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Also Featuring … Catalyst • Supplier Diversity Best Practices • thoughtleaders • MicroTriggers • Perspectives

Volume 12, Number 3 May / June 2010

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Celebrating PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL

Diversity

Heritage Month

AARP

CitiFinancial

Comerica Bank

Comerica Bank

Dell

Dow Chemical

Gibbons P.C.

Harris N.A.

Harris Corporation

ITT

KPMG LLP

National Grid

new york life insurance co

Ogletree, Deakins

sodexo

sodexo

Toyota

U.S. Postal Service

Verizon

W.W. Grainger, Inc.

W.W. Grainger, Inc.

Abercrombie & Fitch

www.diversityjournal.com

With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.

May / June 2010 • VOLUME 12 NUMBER 3

energized by

Asian-Pacific American

Wellmark

also inside: Leveraging Diversity CEO Leadership: Freddie Mac’s Ed Haldeman


James Thomas

Anita Wu

Kevin Shi

Financial Analyst

Organizational Development Consultant

Vice President, Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions

A company that

....................................................................................... is making a difference in your Anjali Reddy

Doe Kittay

Erwin Cruz

Director, Internal Communications and Shared Services

Vice President, Regional Branch Services

Sr. Architect, Enterprise Systems

Jarnal Lail

Sam Kim

Mamta Bhargava

Vice President, Information Technology AGI

Vice President, E-Commerce

Vice President, GIS Brand Segment

world and the

world around you. FINDING THE rIGHT pEoplE caN makE a worlD oF DIFFErENcE.

We’re proud of the Asian/Pacific Islander leaders who have made a world of difference at Grainger. Their hard work and commitment have helped our 1.8 million customers around the globe get their jobsManagement done. We invite you to join because there’s more to done. Waste is a Fortune 200us, company that is changing thebeworld for the better. We are strongly committed

to promoting diversity and inclusion and empowering our employees. We are working with the communities we serve to fuel innovative change—and we need your help. www.wmcareers.com

From everyday collection to environmental protection. Think Green. Think Waste Management. www.thinkgreen.com


James Thomas

Anita Wu

Kevin Shi

Financial Analyst

Organizational Development Consultant

Vice President, Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions

....................................

Anjali Reddy

Doe Kittay

Erwin Cruz

Director, Internal Communications and Shared Services

Vice President, Regional Branch Services

Sr. Architect, Enterprise Systems

Jarnal Lail

Sam Kim

Mamta Bhargava

Vice President, Information Technology AGI

Vice President, E-Commerce

Vice President, GIS Brand Segment

We’re proud of the Asian/Pacific Islander leaders who have made a world of difference at Grainger. Their hard work and commitment have helped our 1.8 million customers around the globe get their jobs done. We invite you to join us, because there’s more to be done.


notebook from the editor editors notebook

diversity dimensions

James R. Rector PUBLISHER

I

Cheri Morabito

EDITOR / CREATIVE DIRECTOR

It recently occurred to me that, even though all the articles in Profiles in Diversity Journal define, evaluate, and discuss the different facets of Diversity and Inclusion, the general tenor of these articles has changed.

Damian Johnson

It is a slight shift, and so subtle as to not even be noticed, but, “in the old days,” the concept of diversity and inclusion focused on the importance of having a diverse workforce—creating a safe environment for all employees—where they were valued and could thrive. Gradually, I’ve noticed more of our contributors writing about the importance of recognizing the diversity of their customers and communities as being another dimension of D&I.

Kenneth J. Kovach

This idea of businesses reflecting the diversity of the customer has been known about all along, and previous articles have mentioned it, but the frequency with which this concept is being presented implies that a critical mass is being reached. The importance of workforce diversity to the success of the enterprise, along with the phrase “Diversity and Inclusion is not just the right thing to do, but it also makes good business sense” is now a given; nobody really needs to be convinced about this fact of modern life and business. Today, new facets of diversity are able to be easily and readily presented and discussed. Sometimes it’s OK to preach to the choir, if the congregation can also benefit from the discussion. I believe that success in our industry will be measured by the day that we no longer need diversity journals to explain the importance of diversity and inclusion in all facets of our personal and professional lives. When the ideas surrounding diversity become so commonplace that nobody really thinks about them anymore, we can happily close our doors. (Or at least remake ourselves to Profiles of Everyone Journal!) Until that day arrives, however, take a look at what PDJ brings you this issue. Leveraging Diversity (page 21), reveals what middle managers are doing to use diversity and inclusion to best achieve the business goals and objectives of their organizations. Our profiles on Supplier Diversity Best Practices (page 38), highlight how to ensure that your suppliers are reflecting the diversity of your customers. Our Celebration of Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month (page 47) profiles leaders who share the unique experiences their backgrounds and heritage have provided them in life and the workplace. We round out the issue with Questions & Answers with Freddie Mac CEO Ed Haldeman, and learn how this diversity leader helped lead a troubled organization into a promising future.

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Laurel L. Fumic

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Alina Dunaeva

O verseas C orrespondent

Jason Bice

WEB MASTER C ontributing W riters

Pamela Arnold Deidre Golden Linda Jimenez

Marie Philippe, Ph.D. Craig Storti Trevor Wilson

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Commentaries or questions should be

addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number. DISPLAY ADVERTISING

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In fact, here’s to a promising future for all of us in our D&I journeys.

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contents

table of contents

Volume 12 • Number 3 May / June 2010

On the Cover

47 Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Special Features 21 Leveraging Diversity

47

29 CEO Leadership: Ed Haldeman of Freddie Mac 38 Supplier Diversity 60 thoughtleaders

29

perspectives 10 Culture Matters

Freddie Mac

21

Leveraging Diversity

38

SupplierBestDiversity Practices

by Craig Storti

12 From My Perspective by Linda Jimenez, WellPoint, Inc. 14 Global Diversity by Deidre Golden, ORC Worldwide 16 Viewpoint by Pamela Arnold, AIMD 18 Human Equity™ by Trevor Wilson, TWI Inc.

Ed Haldeman

thoughtleaders2010

72 Last Word by Marie Philippe, Ph.D.

60

DEPARTMENTS 6 M  omentum Diversity Who, What, Where and When Storti

Jimenez

Arnold

8 Catalyst 

68

Making Mentoring Work

MicroTriggers More Triggers from Janet Crenshaw Smith Golden

4

Wilson

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philippe

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momentum momentum who…what…where…when

Mgm Mirage Executive Nelson Inducted into the Women’s Chamber of Commerce of Nevada Hall of Fame LAS VEGAS— MGM MIRAGE Vice President of Corporate Diversity and Community Affairs Debra Nelson has joined a list of Nelson prominent local women in the Women’s Chamber of Commerce of Nevada Hall of Fame. Nelson was presented with the Chamber’s top honor at its 5th Annual Women’s Hall of Fame and Pioneer Award Luncheon. The Women’s Hall of Fame publicly honors nominees and recipients of the Women’s Chamber ATHENA award, which Nelson was awarded in December. The Hall of Fame also recognizes professional women for their accomplishments in the performing arts, media and entertainment industries. “Since making Southern Nevada her home, Debra has become a role model in the community,” said June Beland, President of the Women’s Chamber of Commerce. “Her contributions to the diversity profession are remarkable and have contributed significantly to the position of MGM MIRAGE as an industry leader.” The Hall of Fame is designed to encourage the continued achievements of businesswomen in Nevada. Proceeds from the luncheon will provide educational scholarships and grants for professional women. “While most of our executives and employees are focused on giving exceptional service to our guests, many of Debra’s responsibilities focus on representing MGM MIRAGE in our community, and she does so in an equally 6

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outstanding way,” said Phyllis James, MGM MIRAGE Senior Vice President, Senior Counsel and Chief Diversity Officer. “She sets a wonderful example for professional women who work in every industry.” At MGM MIRAGE, Nelson is responsible for the strategic development and implementation of the company’s diversity initiative and community affairs activities. Sodexo, Inc. Announces Dunmore as School Services Division President GAITHERSBURG, Maryland—Sodexo, Inc., the leader in Quality of Daily Life Solutions, has announced the appointment of Dunmore Stephen Dunmore as president of the School Services Division. Dunmore, who moves to the role after performing strongly as a senior executive in Sodexo’s Health Care Market, succeeds Lorna Donatone, who was promoted to company chief operating officer and president of the Education Market. In his new role with School Services, Dunmore oversees operations and strategic growth for Sodexo at public school districts in the United States. The School Services Division serves 2.8 million school meals daily at more than 470 school districts across the country. “Steve’s diverse background and proven leadership will help us think in new ways about the opportunities we have to expand and grow,” said Donatone. “As we strive to provide comprehensive service solutions for our clients, his background leading companies in various industries related to Sodexo’s business, and his superior management experience, will be instrumental in meeting our strategic goals.”

