling. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Cancer Society COMPANY: Waste Management, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEB SITE: www.wm.com www.thinkgreen.com BUSINESS: Industry’s leading provider of comprehensive waste management and environmental services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $11.79 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 43,400

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y grandmother was a great mentor to me. She lived a life that demonstrated grace and tenacity. Although she had little formal education, she understood that education was the key to success. On a very modest income, she and my grandfather sent all seven of their children to college or trade school without going into debt. Through their sacrifice, six out of seven of their children worked in the education system and consequently helped others to achieve their goals. My grandmother always looked at the bright side of her accomplishments and the accomplishments of her family. During her retirement, my grandmother went back to school to earn her GED. Her tenacity proved to me that it is never too late to go after your own dreams. Tenacity is important because between the rock and the river, the river eventually wins. Following the example of my grandmother, I too encourage others to become lifelong learners. I support people remaining inquisitive about what is possible and what is around the corner. I have found that

those questions will lead you on an entertaining path. For me, the path has led me to live in all four continental time zones. I am very close to my family and thought that I would always live within a two-hour driving radius of them. While most of my family still lives in South Carolina, my career choices led me to Houston, Seattle, Denver, and Philadelphia. Each city has taught me important lessons about myself and given me an opportunity to broaden my perspective. By making these career choices, I have been able to follow my dreams and expand my family’s horizons. Because I was exposed to this broader world, I made one of my mother’s childhood dreams come true by taking her for a visit to the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France. My mother had read about the Eiffel Tower as a child. Even as an adult, my mother continued to be fascinated by Paris. After sharing the trip of a lifetime, we hold fond memories of our visit to the magical tower. The inquisitive nature, started by my grandmother, continues to motivate and inspire me.

“Tenacity is important because between the rock and the river, the river eventually wins.” 152

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opportunity At AXA Equitable, we believe that commitment to diversity and inclusion shouldn’t be a mere declaration. You should see it and feel it in every hallway and every office, from the cubicle to the corporate suite. You should sense that every employee doesn’t just feel responsible for diversity, but embraces it. We believe that the more diverse opinions, experiences, cultures and perspectives a company has, the stronger it is. And strong companies succeed. AXA Equitable is redefining the standards by which we measure diversity and inclusion. And we live by those standards in every office, every day.

AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company, New York, NY. GE-48228 (2/09) G24915


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Vivian Polak Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP

TITLE: Partner, Co-Chair of the Information Technology and Intellectual Property Practice Group, Chair of the Diversity Committee EDUCATION: BA, in Political Science, Barnard College; JD, Harvard Law School FIRST JOB: Librarian’s assistant WHAT I’M READING: Moral Grandeur and Spiritual Audacity, by Abraham Joshua Heschel; Going on Being, by Mark Epstein; Play It As It Lays, by Joan Didion MY PHILOSOPHY: Every day, make sure that you ask yourself, and answer, the following question: How are the actions I’m taking today meaningful to me? FAMILY: Wonderful life partner, Michelle; two loving parents; courageous sister Nicky; outstanding brother-in-law and nephew with a beautiful spirit; and family of friends. INTERESTS: Polictics – changing the world, philosophy, cooking dinner with friends. FAVORITE CHARITIES: North Shore Animal League, God’s Love We Deliver, In The Life Media COMPANY: Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.dl.com BUSINESS: Law firm. ANNUAL REVENUES: $914 million EMPLOYEES: 1,200+ lawyers

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graduated from law school in 1977. I had planned to be a lawyer for a few years, gather some foundational training and leave to change the world. Much to my surprise, I remained for over 30 years, but have nonetheless done my best to change my small corner of the world. My law school graduating class was 12 percent women and there were almost no women or diverse partners in law firms. Much has changed, but the profession remains a challenging environment for women and diverse lawyers – I often still find myself as the only woman in large meetings, and when I look around the room I see few, if any, diverse men. And, as I continue to work inside the walls of law firm life to press the value of diversity, I consistently rely on a number of solid premises based on many of the lessons I’ve learned: Value and leverage diversity. Diversity by its very nature breeds innovative solutions to problems and brings a valuable element to any business environment. Learn to leverage these perspectives – they will be appreciated by the people you work with and the related community.

“Never compromise your integrity, ethics or values.” 154

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Stay true to yourself. Never compromise your integrity, ethics or values. That said, there are ways to do this without being self-righteous. Drawing attention to points of view in an even, persistent and respectful way can be very persuasive. Imagine the future. In my career as an IP and technology lawyer, I have carefully watched the trends and how technology has changed business. I’ve learned that one can constantly re-envision one’s career trajectory – I’ve done this numerous times in the course of my life. There are many ways to be creative in the legal profession and in business. If you can imagine the future of your area of specialization, you will be ahead of the pack and, with some creativity, invent new pathways for your career. People matter the most. Many women of my generation thought that hard work was all that was needed for success. They often ignored that businesses are run by people. Your relationships with people will be the most important element of your career. Building positive relationships with people at all levels of your organization, clients, customers, and in your community, will be the key to success. Listen. Learn. Connect. Be generous with your time. Help others reach their full potential. You can make a difference.


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Jennifer Pollino Goodrich Corporation

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hroughout my life and career, I have often followed the road less-traveled. My background is in finance, and I have gone from holding various accounting positions to running the day-to-day operations for several business units within Goodrich Corporation. As a woman working in the maledominated aerospace and defense industry, I have benefitted from mentors throughout my journey. These relationships have illuminated some of the more complex aspects of our global industry, from how a defense contract receives funding to integrating joint ventures in several different countries. Mentors have led me through some of the more personal aspects of my career as well. The big decisions that often accompany corporate leadership positions, such as uprooting the family for a new job opportunity, can often gain needed perspective when discussed with a trusted mentor. When I look at Goodrich and how we’ve grown into one of the top aerospace and defense companies in the world with a reputation as a great place to work, I reflect on the importance of the open, two-way communication that’s critical to our success. The simple fact that an employee understands our culture

of one-on-one communication can be an open door to nurturing a successful mentoring relationship with leaders throughout the organization. I am quick to advise people to develop the mentoring relationships they want, because it is rare that an experienced leader would turn down the opportunity to give back and counsel the next generation. I make it a point to serve as a mentor or trusted advisor to both women and men across our organization. By advising others the way my mentors advised me, I believe I am playing a role in developing new leaders to share the values I believe are critical for success – demonstrating mutual trust and respect, displaying ethical behavior and a drive for continuous improvement, valuing the individual and diversity of ideas, and embracing a never-ending zeal for learning.

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Human Resources EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree from the University of Notre Dame, Indiana FIRST JOB: Sales person at The Limited (part time during high school); Auditor in Public Accounting (first part of career) WHAT I’M READING: The Help, by Kathryn Stockett; Coaching Your Kids to be Leaders, by Pat Williams MY PHILOSOPHY: Treat others as you would like to be treated . . . which fits so well with Mutual Trust and Respect which is a key part of our Goodrich People Philosophy. FAMILY: Married with three children. INTERESTS: Working out (hiking/running), time with family/friends, traveling. FAVORITE CHARITies: Many related to child advocacy, education, health: Girl Scouts, my children’s schools, United Way COMPANY: Goodrich Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Charlotte, North Carolina WEB SITE: www.goodrich.com BUSINESS: Aerospace and defense manufacturing. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7 billion EMPLOYEES: 24,000

At the same time, I benefit from the mentoring relationship as well; it helps me keep up-to-date on emerging issues that may not gain visibility at the executive level, and also allows me to participate in finding new approaches to addressing dynamic challenges.

“I am quick to advise people to develop the mentoring relationships they want…” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Diversity is Our Competitive Advantage. We, at ITT, are committed to building a workforce that mirrors the world in which we do business. With operations in over 60 countries and customers on seven continents, ITT is well positioned and making a difference on a global scale. As we continue to grow, we look first to create an environment where our talented employees can succeed and make the world a better place through their unique contributions. We embrace diversity, which includes but is not limited to race, religion, gender, disability, nationality, age, sexual orientation, and ethnic background. Our culture, work practices and programs enable an inclusive and innovative workforce and workplace resulting in premier performance in the global marketplace.

www.itt.com/careers We are an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.

The “ITT Engineered Blocks” symbol and “Engineered for life” are registered trademarks of the ITT Corporation. © 2006


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Billie K. Rawot, Eaton Corporation • Jorunn Saetre, Halliburton • Cindy M. Sanborn, CSX Corporation • Kim Sentovich, Walmart • Marsha Schulte, Rockwell Collins Deborah A. Skakel, Dickstein Shapiro • Louise Scott, Georgia Power • Dr. Charlita Shelton, University of the Rockies • Kristi A. Savacool, Hewitt • Dawn Siler-Nixon, Ford & Harrison ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

9

th

annual

in 2011


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Billie K. Rawot Eaton Corporation

TITLE: Senior Vice President and Controller, Eaton Corporation EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science in Accountancy, University of Illinois FIRST JOB: Staff Accountant at Ernst & Young, Chicago WHAT I’M READING: The Zookeeper’s Wife: A War Story, by Diane Ackerman; In the Land of Invisible Women: A Female Doctor’s Journey in the Saudi Kingdom, by Qanta A. Ahmed, MD MY PHILOSOPHY: Do what you love, and success will unfold. FAMILY: My husband, John, and I have a son and daughter who are both college graduates in their twenties. INTERESTS: Civic activities, skiing, golf. FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way, The Great Lakes Science Center, and The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society COMPANY: Eaton Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Cleveland, Ohio WEB SITE: www.Eaton.com BUSINESS: Diversified power management company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $11.9 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 70,000

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uring my career, I have had the privilege of mentoring many young women and men. Ultimately, the advice I give each of them remains the same: • Reach outside of the box to discover new directions and ignite a new passion. • Carry through to prove yourself and demonstrate your competencies. • Passionately drive for the things you believe in. •Be humble enough to count on family and friends for support and motivation. These principles are ones that I have lived by my entire life. Growing up in a small steel-manufacturing town in Illinois, I learned early on the importance of a strong work ethic, a close support network and a connection to one’s community. But I also learned how crucial it is to step outside of your comfort zone in order to pursue your goals. Although it was an unconventional route at the time for women, I followed my aptitude for math and finance to obtain a degree in business at the University of Illinois.

“…The only limits to your dreams and goals are those you place on yourself.” 158

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While there were only a few women peers, the class make-up was not important toward pursuing my dreams and goals. That scenario prepared me for entry into the business world where I learned the only limits to your dreams and goals are those you place on yourself. Many people contributed to my success in significant ways. My parents always insisted on the best from us, and school counselors encouraged us to expand our vision of potential paths. Managers and mentors, many of whom I met at Eaton Corporation, gave me opportunities to be on their teams, which I jumped at, eager to broaden my skills. I became its first woman officer in 1991. Obtaining work-life balance is all about making time for others – your family, friends, and community. Since family life is such an important dimension, finding high quality childcare options is a top priority. I am also dedicated to encouraging young women and girls to pursue careers involving math and science, targeting community outreach endeavors involving speaking to students about careers using these important skills. The ultimate legacy will be teaching those succeeding us the philosophies that underpinned our success.


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Jorunn Saetre Halliburton

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y career in Halliburton has progressed far beyond what I could imagine when I was hired as a laboratory engineer in 1981. One can truly state that I entered a very maledominated industry that was in its infancy in Norway. As I am approaching 30 years of tenure with Halliburton, I have evidently enjoyed the environment. Looking back, my close to 30 years can pretty much be split into three eras. The first 10 years I worked in very technical positions, gaining insight into the fundamentals of our business. Engineering, business development and offshore work were the name of the game. I developed client relationships that are the basis of a network that is still active today. I was blessed with numerous colleagues who taught me much of what I know and of whom many still are my colleagues. I got my first management position in 1990 in a foreign country – the United Kingdom. Although not very far in distance, the business culture was different and my learning curve was steep. It was hard work and long hours, but I was persistent in my pursuit of exercising my own leadership style. I think many of my colleagues today will testify that this is true. I was given the opportunity

to practice my leadership in several countries in various arenas. For the last decade, I have been the country vice president for our business in Scandinavia. Together with my management team and with support from our executives and our engaged and skilled employees, we have collectively succeeded and developed the business in Scandinavia. It has been a fabulous journey, and we are proud of our achievements. It is my sincere hope that I can serve as an inspiration to other females. I fundamentally believe that organizations and corporations function better when the workforce has a gender balance. It is important that each position is populated by the right person irrespective of gender.

TITLE: Area Vice President, Scandinavia EDUCATION: Chemical Engineering Degree from the Engineering College of Bergen in Norway FIRST JOB: Laboratory Engineer WHAT I’M READING: Love in the Time of Cholera, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez MY PHILOSOPHY: “The way to grow grand is not to demand. In life’s every field, you are what you yield,” – Piet Hein, the Danish multi-thinker and universalist. FAMILY: Married with one son, 12 years old. INTERESTS: Away from work – walking, swimming, music. FAVORITE CHARITies: The Salvation Army COMPANY: Halliburton HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas and Dubai, UAE WEB SITE: www.halliburton.com BUSINESS: Energy services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $14.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 50,000 plus

I have been fortunate in that over the years, I have been “seen” by Halliburton executives and they have demonstrated tremendous faith in me. At the level I have reached in my career, it is my turn to acknowledge future (female) leaders.

“I fundamentally believe that organizations and corporations function better when the workforce has a gender balance.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Cindy M. Sanborn CSX Corporation

TITLE: Vice President and Chief Transportation Officer EDUCATION: BA, Emory University; MBA, University of Miami FIRST JOB: Transportation Analyst with CSX WHAT I’M READING: From Yalta to Berlin: The Cold War Struggle Over Germany, by W.R. Smyser; The Berlin Wall: A World Divided, 1961-1989, by Frederick Taylor; basically anything about post WWII Germany MY PHILOSOPHY: Strive not for success, but rather to add value. FAMILY: Single, no children. INTERESTS: Scuba diving, fishing, boating, and all things involving water. FAVORITE CHARITies: Camp Boggy Creek in Eustis, Florida COMPANY: CSX Corporation HEADQUARTERS: Jacksonville, Florida WEB SITE: www.csx.com BUSINESS: Freight transportation. ANNUAL REVENUES: $9 billion EMPLOYEES: 30,000

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ne of my favorite things about working for a railroad is being part of an industry that is vibrant and integral to the economic development and environmental health of our country. There is something about the tradition of the railroad that inspires confidence, especially as we are investing billions of dollars into its future. Both of my parents were CSX employees, and I have been immersed in railroading for as long as I can remember. I joined the company 23 years ago as a transportation analyst, and I now manage train operations for our entire 21,000mile network as the company’s chief transportation officer. In addition to having a passion for the business, I have learned that perseverance, strong principles and teamwork are critical to success. I consider myself lucky to have grown my career at a company where my personal values align with the corporate culture. One of our shared core values is “generating the right results in the right way.” How you get where you’re going is as important as the destination. Upholding an ethical standard is the right way to get results, and living this tenet has helped my career prog-

ress in a meaningful way. I have had the privilege to work with people at all levels of the organization, which has taught me that a team-focused approach creates a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. Some of my favorite moments in my career have happened during challenging times when everyone pulled together to work toward a common goal. For example, the “Out of the Park” initiative, launched in 2005, brought the entire operations department together to improve our service delivery for customers. The program was a success in teamwork and created a process that we still use today. My path to success was not something that I mapped out with specific timelines or titles to achieve along the way. Instead, it was forged by doing my absolute best in each position I held, sharpening my skills and learning the business from the ground up. For me, success is driven by loving what you do and never backing down from professional challenges. New opportunities are always 90 percent exciting and 10 percent terrifying – the real gains come from embracing the uncertainty and using it as motivation to learn and grow.

“How you get where you’re going is as important as the destination.” 160

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A look back as we go forward On April 3, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr. said, “Something is happening in our world.” In 2009, these words have fresh meaning — reflecting mountaintops reached and new hopes born. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina celebrates Black History Month. In honoring the past, we appreciate the present and find inspiration to create our future.

An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U6325, 1/09


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Kristi A. Savacool Hewitt Associates, LLC

TITLE: President of Benefits Administration EDUCATION: MS, Industrial Management, Lille University, Lille, France FIRST JOB: Jewelry Store Clerk while in High School WHAT I’M READING: 61 Hours: A Reacher Novel, by Lee Child MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t ever confuse who you are with what you do (professionally). FAMILY: Husband, Jeff, and two children, Michelle (23) and Matt (18). INTERESTS: Reading, cooking, hiking. FAVORITE CHARITies: CASA: Court Appointed Special Advocates COMPANY: Hewitt Associates, LLC HEADQUARTERS: Lincolnshire, Illinois WEB SITE: www.hewitt.com BUSINESS: HR consulting and outsourcing services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3 billion in FY09 EMPLOYEES: Approximately 23,000

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s my family and friends tell it, when I was growing up, the only time I wasn’t asking questions, learning something new, or organizing a group to do something was when I was sleeping. I grew into a person who loved learning, had a lot of positive energy and was intent on doing something important. Throughout my career across two different industries, I’ve had many opportunities to learn and make a difference. I spent my first 26 years in the aerospace business – a demanding environment, full of bright and capable colleagues. There was a high standard of business and technical performance required. We operated with an understanding that commercial aviation safety and our country’s security was at stake. Those responsibilities brought out the best in me as a leader and made it possible for teams to accomplish what many would assume was impossible. But it was also an extremely intense culture that could dish up some real dilemmas for an upand-coming executive. At times, I thought it important to challenge

“At times, I thought it important to challenge the way things had been done.” 162

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the way things had been done. This required pressing on the culture and leading complex change in a way that was aggressive yet productive. These situations tested what I stood for as a leader. A mentor once offered me some great advice that I have kept front and center ever since. He said, “Lots of people will come and go in your professional life. Take care of what’s constant – that’s you.” I believe you live and lead by your values, deliver on your commitments and the rest will take care of itself. When all is said and done, you will be proud of the leader you are, the results you produced and the difference you made in the lives of others. I came to realize that while adaptability is important, you must never lose sight of what keeps you grounded. A successful business leader must possess strong business acumen, deep experience and tested management skills. However, what’s most important is being a leader who is clear on what really matters and committed to helping the team to achieve that outcome. As I transitioned from aerospace to the HR services industry, the culture changed, but the sense of mission did not. We understand that our work contributes to the health and financial well-being of millions of people. My commitment to staying centered has helped define the leader I am today.