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In his previous role as division vice president for Facilities Solutions in Sodexo’s Health Care Market, Dunmore managed operations, maintenance and infrastructure renewal. Under his guidance and leadership, Facilities Solutions experienced consistent double digit, year-over-year revenue growth and profit growth of almost 200 percent. Prior to joining Sodexo, Dunmore held key leadership positions with Johnson Controls, where he piloted teams providing facilities management solutions to Fortune 500 clients, and Aramark, where he led foodservice operations for corporate clients. Porter Novelli Names Sroka Senior VP, U.S. Hispanic Practice Leader New York City— Porter Novelli has named Sonia Sroka Senior Vice President, U.S. Hispanic Practice Leader. Sroka An accomplished bilingual, bi-cultural communications practitioner and marketer, Sroka has delivered counsel and expertise on the Hispanic market across a comprehensive range of industries at Porter Novelli, including consumer products, healthcare, food and beverage, retail, corporate and financial services. She implemented the Hispanic market practice at the firm and has led programs for clients including Gillette, The Almond Board of California and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among others. Sroka is also deeply engaged in several diversity initiatives. She is the lead of Porter Novelli’s Diversity Council, a member of the Omnicom Diversity Development Advisory Committee and the national chair of the Public Relations Society of America’s (PRSA’s) Diversity Committee. PDJ


Thanks to you, what makes us different makes us better.

WellPoint proudly celebrates May as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month in honor of achievements, and in recognition of contributions of Asian/Pacific Americans to the culture and development of our nation. WellPoint believes in the power of diversity–the role it plays in creating a workplace culture of distinction, the impact it has on improving the lives of the people we serve and the health of our communities and, ultimately, a brighter future. Working to better people’s lives is not something you do every day. But it can be–at WellPoint.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/diversity EOE

® Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. © 2010 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved ® Registered trademark Profiles in Diversity Journal ® Registered Trademark, DiversityInc Media LLC


www.catalyst.org

Making Mentoring Work By Catalyst

M

Mentoring is a simple idea that can have powerful effects. The impact and potential benefits of formal mentoring programs—those in which organizations match mentors and mentees, designate minimum time commitments, monitor relationships, and evaluate the program—can span entire careers. A common misperception about formal mentoring is that it doesn’t work—that it cannot provide the benefits of informal mentoring relationships. But this simply isn’t true. Formal mentoring relationships can be effective. And the good news is that savvy organizations can avoid common pitfalls with the right knowledge and tools. In Making Mentoring Work, Catalyst debunks the notion that informal mentoring is “good enough” and illustrates that formal mentoring programs are an important talent management strategy. It shows that organizations that embrace formal mentoring gain a competitive advantage by leveraging and tracking those mentoring relationships. This results in the promotion and development of the best talent culled from the full talent pool that is inclusive of all women and men employees, as well as people of color. Ultimately, it enhances a company’s bottom line by putting the best people in charge. Our research has found that lack of mentoring opportunities is frequently a barrier to advancement for women and people of color. Also, women encounter gender-based barriers that keep them from enjoying the full benefits of informal mentoring. Women often have decreased access to potential mentors, are less successful in finding mentors willing to invest in their career development, and receive fewer benefits from mentoring relationships than men do. Talented employees with decreased access to influential mentors often fall behind. Women, women of color, and men of color are especially vulnerable. Senior leaders—individuals whose experiences and positions make them a source of sage advice and introductions to influential others—often choose

1

to mentor those who “look like” themselves.1 And because white men dominate top positions in most organizations, women and people of color lose out. Formal mentoring programs can redress the lack of naturally occurring informal relationships. Proper design and implementation make them effective. Success results when mentoring is tied directly to an organization’s business needs and assessed through a structured system of metrics that the organization identifies and develops based on its particular requirements. For example, assessing the diversity of individuals in mentoring pairs will help organizations ensure that a greater number of pairs benefit from diverse perspectives. Metrics can and should be gathered from a variety of sources, including employee surveys, interviews, and focus groups. While the concept of formal mentoring is not new, the ways in which smart companies conceptualize, track, and leverage these programs is constantly evolving. Utilizing formal mentoring programs to help employees gain job competencies, expose them to others in the organization, or help prepare them for expanded job responsibilities can improve employees’ satisfaction and the organization’s bench strength. By ensuring that career development offerings include mentoring efforts, practitioners can better leverage these important workplace relationships.2 The bottom line is that smart companies cannot afford to lose talent and thus cannot risk leaving mentoring to chance. PDJ

Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive workplaces and expand opportunities for women and business. With offices in the United States, Canada, and Europe, and more than 400 preeminent corporations as members, Catalyst is the trusted resource for research, information, and advice about women at work. Catalyst annually honors exemplary organizational initiatives that promote women’s advancement with the Catalyst Award. Visit www.catalyst.org/page/82/catalyst-e-newsletters to begin receiving Catalyst C-News, our e-newsletter.

Erik H. Erikson, Childhood and Society, 2nd ed. (New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1963).

2 Tammy D. Allen, Lillian T. Eby, and Elizabeth Lentz, “The Relationship between Formal Mentoring Program Characteristics and Perceived Program Effectiveness,” Personnel Psychology, vol. 59, no. 1 (Spring 2006): p. 125-153; Belle Rose Ragins, John L. Cotton, and Janice S. Miller, “Marginal Mentoring: The Effects of Type of Mentor, Quality of Relationship, and Program Design on Work and Career Attitudes,” Academy of Management Journal, vol. 43, no. 6 (December 2000): p. 1177-1194. 8

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Business wins when everyone matters. Diversity and inclusion are enduring values embedded into our culture. These values are fundamental to both our business and our mission of saving people money so they can live better. At Walmart, we continue to look for ways to diversify our business and team of associates to better serve our customers. With ideas like $4 prescriptions, walk-in health clinics in our stores, and healthy eating choices in our grocery aisles, we are able to provide healthy living solutions. We are proud of the strides we have made, but our journey is not over. With the help of our associates, customers, suppliers, and the communities we serve, we look forward to continuing our journey in being a true leader in all aspects of diversity and inclusion by offering programs that truly matter.


culture matters

Watch Your Language By Craig Storti

W

When we interact with people from other cultures, one of the biggest challenges is dealing with language issues, not cultural differences (the raison d’etre and usual subject of this column). In our multicultural world, chances are you have encountered the language challenge if your job involves serving the public or otherwise interacting on a regular basis with clients, partners, colleagues, or customers from outside the United States. Most Americans (around 85%) do not speak another language, and most people from outside the United States either do not speak English, or speak it only as a second language.

something. But the problem for non-native speakers is that the word “count” (which they probably know) means 1, 2, 3, and the word “on” (which they also know) means…well, it means “on”—the problem is that when the parts are brought together in an idiom, the resulting combination means something a non-native speaker could almost never guess. Or consider “up to,” as in “It’s up to you.” Again, non-native speakers know “up” and they know “to,” but how would they ever know that “It’s up to you” actually means “You decide?”

Many people who speak English as a second language are fluent, of course, and many others speak well enough to make themselves understood and to understand a native-speaking American, but many of us have fairly regular contact with people with very limited English. And these interactions, unless you can find a translator, often end poorly; you can’t understand the other person and he/she can’t understand you. It’s natural enough in these situations to assume there’s not much anybody can do to change the outcome: you can’t suddenly start speaking Arabic or Mandarin, and the other person can’t suddenly start speaking fluent English.

Another, related, problem is colloquial expressions: “up a creek,” “out on a limb,” “struck out,” “can of worms.” These expressions pose the same problem as idioms: a whole that simply cannot be reached by piecing together its component parts. Again, you either know what “up a creek” means or you do not, but knowing what “up” means and what a “creek” is doesn’t get you very far.

True enough, but this need not be the end of the story. You can do something about your English, and in doing the right thing, you may change the outcome of an otherwise doomed interaction. There are actually a number of things that you, as a native English speaker, can do to increase the chances that someone with limited English will understand you and successfully complete their business. Idioms and Colloquial Expressions

Starting with idioms—or, more accurately, starting with avoiding idioms. So what’s an idiom? An idiom is a two- or sometimes three-word combination—keep up, look down upon, count on, tied up, do over—that means something quite different than the meaning of its individual component words. Take “count on,” for example, as in “Don’t count on it.” This actually means “Don’t be sure” or “You can’t depend on” 10

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Idioms exist in many languages, and they are one of the hardest things to learn, precisely because you can’t figure them out by piecing the parts together. You either know that “up to” actually means decide, or you don’t. There are entire books of English idioms compiled specifically for non-native speakers.