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Marsha Schulte Rockwell Collins

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lifelong Iowan, I began my career at Rockwell Collins in 1977 as an administrative assistant. At the time, I was working on my undergraduate degree in business majoring in accounting. Now, after more than 30 years of continued service at Rockwell Collins, I hold a graduate degree in finance as well as the position of vice president, finance and controller. In the years since I began my career, I grew in experience and leadership through a variety of positions, including financial analyst; manager, customer financing; and manager, financial planning. These roles allowed me to build the skills and relationships necessary to lead the finance organization at a major aerospace and defense company. My contributions to Rockwell Collins do not end with my work. In 2006, I was provided the opportunity to serve as the first executive sponsor for Rockwell Collins’ Women’s Employee Network, an employee-run group that supports professional growth. The network sponsors events, informal mentoring and career development resources. Also, the network played a key role in the expansion of the Rockwell Collins daycare program, which is now one of the largest employer-supported daycares in the United States. The network has

flourished, growing to more than 1,200 members in seven locations. Along with my career, I have dealt with the challenges presented by raising two sons and battling breast cancer. These experiences brought me to an understanding of the importance of managing a healthy balance between work and life. I found out the hard way that focusing on work at the expense of my health brings dire consequences in the long run. Finding the appropriate mix of work and life outside Rockwell Collins helps me navigate through challenging situations in the office and at home. I emphasize this message to those I mentor at Rockwell Collins, and it’s a theme of a statewide women’s conference I am chairing in 2011 called Choosing to Lead. The conference aims to help develop women leaders, to provide a networking opportunity and to encourage work-life balance. I hope these types of events will inspire more women to earn positions of leadership and strive for balance in their lives.

TITLE: Vice President, Finance & Controller EDUCATION: Undergraduate degree in Business Accounting from Coe College; Graduate degree in Finance from the University of Iowa FIRST JOB: Administrative Assistant at Rockwell Collins WHAT I’M READING: 10-10-10: A Life Transforming Idea, by Suzy Welch MY PHILOSOPHY: “Pay it forward!” FAMILY: Mother of two sons. INTERESTS: Reading, sports (soccer and basketball). FAVORITE CHARITies: American Cancer Society COMPANY: Rockwell Collins HEADQUARTERS: Cedar Rapids, Iowa WEB SITE: www.rockwellcollins.com BUSINESS: Aerospace and defense. ANNUAL REVENUES: 2009 sales of $4.47 billion EMPLOYEES: Nearly 20,000

“My contributions to Rockwell Collins do not end with my work.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Louise Scott Georgia Power Company, a Southern Company

TITLE: Director, Customer Care Center EDUCATION: BS, Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida; BA, Studio Arts, State University of New York FIRST JOB: Grocery Store Clerk @ 15 years old; Distribution Engineer, Florida Power Corporation (first professional job) WHAT I’M READING: Why Do I Love These People?, by Po Bronson; Thank You for Arguing, by Jay Heinrichs MY PHILOSOPHY: All things related to the gold, platinum, silver… rules. FAMILY: Married to Steve Scott, very large extended Irish and Italian family INTERESTS: Family, fitness, art, sporting clays. FAVORITE CHARITies: American Cancer Society COMPANY: Georgia Power Company, a Southern Company HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia WEB SITE: www.georgiapower.com BUSINESS: Electric utility. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.7 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 8,700

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spiring to be tomorrow’s corporate leader is a big goal, and you would think it comes with the need for a great plan. I must admit I have been intimidated by people who have very detailed, written, five- and ten-year plans. I’m just not inclined to write one. But I have been successful and have a few thoughts on how I have achieved success. I hope it will offer insight to you. In business today we do all kinds of personality and/or behavioral profiles that tell us how we are wired. I like these tools and have learned a lot from them. I believe that understanding yourself is an important step in achieving your goals and it is an important part of your plan, written or not. Pay attention to the profiles you have taken. They really capture elements or traits that can be used to build on. From these profiles, I have learned that it helps to not focus on gaps but build up strengths. It is necessary

to assess if a gap is a key element of development. If the gap is vital, I work on it. I’ve also learned it is important to play to your strengths. You never see an athlete play a position in their gap; they play where they can win! This leads to the next part of my story and that is to give people you respect permission to give you honest and timely feedback. These are your valued mentors. How cool is it that the word “mentor” comes from the Greek mentos, meaning “intent, purpose, spirit, passion.” I never looked at the origin of the word and was inspired by those words when I did. My mentors are varied, from parents to peers to bosses. What is common is that they have seen more in me than I have seen in myself. So I do have a plan. It is just written with a different template. It is not a crisp matrix with milestones, obstacles, etc. (Are you reminded of templates you’ve seen?) My plan has led me to the people, skills and resources needed to achieve the successes I have had.

“…I have learned that it helps to not focus on gaps but build up strengths.” 164

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September/October 2010


CVS Caremark celebrates successful women in business. CVS Caremark believes in celebrating women’s achievements as industry leaders. That’s why we are joining Diversity Journal in honoring some of the most successful women in business. We are proud to support the women who challenge us to care and inspire us to lead. We congratulate one of our most valuable CVS Caremark leaders for being recognized as a Woman Worth Watching for her accomplishments: Lisa Bisaccia, Senior Vice President of Human Resources

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Kim Sentovich Walmart

TITLE: Senior Vice President, Pacific Division, Walmart U.S. EDUCATION: MBA, University of California, Irvine; BA, Philosophy and Political Science, Bryn Mawr College FIRST JOB: Regional Sales Representative, Behr Paint Company WHAT I’M READING: The Secret Wife of Louis XIV, by Veronica Buckley; Goodnight Moon, by Margaret Wise Brown MY PHILOSOPHY: “Make your mistakes faster,” a quote from Peter Drucker. FAMILY: Husband, Michael; daughter Nikolina, 6; son Michael, 3. INTERESTS: Cooking, digital photo books, skiing and family. FAVORITE CHARITies: National Center for Missing & Exploited Children; Girls Inc. of Orange County; Homeboy Industries COMPANY: Walmart HEADQUARTERS: Bentonville, Arkansas WEB SITE: www.walmartstores.com BUSINESS: Retail, serving customers and members more than 200 million times per week at more than 8,400 retail units under 55 different banners in 15 countries. ANNUAL REVENUES: $405 billion EMPLOYEES: 2 million worldwide

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ad you asked me 20 years ago where I would be today, I would have described a career on Wall Street rather than merchandising, purchasing, and retail operations. Now as a senior vice president responsible for overseeing operations for 272 stores in five states, I can trace my steps back to early lessons from mentors who showed me the value of taking risks and seeing opportunities in unlikely places. After college, a mentor convinced me to apply for a regional sales position with Behr Paint. I remember telling him, “I don’t know anything about selling paint!” But I took a chance. As I progressed through different roles, I learned how to think on my feet and to learn the total business. Later, I had an opportunity to move into a regional operations management role with The Home Depot. I didn’t know operations, but a mentor urged me to do more and to apply my skills and experience in a different setting. So I took a risk. That choice led me to my current role in Walmart store operations. Looking back, I see the pivotal role that mentors played in helping me navigate my career path. I’m

delighted to give back now to others, applying and sharing what I learned. I learned that a mentor: Provides perspective. A mentor is someone who, in an honest and supportive way, helps others gain a different perspective on their own abilities and career choices. A mentor helps mentees see their strengths and weaknesses, and assists them in developing their own career plans of action. Challenges. A mentor challenges her mentees to do things they might not know they are capable of, and helps them to see their own potential. Takes risks. A mentor is willing to invest in someone based on a glimpse of potential that is not yet realized. I think as women, we can be confident in our knowledge and abilities, yet we sometimes have a hard time letting go of what we know. When we step out we realize, “Wow, I can do this!” In most of my career decisions, mentors have helped me to see why the risk was worth taking. Thanks to the mentors in my life who have helped to guide and shape my career, today I am incredibly fortunate to be in a job I love with a company I believe in. I have no regrets, and I see no limitations.

“Looking back, I see the pivotal role that mentors played in helping me navigate my career path.” 166

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September/October 2010


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Dr. Charlita Shelton University of the Rockies

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ducation is essential to success, but academics and earning degrees didn’t come easy for me. This may seem ironic coming from the president of a graduate school who has spent more than 25 years in higher education. Nonetheless, it is true. It took a big commitment to dedicate myself to learning, and each degree I earned was more challenging than the last. From the get-go, my career strategy was to earn a doctorate degree – this one was definitely the most demanding – and, by far, the most important for breaking through the proverbial glass ceiling. Were it not for my Ph.D., I would have never become president. When I earned my doctorate, many opportunities were presented to me. Without it, I’d have never been considered. Continuing education is a prerequisite to upward mobility in one’s career. I was born in Chicago. My five siblings, parents and I lived in one of the largest housing projects in the country. I experienced what it meant to be poor, but I made a commitment to myself that I would never be defeated by gender or race. Being in the military was a positive experience. The military creates

an environment in which people of all races, cultures and geographic locations come together for a common cause to complete the mission. At times I was one of only two females in a battalion of 180 Marines. I proved myself capable by demonstrating intelligence and confidence, ultimately gaining the respect of my peers. After the Marine Corps, I discovered my passion for higher education, especially in support for the underserved. As long as they are academically qualified, I believe all individuals who desire an advanced degree should be given the opportunity. My own education helped put me in a position to influence positive outcomes for others, and that role continuously motivates and inspires me.

TITLE: University of the Rockies President EDUCATION: PhD, and MA, in Human Development, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara; MS, in Education Administration, National University, San Diego; BS, in Communications, Western Michigan University FIRST JOB: Optician’s assistant WHAT I’M READING: The Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson; I also frequently reread The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, by Deepak Chopra, for inspiration. MY PHILOSOPHY: Always be true to yourself. FAMILY: My partner Lynne, one dog, two cats and a guinea pig. INTERESTS: Wine tasting, traveling, visiting art museums. FAVORITE CHARITies: Soroptimist International COMPANY: University of the Rockies HEADQUARTERS: San Diego, California WEB SITE: www.rockies.edu BUSINESS: Graduate school. ANNUAL REVENUES: $454.3 million for Bridgepoint Education in 2009 EMPLOYEES: Approximately 5,800 for Bridgepoint Education

Beyond academic accomplishments, I’ve recognized the value of building relationships. Relationships mean everything and enhance the journey. To be truly successful, you have to be an individual who respects, admires and believes in all people. I also believe that the more successful you are, the more important it is to be humble. My closing advice: Be a life-long learner and never lose your wit.

“…I made a commitment to myself that I would never be defeated by gender or race.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Dawn Siler-Nixon Ford & Harrison LLP

TITLE: Diversity and Inclusion Partner EDUCATION: BA, JD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill FIRST JOB: Associate Attorney WHAT I’M READING: Crazy Love, by Francis Chan MY PHILOSOPHY: Regardless of my circumstances, I know there is an awesome plan mapped out for my life that I can achieve if I remain focused and committed and maintain a sense of balance in my life. FAMILY: I am a wife with a wonderful husband (Claude), a mother of two beautiful girls (Cameron – 6 and Connore – 3), an equity partner in a law firm where my partners are my friends and where I truly enjoy my colleagues and my work. INTERESTS: Church, family, home decorating, sewing. FAVORITE CHARITies: Seminole Heights Baptist Church COMPANY: Ford & Harrison LLP HEADQUARTERS: Atlanta, Georgia WEB SITE: www.fordharrison.com BUSINESS: Employment and labor law firm. ANNUAL REVENUES: $74.9 million EMPLOYEES: 340

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ind your passion and enjoy every minute of it! Following that directive over the past 20 years has served me well. I have many passions – God, family, friends and the law. When I finally focused on and really prioritized them in my life (and put what others think in the appropriate places) I became successful in all my endeavors. The path I walked was littered with challenges and boulders that seemed almost insurmountable. As a woman of color navigating through what was predominantly an all white male profession, I faced a combination of unique barriers. I was not from the same background, culture, or socio-economic class as my colleagues and was unprepared and illequipped to deal with what I faced upon entering the profession of law. Not only was I routinely the only woman or person of color in any meeting, luncheon, room or gathering, but I was questioned at times whether I was in the right place or who I was with because, as I later learned, individuals of color were not allowed in that particular group, country club or restaurant (yes, in the ’90s!). I resolved to learn as much as possible from those around me and

seek out mentors from the top. I became the unofficial mentee of a white male partner who chaired our litigation practice group. Through that relationship, I gained invaluable experience that allowed me to become an excellent lawyer and navigate the corporate hierarchy and culture. As a result, many doors were opened to me that would have remained otherwise impenetrable, my confidence was bolstered, and my desire to become a leader and mentor blossomed. I became a Partner of a national law firm, a member of our Executive Committee and lead our firm’s diversity efforts. Today more than ever, women are presented with unique opportunities to engage in interesting and challenging work and professions. You should seek out and take advantage of those opportunities, even the most challenging ones, by saying “yes” and stretching beyond your artificial barriers to learn, grow and experience life. Find several mentors, learn as much as you can and extend a hand back to others who may be walking, unbeknownst to you, in your footsteps. You will never look back and be sorry that you did!

“I resolved to learn as much as possible from those around me and seek out mentors from the top.” 168

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Deborah A. Skakel Dickstein Shapiro

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hile there is no formulaic approach for succeeding at a law firm, I believe there are two prerequisites. First, you must do the work well, meaning you must be willing to put in the hours, so you’d better love what you do. Second, you must develop your own style, one that plays to your strengths.

a blue-collar town with more dairy cows than people.

When I began my career almost thirty years ago as an associate at Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, I was very self-directed. I had wanted to be a lawyer from the time I was in grade school, but I was altogether unfamiliar with Big Law life. (I grew up in an Adirondack Mountains town in upstate New York that was smaller than the law firm I joined.)

At the time, I joked that the partners had hired me for comic relief. But in some ways, the things I didn’t know also helped set me apart. I didn’t come in with preconceptions about what it meant to be a woman in Big Law. I just assumed I would get ahead by working hard. But equally important, I never thought to act like anyone other than myself. I relied on my strong sense of humor, oftentimes self-deprecating, to complement my intelligence and work ethic. I earned the confidence of colleagues and clients by putting them at ease. I wasn’t pretentious, but I wasn’t timid. And if anything, partners and clients seemed to find it refreshing.

Bright but unsophisticated, I joined one of New York City’s oldest white shoe firms where I had a crash course in the mores of Manhattan’s legal elite, where everything from ordering a bagel in the office cafeteria to ordering something called a “closing binder” for a project was a first. My peers had country houses and reminisced about their days at summer camp, both of which were foreign concepts to someone who had lived in

I’ve tried to carry that personal style forward through my career at other firms, including Dickstein Shapiro, where I’m now a member of the executive committee. Humor is still one of my favorite tools. I find humor allows me to be a better teacher and guide to young women entering the profession. It makes me more approachable, reduces the stress level and allows young lawyers to build their own self-confident style.

TITLE: Partner: Business and Securities Litigation. Member of: Executive Committee; Associate Retention & Oversight Committee; Associate Performance Evaluation Committee EDUCATION: BA, Syracuse University; JD, Cornell University Law School FIRST JOB: Pumping gas at a marina (age 13); Litigation associate attorney at Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy (age 25) WHAT I’M READING: A Short History of Women, by Kate Walbert; and Justice Older Than the Law, by Katie McCabe MY PHILOSOPHY: An intelligent sense of humor is a great ally in virtually any situation. FAMILY: Husband (Joel Chernov), three children (Allison, 20; Liz, 16; Evan, 13). INTERESTS: Sports (Spectator, player and coach of my kids’ teams). FAVORITE CHARITies: Scholarship funds at Syracuse University and Cornell Law; organizations providing support for women and children COMPANY: Dickstein Shapiro HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C. WEB SITE: www.Dicksteinshapiro.com BUSINESS: Law firm. ANNUAL REVENUES: $297 million EMPLOYEES: 748

“…You must develop your own style, one that plays to your strengths.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Kim Stratton, Novartis International • Janet Crenshaw Smith, Ivy Planning Group • Mary E. Tuuk, Fifth Third Bancorp • Mara E. Swan, Manpower • Teresa Taylor, Qwest Communications Susan Tousi, Eastman Kodak • Nancy R. Tuor, CH2M HILL • Ann Yom Steel, U.S. ICE • Laura Tameron, Perini Building Co. • Margaret W. (Meg) Skinner, Guardian Life Insurance ®

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Margaret W. (Meg) Skinner The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Distribution EDUCATION: BA, Northwestern University FIRST JOB: Employee benefits claims department, Life Insurance Company of North America WHAT I’M READING: MOJO: How to Get It, How to Keep It, How to Get It Back if You Lose It, by Marshall Goldsmith; and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, by Stieg Larsson INTERESTS: Cape Cod, rock & roll, opera. FAVORITE CHARITies: My schools and various organizations that support health COMPANY: The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.guardianlife.com BUSINESS: Life, long term care and disability insurance, employee benefits, 401(k), annuities, mutual funds. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.6 billion in 2009 EMPLOYEES: 5,200

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grew up outside Hartford, Connecticut, which for some time had been widely regarded as the insurance capital of the world. But growing up in the backyard of some of the world’s premier insurance companies had nothing to do with my decision to pursue a career in the insurance business. More important was the influence of my father, who was a senior executive in heavy manufacturing. My father hosted many business dinners in our home. He was a very attentive host and he instilled in me a lesson that remains foremost in my mind today: that it is crucial to pay attention to your customers. My first job after college was in Philadelphia at the Life Insurance Company of North America, where I started in employee benefit claims. Later I moved back to Connecticut and joined The Hartford Insurance Company in the marketing department. There I learned about the importance and complexity of mentoring. At The Hartford, I worked for a manager who I don’t believe thought very much of my abilities at first, but who later became a significant

mentor. His faith in me and his support of my career helped me get hired in the company’s male-dominated marketing department. Why sales? It was a field that always appealed to me because I had always been fascinated by interpersonal relationships and what motivates people. There is both a science and an art to it. I wasn’t deterred by the scarcity of women in marketing jobs. I treated that as a non-issue and kept focused on what interested me. The encouragement of my manager inspired me to mentor others today. When someone asks me to mentor them, I have just one caveat: they accept responsibility for their own fate. I will provide motivation and support, but I will not make career decisions for them or intervene to accelerate their career. Today the insurance industry offers great opportunities for women. They have the opportunity to be in executive leadership roles, managers with significant business responsibilities, or successful financial advisors. I am proud to say that many executives whom I have mentored over the years at other companies, both men and women, are now colleagues of mine at Guardian with successful careers.

“…I will not make career decisions for them or intervene to accelerate their career.” 172

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September/October 2010


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Janet Crenshaw Smith Ivy Planning Group LLC

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here are three key points for those I mentor, and they’re based on my personal journey. • Everything is possible • Don’t just talk – do. • Know the source of your strength. I was born and raised on the south side of Chicago. I lived in the city and attended public schools. I grew up when the inner city was at its best – a time of high achievement and solidarity, with supportive teachers, community leaders and neighbors who actually knew each other. But my secret weapon was my parents. They believed that I could do and be anything I dreamed of.

Don’t just talk – do. Distance yourself from the crowd by being someone who “gets it done.” Most people talk about what they plan to do. I connect with the passion and heartfelt intentions of well-meaning people. But I depend upon people who are able to convert good intentions, passion and planning into the desired outcome. These are my “go-to people,” those I can count on to get the job done. Because tapping into the limitless possibilities requires the collective resources of a diverse group of people, I am always seeking out others to include in my cadre of “go-to people.” So be the person who gets it done!

TITLE: President

Everything is possible. Imagine if the phrase, “Why not?” were your mantra. Colleagues, managers, friends and even family may respond with seemingly logical answers that could limit your possibilities. Those responses may come from a place of love, fear, insecurity, or from their own inability to see possibilities in you and the world. When you consider your career in a context of limitless possibilities, it increases your choices. You ask different questions, spend time with new people, and become open to opportunity.

Know the source of your strength. With limitless possibilities and a commitment to execute, be very clear on the source of your strength. Sometimes an obstacle will knock you flat on your back. Other times you’ll get tired and worn out being the reliable “go-to” person. That’s when you’ll need clarity. My source is a religious faith that continues to grow and a husband who reminds me of that source when I get weak. Your source may be different. The key is to know it, and to call on it early and often.

EMPLOYEES: 10

EDUCATION: BA, Harvard University FIRST JOB: Marketing Rep, IBM WHAT I’M READING: What Mama Couldn’t Tell Us About Love, by Brenda Lane Richardson and Dr. Brenda Wade; and The E-Myth, by Michael E. Gerber MY PHILOSOPHY: With faith all things are possible. Life is good! FAMILY: Married 26 years to Gary A. Smith, who is also my business partner of 20 years. We have three sons. INTERESTS: Family; HGTV (not only because they’re a client); wine-tastings; relaxing at the spa. FAVORITE CHARITIES: Florida Avenue Baptist Church, Washington, D.C., where we actively support domestic and international missions COMPANY: Ivy Planning Group LLC HEADQUARTERS: Rockville, Maryland WEB SITE: www.ivygroupllc.com BUSINESS: Diversity strategy, implementation and training. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3 million

“Imagine if the phrase, “Why not?” were your mantra.” P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

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Ann Yom Steel U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

TITLE: Deputy Assistant Director, Office of State and Local Coordination EDUCATION: BA, University of Iowa; JD, Washburn University School of Law FIRST JOB: Law firm WHAT I’M READING: Shantaram: A Novel, by Gregory David Roberts MY PHILOSOPHY: Confront fear and adversity. FAMILY: Married to David Steel. INTERESTS: Hiking, scuba-diving, photography. FAVORITE CHARITies: CARE COMPANY: U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C. WEB SITE: www.ice.gov BUSINESS: Federal law enforcement agency. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6 billion EMPLOYEES: 20,000

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y personal philosophy is to confront my fears and adversities, not be afraid to fail, and to have a passion for all that I do. It has been a cornerstone in my professional and personal growth and a result of continuous introspection, accumulation of knowledge and experience, and an integrated perspective on life. It drives my decision making, behavior, choices and actions and has served as source a of support during periods of doubt, turbulence and hardship. It was during times of trouble that my greatest strengths and most debilitating weaknesses were revealed, and my personal philosophy has helped me to move forward. Because accumulation of experience and knowledge is a lifelong process with diverse and broad experiences, successes, failures, and challenges, my personal philosophy remains organic. Oftentimes, individuals in demanding jobs do not have the luxury of time for genuine reflection about their personal philosophy. Most write some peripheral thoughts

about leadership, beliefs and personal philosophy, and discuss it with their immediate subordinates. However, allowing time for introspection is essential for one’s personal philosophy to unfold, expand, mature and deepen over time. Every day, we make decisions, some more life-changing than others. These decisions may include choosing between great opportunities, selecting the lesser of two evils or following a familiar road ahead. Such decisions require a great deal of thought, consideration, emotional involvement and sometimes conflict. But being able to rely on an underlying personal philosophy has helped me determine which path to follow. Discovering a personal philosophy is empowering and one that has allowed me to embrace my solitude to create a framework for understanding the world, people and events around me. While my own core values continue to be the bedrock of my personal philosophy, I relish the unpredictable journey ahead and all the possibilities that await me.

“My personal philosophy is to confront my fears and adversities, not be afraid to fail, and to have a passion for all that I do.” 174

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September/October 2010


Pragmatic builds on diversity.

Exelon operates in a world rich in diversity—in race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, experience and thought. Our commitment to diversity and inclusion is straightforward. It means our employees are more engaged, productive and committed. It means the communities we serve can grow and flourish. It means our business decisions are better informed, positioning our company and our shareholders for continued success. And it means fostering a culture that builds on these values now and in the future.

Š Exelon Corporation, 2010

www.exeloncorp.com


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Kim Stratton Novartis International AG

TITLE: Global Head, Group Country Management and External Affairs EDUCATION: Nursing in Sydney, Australia FIRST JOB: Sales representative for Glaxo Inc. in Australia WHAT I’M READING: The Awakening, by Kate Chopin MY PHILOSOPHY: I want to be a role model female leader, realize my full potential and help my family and associates reach theirs. FAMILY: I’m married with 5 children: (Joseph (25) Giles (20) Matilda (17) Piers (12) Henry (7). My husband Peter is CEO of Family Stratton. He lives in Portugal with 3 of our children. INTERESTS: Reading, film, opera, gym, jogging, Being with my kids, family ski holidays. FAVORITE CHARITies: Unicef COMPANY: Novartis International AG HEADQUARTERS: Basel, Switzerland WEB SITE: www.novartis.com BUSINESS: Healthcare. ANNUAL REVENUES: $44.3 billion in 2009 with approximately $7.5 billion invested in R&D EMPLOYEES: 100,000 associates

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ear Reader: Have you written down your purpose or aspiration? If not, then it’s time to do it! If yes, do you revisit it? Do you share it with others? Personally, I think it should be such an aspiration that when you look at it at age 75, you will feel you did not limit yourself – something big, a picture not limited to titles and status. What about “self-positioning?” How would you describe yourself? How would you like others to describe you? Write it down. Again, don’t limit yourself. So you won’t be this every day – I don’t think a few failings or weaknesses negate the fulfillment of trying. Your failings are helpful if you think about it. What has stopped you from achieving your purpose? What has helped? Write these down – these are my “hygiene factors!” So now you have your aspiration, and you are more conscious of hygiene factors that can help you. The next challenge: do you have a personal logo? No artistic skills required! What symbols or visuals remind you of yourself? A doodle that reminds you of your aspiration or self positioning or self hygiene

“It’s...about resilience with elegance and authenticity.” 176

P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

September/October 2010

factors. Doodle it now. Make it something that’s easy to draw in that moment when you think you are losing the plot! Now my challenge is to share mine with you! My self aspiration: To fully realize my potential at home and at work and create an environment that allows my family and colleagues to reach theirs! My self positioning: To be a successful role model female business leader for me, my family, and my colleagues; achieving a balance of life, work, health and happiness. My hygiene factors include: • Taking care of myself, my family, friends and colleagues • Making time to think and plan for work, family events and celebrations • Managing self, ego, arrogance, frustration and expectations • Providing positive energy in terms of body balance, humor, and how I make others feel. As for my logo, I will draw this for you the next time we meet. So get writing and doodling, loving yourself and those around you, warts and all. It’s not about attaining perfection but about resilience with elegance and authenticity. PS: All ideas and words were inspired and stolen shamelessly from mentors, coaches, my life coach, family, friends, and colleagues, past and present.


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Mara E. Swan Manpower Inc.

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In my role, I head up our “Unleashing Potential” initiative, designed to help each of us lead more effectively and to adopt a coaching style of leadership to create winning relationships. The program provides our people with self-awareness and development, using our Three Es: Experience, Exposure and Education.

Mentoring, a vital part of enhancing a company’s culture, helps build that confidence. Using your insight and knowledge to influence others helps foster dialogue to build learning, trust and commitment. It’s all about engagement. Engaged employees are more likely to be motivated, contribute more to the organization, and stay.

In leading the development of global leadership, I aim to drive better strategic execution through coaching, mentoring and leadership behaviors. We use the program to drive a common language and culture that embodies the company’s vision: lead in the creation and delivery of innovative workforce solutions and services that enable our clients to win in the changing world of work, and values – People, Knowledge and Innovation.

Worldwide, there is a talent mismatch, and as the economy continues to improve and opportunities increase, workers are going to move on and new ones will be tougher to find. My company leverages its expertise to advise organizations on how to attract and retain the best talent, and we practice what we preach.

The world of work has changed so much that now women are faced with a wide range of choices. They have more opportunities for career development and advancement but need to have the confidence to choose what’s right for them and the willingness to take risks. Often, women wait to pursue an opportunity until they know they have acquired the skills necessary. Instead, women need the confidence to be willing to try, and potentially fail, in the process of reaching for their career goals.

I am fortunate to be employed by a company that has its finger on the pulse of the world of work. Manpower has the inside track on how to foster a company culture which means more people are drawn to us and stay here. I’m a believer in creating an environment that promotes entrepreneurship, rewards high performance and motivates people to reach their potential.

TITLE: Executive Vice President, Global Strategy and Talent EDUCATION: BS, University of Buffalo; MBA, University of Minnesota FIRST JOB: Personnel assistant for Miller Brewing Company WHAT I’M READING: The First Tycoon, by T.J. Stiles; Benjamin Franklin, by Walter Isaacson; Crowdsourcing, by Jeff Howe; Linchpin, by Seth Godin; and others MY PHILOSOPHY: Do your best at everything you do. Keep learning. Start and end every day happy. Treat people with warmth and grace. Love your family. FAMILY: Husband Craig; Daughter Madden (23), Son Jacob (20). INTERESTS: Weightlifting, reading, painting, cooking, knitting, entertaining, outdoors activities, my family. FAVORITE CHARITies: Boys and Girls Club, United Way, United Performing Arts Fund, American Heart Association COMPANY: Manpower Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Milwaukee, Wisconsin WEB SITE: www.manpower.com BUSINESS: Workforce solutions and employment services. ANNUAL REVENUES: $16 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 30,000

“…I aim to drive better strategic execution through coaching, mentoring and leadership behaviors.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Laura Tameron Perini Building Company

TITLE: Project Executive EDUCATION: BS, in Construction, College of Engineering, Arizona State University FIRST JOB: Intern for Mardian Construction in Phoenix, Arizona WHAT I’M READING: Blink, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: “Go for it now. The future is promised to no one.” – Wayne Dyer; and “Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined.” – Henry Thoreau. FAMILY: My parents and two brothers, Joe and Mark, live in Arizona with their families; my twin sister Andrea lives in San Francisco; and my brother David, and his wife Jessica, are in Denver. INTERESTS: International travel, hiking, reading. FAVORITE CHARITies: JDRF, Awakenings COMPANY: Perini Building Company HEADQUARTERS: Las Vegas, Nevada WEB SITE: www.tutorperini.com BUSINESS: Commercial construction. ANNUAL REVENUES: $4.5 billion (Number inclusive of all commercial building companies in Tutor Perini Corporation) EMPLOYEES: 322 (Perini Building Company only)

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began with Perini Building Company in 1986 during a summer internship program while attending Arizona State University. I started as an engineer on the Flamingo Hilton Casino Hotel and remodel in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over the years, I traveled with the company and worked throughout the Southwest on various projects such as casinos, hotels, luxury resort villas, state and private correctional institutions, medical facilities, airports, and multipurpose sports arenas. I gradually worked up the corporate ladder and advanced to project executive on CityCenter in Las Vegas, the largest private development in the country. The general nature of the construction business industry requires moving to new types of projects in different locations. In each instance, it is an adjustment to a new owner, architect, design team, and project team. You must learn to quickly adapt and be a team player in new environments. One thing remains the same: hard work and diligence pay off. In order to earn respect, you must also give respect to people at all levels. My greatest challenge, initially, was that I was an anomaly in the construction industry. I started in this business

24 years ago when it was unique to be a woman in this field. Any assignment, any project, any challenge was an opportunity for me to learn and grow. There have been many role models in my life growing up and throughout my career. I was raised with a very strong work ethic and desire for learning by my parents. Mentoring came in the form of watching all levels of management in construction: superintendents, managers, architects, and laborers. I was fortunate to work with amazing mentors in my industry who allowed me to learn and grow. The role of being a mentor is truly described best by John Quincy Adams: “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader.” A mentor inspires people to reach for their dreams and do what they think they cannot do. Becoming involved in local philanthropies and helping those less fortunate really shifted the balance and focus in both my professional and personal life. A great leader inspires those people around him or her to have confidence in themselves. However, it is through our own greatest challenges that growth occurs as we realize our potential.

“A mentor inspires people to reach for their dreams and do what they think they cannot do.” 178

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September/October 2010


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Teresa Taylor Qwest Communications

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science degree, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse FIRST JOB: Waitress WHAT I’M READING: Blink, by Malcolm Gladwell MY PHILOSOPHY: Try to walk in someone else’s shoes . FAMILY: Married with two sons. INTERESTS: Snow skiing. FAVORITE CHARITies: Colorado Children’s Campaign COMPANY: Qwest Communications HEADQUARTERS: Denver, Colorado WEB SITE: www.qwest.com BUSINESS: Telecommunications. ANNUAL REVENUES: $12.3 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 30,000

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o you remember your first interview – that eager candidate anxious to talk up their qualifications? Throughout our careers many of us have, without a doubt, interviewed and hired hundreds of people. We all know how the game is played, so here are some tactics I have found helpful when trying to decide whom to hire. In an office setting everyone is on their best behavior. I believe it’s outside the office where you can learn what a candidate is really like. That’s why I never hire someone without having a meal with them first. Wondering how a candidate will manage a team? Pay close attention to how they interact with the wait staff. Curious about a candidate’s ability to communicate? Listen to how they order. Questioning how a candidate will conduct themselves in various situations? Observe their table manners. It may have been the candidate who took 15 minutes to tell the waiter how he wanted his highly personalized meal prepared. It

may have been the candidate who kept looking around the room of a popular restaurant to see who she recognized or knew. Based on these experiences and countless others, I have changed my mind about candidates after having shared a meal with them. Another thing I like to do is ask each candidate, “If I called three people who have worked for you, how would they describe you?” While it may sound simple, candidates usually tell me at least one negative story along with two good ones. It’s almost as if they are afraid you’re actually going to do it. In the end, you get more information and a better sense about the candidate than you might have otherwise. Hiring the right people for the right positions is an important role of corporate leaders. I highly recommend that people have their own consistent, personal style of interviewing and hiring to ensure they are doing all they can to attract the right people to their organizations.

“Hiring the right people for the right positions is an important role of corporate leaders.” 180

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September/October 2010


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Susan Tousi Eastman Kodak Company

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y approach to mentoring has two vectors. The first was built around the lesson that “your job is what you make of it, not the job title.” If you plan to grow in your professional life, you need to be performing beyond the level of your job. If you want the next job on the ladder, you need to be doing it already. The second is that you must embrace risk. You’re going to achieve much more if you set out for a very big win, even if you don’t know the win is achievable. You might end up with a great win, but if you only set out for something mediocre, that’s what you’ll achieve. This led me from a traditional engineer’s role to an opportunity in Barcelona, where my role was to set up a lab, and hire and train employees on inkjet technologies. From that assignment, I became an engineering project manager and then a program manager with cross-functional responsibilities. Soon I was leading program teams for successful product launches. When Kodak set up a joint venture with Hewlett-Packard in 2000, I got the opportunity to be part of a company that I respected and had values consistent with my own.

Although the joint venture later dissolved, I was hired by (Kodak CEO) Antonio Perez and (Kodak President and COO) Phil Faraci to lead the development of Kodak’s inkjet technology for desktop home printing. Today, I’m general manager of Consumer Inkjet Systems at Kodak, where I lead a worldwide group of some 400 people across all functions in the business. As a woman in business, you sometimes get talked over, especially in a room where you’re the only woman. So, assertiveness is an asset for me. I decided that “getting talked over” would not be the reason I didn’t get heard. As a manager and mentor today, whether coaching men or women, I make sure that their demeanor isn’t the reason they aren’t heard.