If you use idioms and expressions with people with limited command of English, you can very quickly confuse them, and before you know it, they are waving their hands in front of you, saying “Sorry, no English.” They don’t actually mean “No English,” of course; they really mean “No English like the English you’re speaking.” But if you’re careful, if you consciously try to avoid idioms and expressions, it may turn out that Indira, Sergei, or Yang, standing in front of you, actually has enough English to get the job done. Rephrasing

So what should you do? Two things: try to catch yourself in the act of using idioms and expressions, and try rephrasing, saying the same thing in more basic English, as in the examples below. Instead of this........................ Say this

Up to you...........................................You decide Watch out. .........................................Be careful Out of. ................................................Nothing left, nothing remaining


Communicating with Non-Native Speakers Do that over......................................Do that again, repeat

Here are some other tips for helping non-native English speakers understand you better:

From now on....................................After this, next time

• Slow down when you speak.

It’s all over..........................................It’s finished

• Don’t raise your voice. They can hear you; they just may not understand you.

Out on a limb...................................Taking a risk, taking a chance No way................................................Not possible Struck out. .........................................Failed, did not succeed Piece of cake......................................Easy, simple The easy part here is the rephrasing; the hard part is to catch yourself in the act of using idioms and expressions. Most of us are just not in the habit of listening to ourselves very closely, or monitoring our speech. If the exchange is face-to-face, sometimes you can see a blank look come across the other person’s face, which is your cue you’ve said something the other person does not understand, which might prompt you to rephrase. But if the exchange is on the telephone, then there is no cue and no rephrasing. If the person you are talking with in English speaks one of the Romance languages—French, Italian, Spanish, or Portuguese— then you may have cognates working in your favor. A cognate is a word that exists in several related languages and means the same thing but is spelled and pronounced somewhat differently. If you were to say “You decide,” for example, rather than “It’s up to you,” chances are a Spanish speaker would understand you because Spanish has the word decidir (just as French has décider), and your listener will probably recognize the word. Remember: People May Be Translating

Another thing you can do to help non-native speakers is to be sure to give them enough time to translate when they’re talking with you. Foreigners with limited English have to: 1) translate what you say into their native language, 2) compose their answer in their native language, 3) translate their answer back into English, and 4) then respond to you. This is a four-step process, versus the usual two-step process that unfolds in an exchange between two native speakers. Keeping all this in mind, you should be careful in these situations to make a conscious effort to: • Speak more slowly • Stop from time to time to let the person translate out of/back into English • Pause twice as long as usual to let the person respond • Not act as if you’re in a hurry.

• Use simpler, shorter sentences. • Pause more often and for longer to allow them to absorb and respond to you. • Stay away from the passive voice: Say “You need to fill out that form,” rather than “That form needs to be filled out.” • Avoid slang and acronyms/jargon. • Offer to repeat. • Ask them what questions they have (not “Do you have any questions?”). Stay Calm

The last piece of advice, not acting impatient, is especially critical when dealing with non-native speakers. Chances are they’re already a bit self-conscious and nervous; they know they’re taking longer to get their point across than a native speaker; they know they’re using up a lot of your time; and they’re well aware that all this may be frustrating for you. If you show that you’re impatient or frustrated, this just makes the individual even more self-conscious and nervous, and when people are nervous and anxious, they quickly forget their English. Anything you can do to not add to their anxiety and to help them relax will create the best possible environment for them to be able to recall their English and have a successful exchange with you. Not all exchanges will end happily when these techniques are deployed, but in some cases they can tip the balance in favor of a successful outcome. And success not only means non-native speakers accomplish whatever objective they had for that particular conversation (as do you), it boosts their confidence going into the next and all subsequent conversations. You do foreigners and yourself a favor by watching your English.

Craig Storti, a consultant and trainer in the field of intercultural communications, is the author of seven books. His latest, Speaking of India, describes the common cultural flashpoints when Indians work together with North Americans and western Europeans. He can be contacted at: craig@craigstorti.com. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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from my perspective…

Media, Diversity, and Negative Perceptions and Assumptions By Linda Jimenez

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Chief Diversity Officer and Staff Vice President—Diversity & Inclusion WellPoint, Inc.

In the past 50 years, as technology has made tremendous advancements, the power of the media has also gained increased influence as more individuals are able to access real time information with greater rapidity. Increasingly, we live in a society dependent on this information and communication to perform our daily activities. We all make decisions based on the information that we gather. We live in an age where there are myriad media sources and, more often than not, these sources carry a bias on each issue.

After the attacks of 9/11, the media dedicated significant time and coverage to the event and the surrounding circumstances, which led to the public’s indictment of Osama Bin Laden for the attack, and greatly influenced the public’s perception about the existence of weapons of mass destruction.

As a society, we have put a tremendous amount of trust in the media as an authority on a broad range of topics, and we rely on them for accurate information on current events, entertainment, and education. The media can be a helpful, but equally harmful, force. The inundation of repetitive messages can develop and perpetuate negative perceptions and assumptions, as well as shape our opinions and beliefs—sometimes correctly, other times incorrectly.

The health care reform debate is illustrative of how an issue was distorted or over-simplified, and led to the complete public polarization on an issue. Instead of objectively looking at the system’s overall failure, the media became complacent in its reporting and often remained focused on a few surface issues. This often resulted in blaming the system’s failure on just one sector of the health care industry, and reinforced the public’s negative perception of some health care organizations and the people who work at these companies.

As seasoned diversity practitioners, we stress the importance of viewing things from different perspectives. The media can shape our attitudes about a multitude of things from what we buy, the people we admire (and those we don’t), our perceptions of political issues like immigration and health care, to social issues focused on diversity facets such as race, gender, sexual orientation, and age. We all need to be vigilant, and ensure that we look for opposing opinions and evaluate the facts for ourselves, rather than blindly accept one media outlet’s or one individual’s version of the “truth.” Journalism is a profession like any other, and certain standards of quality and professionalism must always be maintained. At the same time, in this age of prolific media sources and abundant perspectives, we must all make sure we take time to find differing viewpoints.

Many similarities occurred with regard to the health care reform debate. While I applaud the attention given to this important issue, it can be problematic if the media receives and reports inaccurate information, only shares one side of the argument, or over-simplifies a complicated subject. This can inadvertently lead to the propagation of negative perceptions and assumptions about people and companies, and prevent a healthy and necessary public forum from occurring.

Omitted from the public discourse were the many other issues complicating the health care system, as well as the efforts those within the health care industry made to advance ideas on best ways to offer quality and affordable health care to more Americans. The media’s reporting did very little to advance the public discourse on what health care reform is and how it should be shaped, and actually limited the public’s knowledge on what are the real and myriad issues crippling our nation’s system. Let us remember: generalizations, assumptions, and perceptions can all be influenced by the media, but it is up to each of us, as diversity champions, to be diligent in encouraging the discovery and evaluation of all perspectives, opinions, and accurate information. PDJ Linda Jimenez is a native of San Antonio, Texas, and attended the University of Texas at Austin where she received her B.A. with honors. She is also a graduate of the University of Texas School of Law and has spent 20 years specializing in labor and employment law.

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CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive


global diversity Is Socio-Economic Class the “Next Big Thing”? By Deidre Golden, Director, Global Equality, Diversity, and Inclusion Practice

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ORC Worldwide

The International Labour Organisation (ILO) identifies discrimination based on social origin as a longrecognised form of discrimination, and one that is very difficult to address. While it has not been “on the radar screen” of most diversity and inclusion efforts to date, ORC has recently observed an emerging focus on class and socioeconomic background as a ‘new’ area of diversity. We see this particularly in the U.K., the focus of this article, but also with relation to a number of countries in South America. We believe that this trend will have implications for the global diversity initiatives of many organisations. In the U.K., class has long been the elephant in the room that no one wants to address because it is felt that a modern, seemingly meritocratic society has no room for such notions. In common with all E.U. member states, the U.K. has a robust framework of anti-discrimination legislation covering six key areas or “strands:” race and ethnicity, equal treatment between men and women, disability, religion and belief, sexual orientation, and, most recently, age. This broad framework of legislation does not include socio-economic disadvantage, or class, but with this issue making strong inroads into the diversity discourse, and bolstered by the continuing impact of the recession, it looks set to gain ground in Britain. Two recent events have created additional impetus in the U.K. First, the publication earlier this year of a governmentsponsored report by the National Equality Panel has placed the issue centre stage. The report finds that despite a whole range of government policies and initiatives to address inequality, the social group into which a person is born has as much effect on the individual’s life chances as differences arising from ethnicity, gender, etc. Second, the U.K. government has just passed legislation that places a duty on public authorities to implement strategic decisions in a way “designed to reduce the inequalities of outcome which result from socio-economic disadvantage.” Although the legislation lacks an enforcement mechanism, it 14

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is bringing the issue of socio-economic class into sharp relief. Importantly, its impact will be felt beyond public authorities, especially in companies that undertake work or contracts as suppliers to the public sector (perhaps as much as 30% of the private sector). In addition, as more private sectors undertake work for the public sector, and as social inequality continues to be a high-profile topic of conversation in politics and the media, other private sector organisations will be increasingly nudged towards taking action. Faced with this legislative change, and the related political rhetoric surrounding the May 6 general election, U.K. employers are still getting their heads around what it all means in practice. One likely outcome will be that employers, starting with public sector organisations, will need to figure out how to include socio-economic class in their diversity monitoring programs. It is unclear what question an organisation could ask its employees to determine their class background. One solution would be to ask people to self-identify; another would be to use proxies such as education (private or state schools) as markers of class. Organisations will also need to re-examine hiring criteria such as educational requirements to make sure they are not disproportionately excluding individuals from economically-disadvantaged backgrounds who have the competencies to do the job. It will take some time for all of this to take shape, but it is clear already that the discourse on equality and antidiscrimination is changing and is moving from what has been, to date, a strand-specific approach (looking at each equality strand on its own) to one that takes a more holistic approach. Because socio-economic advantage is closely tied in one way or another to the experiences of people in every strand, this may well be the issue that helps create more integrated strategies. PDJ

ORC Worldwide (ORC) is an international management consulting firm offering professional assistance in the areas of global equality, diversity and inclusion; talent management; global and domestic compensation; labor and employee relations; and occupational safety and health. Visit www.orcworldwide.com for more information.


At Vanguard, diversity is about more than color.

At Vanguard, we know diversity is more than just labels or gender or the color of someone’s skin. We believe in an unwavering commitment to inclusiveness that resonates through every level of our team. Diversity at Vanguard means: • Respecting the variety and differences among people across all communities and creeds. • Putting programs in place to foster connection in the workplace—including monthly awareness activities, diversity councils, and training activities for everyone from senior management to new hires. • Partnering with national professional organizations representing minorities and women. • Actively recruiting and promoting a diverse workforce. Most importantly, we value our employees for being themselves and for what they contribute. Because in an environment that champions the unique value of each individual, diversity represents unlimited potential.

To learn more

Connect with Vanguard > www.vanguard.com/careers ®

Vanguard is an Equal Opportunity Employer. © 2010 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


viewpoint

The Diversity Destination and Journey: “Are We There Yet?” By Pamela Arnold,

F

President

American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc.

For more than a quarter of a century, the American Institute for Managing Diversity (AIMD) has been involved in leading, guiding, and partnering with companies, academia, and community organizations to advance the field of diversity. Many of the inquiries that come to AIMD are related to whether the “diversity” question has been answered and, if so, can we check it off the list as completed? In the words of a Karen Carpenter song from the 1970s, there are times when I think that the “We’ve Only Just Begun” song title applies to the diversity experience. There is more to do and more to learn and, just when you think you’ve got it, the journey and the destination are redefined. “Are we there yet?” How many times have you heard “are we there yet?”— particularly on a long journey with children. The question is usually asked repeatedly until the journey is over. But it is curiosity about the destination, and the excitement about what awaits them that may be driving the questions. The subject of diversity and the process of managing diversity generate the same type of dynamics. All of us have heard this question or conversation at some point in time as organizations and leaders work to understand and implement diversity and the elements connected to it. “Are we done yet?” This is a different diversity question that also comes up and implies that diversity is going to be finished or “done” at some point in time. There is not an end-date out there that we will all reach, or ever reach at the same time. Companies are working on developing and expanding their business case for diversity and creating a road map to follow for implementing practices that are sustainable. CDOs, consultants, and educators are continuing to research diversity, build diversity models, and expand the view of diversity management. Students and employees across all generations are asking questions and offering new dialogue about diversity. “Are we there yet AND are we done?” Have we arrived at a final diversity destination point and, once there, are we finished with diversity now? Feedback and discussion from our constituents, students, practitioners, researchers, and consultants tell us that we are still on the diversity journey and there is more work to be done.

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An example of this would be an organization that recognizes that they are “diversity challenged,” so they develop diversity education modules for all levels of the company. Over the next 12 months everyone, including new employees, goes through the training. Assessments performed both before and after the training indicate that the training has increased diversity awareness. But the journey is not finished. Now that the employees have increased their learning, a plan needs to be developed to implement changes to the processes, systems, and policies and procedures for sustainability. Additional steps may include change management, organizational changes, additional training, and other steps to keep moving forward. The next time you feel compelled to ask, or you are asked of the diversity destination “are we there yet,” consider these points: • The Diversity dialogue and journey is ongoing. The search for diversity and inclusion answers may be different for each organization, team, and individual— and the solutions will be unique. • Diversity Recruitment—Talent management. Organizations are always looking for diverse talent to bring creativity, imagination, and innovation to the business and to the bottom line. Getting, keeping and retaining talent is ongoing. • Diversity is not limited to a place or thing or point in time. • There are no “one-size-fits-all” or “one-answer-fits-all” solutions. • Diversity, like people, is not static; it is always moving, changing, evolving. • There is no final completion date! AIMD is excited about continuing the journey and serving as the Global Positioning System (GPS) to help its constituents move forward and foster breakthrough ideas and practices in diversity through education, research and public outreach. Come join us and enjoy the journey! PDJ

Pamela W. Arnold is President of the American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc. The organization is a 501 (c) (3) public interest non-profit dedicated to advancing diversity thought leadership through research, education, and public outreach. AIMD works to strengthen our communities and institutions through effective diversity management. For more information, please visit www.aimd.org.


Bring It!

Your Talents. Your Ideas. Your Passion. Thu, Verizon, Marketing

At Verizon, we want you to bring your diverse talents, experiences, backgrounds, and viewpoints to work. It’s your smarter leadership, bolder innovations, and faster results that will move our business forward at the speed of FiOS! So, bring it in and bring it on – bring your diversity to work at Verizon!

Verizon Diversity Leadership. Innovation. Results.


human equity™

The SHAPE of Talent By Trevor Wilson Author and Global Human Equity Strategist TWI Inc.

“We need someone who is genetically programmed to recognize and avoid serious risks, including those never before encountered. Temperament is also important, independent thinking, emotional stability and a keen understanding of both human and institutional behaviour. I’ve seen a lot of very educated people who have lacked these virtues.”

I

In this quote, legendary investor Warren Buffet is describing his eventual successor. The traits he describes are unlikely to be found on the conventional resume, which typically highlights credentials and technical skills. The overlap between the “right education” and the “right skills” has become the standard way to identify talent and determine the best candidates for recruitment or promotion. But as the quote implies, there could be more. When Jack Welsh ran General Electric, he would conduct reference checks on people applying to relatively junior management positions. He was looking for intangible traits for future GE leaders, traits so intangible that sometimes he couldn’t even put them into words. What was it that Welsh, Buffet, and other great people-leaders know and see about talent that the rest of us miss? We are answering that question. As TWI evolves its work in diversity beyond group to the individual, we are focusing on human equity by providing practical tools, which show people-leaders and managers how to maximize on the unique differences of their entire workforce. These tools and templates enable leaders to more strategically position performance management, career development, and succession planning. One of the most interesting human equity projects we have worked on was for a construction company. Annually they awarded the “builder-of-the-year” in a very public, prestigious event. Each candidate was nominated from eight regions across the country based on their projects. I asked the CEO if he knew what trait would be common among each of the eight finalists, i.e., what makes a great builder. He thought about it for a while. After a few minutes he said, “I really don’t know for sure.” I asked him if he would like to find out. Using a couple of tools, we managed to quickly 18

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—Warren Buffet

isolate the trait that ran through all eight of the builders. This trait, called harmony, had never been written on their resumes or their corporate profile. The CEO was shocked to find out that this so-called intangible strength had never been written in a job ad, position description, or succession plan. How do we really identify great talent? Enter the human equity talent model called SHAPE V. SHAPE V is an acronym that stands for the following: “S” stands for Strengths, the innate traits individuals have. “H” stands for Heart, i.e., the passion people have for certain activities. “A” stands for a person’s Attitude towards work. “P” stands for Personality. “E” stands for Experience, not the technical experience usually reviewed, but the unique, diverse life experience. “V” stands for Virtue or how a person lives their values. This model allows us to put a label on the intangible attributes of talent. It seeks to put into words what great people leaders have always intuitively perceived about high potential talent. The French sometimes call it the “je ne sais quoi.” By adding the intangibles to the talent discussion, we may be very surprised about the shape talent actually takes, and the talent we miss. PDJ In 1996 Trevor started TWI Inc. to specialize in the area of equity and diversity as a business issue. In the same year, Trevor published a highly acclaimed book entitled Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity. The firm’s clients include some of the most progressive global employers. TWI’s Human Equity™ approach was instrumental in catapulting Coca-Cola’s South African division to the top performing division worldwide. Visit www.twiinc.com for more information.