TITLE: General Manager, Consumer Inkjet Systems and Vice President, Eastman Kodak Company EDUCATION: BS, Engineering Science & Mechanics, Penn State Univ.; honors discipline in college of engineering; MBA, UCLA: Exec. program FIRST JOB: Hewlett-Packard, Inkjet printing development engineer WHAT I’M READING: The Lost Symbol, by Dan Brown; The Brain That Changes Itself, by Norman Doidge MY PHILOSOPHY: Play to win. FAMILY: Husband, 3 boys (ages 12, 10, 2). INTERESTS: Travel with children, take them everywhere. History, biography of Winston Churchill; to learn about history of different places. Exercise and health. FAVORITE CHARITies: St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital; American Cancer Society COMPANY: Eastman Kodak Company HEADQUARTERS: Rochester, New York WEB SITE: www.kodak.com BUSINESS: Digital and traditional imaging and printing systems. ANNUAL REVENUES: $7.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 20,000

I’ve made work-life balance a priority. I have times that are sacred with my family. There are key events in my kids’ lives that they’ve put hard work into, and there’s no way I would miss those. I’ve jumped through hoops to be there. A few hours in the evening I hold sacred, whether helping my kids with homework or playing with the baby. There’s no BlackBerry®, no TV.

“If you plan to grow in your professional life, you need to be performing beyond the level of your job.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Nancy R. Tuor CH2M HILL

TITLE: Group President and Corporate Sponsor for Sustainability EDUCATION: BS, Economics and Graduate studies toward MS, in Environmental Policy, Portland State University FIRST JOB: Administrative Assistant in an Engineering firm in 1970 as a new college graduate WHAT I’M READING: Peter the Great, by Robert K. Massie; and Lord Peter: The Complete Lord Peter Wimsey Stories, by Dorothy L. Sayers MY PHILOSOPHY: Hire great people, then trust and support them. FAMILY: Husband, James, and son, Ian. INTERESTS: Competitive horseback riding, reading, and travel. FAVORITE CHARITies: Water For People COMPANY: CH2M HILL HEADQUARTERS: Englewood, Colorado WEB SITE: www.ch2mhill.com BUSINESS: Engineering and construction. ANNUAL REVENUES: $6.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 23,500

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he most significant obstacle I overcame in my career, especially in the beginning, was being a nonengineer in an engineering firm. My advice is to really be introspective and self-aware – learn to play to your strengths and manage your weaknesses. For example, I’m not a technical person, but I have a technical aptitude and I use this to give the teams I lead the leverage and resources they need to get the job done. I’m also not a micromanager. I would much rather set the vision, get the right team and help them get the job done. As a project manager, the focus is on how well you serve the client and the project. For women who want to develop their project management skills, I recommend that you build a toolkit of skills. For example, learn to build project plans, then develop a detailed understanding of how to manage costs and project schedules, and look for opportunities to interface with clients.

“For women who want to develop their project management skills, I recommend that you build a toolkit of skills.” 182

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September/October 2010

Understanding my client’s desired outcomes is one of the most important things I can do. It’s important to understand what they really want and then craft a path to get them there. One key strategy is to continually ask “Why?” or “Why not?” This line of questioning can create another path that may be more advantageous for them. When we started on the Rocky Flats Closure project – one of the most well-known nuclear cleanups worldwide – our client, the U.S. Department of Energy, said, “We expect this cleanup to be completed in 70 years and cost $36 billion dollars.” By asking “why?” our team was able to develop a different path that enabled the closure of Rocky Flats to be completed 60 years ahead of schedule and $29 billion under budget. Mentoring: Building strong alliances with people I’m working with on projects has been extremely valuable for me. I think it is almost more important than having a mentor. This network of people knows what I’m capable of and when an opportunity arises they say, “Let’s talk to Nancy about that.” As a mentor, I try to help people get focused on what they really want to do. It’s important to help mentees identify what activities they enjoy doing rather than the job title they think they want.


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Mary E. Tuuk Fifth Third Bancorp

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was raised in a religious home in Grand Rapids, Michigan. My family has always been very close, and to this day I have deep and meaningful relationships with my mother, brothers, sisters-in-law, and nieces and nephews. As a high school senior, I had never experienced any significant life challenges. However, that stability was soon shaken when my father was diagnosed with Stage IV bone cancer. My father passed away when I was a college senior, and those years were colored by the backdrop of a father struggling to beat a Stage IV terminal diagnosis. During my college years, I was heavily involved in music programs. Although music was a great love of mine, I decided to maintain musical pursuits in some capacity other than a vocation. I had always had a strong interest in business and law, and I chose to enroll in Indiana University’s JD/MBA program. At Indiana, I experienced an environment very different from the one to which I was accustomed. However, despite those challenges, my years at Indiana were extremely rewarding. I met many different people from diverse backgrounds. I soon formed a variety of friendships and was enriched by the intellectual opportunities that fed my love of learning. I have seen similar patterns estab-

lish themselves throughout my professional career. Each time I have been faced with a professional challenge, I have envisioned how that challenge could be overcome and the tremendous learning that would result. Many of my career stages have been part of a journey in which doors open at mysterious times, culminating today in my position as Chief Risk Officer for Fifth Third Bancorp.

TITLE: Executive Vice President & Chief Risk Officer

I view all challenges in the context of a lifelong journey. I also see current challenges against the backdrop of my father’s experience, and I immediately gain additional perspective.

INTERESTS: Music, sports, travel, reading, the beach.

I am fortunate to have a multitude of natural interests. My love for music and sports is a source of joy and I have an affinity for people and friendships. My strong family relationships and many friendships from all stages of my personal and professional life have kept me grounded in today’s uncertain world.

WEB SITE: www.53.com

EDUCATION: JD/MBA, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; BA, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI FIRST JOB: Waitress WHAT I’M READING: Resonant Leadership: Renewing Yourself and Connecting with Others Through Mindfulness, Hope, and Compassion, by Richard E. Boyatzis MY PHILOSOPHY: Be open to challenges because they represent a door to the future and are tomorrow’s learning. FAMILY: I am very close with my mother, brothers, sisters-in-law, nieces and nephews.

FAVORITE CHARITies: Fine Arts Fund of Cincinnati COMPANY: Fifth Third Bancorp HEADQUARTERS: Cincinnati, Ohio BUSINESS: Financial institution. ANNUAL REVENUES: $8.1 billion (2009) EMPLOYEES: 22,000+

Many would say that I have a calm style based on thoughtfulness, objectivity and unflappability. Instead, I believe my approach is rooted in a firm foundation continually enhanced by a diversity of enriching experiences.

“I view all challenges in the context of a lifelong journey.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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CELEBRATING A TRUE VISIONARY WE CONGRATULATE LISA VAN DEMARK, BAUSCH + LOMB VICE PRESIDENT OF BRAND MARKETING, ON BEING RECOGNIZED IN PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL’S WOMEN WORTH WATCHING. YOUR OUTSTANDING VISION, PASSION AND LEADERSHIP HAVE MADE YOU A TRUE VISIONARY IN EYE HEALTH.

WE’RE PROUD TO CELEBRATE ALL THOSE HONORED THIS YEAR – YOUR VISION INSPIRES US EVERY DAY.

© 2010 Bausch & Lomb Incorporated. Bausch & Lomb is a registered trademark of Bausch & Lomb Incorporated. All other product/brand names are trademarks of their respective owners. PNS05154


COMPANY AND EXECUTIVE Women Worth Watching 2011 AWARD WINNERS Kelly J. Watson, KPMG • Leila Vespoli, FirstEnergy • Mary Zimmer, RBC U.S. Wealth Management • Christine Wilson, O’Melveny & Myers • Pamela A. Wickham, Raytheon Tujuanna B. Williams, Freddie Mac • Kelli Valade, Brinker Intl. • Lisa VanDeMark, Bausch + Lomb • Frances M. Vallejo, ConocoPhillips • Joyce L. Ulrich, Legg Mason • Tammy Young, Moss Adams ®

Volume 12, Number 5 September / October 2010

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th

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in 2011


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Joyce L. Ulrich Legg Mason Global Asset Management

TITLE: Managing Director, Co-Chief Information Officer; Head of Global Systems and Operations EDUCATION: Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, BS, Economics FIRST JOB: Management Trainee, Defined Benefit Pension Dept., Mutual of New York WHAT I’M READING: SuperFreakonomics, by Steven D. Levitt MY PHILOSOPHY: Work hard, do your best, be kind. A thing worth doing is worth doing well. Help others however you can. FAMILY: Husband, Hank Stewart; daughters: Louise, and Elizabeth. INTERESTS: Advisor to Girl Scout Troop 1383; gardening; sewing. FAVORITE CHARITies: Girl Scouts of Central Maryland. Board memberships: the American Diabetes Association of Maryland, the Baltimore Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America, and others COMPANY: Legg Mason Global Asset Management HEADQUARTERS: Baltimore, Maryland WEB SITE: www.leggmason.com BUSINESS: Global Asset Management. ANNUAL REVENUES: $2.6 billion EMPLOYEES: 3,700

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hen I finished college in 1978, I accepted a position as a management trainee. I selected this offer over others because I had the feeling that my new manager would be a great boss, and it turned out my instinct was right. He really cared about my career development, and he has been the yardstick against which I have measured all subsequent managers, and the standard I set for myself as a manager. I have learned something from every manager I ever had – some things good, and some things “what not to do.” One piece of advice I would give is to be self-aware and learn from your experiences. When I am hiring, the “perfect candidate” is smart, honest, fair, willing to work hard and flexible. I can teach you everything else you need to know, but you must bring the basic building blocks with you. I have a few favorite sayings, and one of them is “intellectual discipline, intellectual rigor, and intellectual honesty.” Be curious about how things work and how to make things

better. Be open minded to change and different ideas. Be fair and always be honest with yourself and others, even when the truth is painful. When you understand the truth, you can act with conviction. Get a good education. Put yourself in hock if you have to! Through work and loans, I personally financed my college education. I still use things I learned years ago. College helped me learn how to think; not what to think, but how to think. This is the best investment I ever made. Practice moderation. That’s how you’ll be able to balance a career and a family. Lose the guilt – it’s a waste of energy. Just do your best and things will work out. Optimism is underrated and entirely too scarce. I have seen a lot of changes over these past three decades. Now, it’s rare that I am the only woman in the room, and that is a refreshing change. Don’t let folks who are uncomfortable with diversity stand in your way. Persevere, because talent and hard work will win out.

“Be fair and always be honest with yourself and others, even when the truth is painful.” 186

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Kelli Valade Brinker International

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y roots in the restaurant industry were firmly planted when I began as a server at TJ’s Big Boy restaurant, and the opportunities for growth have been nonstop since. Early in my career I realized I was engaged in something powerful. Going above and beyond to create a phenomenal hospitality experience is why I have always been proud of what the restaurant industry stands for: connecting with people at a human level. My career development has encompassed several key disciplines over the years. Exposure within human resources taught me worklife skills that allow me to be proud of the results and their impact on our business. Compensation and diversity taught me how to retain the best of the talent pool, regardless of background. My exposure in training further honed my skills in communication and taught me the value of accuracy. It instilled in me the desire to raise the bar for delivering the best tools to our operators while positively impacting results. When I returned to operations, the experiences in those departments set me up for success in my current role as chief operating officer.

I was fortunate to have been hired and developed by two strong businesswomen, who saw in me what I might not have seen in myself early in my career. Those women are powerful mentors to me to this day. I realize the impact strong women leaders can make on a woman in this business and I’m proud to nurture those relationships today.

TITLE: Chief Operating Officer for Chili’s Grill & Bar

Currently, I am responsible for operations and endorse initiatives that empower our 1,300 restaurants nationwide. My responsibility is to set a positive example and nurture each team member’s development at every level. The most important lesson in leadership I’ve learned as of late is that fairness, and being trustworthy and courageous, are vital attributes to growth and achievement.

INTERESTS: I love spending time with my family, traveling, cooking (Italian food) and helping my kids with their basketball games.

EDUCATION: BA, Binghamton University; MBA, Syracuse University FIRST JOB: Server, TJ’s Big Boy restaurant WHAT I’M READING: Joker One, by Donovan Campbell; and It’s Not What You Sell, it’s What You Stand For, by Roy M. Spence, Jr. MY PHILOSOPHY: Always assume good intentions from everyone. Your response and approach will be different because of it. FAMILY: Husband, Don; 9-year-old daughter, Morgan; 7-year old son, Christian.

FAVORITE CHARITies: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital® COMPANY: Brinker International HEADQUARTERS: Dallas, Texas WEB SITE: www.brinker.com BUSINESS: Casual dining restaurant company, with restaurant brands including Chili’s® Grill & Bar and Maggiano’s Little Italy®. ANNUAL REVENUES: $3.2 billion in 2009 EMPLOYEES: 100,000

What I love the most about Brinker International is that while we are a global company in reference to the number of restaurants we operate, we have such a small and inclusive family atmosphere. I’m extremely proud to be a part of an organization that understands the importance of giving back and supporting our communities, while guiding people in their professional and personal success.

“My exposure in training further honed my skills in communication and taught me the value of accuracy.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

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Frances M. Vallejo ConocoPhillips

TITLE: Vice President and Treasurer EDUCATION: BS, Mineral Engineering Mathematics, Geophysics Specialty, Colorado School of Mines; MBA, Finance and International Business Specialties, Rice University FIRST JOB: Geophysicist, Phillips Petroleum Company WHAT I’M READING: The Korean War in Color, Recollections and Photos of a Combat Photographer, written by my dad, M. Edmund Vallejo MY PHILOSOPHY: Make the most of your God-given talents, have life balance, and give back. FAMILY: My #1 priority! Husband Scott Irvine and kids Elise, Elena and Eli. INTERESTS: Travel, piano, and gardening. FAVORITE CHARITies: Teach for America, United Way, my kids’ schools COMPANY: ConocoPhillips HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEB SITE: www.conocophillips.com BUSINESS: Integrated energy company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $152.84 billion EMPLOYEES: 30,000 worldwide

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hen I was a child, I didn’t know what I wanted to be when I grew up. I envied those who did. Fortunately, my loving and supportive family gave me opportunities to explore and learn and choose what I wanted to do. I was good at math and science, so I chose the best engineering school in my state, the Colorado School of Mines. It wasn’t until I was forced into a decision that I chose my major – engineering mathematics with a geophysics specialty. After graduation I joined ConocoPhillips and spent six years as a geophysicist. I enjoyed it, but felt I had other things to offer. So I moved into natural gas supply. It was a learning experience, but still not home. So I pursued an MBA, not to change my career, but to gain the knowledge. I was hired back into our treasury function, then moved into the strategic transactions group while our company was growing through mergers and acquisitions. Today I serve as vice president and treasurer for ConocoPhillips. To me, it’s the best job in the company. I didn’t plan this career path, but I was open to change, and manage-

ment was open to trying me in new areas. It has turned out well. The bottom line to me is choosing work you are passionate about and enjoy, doing your job well, and focusing on the task at hand. Trust in yourself and your abilities, and trust that you will be recognized for them. People who spend too much time worrying about their next promotion probably aren’t doing their job. My parents told me growing up that it was okay to be anything, high or low on the ladder, but to be the best at it. This is all the guidance I’ve needed. I’ve also benefited from the support of my husband and three children, and our shared success at allocating our time to the activities most important to all of us. I’ve also had supportive managers as well as employees. Further, I’ve benefited from seeking out “not-my-job” activities. Whether serving on a cross-functional team of colleagues addressing a work need, or assisting a community or charitable organization, you will expand your skills and demonstrate your talents to a wider group of people. And one day, these new skills or people may lead to your next opportunity.

“Trust in yourself and your abilities, and trust that you will be recognized for them.” 188

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It takes all of us to shape innovation As a global leader in packaging solutions, MWV understands that diversity fuels innovation. That’s why we’ve built a culture of inclusion in which people of all backgrounds are valued and multiple viewpoints are encouraged. Together, our talented workforce generates creativity that keeps us competitive in the marketplace. That’s the power of diversity.

mwv.com


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Lisa VanDeMark Bausch + Lomb

TITLE: Vice President of Marketing, North America Vision Care EDUCATION: BS, Rochester Institute of Technology; MBA, Cornell University FIRST JOB: Production Supervisor at a small privately owned printing company WHAT I’M READING: Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen; Blue Ocean Strategy, by W. Chan Kim; Twilight Series, by Stephanie Meyer MY PHILOSOPHY: Don’t take yourself too seriously. FAMILY: Husband, Chris. Married 15 years. Two sons, Cameron (12) and Joshua (10). Dog Copper (2). INTERESTS: Spending time watching my sons’ sporting events and music endeavors, camping, spending time with family and friends, reading, working out. FAVORITE CHARITies: United Way COMPANY: Bausch + Lomb HEADQUARTERS: Rochester, New York WEB SITE: www.bausch.com BUSINESS: A global company dedicated to bringing visionary ideas to eye health. ANNUAL REVENUES: Privately Held EMPLOYEES: Approximately 11,000 worldwide

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s a working mom, I’m often asked how to achieve balance between home and work life. It’s a challenging question and one that I’ve found doesn’t have a formulaic answer. I’ve learned that balance is not about having it all, but instead about knowing what’s important and holding true to that idea. As a result, I know what tradeoffs I’m willing to make to achieve my own balance. The definition of balance is different for each individual and the definition can change over time, even on a daily basis. Achieving balance isn’t a one-time decision; it’s an ongoing series of choices and decisions. I find myself making decisions daily on the tradeoffs between my work and family life. For me, it’s not an individual effort but a team effort with my husband. For my husband Chris and me, it was important that our children were under our care the majority of time prior to attending school. My hus-

“Achieving balance isn’t a one-time decision; it’s an ongoing series of choices and decisions.” 190

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band’s career allowed him to work a flexible schedule. We combined his flexible work schedule with a nanny three days a week. That arrangement worked for us. However, as our children grew older, it became equally important to us to continue being the primary care givers for them when they were not at school. At the time, we were both working full-time and for us, the balance equation was not conducive to our needs. We made a mutual decision that my husband would make the big leap and become a stay-at-home dad. This was in no way an easy decision but for us, it was the right decision. Given this background, my personal balance comes from having the ability to spend maximum time with my family and friends. I strive to never miss one of any of my children’s games, concerts or a special event at school. It doesn’t always turn out that way, but on balance it works for me. While I am not able to be a school volunteer or to coach a team, my husband is and that helps create a total balance for my family. My advice is simple: understand what’s important to you and hold true to it, being open to the idea that the definition of balance and how you achieve it may change over time.