[ Bank of the West ]

WANT TO WORK FOR A TRULY GREAT BANK?

AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED. Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.


A look back as we go forward On April 3, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr. said, “Something is happening in our world.” In 2010, these words have fresh meaning — reflecting mountaintops reached and new hopes born. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina celebrates Black History Month. In honoring the past, we appreciate the present and find inspiration to create our future.

An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U6809, 1/10

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Profiles in Diversity Journal would like to focus on the managers who have successfully leveraged the diversity of their teams in order to best achieve their business goals and objectives. These managers are often the “back-bone” of an organization: they have skills and experience that can’t be easily replaced, and they often have the most knowledge about how things work and how the work gets done in the most efficient manner. Read how they are

Leveraging Diversity Driving Sales Through Diversity by Steve Medina Brand Manager MillerCoors, U.S. Hispanic Sales

To be successful in business, companies not only need to provide quality service to their customer base, but ultimately they need to truly connect with their customers. MillerCoors is focused on building a workforce and supplier base that represents the diverse ethnic and gender groups that consume our products. Additionally, we are committed to connecting with our consumer, not only through marketing initiatives, but through community investments as well. For example, one of our largest distributor partners, Manhattan Beer Distributors (MBD), has embedded diversity into its business, and has realized substantial sales growth as a result. Faced with the crowded marketplace of New York, MBD needed a strategy to build strong brand equity among beerdrinking consumers faced with countless choices. To increase market share among Latino consumers, we, along with the MBD team, developed strong relationships with Hispanic retailers by listening to their needs and developing point-of-sale marketing and promotional materials that resonated with key Latino beer drinkers. Additionally, some MBD leaders made the extra effort to connect with retailers by being bilingual, even if Spanish was not their first language. This showed tremendous effort on behalf of the team. Additionally, MBD has partnered locally with us on two programs to build brand loyalty—the Puerto Rican Day Parade

and Compartiendo Mesa. In 2006, Coors Light became the official national sponsor of the Puerto Rican Day Parade, which is attended by millions each year, and viewed on television by nearly 12 million in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. As part of the sponsorship, Coors Light invests $75,000 in scholarships to students through certified affiliates of the parade. Also, in conjunction with MBD, we developed the community-focused food drive, Compartiendo Mesa. Together, we worked with local non-profits to assemble and distribute food baskets during the holiday season. In 2009, we distributed more than 450 baskets to families in need. Ultimately, MBD realized substantial growth as a result of diversifying its workforce to not only reflect the market, but to also understand the marketplace. Key outcomes garnered from a diverse workforce are better business decisions and increased innovation. To date, 51% of Manhattan’s combined workforce is Latino, and it has experienced double-digit Coors Light growth in marketplace sales every year since 2003. As a result, Coors Light is now the best-selling beer in New York City, and has higher share among Latinos in New York than the general market. PDJ Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Leveraging Diversity

Complex Contract Negotiation Benefits from Team Diversity by Sheryl Morrison Director of Finance Pitney Bowes Inc.

One project with which I was involved as director of finance was a contract renewal for IT support with an outsourcing vendor. The challenge was to lead a team in structuring a deal with pricing, terms, and conditions that were in line with the company’s expectations. The global contract renewal was a multi-million dollar, five-year deal with numerous points to be agreed upon. A global cross-functional team was established that included IT, Finance, Procurement, and Legal. The team diversity encompassed age, gender, cultural, and racial differences. The team’s diversity was a catalyst to achieving a successful outcome. Different ideas were generated through numerous team meetings and the team prioritized frequent communication. Through communication and an inclusive mindset, the team was able to understand various points of view and develop effective solutions. We were able to evaluate the facts, without bias. We also determined what items were critical and what items were negotiable. In addition, we developed evaluation criteria to determine the need for competitive bidding. An external benchmarking service was engaged to provide market reference and productivity data. Workload volumes and service level requirements were updated from the prior contract for the U.S., Canada, and International operations. We conducted several rounds of negotiations with the vendor, covering all key elements of the contract. Initially, there were some areas where both parties held firm to their positions. There were numerous long nights, spirited debates and heated discussions.

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The inclusive mindset of the team broke down any cultural barriers or bias, and the diversity helped appeal to a vendor located in a different country.

However, the team understood that in order to have a successful outcome for the contract, there needed to be perceived value on both sides. So the team was willing to be flexible on the negotiable items that were important to the vendor, while holding firm to other points that were critical to Pitney Bowes. The inclusive mindset of the team broke down any cultural barriers or bias, and the diversity helped appeal to a vendor located in a different country. The inclusive team environment also led to greater innovation and creativity, as well as openness to listen to different perspectives. The vendor’s final response met, and exceeded, both our internal evaluation criteria and the external benchmarks for competitiveness. The contract saved $1 million in 2009, with essentially flat pricing through 2013. Foreign exchange exposure was borne by the vendor. Additional contract highlights included improvements in service levels, increased customer satisfaction targets, and elimination of fees for early contract termination. As a result, the team negotiated a mutually acceptable renewal contract and the agreement was signed. Such a favorable outcome was directly linked to the diversity and inclusiveness of the team. PDJ


Leveraging Diversity

Collaborative, Inclusive, & Diverse Team Delivers Gold-Medal Results by Jennifer Anderson Marketing Director Pitney Bowes Mail Services

In 2009, I had the honor of being asked to Chair the Pitney Bowes Employee Giving Campaign, a position that involves leading a diverse group of select employees at all levels, from all divisions. As Chair, I faced significant challenges posed by the global economic environment. Our goals were to exceed the prior year’s financial giving through employee participation levels, so I had to rely heavily on the planning team’s unique professional experiences and differences for creative solutions. The Employee Giving Campaign was a global initiative, combining efforts in the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. Because the campaign occurred across and within different cultures, the planning committee understood that a unified global message and theme was imperative for success. As team members came from different areas of the business and were from different backgrounds, they brought unique perspectives in how to best communicate and engage employees with the campaign. These unique perspectives and differences, along with an inclusive team environment, worked to our advantage by providing different and innovative ideas for a challenging assignment. For example, we used technology, such as live streaming video during the kick-off events, to create a sense of unity, regardless of where employees were based. In addition, members of the planning team orchestrated in-person rallies, with Pitney Bowes executives and guest speakers from local charities at key locations to keep momentum going and visibility high. We developed rich content for our intranet portal, and pushed regular messages out to all employees at all levels. We also chose a theme that all employees could relate to: the Olympics.

The diversity of thought that came from each individual on the planning committee helped deliver gold-medal results for this year’s employee giving campaign. It was through stellar communication within the team, dedication to an inclusive team environment, and commitment to the cause that helped us succeed. The team increased financial giving by more than 1,200 employees, a 27% overall increase. And, donations increased by over $100,000 from the prior year. At a time when many are trying to hold onto every penny, Pitney Bowes employees chose to give more than ever before. This is positive proof that diverse and inclusive teams can really go the distance when faced with a challenging project or assignment. It was an honor to lead such an important initiative with a diverse team, at a time when it meant so much to the communities where we live and work. PDJ

Jennifer Anderson with the Pitney Bowes Employee Giving Campaign’s Senior Leadership Team. From left to right: Vice President, Pitney Bowes Foundation, Kathleen Ryan Mufson; Marketing Director, Pitney Bowes Mail Services, Jennifer Anderson; Chairman, President & CEO, Pitney Bowes Inc., Murray Martin; President, Pitney Bowes Mail Services, John Ward; Director, Community Investments, Polly Morrow; Chief Marketing & Communications Officer, Juanita James.