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Leila Vespoli FirstEnergy Corp.

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hange has been the one constant during my career.

In my 25 years in the electric business, I’ve been part of the industry’s most significant evolution from a fully regulated business to the challenging world of deregulation and competition. This business also has changed from one where few females reached the top jobs to an environment with tremendous career opportunities at all levels of the organization for talented women. My career at Ohio Edison, and then FirstEnergy, began right after I graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. At that time, there were no clear paths for women’s careers in the electric utility business. We tried to fit in as best we could by mimicking the clothing and work styles of the men who held the leadership roles. That has certainly changed. I started my career working on regulatory issues, and it was the best training ground I could have imagined. These issues touched every aspect of our business. While I was developing my legal skills, I also was gaining knowledge about my company and industry. Meanwhile, I was learning from the talented leaders around me, honing my own leadership skills. Leadership isn’t gender-specific.

Effective leaders share common traits. They demonstrate the qualities of strong leadership every day through their actions, decisions and sometimes simply through the image they project. Great leaders also are great communicators. They have frequent, open and honest communication with employees. They know how to deliver tough messages. But they know it’s equally important to be a good listener. The opportunities for young people starting out in this business are incredible. The best advice I can give new employees is to find something they love to do, work hard at it and always give their best. Accept and even embrace change – it will keep coming, and you may even learn to enjoy it! Talent is essential, but determination and a solid work ethic are equally important.

TITLE: Executive Vice President and General Counsel, FirstEnergy Corp. EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science in Business Economics, Miami University; Law degree, Case Western Reserve University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor Technology Course for Utility Executives FIRST JOB: Associate attorney with Ohio Edison (predecessor company of FirstEnergy) WHAT I’M READING: I enjoy mysteries MY PHILOSOPHY: Leaders create a work environment that showcases others’ strengths and provides them with the tools and assistance they need to succeed. FAMILY: Husband, Tony. Two collegeage daughters – Daniella and Carolyn. INTERESTS: Painting and snow skiing. FAVORITE CHARITies: The Food Bank and United Way COMPANY: FirstEnergy Corp. HEADQUARTERS: Akron, Ohio WEB SITE: www.firstenergycorp.com BUSINESS: Diversified energy company. ANNUAL REVENUES: $13 billion EMPLOYEES: 13,379

I’ve never seen challenges as roadblocks. It fact, they have served to strengthen my resolve and remind me of the importance of mentoring talented individuals who will be our future leaders, fully equipped to meet the challenges that lie ahead.

“The opportunities for young people starting out in this business are incredible.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

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Kelly J. Watson KPMG LLP (the U.S. firm)

TITLE: KPMG LLP Office Managing Partner, Short Hills, New Jersey EDUCATION: Fordham University, BS, Accounting and Finance FIRST JOB: KPMG LLP as an intern WHAT I’M READING: Elizabeth Street, by Laurie Fabiano MY PHILOSOPHY: “Go into the world and do well, but more importantly, go into the world and do good” – Minor Myers Jr. FAMILY: Husband, Derek; and 11-yearold daughter, Victoria; and eight-year-old son, William. INTERESTS: Traveling, reading, playing tennis. FAVORITE CHARITies: Millennium Promise COMPANY: KPMG LLP (the U.S. firm) HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.kpmg.com BUSINESS: Audit, tax and advisory firm. EMPLOYEES: 21,000 in the U.S.

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s Robert Frost said “And I, I took the road less travelled and it has made all the difference.” This message has served me well in my career at KPMG, since joining the firm more than 21 years ago. I like to think of my career as a marathon rather than a sprint and right now, I am enjoying this part of the journey. While everyone should have personal and professional goals that guide where they want to be in five or ten years, it’s important to be flexible with those goals in order to take advantage of opportunities that might come along. Taking advantage of those opportunities has changed me. Typically, it takes about 10-12 years to become a partner in a public accounting firm after graduating from college. It took me longer – over 15 years because I veered off course more than once to pursue opportunities that helped shape me into a better leader. The first opportunity was taking an assignment in Prague, where I helped establish KPMG’s Central

“I learned at an early age about taking chances and being brave.” 192

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and Eastern Europe training program and served various multinational corporations. It wasn’t part of my original plan, but it was an incredible experience. I traveled to 19 different countries, met with international clients and made wonderful friends along the way. The second career-changing decision I made was to work part time when our two children were babies. This was an important and fleeting time in our lives, and I didn’t want to miss it. Again, it set me back in terms of my goal to become a partner, but it was well worth it. I learned at an early age about taking chances and being brave. When I was seven years old, my family moved to western Africa. It turned out to be one of the true gifts of my life because it opened my eyes to a world I would never have known. The experience helped me understand the struggles other people face and to never take good fortune for granted. It taught me the critical traits of both empathy and sympathy. There were times when I struggled with the decisions of diverging from my original path, and I would now say to others, “Take the chance, run with it and enjoy—things will work out the way they are supposed to.” For me, taking that less traveled road has indeed made all the difference.


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Pamela A. Wickham Raytheon Company

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here have been two themes throughout my career. The first has been my commitment to my profession of communications. I’ve always loved what I do and I have a passion for the discipline. It’s an exciting profession, never boring and always challenging. And it is the challenging part that is personally most rewarding. To take on a challenge, leverage expertise and talent from your team, craft a strategic response, and execute with excellence is an experience rich in its diversity of accomplishment. The second theme is “Do what you love and love what you do.” You owe it to yourself, your team and your employer to be fully engaged in the here and now. You can’t predict the future and you shouldn’t waste your time on “if onlys.” What you can do is manage your time, your behavior and your commitment today, right now. Those who deliver on their commitments are solid performers, but those who exceed expectations are superstars. Others will always take notice of those employees, and great opportunities will surely follow. I began my career as a substitute teacher, and then joined a public relations agency in a secretarial role. I was thrilled with the opportunity, and that enthusiasm combined with a lot of hard work helped me progress into more senior roles. Now, I’m privileged to lead an industry-best communica-

tions team for a Fortune 100 company, and my enthusiasm for my work, my company and my team continues to grow by leaps and bounds. Throughout my journey, I kept personal responsibility a priority. Regardless of where you are in your career, I believe these behaviors are key to success: Lead by example. You were hired because someone believes in you. Think about that every day and work hard to earn that confidence. Embrace the highest ethical standards. Be a role model in this area and never compromise your ethics. Always treat others with respect and seek out diversity of thought and opinion. Be in charge of your own career. Don’t look to others to make your dreams come true. You own your career – make the most of it!

TITLE: Vice President of Corporate Affairs and Communications EDUCATION: BA, English – University of Oklahoma FIRST JOB: Assistant, Richard Weiner, Inc (NYC) WHAT I’M READING: Game Change, by John Heilemann; Van Gogh, by Ingo F. Walther MY PHILOSOPHY: Do what you love and love what you do. FAMILY: Wonderful parents, 5 brothers and sisters, and 9 nieces and nephews. INTERESTS: Visiting art museums, wine tasting, beachcombing in North Carolina, and spending time with family and friends. FAVORITE CHARITies: Marjorie Wickham Memorial Scholarship for young women at Lee (MA) High School; and others COMPANY: Raytheon Company HEADQUARTERS: Waltham, Massachusetts WEB SITE: www.raytheon.com BUSINESS: Defense, homeland security, information security and other government markets. ANNUAL REVENUES: $24.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 75,000

Remember, your journey is your own. There will be victories and challenges, excitement and frustration. But, through it all, if you love what you do, exceed expectations, partner and team effectively, and own your own success, you will position yourself to become a leader tomorrow.

“I’ve always loved what I do and I have a passion for the discipline.” P ro f i l e s i n D i v e r s i t y J o u r n a l

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Tujuanna B. Williams Freddie Mac

TITLE: Vice President, Diversity and Inclusion EDUCATION: Middle Tennessee University FIRST JOB: Reservations Sales Agent WHAT I’M READING: The Bible MY PHILOSOPHY: To whom much is given, much is required; ensure that your service to others is great. FAMILY: Husband and two daughters. INTERESTS: Reading, traveling and spending time with family. FAVORITE CHARITies: Suited for Change COMPANY: Freddie Mac HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEB SITE: www.freddiemac.com BUSINESS: Mortgage finance. ANNUAL REVENUES: $14.3 billion (2009) EMPLOYEES: Approx. 5,400

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s Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion for Freddie Mac, I know all too well the challenge of trying to find the right balance between your career and personal life. As women, many of us also have the added pressure of feeling guilty that we are focusing too much on advancing our careers, and not spending enough time on our responsibilities as wives and mothers.

means to you. Each individual’s road to success is paved by what is uniquely important to him or her. Once that has been defined, you can begin to create your foundation because we will all need help and support from our loved ones. As soon as I admitted that to myself, I easily found the support I needed at home, and at work, to ensure I was able to deliver on the things that meant the most to me.

Having that balance starts with knowing what is truly important in your life. I have found that doing the things that support my wellbeing, like spending quality time with family and friends, being active in my church, and serving others, has helped me to be more successful in my career. It also helps that my chosen career is something I am very passionate about. While it can be challenging at times, I am invigorated by speaking at diversity events, sharing best practices, educating people on the importance of fairness and inclusion in the workplace, and teaching them to look at things from a different perspective.

It is also important to realize, for women especially, that you can have it all, just not all at the same time. You can move up in your careers and still focus on your family. There may be times when you need to make lateral career moves to have more time at home, but you can still gain new skills and experiences. Once your personal circumstances change, you will be equipped to focus on that next move on your career ladder.

My advice to any professional is to first define what balance really

We are all striving for the same things, doing well at work while doing right by others and ourselves. It’s not always an easy task, but you can learn to strike the right balance by pursuing what is most important to you as a person.

“My advice to any professional is to first define what balance really means to you.” 194

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Think what’s possible.

Diversity and inclusion are part of who we are and what we value. Thousands of people within the Novartis Group work tirelessly each day to improve, extend and save millions of lives. That is why our commitment to our employees is a top priority. Diversity initiatives such as employee resource groups, local diversity councils and outreach panels empower our associates to innovate continuously and better serve our diverse patients and customers. These initiatives, coupled with healthy lifestyle programs, domestic partner benefits, child/elder care subsidies and more, result in a corporate culture that is not only unique, but invigorating. For more information, please visit www.novartis.com. Novartis Group Companies are committed to embracing and leveraging diverse backgrounds, cultures and talents to achieve competitive advantage. Across 140 countries worldwide, Novartis Group Company associates share a vision of a better today and tomorrow for patients – a vision that drives our growth and success. The greatest job satisfaction for our associates is the knowledge that they help improve the quality of life for patients with increasing precision and efficiency through breakthrough science and innovation. Our performance-oriented culture and responsible approach attract top experts in all areas – research and development, marketing and sales, finance and administration. Our talented associates have made us a global leader in healthcare. Novartis is committed to rewarding the people who invest ideas and work in our company. Novartis Group Companies are equal opportunity employers m/f/d/v.


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Christine Wilson O’Melveny & Myers LLP

TITLE: Partner EDUCATION: BA, University of Florida (Phi Beta Kappa); JD, Georgetown University Law Center (Cum Laude) FIRST JOB: Math tutor WHAT I’M READING: Liberty and Tyranny, by Mark R. Levin; From Third World to First, by Kwan Yew Lee; The Bible MY PHILOSOPHY: There is no limit to what you can accomplish if you don’t mind who gets the credit (attributed to Ronald Reagan). FAMILY: My husband and I share our home with two daughters, two dogs, six cats, my mother, her husband, his fish aquarium, and a public interest law school student. INTERESTS: Promoting free markets, halting human trafficking, reading, spending time with my family. FAVORITE CHARITIES: International Justice Mission COMPANY: O’Melveny & Myers LLP HEADQUARTERS: International WEB SITE: www.omm.com BUSINESS: Law firm. ANNUAL REVENUES: $826 million EMPLOYEES: Nearly 2,000

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have been blessed with mentors who shared their wisdom freely, patiently turned my mistakes into teaching moments, and provided me with countless opportunities to grow. These mentors helped me build the flourishing legal career that I enjoy today. Below are some lessons I learned along the way: Embrace growth opportunities: One mentor routinely provided amazing opportunities to develop new skills. Once, though, he asked me to handle a task that seemed way beyond my capabilities. I told him, “This doesn’t exactly fall within my comfort zone.” He pulled himself up to his full height and thundered, “I don’t pay you to live within your comfort zone!” I’ll never forget the way he pushed me to grow. If I had remained in my comfort zone, how many lessons would have gone unlearned? Seek shoulders to stand on, and become the shoulders for others: Following law school, I worked for a former Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust. Early on, we made a deal: If I devoted 100 percent of my time, talent, and energy to his practice, he would teach me

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everything he knew before turning me over to another mentor. For five years, I devoted myself to the success of his practice. And when our mutual colleague was nominated as chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, the former AAG encouraged him to select me as his chief of staff. In that role, I grew as an antitrust lawyer and a leader. Without support from these mentors, I would not be where I am today. But to whom much is given, much is expected. Thus, I seek to invest in the next generation just as my mentors have invested in me. Enjoy the current season: During a two-year sabbatical from the practice of law, I relished spending time with my family but missed aspects of my professional career. After all, the mother of young children can grow weary of nonlinear conversations and the lack of appreciation for her hard work. (You probably never said to your mom, “Wow! I just love the way you folded that load of laundry!”) Today, I’m thrilled to be practicing law. Not surprisingly, though, I remember fondly the days of unlimited time with my family. The lesson? You can have it all, just not necessarily at the same time. Focus on the benefits of each season, not the costs. The next season in your life may provide what you think you lack today.


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Tammy Young Moss Adams LLP

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ver the years, I’ve learned that growing a career is a lot like building and managing a profitable portfolio. Success is all about making smart investments, considering risks, and focusing on the long term. From the midpoint of my college career, I had a vision for my future: I wanted to be a human resources executive. But first I had to figure out how to get there. One of my valued mentors, my older sister, suggested a counterintuitive approach – pursue an accounting degree to build a strong technical foundation and learn the business world, from assets and liabilities up. I’ve never regretted following her advice. A balanced portfolio of skills is vital in the long term, and it starts with the right building blocks. Like a good asset manager, I focused next on diversification. Developing acumen in communication, negotiation, and leadership took time and, most important, mentoring. I put my best foot forward today because I’ve learned from a list of immensely talented mentors over the years, from supervisors to peers to direct reports. Each relationship required an investment of time from both parties. I’m thankful to those who have been vested in my success, and I’ve strived to be vested in theirs as well. We perform at our peak when we work in an area that challenges and

interests us. Over time I balanced the investments in my career portfolio by pursuing work aligned with my interests and for which there’s demand. Migrating my career focus involved taking several well-timed risks. Accepting these risks ultimately brought me to my current role, a position that fully engages me intellectually and is a good match for my energy and passion.

TITLE: Managing Director – Human Resources

Finally, a thought that runs parallel to the emerging concept of socially conscious investing: I have great passion for serving my community and inspiring others to do the same. It’s the right thing to do, and it pays rich career dividends. As a result of my community-focused time, my network is full of contacts from nearly every segment of the business and nonprofit world. This is a vibrant, well-connected group of people whose values are aligned with my own and those of my firm.

INTERESTS: Cycling, gardening, cuisine – cooking and dining.

EDUCATION: University of Wisconsin, BBA, Business/Accounting and Finance FIRST JOB: Auditor – Arthur Andersen WHAT I’M READING: The Loudest Duck, by Laura A. Liswood; Farm City, by Novella Carpenter; and a big stack of the Harvard Business Review MY PHILOSOPHY: “Personal energy is your greatest asset. Lead with it. Spend it wisely. Replenish it.” FAMILY: Parents (89 and 85), my significant other, Hahns, his three children (14/12/12) and my loyal canine companion.

FAVORITE CHARITies: Boys & Girls Clubs of King County COMPANY: Moss Adams LLP HEADQUARTERS: Seattle, Washington WEB SITE: www.mossadams.com BUSINESS: Public accounting & consulting. ANNUAL REVENUES: $322 million EMPLOYEES: 1,750

Like investing, building a career portfolio is a process that takes thought, care, and time. But it’s a process that pays dividends for the rest of your life.