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Leveraging Diversity

Committed to Diversity, for Associates and Customers Wally Wozniak Executive Director of Support Services; Director of the Food & Nutrition Services Sparrow Hospital

Wally Wozniak has been instrumental in fostering a diverse and inclusive work environment. He has always tried to develop his workforce, and to promote from within. For example, he encouraged a minority Associate to complete his education. Down the road, this allowed the Associate to qualify for, and be promoted to a supervisory position. If this Associate had not received the encouragement and support from Wozniak to return to school to earn his diploma in the time frame that he did, it probably would have resulted in a different, less favorable outcome for the Associate. Wozniak has been proactive in building a very diverse leadership team by promoting from within those of various race, sex, culture, and beliefs. In his role as the Director of the Food & Nutrition Services department, Wozniak is sensitive and inclusive to the dietary expectations and desires of the customers. Visitors to the Sparrow Cafeteria(s) on the Main and St. Lawrence campuses are offered special theme meals (on occasion) that feature menu items reflective of various cultures, religions, or lifestyles. These include: Black History Month, Cinco de Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, Fat Tuesday/Ash Wednesday—to name just a few. In 2010, the Black History Meal celebration and Ash Wednesday Meal were held on the same day, offering meals respectful of both groups. For a hospital that is focused on providing the highest quality care to a diverse patient population, Wozniak is responsive to varying dietary needs. With the inception of Room Service to

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People of various backgrounds and cultures serve to enrich the environments where we live and work. the Main Campus, patients can now order what they want (within their specific dietary guidelines) when it is convenient for them to eat. Patients are also offered foods or items that fit their lifestyle, including kosher meals, gluten-free diets, foods free of trans-fats, some organic foods, and locally grown or raised products. In 2010, Food and Nutrition went “live” with menus written in Spanish. It should also be noted that the departments under Wozniak’s direction are among the most ethnically diverse at Sparrow, with Associates from various diverse groups and cultures including: AfricanAmerican, Mexican-American, Asian-American, AsianIndian, European-American, and many more. Having a diverse workforce demonstrates a leader’s concern and compassion towards inclusion. Where there is diversity, there is innovation. People of various backgrounds and cultures serve to enrich the environments where we live and work. Wozniak’s actions as a leader exemplify the true spirit of diversity and inclusion. PDJ


Leveraging Diversity

Diversity Events Committee: Popular Programs Bring Positive Results Jolene Jacobs Human Resources Director SPARROW Clinton Hospital

Following Sparrow’s lead, Sparrow Clinton Hospital (SCH) embarked on its own diversity journey in May 2008, led by SCH Human Resources Director Jolene Jacobs. From the beginning, Jacobs understood that the first step to performance improvement efforts was to have a strong commitment to Associate education designed to increase awareness and sensitivity. As chairperson of the Clinton Memorial Hospital Diversity Events Committee, Jacobs has assisted with the implementation of more than 20 diversity-related programs and celebratory events. Thanks to her dedication, 300 SCH Associates have gained important skills that will help them provide exceptional care for a diverse patient population. In addition, diversity education has encouraged them to develop better Associate relationships through learning to appreciate and embrace individual differences.

SCH Associates look forward to Diversity events at the hospital, knowing they will be enlightened.

The Diversity Events Committee “broke the ice” with a popular program that taught Associates how to track their family tree. Jacobs arranged for a genealogy coordinator from the Library of Michigan to provide an on-site workshop. Committee members set up a map in the hospital cafeteria so Associates could plant a pin to mark their ancestral homelands. Pins popped up on every continent of the world by the end of the event, generating further discussion by Associates about family traditions and cultural observances.

The Diversity Events Committee combined education with action when Jacobs brought in a speaker from Goodwill Industries. A clothing drive was held to benefit the local Goodwill store. This presentation centered on the Americans with Disabilities Act. Program participants were made aware of how the law provides reasonable accommodation in work situations and sets standards for physical access to buildings and public transportation. Associates spent time considering the possible impediments that patients with disabilities might face when accessing SCH facilities. At the end of the sessions, ideas for improvement were forwarded to the SCH Environment of Care Committee for review. The best attended and most popular event sponsored by the Diversity Events Committee to date was a workshop called Generational Differences. Designed by Jacobs and committee members, this interactive program spurred Associates to understand the impact their generation had on their social views, ethics, personal dress code, work habits and methods of communication. Participating Associates discussed how to best use this information to enhance their understanding of how to communicate better with patients and Associates. Jacobs and SCH Diversity Events Committee members constantly explore new opportunities for interactive, hands-on diversity education and awareness programs. Through special luncheons, contests, and games—even dancing to Polka bands—Associates gain valuable skills in a creative learning environment. SCH Associates look forward to Diversity events at the hospital, knowing they will be enlightened. PDJ

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Leveraging Diversity

Leveraging Engagement and Inclusion for Business Results by Debra Clayton Human Resources Manager Verizon As a Human Resources manager, I work closely with my clients to identify and develop solutions for issues impacting the workforce. Increasingly, it has become a challenge to effectively respond to constantly changing economic, customer, and workplace requirements. To identify areas of opportunity, my team conducted field visits to identify common issues impacting the workforce. Several themes surfaced, and after discussions with the senior executive team, we agreed to address these holistically, using diversity management as the anchor, leveraging both the functional and professional diversity of the team. In partnership with our Diversity Management team, we designed a one-day development workshop, including extended learning application sessions that address common themes—diversity and inclusion, effective communication, feedback, managing conflict, and engaging yourself and your team—while expanding the conversation about diversity, its impact on performance, and delivering results. The success of the workshops was enhanced because of several aspects of diversity. First, in developing the workshop we relied on people with backgrounds in organizational development, industrial/organizational psychology, HR generalist roles, and field operations. This blended approach helped ensure that workshop content included best practices from research and was applicable in the real world. Second, during the workshops, participants of varying backgrounds—professional, cultural, and personal—interacted and worked together to identify issues they were trying to solve in the workplace, and learned how to apply the tools from the workshop in their particular work environment. Expanding the perception of diversity was a key learning component. While many embraced the importance of the value of diversity and inclusion, some still held the view that diversity primarily addressed issues of race, ethnicity, and gender. In expanding the conversation, participants learned that diversity also includes age, personality, language, sexual orientation, cultural background, education, disability, religious belief, cognitive style, organizational function, and much more. More importantly, participants came to

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understand that this means diversity is about each and every individual on our teams, and that as we become more aware of the diversity mix of the organization, we increase our ability to effectively manage relationships with our co-workers, while creating opportunities for creativity, learning, and enhancing business results. The initial participant response was very favorable. The learning lab was an opportunity to discuss in depth how diversity impacts each of us, and provided tangible tools and techniques that were easy to use back on the job. Many participants reflected that after completing the workshop, they felt they were better equipped to understand and interact with their co-workers, facilitate greater engagement and inclusion, and deliver on the team’s performance objectives. Key measures that we are tracking to determine the longerterm impact include: • Turnover and absenteeism, • Improved productivity metrics, • Inclusion index, • Safety metrics. Driving inclusion and engagement allows us to fully tap into and leverage the power inherent in the diversity of our workforce; a factor we view as critical to successfully compete in today’s business environment. PDJ

Team Lead Debra Clayton, with team member Shaheen Barrett. Other team members not pictured: Matthew Dreyer, Max Portrey, and Pava Radakovich.


Leveraging Diversity

Leveraging Diversity for Community Outreach: A Case Study Ernest Duplessis Vice President, Investor Relations W.W. Grainger, Inc. THE CHALLENGE:

W.W. Grainger, Inc. sought to increase its presence in the U.S. communities it serves by encouraging 430 local branch managers to develop a proactive approach to community relations. The challenge, according to Ernest Duplessis, Grainger’s Vice President of Business Communications at the time, was two-fold: to help branch managers understand what was important within their own communities, and to give them the tools they needed to reach out effectively. HOW DIVERSITY HELPED GENERATE ANSWERS:

Grainger assembled a corporate team that featured both cultural diversity and a cross-section of skill sets to design the outreach program. This included internal and external communications professionals, philanthropic experts, community relations advisers, and regional leadership. “We also benefited from the fact that our team members represented the diversity of ethnicity, gender, and generation found in the communities where we do business,” Duplessis says. “This gave us further insight into the differences in our local markets and helped us consult with our branch managers on the most relevant ways to engage with community leaders.” The “Engage Your Community” initiative began with an orientation for branch managers that provided the tools to assess needs within their communities and find the most relevant ways to support local organizations. Grainger’s wellestablished philanthropic focus on emergency preparedness and disaster relief, as well as technical education, provided a platform for Grainger’s managers to get involved, in addition to other relevant, local opportunities. The diverse team of professionals that designed the program armed the managers with training and education to identify strategic, local partnerships and effective processes for engaging and building strong networks, according to Duplessis.