“A balanced portfolio of skills is vital in the long term, and it starts with the right building blocks.” Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

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Mary Zimmer RBC U.S. Wealth Management

TITLE: Head of Primary Advisor Services EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree (accounting), University of St. Thomas; Master’s degree (taxation), University of Minnesota – Carlson School of Management FIRST JOB: Waitress at Bridgeman’s WHAT I’M READING: Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortenson MY PHILOSOPHY: Open mind, open skies – always focus on the positives. FAMILY: Husband, Bill; sons Jon and Tom; my parents; seven siblings. INTERESTS: Family, golf, basketball, travel, music and theater. FAVORITE CHARITies: Greater Minneapolis Crisis Nursery; The Morton Cure Paralysis Fund (MCPF) COMPANY: RBC U.S. Wealth Management HEADQUARTERS: Minneapolis, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.rbcwm-usa.com BUSINESS: Financial services: Providing investment advice, exceptional service and an unbiased, independent perspective to clients to help them achieve their financial goals. ANNUAL REVENUES: $1.2 billion in 2009 EMPLOYEES: 4,900

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can point to three factors that contributed to my career advancement – education, experience and people. Clearly, my education and experience were essential to doing my job well. However, I’d have to say my relationship with people has mattered the most. And I’m fortunate that I work for a company that highly values its people. RBC U.S. Wealth Management provides a welcoming, inclusive work environment that offers the flexibility and support that most employees look for in a company. This type of culture, along with diversity and inclusion initiatives that continually improve our workplace, is particularly important to me as both a female professional and working mother. I’m very pleased with the accomplishments our firm is making toward women’s growth. What’s more, I’m also proud that our parent company, Royal Bank of Canada, was honored with the 2010 Catalyst Award for exceptional initiatives that

support and advance women and people of color in business. I believe women in business can advance in their careers and overcome challenges in the workplace by seizing learning opportunities and garnering the support of other women. I have had wonderful women supporting me my entire life; specifically, my mother and my five sisters. By sharing our qualities and perspectives, we have helped each other through critical decisions and life’s challenges. Many other women and men have also provided guidance and advice throughout my career. These have inspired me, in turn, to reach out, mentor and give back to others. For women who want to know the secret to building a successful career in business, my answer is this: seize every opportunity to acquire a wide array of business experience, get a well-rounded education and, most importantly, value key relationships, because people can and will help others succeed.

“Seize every opportunity to acquire a wide array of business experience, get a well-rounded education and, most importantly, value key relationships, because people can and will help others succeed.” 198

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Relationships matter Whether achieving your career goals as a female financial professional or accomplishing your investment goals as a woman, the people you choose to work with can play a key role in your success. At RBC Wealth Management, our culture values the contributions of women. And we actively encourage women to support one another through a variety of programs designed to help women create the futures they want. Both for themselves and those that they care about.

Congratulations, for being named one of the Women Worth Watching.

Mary Zimmer, Head of Primary Advisor Services One of the many RBC Wealth Management women worth watching.

Š 2010 RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets Corporation, Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC.


Celebrating

Hispanic Heritage M nth Celebración del Mes de la Herencia Hispana

Hispanic Heritage Month begins September 15th, the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries – Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua – that all declared independence in 1821. Today, approximately 45 million people in the United States identify themselves as Hispanic or Latino. We asked our Hispanic readers to share their stories with us. We wanted to know who influenced them early on, what they value right now, and what they share as mentors. We are proud to introduce these individuals to you; we applaud their efforts and celebrate their achievements. We hope you’ll enjoy meeting them.

Ramon Martin

Executive Vice President, World Service Americas

American Express Company HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.americanexpress.com Primary BUSINESS: Financial services & insurance/banking/credit services. EMPLOYEES: 59,000 employees world wide

What is your definition of leadership? A leader is someone who makes a positive impact on people’s lives – both professionally and personally. A leader also creates followership. This happens when people achieve more under your leadership than they ever thought they would. EDUCATION: Bachelor’s Degree in Industrial Engineering with an MBA from the Instituto Empresa in Madrid and an ABS from Harvard WHAT I’M READING: Right from the Start, by Dan Ciampa; Garoé, by Alberto Vazquez-Figueroa MY PHILOSOPHY: To be true to my principles which are: family first; do the right thing; and have a positive impact on other people’s lives. INTERESTS: My interests are around family activities. I also enjoy horseback riding, skiing and reading.

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What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? My career accomplishments are on going. For example, each time my team wins or achieves a goal – that’s an accomplishment. Each time my team members progress professionally or personally – that’s an accomplishment. Each time I hear about my team members’ personal successes – that’s an accomplishment. What are the personal and/or professional sacrifices to being a leader? One of the sacrifices a leader will make is that of time. So always strive to have a balance between your personal and your professional life. Be aware of the decisions you’re making and how those decisions will impact where you’re spending your time. Be clear at all times about your own principles and priorities. This helps as you attempt to maintain a balanced personal and professional life.

September/October 2010


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Carlos (Charlie) Vizoso

Regional Vice President, ARAMARK Healthcare

ARAMARK HEADQUARTERS: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.aramark.com Primary BUSINESS: Professional services. EMPLOYEES: 255,000

EDUCATION: BA in Liberal Arts, Penn State University WHAT I’M READING: Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard, by Chip and Dan Heath MY PHILOSOPHY: Always do the right thing. INTERESTS: Family and Boating.

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success? One of the largest, most successful landowners in Cuba, my grandfather left the country in 1960 with nothing, but his family by his side. He did not speak English, but he started working to support his entire extended family as soon as he arrived in Miami. He worked tirelessly and held a variety of jobs just to make the ends meet. Today, he is fluent in English, an extremely successful businessman and has been married for 65 years. To me, there is no greater model for personal and professional success as my grandfather who, against all odds, made a life for himself and his family that we could all be proud of. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? I feel an incredible sense of accomplishment when I watch those I’ve mentored and coached throughout my career grow into executive positions with strong responsibilities and become great leaders. What advice can you provide for young leaders? Good is never good enough. Strive to be the best at everything you do – both in your personal and professional life.

Angela Maria Messer

Senior Vice President

Booz Allen Hamilton HEADQUARTERS: McLean, Virginia WEB SITE: www.boozallen.com Primary BUSINESS: Technology and management consulting. EMPLOYEES: 22,000+

What is your definition of leadership? A true leader is one who has the ability to persuade people to follow. They establish the direction of their work to influence and align others toward a common goal – motivating and committing them to action all while making them responsible for their actions and performance. What advice can you provide for young leaders? To be successful, you need to first come to know yourself. Next, you should work to master the art of listening and two-way communication. This will help you to develop lasting relationships – ones based on respect, rapport, and trust. Developing your leadership skills is not something you can accomplish quickly; it’s a journey you take throughout your life. Along the way, find mentors to help you navigate your options and inform your decisions at every stage of your career. Given the chance, would you do anything differently? The experiences and choices I’ve made along the way have shaped the person I am today. I believe you should continue to look forward and embrace past experiences to improve future decisions.

EDUCATION: BS Management Engineering (United States Military Academy), MS Management (Florida Institute of Technology) WHAT I’M READING: The Fourth Star, by Greg Jaffe and David Cloud; Cyber War by Richard Clarke; Leadership Secrets of Hillary Clinton, by Rebecca Shambaugh MY PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing; make a difference. INTERESTS: Travel, music, dance, and outdoor activities like diving, boating, and cycling.

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Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Irving David Ramirez

Vice President and Division Manager

CACI International Inc HEADQUARTERS: Arlington, Virginia WEB SITE: www.caci.com Primary BUSINESS: Government contractor. EMPLOYEES: 13,100

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success? My father. He enlisted in the United States Air Force and worked tirelessly to make a difference for our country and provide for our family. I witnessed the personal sacrifices he made to do the right thing. He taught me about commitment, hard work, love for country, and respect for the military. What are the personal and/or professional sacrifices to being a leader? You are never “off the job” – as the leader of my organization, I am accessible to my team 24/7. To avoid favoritism and bias, I maintain only professional relationships with my team. I set the example for my team by being willing to work harder than anyone else. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take? Leaders must be willing to put their personal and professional reputations on the line. They cannot sit back and think of the consequences that taking action or making a decision will have on their reputation. Effective leaders listen to their teams’ advice and counsel and then trust in their own abilities to make the right decisions.

Kristina Robinson

EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science, Computer and Information Science, 1984, The Ohio State University WHAT I’M READING: Think Again, by Sydney Finkelstein; The Power of One, by Bryce Courtenay MY PHILOSOPHY: Epictetus once said, “It is the emergence out of the darkness that makes the sunrise so splendid.” INTERESTS: Running, Buckeye (Ohio State) sports, MLS Soccer, playing the trumpet, Siberian Huskies, and spending time with my friends and family.

Director of Research Project Management

Cardinal Health HEADQUARTERS: Dublin, Ohio WEB SITE: www.Cardinalhealth.com Primary BUSINESS: Healthcare products and services. EMPLOYEES: 30,000+

What is your definition of leadership? Leadership is having a vision/goal, making it real to people and getting their commitment to support it. It’s about surrounding oneself with the best people and trusting them to execute to achieve a common goal. EDUCATION: MBA, General Management, Clarkson University; BA, Computer and Information Sciences, SUNY Potsdam WHAT I’M READING: Water for Elephants, by Sara Gruen; Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, by Jamie Ford MY PHILOSOPHY: Hope for the best, plan for the worst and do not second guess yourself. Everything happens for a reason. INTERESTS: Pilates, yoga and spinning; reading; charity work in support of the health and protection of animals.

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What is your most rewarding professional accomplishment? Most rewarding for me is the varied experiences I have had – numerous roles in IT and recently a role in the business which has given me such an appreciation for the work that we do and how we affect our customers. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take? Be honest, and be yourself at all times. Get to know people, and let them get to know you on a personal level. Take accountability when things go wrong, and give credit to your team when things go right. Don’t be afraid to say, “I don’t know.” It’s important for building credibility. Also, be sure to get an answer, follow up and bring closure.

September/October 2010


INVESTING IN THE VALLEY. Helping the Valley’s many communities thrive is at the heart of everything we do. After all, we live here too. In fact, SRP has supplied the Valley with energy and water for over 100 years. Besides being stewards of these crucial resources, we’re proud to invest in the Valley’s future and celebrate its many accomplishments. Whether it’s education, the environment, human services, the arts or economic development, SRP is committed to helping the Valley prosper for generations to come. To learn more, visit srpnet.com/community.


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Carlos L. Aguilera

Vice President and General Manager Business Development

Chevron HEADQUARTERS: Houston, Texas WEB SITE: www.chevron.com Primary BUSINESS: Oil and gas exploration and production. EMPLOYEES: 60,000

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? My greatest reward was seeing the faces of my local staff when we completed a successful turn-around for a struggling project in Latin America a decade ago. We went from losing $150 million a year to earning $20 million annually. Success was achieved by believing in the staff, focusing on safety first, and then concentrating on becoming cash flow positive. When I left, I could see they were filled with confidence, knew they had made great accomplishments and would continue to grow personally and professionally. What’s the worst fault a leader can have? Very simply, when leaders stop listening. I’ve learned the greatest ideas and solutions many times come from the work force. Our job as leaders is to create an environment where people feel free to voice their opinions, fears, concerns, and solutions. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take? After careful, thorough analysis and evaluation, believe in yourself and stick to your conclusions, even if they’re unpopular. Others may not appreciate your recommendations at the time, but they will respect your conviction, even if you are proved incorrect later on.

Sergio M. Garcia

EDUCATION: MBA – MIT and BS, Geology – LSU WHAT I’M READING: The Little Zen Companion, by David Schiller; Where Have All the Leaders Gone?, by Lee Iacocca MY PHILOSOPHY: Life is a journey; explore, create and give credit to those who enrich the voyage. INTERESTS: The art of painting (my wife is an artist), the growth of my children, vintage cars, Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) education, golfing, and overall health.

Senior Director of Business & Product Management

Cricket Communications, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: San Diego, California WEB SITE: www.mycricket.com Primary BUSINESS: Wireless operator. EMPLOYEES: 4,000+

EDUCATION: San Diego State University: BA in Political Science with legal emphasis & Economics WHAT I’M READING: An average of 250 emails a day MY PHILOSOPHY: It is as much about the journey as it is about the end result. INTERESTS: Family life, golf, & wireless devices.

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What is your definition of leadership? Leadership is not just about recognizing your team’s strengths and weaknesses, but recognizing when to coach and when to follow. A good leader needs to recognize the ecosystem on which success depends. Leadership starts by identifying one’s own limits and by ensuring that you lead by example. It is then followed by one’s own ability to bestow confidence on to others to do that 5% that they did not believe could be achieved. What’s the worst fault a leader can have? Ego. I try to hire people who are smarter than me. Not only does this produce better company results, but it forms a greater sense of teamwork. What advice can you provide for young leaders? As a young leader, it is very tempting to get caught up in the end goal. However, much of true leadership stems from recognizing the value in the experience gained along the way. I have found that leaders who fail to recognize this, have a difficult time producing consistent results.

September/October 2010


Ahmed Velez

General Manager, CVS/pharmacy Operations, Puerto Rico

CVS Caremark HEADQUARTERS: Woonsocket, Rhode Island WEB SITE: www.cvscaremark.com, www.cvs.com Primary BUSINESS: Health care, retail. EMPLOYEES: 211,000

What is your definition of leadership? People who create an environment of trust, support, teamwork and open communication. Those that inspire and lead towards desired outcomes by working through the strengths of his or her team to build a strong and successful business. EDUCATION: Registered Respiratory Therapist (2-year degree) WHAT I’M READING: The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, by John C. Maxwell MY PHILOSOPHY: You’re only as good as the people you surround yourself with. INTERESTS: Watching my son play Pee Wee football, weightlifting and playing music (singer and percussionist).

What’s the worst fault a leader can have? Not appreciating or using the diverse assets on his or her team to help a company grow. Diversity brings new ideas that foster success; not listening to these discourages creativity from the team. It’s extremely important to make it safe for people to offer their ideas and create an environment of support and teamwork. What advice can you provide for young leaders? Know that people may resist change or may not want to adapt to and embrace your leadership style, especially when you’re young and up-and-coming. Be innovative, and think outside the box – however, don’t expect things to go perfectly, and treat errors and experiences as learning opportunities.

At FirstEnergy, we’re committed to building a diverse and inclusive work environment – a place where people feel accepted, where their ideas are welcomed, and where they can make a positive impact on the business and in the community.

Leila L . Vespoli,

executive vice president and

general counsel, dedicates herself to these principles every day. We congratulate her for being a Woman Worth Watching.

www.firstenergycorp.com


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

John Vegas

Regional Vice President of Sales, Institutional

Ecolab HEADQUARTERS: St. Paul, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.ecolab.com Primary BUSINESS: Product development, manufacturing, sales and service. EMPLOYEES: 26,000 worldwide

What is your most rewarding professional accomplishment? In a previous Ecolab role, I received the Pewter Plate award. It’s given annually to a leader who makes a significant contribution to the organization and represents our culture values of Spirit, Pride, Passion, Commitment, Determination and Integrity. It was very rewarding but I would not have received the award without the support of my very talented team. What obstacles have you overcome in your career to date, and how has this made you a better leader? Early in my career, my education, cultural background and age created difficult challenges. The managers who reported to me were 20+ years older and had more experience. After openly recognizing that they were technically much stronger than I was, I focused on building trust by being open, honest and supportive. What is the best advice you have ever received? “Learn new things every day.” I began my career in a management training program. While I was ambitious and committed, it was evident I knew very little about the business. By asking questions and keeping an open mind, I built strong mentoring relationships that have lasted throughout much of my career.

Luis J. Diaz

EDUCATION: BA, Bowdoin College and MSOD, American University WHAT I’M READING: Never Give In! – The Best of Winston Churchill’s Speeches, by Winston S. Churchill MY PHILOSOPHY: “Never forget where you came from or who you are.” INTERESTS: Time with family and being active (triathlons, marathons).

Chief Diversity Officer

Gibbons P.C. HEADQUARTERS: Newark, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.gibbonslaw.com Primary BUSINESS: Law firm. EMPLOYEES: 373

EDUCATION: BS, Cook College, Rutgers University and JD, Rutgers University School of Law WHAT I’M READING: Obstacles Welcome: Turn Adversity To Advantage in Business and Life, by Ralph de la Vega MY PHILOSOPHY: The Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. INTERESTS: Family reunions, community service via U.S. Hispanic Advocacy Association, and Leadership New Jersey, horseback riding, computing, diversity advocacy, and writing.

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Who in your family had the most impact on your success? My mother, Caridad Diaz, had the greatest impact on my success. After my mother emigrated from Cuba in 1970 with two small children, her daily sacrifice and work ethic inspired my sister and me to always do our best. She instilled in us a love of family, a love of learning, and a genuine sense of gratitude to this great nation. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? I have been very blessed in my professional career to have worked with some incredible lawyers at places like Fennemore Craig, IDT Corporation, and now at Gibbons P.C. However, my most rewarding career accomplishment is not based on the success I have enjoyed representing clients, although I derive great joy from helping others. Instead, my greatest accomplishment has been the opportunity to serve as a Chief Diversity Officer at Gibbons P.C. Gibbons has a long history of tackling some of the toughest issues in the legal industry. Its Women’s Initiative and Gibbons Fellowship are models for the industry. Thus, the chance to lead an effort to level the playing field for diverse attorneys while working within an Am Law 200 firm is serendipitous. We have launched a comprehensive initiative at Gibbons P.C. that encompasses all aspects of diversity: workplace, supplier, and marketplace. September/October 2010


Andrés T. Tapia

Chief Diversity Officer / Emerging Workforce Consulting Leader

Hewitt Associates HEADQUARTERS: Lincolnshire, Illinois WEB SITE: www.hewitt.com Primary BUSINESS: Global HR consulting and outsourcing. EMPLOYEES: 23,000

What is your definition of leadership? Understand why we are where we are, articulate where we could end up if nothing changes, and declare a compelling vision of the future and the plan to get there. EDUCATION: Northwestern University, BA History WHAT I’M READING: The Promise: President Obama, Year One, by Jonathan Alter MY PHILOSOPHY: Se hace el camino al andar – as a leader one must be bold enough to chart a path where there isn’t one. INTERESTS: Anything that connects people to one another – salsa, fútbol, community service, a great story.

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Successfully making diversity into a business issue that has generated revenue, enhanced our brand, stimulated greater creativity and innovation, and in the process, inspired us to become even more diverse and inclusive as an employer. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take? Once you have mastered the rules of the game, have the courage and boldness to know when to break them to change the game. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? The first time I had to make a decision that was not popular, nor understood, but given the circumstances and what we knew as a leadership team, was the right thing to do.

Work that makes a difference. Opportunities that expand your horizons. A culture that embraces diversity. Are you ready for what’s next in your career?

At Booz Allen Hamilton, our ability to help clients solve their most challenging problems and achieve success in their most critical missions hinges on our people. We also believe diversity of backgrounds contributes to more innovative ideas, which in turn drive better results for clients. Booz Allen’s commitment to an inclusive environment incorporates facilitating understanding and awareness, and creating initiatives to improve the quality of work life for our staff. From our long-standing relationships with organizations such as Girls Inc., Society of Women Engineers, and League of Black Women, to supporting events such as Women in Clearable Careers, we understand diversity is central to who we are and what we do. If you’re looking to do work that makes a difference at a firm that’s committed to helping you achieve your professional and personal goals, Booz Allen could be what’s next in your career. For more information, e-mail diversityrecruiting@bah.com.

Ready for what’s next. www.boozallen.com/careers We are proud of our diverse environment, EOE/M/F/D/V.


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Juan Carrera

Vice President Global Operations

ITT Corporation HEADQUARTERS: White Plains, New York WEB SITE: www.itt.com Primary BUSINESS: Multi-industry engineering and manufacturing. EMPLOYEES: 40,000

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why? My father, who came from a poor family without any resources, has influenced me most. He is educated with an MBA and a great example for his family. What is your most rewarding professional accomplishment? One of my previous companies was ready to close a facility due to poor performance. I had the opportunity to turn it around and it became the best facility in the system.

EDUCATION: BS, Electronic System Engineer, Tec de Monterrey University

What’s the worst fault a leader can have? To fail in their commitments to their people.

WHAT I’M READING: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done, by Larry Bossidy, Ram Charan, and Charles Burck

What advice can you provide for young leaders? Be focused and work hard.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Focus on the right things; the results will be there.

What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? When I was a production supervisor I realized that I enjoyed working with people regardless of the amount of time invested at work or the income; and that the satisfaction derived every day was a result of executing plans and seeing people relish in their success.

Juan Pablo Villalobos

INTERESTS: Family.

Senior Vice President Kellogg Co. / President US Morning Foods

Kellogg HEADQUARTERS: Battle Creek, Michigan WEB SITE: www.kelloggcompany.com Primary BUSINESS: Food manufacturing. EMPLOYEES: Approximately 31,000

EDUCATION: Industrial Engineer WHAT I’M READING: Good to Great, by Jim Collins; The Lost Symbol, by Dan Brown MY PHILOSOPHY: A great company is formed by capable, happily engaged and growing individuals, and when they win, the company wins. INTERESTS: My family, cooking, traveling, golf.

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What advice can you provide for young leaders? Be humble. If we want to be successful, we need to learn from others. We need to have the humility to learn from multiple life experiences, both personal and work related. We need to open our minds to different points of view, listen a lot and always look for the positives in our bosses, colleagues and friends. I know the new generations are very well prepared, but being wise in listening for learning will accelerate their own development as leaders. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take? As a leader you need to have a vision…a long-term goal you can sell to the people you are trying to influence, which can be family, friends or your team, and if accomplished, will generate benefits not only for the group but, more importantly, for each individual. When you think about the future there are many unknowns. You cannot be certain of everything, so understandably it is very difficult to have a strong conviction about your future aspirations. However, if you embrace those thoughts with passion, it will serve as a beacon to guide your actions, be consistent, and get the satisfaction of moving in the right direction and eventually accomplishing your goals. This requires taking a lot of risks and courage to embrace your journey. September/October 2010


Rebecca Priegues Sproul

Audit Partner

KPMG LLP HEADQUARTERS: New York City WEB SITE: www.us.kpmg.com Primary BUSINESS: Audit, tax and advisory services. EMPLOYEES: Approximately 21,000

EDUCATION: BS, Accounting, MBA, Florida International University WHAT I’M READING: The Bourne Objective, by Robert Ludlum MY PHILOSOPHY: Work smarter, not harder. INTERESTS: Family time and reading (on the iPad™).

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success? My parents have had the most impact on my success. They made sure that my siblings and I had access to a higher education, and they’ve always been very supportive of all of my endeavors, both academically and professionally. Most important, my parents help with the care of my two children. Knowing that they’re looking after the kids while my husband and I are working late or attending a client meeting out of town has allowed me to focus on my work and become successful. Life is a matter of priorities, and family takes priority. But for those times when work is the priority, my parents are there to back me up and provide the peace of mind I need to perform and be successful. Given the chance, would you do anything differently? Although it hasn’t always been easy, there is nothing I would do differently. The decisions I’ve made throughout my career, both good and bad, have enabled me to achieve the goals I set for myself. Every major decision has allowed me to learn something that could be applied in the future.

CSX proudly congratulates Cindy Sanborn, our own Vice President & Chief Transportation officer, for her recognition by Diversity Journal as a Woman Worth Watching. CSX: How tomorrow moves.


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Martha Carranza Artiles

Global Chief Diversity Officer

Manpower Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Milwaukee, Wisconsin WEB SITE: www.manpower.com Primary BUSINESS: Employment services. EMPLOYEES: 28,000

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Coaching and mentoring individuals that are often the first in their family to complete college. Helping them learn how to be successful in an environment where they are one of few visibly diverse people. EDUCATION: BS, Mechanical Engineering, Santa Clara University WHAT I’M READING: Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert MY PHILOSOPHY: “Be the change that you want to see in the world.” – M. Gandhi INTERESTS: Spending time with my husband and two grown children.

What’s the worst fault a leader can have? That they know everything and don’t need to broaden their perspective through continuous learning or surrounding themselves with people that think differently. Also lacking empathy and compassion. What advice can you provide for young leaders? Don’t forget the community you came from – give back by mentoring and bringing others up behind you. What are the personal and/or professional sacrifices to being a leader? You sacrifice time that often affects the time you spend with your family. To deal with this it is good to create clear distinction between family time and work time and not allow the two to mix.

Rick Gomez

Vice President Marketing, Coors Brands

MillerCoors HEADQUARTERS: Chicago, Illinois WEB SITE: www.MillerCoors.com Primary BUSINESS: Beer. EMPLOYEES: More than 8,700

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why? While I have been very fortunate to have had several leaders serve as coaches and mentors to me, one in particular stands out. What she did for me was invaluable. She believed in me. She gave me opportunities to expand my responsibilities and to stretch myself. She pushed me out of my comfort zone and provided the coaching and inspiration to succeed. When I asked her how I could re-pay her, she simply said to do the same for others. I believe that we all have a duty to coach and mentor others. It is what builds great organizations and great leaders. What is your definition of leadership? I believe leaders are meant to serve their teams. Their role is to remove obstacles so their teams can perform and thrive. Leaders foster an environment that encourages collaboration, creativity and a results orientation. What advice can you provide for young leaders? Strive to make an impact every day. Be a change agent who constantly looks for opportunities to drive improvements. Identify ways to make things faster, more effective, more impactful. Don’t settle for the status quo. 210

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September/October 2010

EDUCATION: BA, Dartmouth College WHAT I’M READING: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson MY PHILOSOPHY: Give it your all. Don’t settle. And play to win! INTERESTS: Training for marathons and triathlons; Eating out; Traveling.


Joseph Pradas

Director, Joint Ventures & Business Development

National Grid HEADQUARTERS: London, England WEB SITE: www.nationalgrid.com Primary BUSINESS: International energy delivery company. EMPLOYEES: 28,000

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success? My dad had a very strong work ethic, which he brought with him when he arrived in this country from Spain with my mom and seven children, in the early 1960s. He also had very strong views about the value of a solid education, which led to all seven of us receiving post graduate degrees. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Leading a large team of highly motivated, qualified and multi-disciplined professionals from within National Grid and outside of the company, in pursuit of a major joint venture investment opportunity in the Northeast. The project was a high profile energy facility with a very complex set of financial, operating and regulatory issues, all of which were successfully addressed by the team. What advice can you provide for young leaders? I think it’s very important to have a positive attitude in the way you approach your job and your career in general. Here are a few thoughts: stay focused; do the right job; excel in it; lead by example; don’t take yourself too seriously; don’t be consumed by it; and, remember that the next exciting opportunity is right around the corner.

EDUCATION: Civil Engineering, Manhattan College; MBA Finance, New York University WHAT I’M READING: Game Change, by John Heilemann and Mark Halperin MY PHILOSOPHY: Think positive, stay flexible and remember that this is the first day of the rest of your life. INTERESTS: Golf, Skiing, Travel.


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Douglas J. Farmer (Perez)

Shareholder

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. HEADQUARTERS: Greenville, South Carolina and Atlanta, Georgia WEB SITE: www.ogletreedeakins.com Primary BUSINESS: Law firm. EMPLOYEES: 900

EDUCATION: JD, Harvard Law School; AB, magna cum laude, Harvard College; Rotary Graduate Scholar; Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City WHAT I’M READING: Justice: What’s The Right Thing to Do?, by Michael Sandel MY PHILOSOPHY: I’ve been really lucky . . . The harder I work, the luckier I get. INTERESTS: Travel photography; Tennis.

What is your definition of leadership? I manage a group of prima donnas – all highly skilled and talented at what they do. I have found that to lead this group effectively, you need to walk beside them, not ahead of them. I feel I am most successful when I am bringing someone to the top of their game and they have no idea that leadership is in the room. What advice can you provide for young leaders? Limit the amount of time you spend drilling down on people’s weaknesses. You will get more bang by looking for and developing your people’s strengths, and positioning them in your organization to take advantage of those strengths. Your job will be made much easier by getting the right people on the bus in the first place. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take? Our profession remains highly stratified by any measure – race, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, disability. I think we have been far too cautious in advancing diverse lawyers up the ranks, and advancing diverse partners in to meaningful leadership roles. What we do is not rocket science. What may seem like risk may in reality present no risk at all.

Edward Salas

Senior Vice President, Engineering and Operations

Pacific Gas and Electric Company HEADQUARTERS: San Francisco, California WEB SITE: www.PGE.com Primary BUSINESS: Gas and electric utility. EMPLOYEES: Approximately 20,000

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? I have had the privilege of being a leader in two different industries (telecom and energy). I feel particularly good about my work at Verizon Wireless, where we helped establish and grow a new and critical communications segment. At PG&E, I am proud of the fact that we are helping to lead the industry in the emerging Smart Grid arena. Here, I am the lead officer responsible for our company’s strategy and execution during this exciting time. What are the personal and/or professional sacrifices to being a leader? I make choices as a leader about setting future direction, how to resource work, and how to lead my teams to contribute at a very high level. Some of the decisions I make and approaches I take to leadership don’t always make me popular. I have to give feedback that people don’t want to hear, I’ve had to shut down parts of a business, lay off people and affect their lives and that of their families. All of these decisions are tremendously challenging and I don’t make them lightly. In addition, I was very fortunate; I married a wonderful woman who really managed our home life, which gave me the freedom to focus on the business. Our partnership has made it possible for me to succeed.

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September/October 2010

EDUCATION: BA, Psychology; PMD (Harvard Business School) WHAT I’M READING: Crucial Conversations, by Kerry Patterson MY PHILOSOPHY: Communicate, listen and make others successful. INTERESTS: Reading, boating, hiking.


Jose Luis Bravo

Chief Scientist

Royal Dutch Shell HEADQUARTERS: The Hague, The Netherlands WEB SITE: www.shell.com Primary BUSINESS: Global group of energy and petrochemical companies. EMPLOYEES: Approximately 101,000

What is your definition of leadership? Thought leadership is the one that intrigues me. How can one individual influence the course of large organizations by the power of his/her original thoughts and communication abilities. Leadership by vision. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? The recognition of my abilities and influence when I was asked to step into the Chief Scientist role at Shell. In a more particular way, to be able to implement/produce several innovative technically and commercially successful chemical processes using very fundamental engineering concepts and science.

EDUCATION: Undergraduate, University Iberoamericana (Mexico City), Graduate, University of Texas at Austin WHAT I’M READING: Any subject matter covering photons to fuels.

What advice can you provide for young leaders? Do what you have passion for, always speak the truth; the rest will follow.

MY PHILOSOPHY: Play to your strengths, manage your weaknesses; Pragmatic Intuition and Sincerity win the day.

What are the personal and/or professional sacrifices to being a leader? None, it is a part of one’s life. Your abilities to lead well, if genuine, translate well to all your relationships and your personal life if you are passionate and curious.

INTERESTS: Hunting, fishing, the complexities of human behavior, Chemical Engineering; what makes a good leader.

Big thinking. Big network. Big possibilities.

The first moon transmissions? Ours. GPS? Ours, too. Networked battlespaces and NextGen air transportation systems? Yes and yes. Big ideas call for big thinkers…and we have a lot of them. In fact, at Rockwell Collins we’re building a global workforce of men and women with diverse backgrounds, viewpoints and ideas who are committed to our foundation of innovation. To find out how your big ideas can lead to big possibilities, visit our website at www.rockwellcollins.com.


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Ramon E. Coto, CPA

CFO, UnitedHealthcare, South Florida

UnitedHealthcare (UHC) HEADQUARTERS: Minnetonka, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.uhc.com Primary BUSINESS: Health insurance & services. EMPLOYEES: 31,000

EDUCATION: BBA, Florida International University WHAT I’M READING: Pursuit of Honor, by Vince Flynn; Creating Teams with an Edge, by Harvard Business School MY PHILOSOPHY: There is no “I” in TEAM. INTERESTS: Playing Softball and Chevy Corvettes.

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why? I was fortunate to have a wonderful mentor during my tenure at the international accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche. From my initial recruiting visit to the time I left the firm as a Senior Manager, Maritza Gomez Montiel (D&T partner) provided me the type of personal guidance and professional advice that helped form the foundation of my success. To this day, over fifteen years since leaving D&T, Maritza and I remain close friends. What is your definition of leadership? Leadership is so much more than being a good manager. A good manager can certainly take on a job or a project and drive a successful outcome. However, a leader will also develop people who will follow and become leaders in their own right. Leadership is about laying out a vision, providing people the tools and resources, being open to listening to different points of view, and knowing when to coursecorrect to achieve the desired result. The last but certainly one of the most important aspects of leadership is the ability to recognize the accomplishment of others.

Madeleine Gray

Vice President, Business Technology Delivery

US Airways HEADQUARTERS: Tempe, Arizona WEB SITE: www.usairways.com Primary BUSINESS: Airline transportation. EMPLOYEES: 31,000

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success? Two people – my mother and my husband. My mother molded my independent spirit and set an example that with hard work, perseverance and determination, anything is possible. My husband has always been my biggest cheerleader and gave me the space and support to explore career options. What is your definition of leadership? To me, leadership is being able to set a visionary goal, inspire and enroll the team to believe that it’s possible, then move out of the way so the team can accomplish it but always be available should they need your help. What advice can you provide for young leaders? First of all, be humble. You’ll likely be leading folks that may be older and with more experience. So you have to earn their trust by respecting their experience and listening earnestly. Admit your mistakes and don’t be afraid to show your vulnerability as your team will then become your champion. Build strong relationships with your peers, don’t burn bridges in the quest for success, assume you still have lots to learn and live with integrity. 214

Pr o f i l e s i n Di v e r s i t y Jo u r n a l

September/October 2010

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in Spanish & Sociology, University of Texas, Arlington WHAT I’M READING: Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter, by Liz Wiseman, Greg McKeown MY PHILOSOPHY: Nothing is impossible. INTERESTS: Baseball fan, reading, mentoring.


Alonzo R. Peña

Deputy Director

Department of Homeland Security HEADQUARTERS: Washington, District of Columbia WEB SITE: www.ice.gov Primary BUSINESS: Government. EMPLOYEES: ICE employs approximately 19,000 people in over 400 offices worldwide

What is your definition of leadership? Leadership is motivating people to do what’s necessary to get the job done. This is best accomplished through the example of your own action and direction. It means articulating the mission so that people understand it, get behind it and, ultimately, accomplish it. Most basically, it means inspiring people to be their best. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? What’s most rewarding for me is seeing that things between the U.S. Government and the Government of Mexico are improving for the betterment of both nations, and believing that the relationships I have made throughout my career along the southwest border have, in some small way, played a role in that. What advice can you provide for young leaders? Know and understand those you lead – what drives them, what they care about. Equally important, know who you are and remain true to yourself and your convictions. Know that to be successful, you need not only intelligence and commitment, but you also need to surround yourself with people you can learn from. Your success won’t be measured by what you did alone, but by what you did together.

EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science degree, Pan American University, Edinburg, TX; Senior Executive Fellowship Program, Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government WHAT I’M READING: The Shack, by William P. Young; God’s Middle Finger, by Richard Grant MY PHILOSOPHY: You will accomplish more through goodness and fairness than through being dictatorial and narrowminded. INTERESTS: Studying history (and learning from it), fishing, jogging and bike riding.

Congratulations Mary Heger An Award-Winning Leader From An Award-Winning Company Ameren –– Among the nation’s top energy companies in diversity leadership. We believe understanding and celebrating our differences makes us stronger.

Leading the Way to a Secure Energy Future


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Steven Hernandez

acting Vice President of Sales

United States Postal Service HEADQUARTERS: Washington, D.C. WEB SITE: www.usps.com Primary BUSINESS: Mail delivery to 150 million homes, businesses and Post Offices. EMPLOYEES: 596,000

EDUCATION: M.S., Management Science, Stanford University (Sloan), Stanford, CA; MBA, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana; B.S., Petroleum Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, Texas WHAT I’M READING: The Age of Turbulence, by Alan Greenspan MY PHILOSOPHY: Be an inspiration by giving your best every day…and make it fun! INTERESTS: Running, Biking, Reading, Music.