We also benefited from the fact that our team members represented the diversity of ethnicity, gender and generation found in the

The team developed speaker training and media relations classes for news conferences or interviews, an efficient process to uncover and make charitable contributions, and guidelines to participate effectively on local civic and not-for-profit boards. HOW DIVERSITY MADE A DIFFERENCE:

“This program would not have met its objectives without diversity,” asserts Duplessis. “Tapping the different perspectives on the team was essential. It helped our managers gain a deeper understanding of what was relevant to the people in their local markets and how to cultivate effective community relations,” he says. In addition, the various disciplines brought new perspectives and insights to the managers which multiplied the positive effects of the tailored outreach effort in each community. “If we had tried a cookie-cutter approach, we would have simply been shooting in the dark.” MEASURING POSITIVE OUTCOMES:

Internally, Grainger measures its ability to develop branch managers as more effective community leaders through the orientation and support process. This process introduces new skills for engaging with their contacts, and follows up with checkpoints and surveys. Externally, Grainger compiles the impact of the program in media coverage, feedback from employees and customers, public recognition of charitable contributions, and new partnerships reflected in branch manager board placements, speaking invitations, and volunteer events. In addition, the process has built-in sustainability, with regional managers taking an active role to champion and steward the program, which has led to full adoption throughout the country. All the local markets have the tools to continue their outreach in the future. Indeed, because so many of the community activities are aligned with Grainger’s business interests, new relationships are developing into future business opportunities. According to Duplessis, “This represents the true power of diversity. The ability to leverage this powerful tool of diversity against real business issues, results ultimately in increased organizational effectiveness and broader opportunities for the business.” PDJ

communities where we do business. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Take the next

step.

Join us as we play a key role in Making Home Af fordable. We’re a vital part of President Obama’s initiative to stabilize the housing market. For you, that means exciting challenges and an opportunity to have a real impact on our nation’s economy – and your neighbors’ lives. We’ll provide a solid platform for your career and the tools to assist your professional growth.

Audit | Compliance | Default Asset Management | IT 9

When you join the Freddie Mac team, you’ll discover an inclusive, empowering culture with an equal opportunity employer who recognizes the value of diversity. You’ll also find a total rewards package that supports your success both at work and in your personal life. We encourage you to visit us at upcoming diversity conferences, which are listed on our career site. Visit us online at:

FreddieMacDiversity.jobs careers with impact


Meet

Ed Haldeman CEO, Freddie Mac Growing up in Philadelphia, Ed Haldeman was driven to succeed from an early age. Today, he’s driving Freddie Mac’s success.

Ed Haldeman developed his solid work ethic while working in his family’s store, and was the first in his family to attend college.

COMPANY Name: Freddie Mac Headquarters: McLean, Virginia Web site: www.freddiemac.com Primary Business or Industry: Mortgage finance 2009 RevenueS: $14.3 billion

Good timing was a factor in starting his career, but luck isn’t the only driver of his success. In 2003, as CEO of Putnam Investment Management, his passion and determination helped save the troubled firm and restore its reputation. Freddie Mac noticed his skill with Putnam. In 2009, they offered him the CEO position. Haldeman was aware of Freddie Mac’s troubles from the media coverage; however, his research led him to the conclusion that the organization, its mission, and its people were vitally important, and was worth rescuing. Nine months later, with Haldeman at the helm, Freddie Mac is playing a key role in the nation’s housing and economic recovery efforts. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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&

Questions Answers

wi th Fre d d i e Mac

MAC Week Home Dedication What D&I innovations has Freddie Mac planned for 2010? In 2010, one of our primary objectives is to increase diversity representation in the company’s officer and senior director ranks. This objective will be met by continuing to focus on ensuring that all interview slates are diverse, and seeing that current senior management supports diverse career events and networking opportunities. Additionally, the Executive Diversity Council, which is led by our CEO Ed Haldeman, will be focused on ensuring we meet this objective. Most company leaders say diversity drives business results. What part did diversity and inclusion play in your company’s 2009 growth? Our commitment to diversity and inclusion is essential to the success of the company and its critical mission to stabilize the housing market and support the nation’s economic recovery. We recognize that attracting, retaining, and harnessing top talent from diverse backgrounds and cultivating a spirit of inclusion within our workforce is essential to successfully fulfilling this mission and serving our customers, business partners, and our diverse communities. Last year, we took important steps to increase diversity representation within our workforce and among our senior leadership, foster a more inclusive culture, and better serve our diverse communities. Some of our diversityrelated successes include: Workplace/Culture Freddie Mac is truly a diverse workplace: with almost 50 percent of our population female and 44 percent minority, we embrace a multitude of cultures. Last year, minorities made up 44 percent of the total new hires and 42 percent of all promotions. Also, 48 percent of our officer promotions in 2009 were female and 26 percent were minority. 30

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Freddie Mac’s seven dynamic Employee Network Groups (ENGs) work tirelessly to ensure that all of our employees understand and appreciate the various cultures in the workplace. The network groups host a variety of monthly and bi-monthly events such as DNA testing to discover one’s African Heritage; a recent event with Karem Dale, Special Assistant to the President for Disability Policy; leadership panels; and career coaching, just to name a few. Throughout the year, more than a quarter of our employees actively participate in networksponsored events. This year, our new CEO Ed Haldeman kicked off events sponsored by the ARISE and ASIAN Employee Network Groups, and hosted last year’s Employee Network Group Recognition Luncheon. We also encourage our employees to participate in professional development programs organized by diverse organizations such as National Black MBA, National Association of Black Accountants, Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting, and the Executive Leadership Council.

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Pictured (l-r) at Freddie Mac’s 2009 MAC Week Home Dedication Event are new homeowners Nicole Smith and Kolowole Marville and their daughter with Freddie Mac CEO Ed Haldeman.

Marketplace Freddie Mac continues to be recognized in the marketplace as an ‘Employer of Choice’ in several ‘best places’ lists including Hispanic Business Top 60 Diversity Elite Companies, Working Mother 100 Best Companies for Working Mothers, Black Enterprise Top 40 Companies for Diversity, Latina Style 50 Best Companies for Latinas, and Black Collegian Top 100 U.S. Employers, to name a few. In addition, many of our executives have received individual recognition, including our Chief Diversity Officer as one of 50 Working Mothers from across the country by Working Mother magazine, Senior Vice President Ingrid Beckles, and Vice President Tricia McClung as top 100 Women Worth Watching® by Profiles in Diversity Journal, Senior Vice Presidents Dwight Robinson and Paul Mullings as Top 100


Questions & Answers

Freddie Mac

Pictured (l-r) at Freddie Mac’s 2009 MAC Week Event is Freddie Mac CEO Ed Haldeman working alongside Kolowole Marville, one of the recipients of the newly built D.C. homes.

Most Influential Blacks in Corporate America by Savoy magazine, and Vice President Zenia Raudsepp as a Top 20 Elite Woman of the Year by Hispanic Business magazine. Philanthropy Freddie Mac also continues to be a leader in the community. In 2009, we contributed more than $2.2 million in funding to local nonprofit organizations, many of which serve ethnic minority communities.

LEADERSHIP What resources are allocated to diversity? We have a dedicated Office of Diversity & Inclusion, led by Freddie Mac’s Chief Diversity Officer, Tujuanna B. Williams. The team includes two senior diversity advisors and support staff, as well as a separate Supplier Diversity team. This office integrates and aligns senior leadership’s vision with daily business practices, and communicates goals and progress to the organization. The diversity and inclusion budget sufficiently supports all outreach activity, education, career, and networking events. Additionally, the seven ENGs are funded through the Office of Diversity & Inclusion. How does Freddie Mac deal with/train for cross-cultural competencies for its leadership? What accountability do you employ to meet objectives? Diversity and inclusion training that raises awareness and builds skills is a cornerstone of professional development for both senior management and employees at Freddie Mac. We provide the training and skills employees and senior leaders can use to forge strong relationships, and make a positive impact on our corporate environment. Our instructor-led and web-based diversity training and education programs include a mandatory on-line training module for all new hires, and seven different instructor-led courses offered through the year.

Some of the topics these courses are focused on include: • Four Generations—Four Approaches to Work • Enhancing Your Cultural Competency • Managing Micro-Triggers • Exploring Unconscious Bias • Self-Efficacy (for African Americans, LGBTs, Hispanics/Latinos, Women, and Asians) • Recruiting Through a Diversity Lens • Performance, Image, and Exposure: P.I.E. —Your Competitive Advantage Who chairs your company’s diversity council? How are decisions about diversity made in your organization? Freddie Mac will be launching its first internal executive diversity council this year, led by the CEO, Ed Haldeman. The council will meet regularly to establish and review the diversity and inclusion goals and progress.

MARKET ISSUES How does a company in an industry as fastchanging as yours keep up with diversity development throughout the organization? Recognizing that the market is ever-changing, our diversity and inclusion efforts are even more focused on meeting corporate objectives, particularly in this current housing and economic climate. Last year, we made progress in increasing diversity representation—both within our workforce, and among our leadership—to be representative of the diverse communities that we serve. We also continued to provide employees with dynamic and comprehensive diversity training and education, partnered with numerous diversity-focused organizations to recruit diverse candidates and stay abreast of diversity best practices, provided employees with competitive benefits and professional development opportunities, and helped strengthen children

and families in diverse communities through our philanthropic and housing-related efforts.