What is your definition of leadership? Leadership is the extraordinary talent to inspire and motivate people to achieve a greater goal. Effective leadership goes beyond the efficient management of resources and productivity to attain a target. It incorporates a higher-level ability that overlays good management processes with great people skills: listening, empathy, communication, engagement, encouragement, and coaching. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? The clearest defining moment for me and for many of us at USPS was 9/11, which was closely followed by the Anthrax attacks. As I think back on it, there was clear leadership at the top that cascaded down through the whole organization. As a company, we were quick to communicate a plan that incorporated the needs of the American public, our employees, and business mailers. When the Anthrax attacks occurred on the heels of 9/11, once again our leadership organization sprang into action to quell the fears of employees and customers while making major changes to our operations. I look back at those difficult days with a sense of pride knowing my contribution to the leadership team helped stay the course during a chaotic time.

Manuel S. Calero

Principal

Vanguard HEADQUARTERS: Valley Forge, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.vanguard.com Primary BUSINESS: Investment management. EMPLOYEES: 12,500 in the Unites States

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success? My mother has given her entire life to her family and helping others. Every lesson she taught me was rooted in unconditional love and service, and instilled in me the passion to face every single day with an unwavering sense of duty and with infinite love for God and life. She is my hero in every sense of the word, and I owe my success to her. What’s the worst fault a leader can have? Good leaders are talented, passionate, and driven. The worst fault of a leader is to be led astray by mistaking traction for purpose, by substituting the why with the how. It turns leadership into a hollow activity full of small victories, and leaders into good people blind to the broader mission. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take? The question shouldn’t be what risk to take but how to prepare yourself to successfully take risks. Surround yourself with a loving family and good friends, great teachers and mentors, be clear about who you are and what’s right and wrong, and you will ensure a good outcome every time you face risk.

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EDUCATION: BAS, Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania WHAT I’M READING: Leadership and the Sexes, by Michael Gurian and Barbara Annis; To Gettysburg and Beyond, by Michael Golay MY PHILOSOPHY: Rise every morning with a smile and go out with the simple purpose of serving everyone around you. INTERESTS: Spending time with my wife and kids. Reading about history and theology. Watching college football.


Cynthia M. Medina

E-commerce Service Center Manager

W.W. Grainger, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Lake Forest, Illinois WEB SITE: www.grainger.com Primary BUSINESS: Distributor, facilities maintenance products. EMPLOYEES: 18,000

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why? Brian Hopkins is my current manager as director of our service center, and is the latest of a long line of mentors I have benefited from over the years at Grainger. He has been genuinely interested in me and cared about the development of my career. It’s not all about “hooray for you,” but includes constructive criticism and a lot of guidance. My mentors have helped me learn it’s acceptable to make mistakes, but to learn from them. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership? Being selected as the president of Grainger’s Latino Business Resource Group last year ONLY to my understanding of leadership. It is one thing brought PRODUCTION a whole new dimension 08/01/2010 to be a leader of a business unit, where you have direct reports, but it is something 1270336-PHPC53823 else againCRICKE to lead a volunteer organization with independent members from across the country 7.75” and many different disciplines within the company. I have learned different x 4.75” skill sets Wendy and broadened DeHaas my v.3 scope of leadership in taking on this role. I knew about different management styles, but this has been a paradigm shift in my leadership journey that really brings that knowledge to life.

EDUCATION: Bachelor of Arts, Business, DePaul University; Currently pursuing MBA at Lake Forest Graduate School of Management WHAT I’M READING: Groundswell, by Charlene Li; Corporate Culture Survival Guide, by Edgar H. Schein MY PHILOSOPHY: Do the Right Thing, Do What Feels Right. INTERESTS: International travel (recently China, Thailand, and France) Motorcycling.

Cricket Salutes Sergio Garcia Sr. Director of Business & Product Management And the many other driven professionals who seize life’s unlimited opportunities. Cricket Communications is committed to a culture of diversity that reflects our customers and communities in which we live and do business. Cricket provides innovative, high-value wireless services to a fast-growing , culturally diverse customer base. Our inclusive work environment allows us to better serve our customers, our employees and our communities. At Cricket, everyone has the opportunity to reach their full potential and drive outstanding results. To learn more about Cricket, our unlimited wireless services and our professional career opportunities, visit www.mycricket.com We are proud to be an EEO employer M/F/D/V.


Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month

Anthony E. Santiago

Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer

WellPoint, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Indianapolis, Indiana WEB SITE: www.wellpoint.com Primary BUSINESS: Health benefits. EMPLOYEES: 39,000

What advice can you provide for young leaders? Take control of your own development. Set the bar high. Think about where you want to be 5, 10 and 15 years from now and make sure you get the right job experiences and education to fulfill your professional goals. Put yourself in situations that stretch your abilities and expose you to new areas of the business. And spend time mentoring and developing your people, something that all of us need to spend more time doing.

Diversity powers our workforce and economy Pacific Gas and Electric Company congratulates Chief Information Officer Pat Lawicki on her recognition as one of Diversity Journal’s Women Worth Watching. The heart of PG&E is a diverse workforce of more than 20,000 people representing a remarkable range of backgrounds and life experiences. Our diversity makes us stronger. And it is a prime source of new and innovative ideas. Pacific Gas and Electric Company is also committed to creating partnerships with diverse businesses. We believe the people we work with should be as diverse as the people we serve—the people of California.

EDUCATION: BS in Accounting, SUNY at Buffalo; MBA from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania WHAT I’M READING: The Big Short, by Michael Lewis MY PHILOSOPHY: Highest integrity in everything you do and have the courage to do something different and impactful. INTERESTS: Golf; it is my escape and takes my mind off everything else.

“PG&E” refers to Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation. ©2010 Pacific Gas and Electric Company. All rights reserved.

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? My most rewarding career accomplishment was successfully leading the SAP implementations at Bristol-Myers Squibb. We re-engineered many of the finance processes, configured the software and then trained our employees to use the new systems. It was an incredibly complex, enterprise-wide initiative and most companies failed at this. We completed the implementations on time, on budget, to the great surprise of many. This was possible because I had a great team that was as committed as I was to success.


featured

corporate spotlight

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Affiliated Computer Services . .. .. .. .www.acs-inc.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 111, 125 Aflac. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.aflac.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .127, 136 Alliant Energy . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.alliantenergy.com . .. .. .. .. .. . 83, 95 Allianz Life Insurance Co. of N.A. . www.allianzlife.com. .. .. .. . 141, 150, 219 Ameren Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.ameren.com. .. .. .. .. .. ..83, 87, 215 American Eagle Airlines. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.aa.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 55, 62 American Express. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.americanexpress.com. .. .. .. .. ..200 Applied Materials, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.appliedmaterials.com . .. .. .. . 83, 92 ARAMARK. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.aramark.com . .. .. .. 21, 69, 80, 201 Arrow Electronics, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.arrow.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 127, 134 AT&T . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.att.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 111, 117, 119 AXA Equitable Life Insurance. .. .. www.axa-equitable.com. .. . 141, 151, 153 Bank of the West. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.bankofthewest.com . .. .. . 54, 55, 60 Bausch + Lomb . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.bausch.com. .. .. .. .. . 184, 185, 190 BDO USA, LLP. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.bdo.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 68, 69, 81 Best Buy Co., Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.bestbuy.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 17, 27 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.bcbsfl.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 83, 94 Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.bcbsnc.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..161 BMC Software, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.bmc.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 41, 44, 45 Booz Allen Hamilton. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.boozallen.com. .. .. 41, 52, 201, 207 Brinker International. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.brinker.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 185, 187 Burger King Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.bk.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 55, 56 CA Technologies. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.ca.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 7, 141, 144 CACI International Inc. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.caci.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..202 Cardinal Health. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.cardinalhealth.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 202 Catalyst. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.catalyst.org. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 12, 69, 71 CB Richard Ellis Group, Inc. . .. .. .. .www.cbre.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 55, 66 CDW LLC . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.cdw.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..97, 109 CH2M HILL. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.ch2mhill.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .171, 182 Chevron. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.chevron.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 73, 204 Chubb Group of Insurance Cos. .. .. www.chubb.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 97, 99 Cisco. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.cisco.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. 47, 127, 137 Citi. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.citi.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 83, 84, 85 Colette Phillips Comms., Inc. . .. .. .. www.cpcglobal.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 141, 148 Comcast Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.comcast.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 17, 24, 25 ConAgra Foods . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.conagrafoods.com . .. .. .. 41, 48, 49 ConocoPhillips. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.conocophillips.com. .. .77, 185, 188 Constellation Energy Nuclear Group. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.cengllc.com . .. .. .. .. .. 97, 102, 103 Country Financial . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.countryfinancial.com . .. .. .. .. 29, 30 Cricket Communications, Inc.. .. .. www.mycricket.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 204, 217 CSC. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.csc.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 111, 120, 121 CSX Transportation. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.csx.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 157, 160, 209 CVS Caremark . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.cvscaremark.com. 29, 33, 165, 205 Deloitte LLP. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.deloitte.com. .. .. .. .. . 14, 15, 17, 22 Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP . .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.dl.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 141, 154 Dickstein Shapiro . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.dicksteinshapiro.com . .. .. 157, 169 Diversified Search Odgers Berndtson. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.diversifiedsearch.com. .. .. .. .. .. . 11 Domtar Corporation . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.domtar.com . .. .. .. .. .. ..17, 23, 149 DreamWorks Animation SKG. .. .. www.dreamworksanimation.com . .. .. .. .. 135, 141, 142 Eastman Kodak Company. .. .. .. .. www.kodak.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 28, 171, 181

Eaton Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.eaton.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 157, 158 Ecolab.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.ecolab.com. .. .. .. .. .. 111, 124, 206 Ernst & Young. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.ey.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 41, 46 Exelon Corporation . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.exeloncorp.com. .. .. .. ..69, 72, 175 Fifth Third Bancorp. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.53.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .171, 183 FirstEnergy Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. www.firstenergycorp.com. . 185, 191, 205 Ford & Harrison LLP. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..www.fordharrison.com . .. .. .. .. .157, 168 Ford Motor Company . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.ford.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 29, 31 Freddie Mac . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.freddiemac.com. .. .. .. 82, 185, 194 Genworth Financial . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.genworth.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 69, 74 Georgia Power Company. .. .. .. .. .. www.georgiapower.com. .. .. .. .. 157, 164 Gibbons P.C.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..www.gibbonslaw.com. .. .. .. ..17, 20, 206 Goodrich Corporation . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.goodrich.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. 141, 155 Guardian Life Ins. Co. of America, The. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.guardianlife.com. .. .. .. .. .. 171, 172 Halliburton. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.halliburton.com. .. .. .. .79, 157, 159 Harrah’s Entertainment, Inc.. .. .. .. .. www.harrahs.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 127, 133 Harris Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.harris.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 111, 114 HCA Healthcare . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.centerpointmedical.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 41, 43, 179 Hewitt Associates . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.hewitt.com. .. .. .. .. .. . 157, 162, 207 Highmark Inc. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.highmark.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 41, 50 Honeywell. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.honeywell.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 17, 19 Illinois Tool Works Inc. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.itw.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 65, 69, 76 Ingenix. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.ingenix.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 29, 39

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BOLD denotes Advertiser

NetApp, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.netapp.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 83, 86 New York Life Investments. .. .. .. .. .www.nylim.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 91, 127, 128 Newell Rubbermaid . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.newellrubbermaid.com. .. . 111, 123 Northern Trust. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.northerntrust.com. .. .. .. .. . 111, 116 Northrop Grumman Corporation. .. www.northropgrumman.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 83, 93, 101 Novartis International AG . .. .. .. .. www.novartis.com. .. .. .. .. . 171, 176, 195 OfficeMax, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..www.officemax.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 29, 36 Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. . .. .. .. .. .www.ogletreedeakins.com. .. .. .. .. .. 212 O’Melveny & Myers LLP. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.omm.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 185, 196 Pacific Gas and Electric Company . .www.pge.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 97, 107, 218 Parker Hannifin. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.parker.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 170 PepsiCo. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.pepsico.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 5 Perini Building Company. .. .. .. .. .www.tutorperini.com . .. .. .. 171, 178, 220 Pfizer Inc . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.pfizer.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 69, 78 Pitney Bowes Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.pb.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 97, 108 Prudential Financial . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.prudential.com . .. .. .. .. .. 29, 34, 35 Qwest Communications. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.qwest.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 171, 180 Raytheon Company. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.raytheon.com . .. .. .. .. 59, 185, 193 RBC U.S. Wealth Management. .. .www.rbcwm-usa.com. .. .. . 185, 198, 199 Rockwell Collins. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.rockwellcollins.com . . 157, 163, 213 Royal Dutch Shell. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.shell.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 127, 132, 213, Back Cover Page 1 Ryder System, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.ryder.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 111, 122 SAIC. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.saic.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 97, 98 Salt River Project. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.srpnet.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. 41, 42, 203 Sodexo. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.sodexousa.com and www.sodexo.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3, 111, 112 Stryker . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.stryker.com. .. .. .. .. .. 141, 146, 147 Target. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.target.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 17, 18 Terex Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.terex.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 17, 26 Textron Marine & Land Systems . .. .www.textronmarineandland.com . . 55, 58 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. .. .. .. .. .. www.ice.gov. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 171, 174, 215 U.S. Postal Service . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.usps.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 29, 38, 216 UBS. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.ubs.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 83, 88, 89 Unilever N.A. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.unileverusa.com. .. .. .. .. . 9, 97, 100 Union Pacific Railroad. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.up.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 55, 63 UnitedHealth Group . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.unitedhealthgroup.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. 111, 118, 131

ITT Corporation . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.itt.com. .. .. .. .. ..141, 143, 156, 208 Ivy Planning Group LLC. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.ivygroupllc.com . .. .. .. .. .. 171, 173 Johnson & Johnson. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.jnj.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..41, 51, 115 Juniper Networks, Inc. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.juniper.net. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 55, 57 KBR, Inc. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.kbr.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 211 Kellogg. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.kelloggcompany.com . .. .. .. .. ..208 Kelly Services. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.kellyservices.com. .. .. .. .. .. . 29, 32 Kindred Healthcare.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.kindredhealthcare.com. .. .. .. 29, 37 KPMG LLP. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.kpmg.com. .. .. .. . 13, 185, 192, 209 Legg Mason. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.leggmason.com. .. .. .. .. .. 185, 186 Lockheed Martin Corporation. .. .. www.lockheedmartin.com. .. ..96, 97, 106 Manpower Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.manpower.com. .. .. .. 171, 177, 210 Mercer.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.mercer.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 127, 130 McDonald’s Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. www.mcdonalds.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..140 MeadWestvaco. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.mwv.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 189 MGM MIRAGE . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.mgmresorts.com . .. .. .. .. .. 111, 113 MillerCoors . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.millercoors.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..210 Monsanto Company. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.monsanto.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 83, 90 Moss Adams LLP . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.mossadams.com. .. .. .. .. .185, 197 National Grid . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.nationalgrid.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. 16, 211 Nationwide. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.nationwide.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. . 69, 75 Navistar International Corporation. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.navistar.com. .. .. .. .. .. 97, 104, 105 Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP. .. .. .www.ngelaw.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 69, 70

PER-1149 WWW Ad 3.75x4.75:Layout 1

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To Build A Great Project, First We Build A Great Team.

Perini is committed to supporting women in construction.

UnitedHealthcare. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.uhc.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..214 University of the Rockies. .. .. .. .. .. .www.rockies.edu. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .157, 167 UPMC. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.upmc.com. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 61 US Airways . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.usairways.com . .. .. .. .. 55, 64, 214 Vanguard . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.vanguard.com. ..126, 127, 138, 216 Verizon. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.verizon.com. .. .. .. .. . 110, 127, 139 W.W. Grainger . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.grainger.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Inside Cover, 1, 53, 217

Las Vegas (702) 792-9209 — Phoenix (602) 256-6777

Walmart. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. www.walmartstores.com. .. 145, 157, 166 Waste Management, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. www.wm.com and www.thinkgreen.com . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 141, 152, Inside Back Cover WellPoint, Inc.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.wellpoint.com . .. . 40, 127, 129, 218 Wyndham Worldwide. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .www.wyndhamworldwide.com. .. .. 55, 67

www.tutorperini.com

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Diversity & Inclusion A t

W A s t e

M A n A g e M e n t

Anais Meza

Enrique Juarez

Mario Sagastume

Financial Analyst

Table Designer, Direct Marketing

Manager, Reseller Strategy

A company that is making a difference in your Together, we’re in the business of done.

world and the world around you. Elizabeth Valdez

Joseph Morales

Rudy Mendez

Executive Assistant

Diversity Specialist

Human Resources Director

We’re proud of the Hispanic team members who have made a world of difference at Grainger. Their hard work and commitment have helped our 1.8 million customers around the globe get their jobs done. We invite you to join us, because there’s more to be done.

Waste Management is a Fortune 200 company that is changing the world for the better. We are strongly committed to promoting diversity and inclusion and empowering our employees. We are working with the communities we serve Gloria Ysasi-Diaz Frank Lopez

Cynthia Medina

President, Latino Business Resource Group to fuel innovative

Vice President,

Logistics Management change—and we need your help. www.wmcareers.com

Branch Manager, Florida

From everyday collection to environmental protection. Think Green.® Think Waste Management. www.thinkgreen.com


Featuring 124 Mentoring Essays from Senior Women Executives • 27 Profiles from Hispanic Leaders

CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

Volume 12, Number 5 SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2010

25.00 U.S.

$

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2010 • VOLUME 12 NUMBER 5

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

www.diversityjournal.com

And the 9 Annual Award Winners Are... th

Diversity Journal - Sep/Oct 2010  

The 2010 Women Worth Watching Awards Issue

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