EMPLOYEE INCLUSIVENESS Sometimes diversity is referred to as a ‘numbers game.’ How does your company know its culture is not just tied up in numbers? How do the human stories circulate in-house/celebrate success? At Freddie Mac, diversity is much more than a ‘numbers game’—we are cultivating a work environment where everyone feels included and has a responsibility for appreciating, respecting, and celebrating our differences. Our diversity is woven into everything we do, and we have a number of opportunities for employees to participate in a myriad of diversity programs and activities, including Hispanic Heritage Month, Black History Month, and Asian Lunar New Year activities; diversity training and education sessions; and external diversity networking and recruiting events. We not only strive to recruit top diverse candidates, but foster an inclusive culture within our workforce that recognizes and celebrates the unique similarities and differences of all of our employees. How are employees more involved in diversity and inclusion efforts at the company than they were two years ago? Our ENGs are open to all employees and provide opportunities for professional advancement and personal development, as well as an open environment to share insights and network. Participation in these network groups has increased year after year; today, more than

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Questions & Answers

Freddie Mac

2010

Diversity Recognition Luncheon Freddie Mac CEO Ed Haldeman

25 percent of our employees participate in network-sponsored events. In 2008, the Employee Network Ambassador program was launched to support the efforts of the Office of Diversity & Inclusion. These volunteer Ambassadors accompany recruiters to diversity recruiting events to provide potential candidates with an objective perspective about the company culture. The Ambassadors also greet all new hires within the first 60 days of employment, to welcome them to the company and deliver a packet of information about Freddie Mac’s diversity and inclusion offerings. Our employees also take part in our robust diversity training and education programs throughout the year. Last year, more than 40% of our workforce participated in diversity education and training and employees participated in more than 60 instructor-led training workshops. This denotes a significant year over year increase. How are employees’ opinions solicited/ valued, and responded to? Employees are able to offer their opinions and/ or make suggestions on a variety of topics and company offerings through an employee ‘feedback box’ on the company’s intranet site ‘Homefront.’ A member of the company’s employee communications team regularly reviews employee comments, follows up with employees, and shares the feedback with the Office of Diversity & Inclusion. Can you describe your method for orienting new hires into your culture, and enriching awareness or introducing new issues? All new hires attend a one-day orientation class to familiarize them with Freddie Mac’s mission, business and corporate culture. Presentations are delivered by several divisions and provide detailed information about the company’s diversity and inclusion efforts, benefits, professional development and mentoring opportunities, and key business area initiatives. Senior leaders, including the CEO, often attend the new-hire orientations to welcome new employees to Freddie Mac. As part of our on-boarding efforts and overall commitment to diversity at the company, we have our Employee Network Ambassador Program. Last year, Freddie Mac also launched 32

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(Above) Paul Mullings, SVP, SingleFamily Sourcing; and (right) Ed Golding, SVP of Economics & Policy, and Making Home Affordable Program executive.

an Employee Network Mentoring Program enabling network members to be mentees and also select mentors of the same gender or ethnic background if they choose to. How do you deal with those who perceive inclusion programs for underrepresented groups as being exclusionary for others? Our diversity and inclusion programs have been very well received by employees. We have yet to receive feedback that these programs have been perceived as exclusionary, as we are very deliberate with the positioning of our diversity and inclusion programs. The messaging is consistently inclusive and emphasizes that diversity and inclusion pertains to and affects every employee. Freddie Mac’s ENGs are open to all employees. The goal of these groups is to provide employees with both professional advancement and personal development opportunities. We make it clear through our internal communications that every employee is welcome to participate in any one of our ENGs, regardless of their race, gender, ethnicity, or physical ability or disability. The seven ENGs are: • Abilities: Valuing Everyone’s Abilities (focuses on employees touched by disabilities) • ARISE: African-Americans, Resources and Information Sharing for Everyone • ASIAN: Asians Supporting Inclusion and Awareness Network • HOLA: Hispanic Organization for

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Leadership and Achievement • Lambda: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Employee Network • Sandwich Generation: Supporting those caring for aging family members • WIN: Women’s Interactive Network Can you name specific ways Freddie Mac supports upward development toward management positions? Freddie Mac provides employees with a myriad of opportunities for professional growth and leadership development. An example of this is Freddie Mac University (FMU), the company’s integrated online and instructor-led learning curriculum that provides employees with professional learning and leadership development opportunities in a variety of areas. We also have a robust Succession Planning Program to identify and groom employees for management positions at the company. The Succession Planning Program includes both a Leadership Talent Review and a Leadership Development Program. How does Freddie Mac bring women and minority employees into the fabric of the organization? One of the ways Freddie Mac helps ensure women and minority employees are in the pipeline for advancement and promotions is through its newly developed Leadership Development Program, spearheaded by the company’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion. It is specifically designed to identify high-


Questions & Answers

Freddie Mac

SDAC Supplier Diversity Action Council potential African-Americans and women of every ethnicity to address their specific leadership development needs in a single gender and single identity training environment. This high-impact leadership development program is a multi-year training effort that includes online and instructor-led courses, high visibility, and access to senior leaders of the company. We also offer individual career coaching opportunities and specific leadership development programs externally, such as our Executive Leadership Council pipeline talent program. Freddie Mac also identifies high-potential female employees from all racial and ethnic backgrounds through its Leadership Talent Review Succession Planning Program. This program is an ongoing effort that identifies high-potential employees from 3 tiers: division heads, direct reports, and those that report to direct reports.

SUPPLIER Diversity What is Freddie Mac’s commitment to minority suppliers? Freddie Mac’s Supplier Diversity program is designed to increase awareness of the capabilities, talents, and importance of Minority- and Woman-owned Business Enterprises (M/WBEs). Our M/WBE suppliers are critical to helping

Freddie Mac carry out its important mission to stabilize the housing market and support the nation’s economic recovery. Supplier Diversity is Freddie Mac’s way of assuring that our suppliers reflect the diversity of the American workforce. Our objective is to ensure that M/WBEs receive the opportunity to compete fairly in all of the corporation’s business dealings.Diversity Do you set specific percentage or dollar targets? How do you measure success? We measure how well our Supplier Diversity Program is meeting corporate and business area objectives by looking at the percentage of total spend, the number of diverse suppliers, and the recognition we receive from outside organizations. In 2009, Freddie Mac generated nearly $375 million in contracts with Minorityand Woman-owned Business Enterprises (M/WBEs). This represents a 200% increase over 2008 and was 26% of Freddie Mac’s total procurement spend. Last year, we also launched a Supplier Diversity Action Council (SDAC), comprised of 25 members from across the company that work to better integrate diversity and inclusion into the contracting practices of all business areas. PDJ

Pictured (l-r) are Freddie Mac Supplier Diversity Action Council (SDAC) members who attended the inaugural meeting in August of last year: Jay Inouye, Graham Kidner, Anna Smith, Charlene Wilson, Tim Prime, Jennifer Meyer, Mandy Mason, Julie Sun, Dean Blake, Michael Barr, Cie Riley, Deborah Gladstone, Tamla Bias, Trang Gueron, Eric Sorensen, John Stickeler, Susan Russell, Lauren Englander, Alma Jadallah, Carlos Martinez, and Bunni WheelerYoung. Not Pictured: Donna Brandveen, Donald Campbell, Christina Diaz-Malone, Leigh Guthrie, Devonna Kee, Alain Pakabomba, Gail Price, Boyd Stewart, and Zixta Martinez.

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Profile Ed Haldeman

&

Questions Answers

w i t h C E O E d H a lde m a n

regularly for the past year. But what I found through my research is that the public perception of Freddie Mac, its work, Where does your personal belief in diversity and its people, is at odds with reality. The and inclusion come from? Was there a pivotal truth is that the company has a critically experience that helped shape your view? important mission—to provide liquidity, Like many people, I was taught at home, stability, and affordability to the nation’s at church, and at school, that an important housing finance system—and Freddie Mac human value was a commitment to equalserves that mission every day. Freddie Mac’s ity and inclusiveness. employees are deeply committed to their However, this teaching as a child was work. And the company’s mission has about a concept. It became more real for never been more important than it is today, me later in life. My wife’s family is Chinese, as the nation works its way out of this long, and I heard stories from them about how, deep recession. in the 1950s and 1960s, real estate agents Freddie Mac not only plays a vital, ongowould not show them homes in certain ing role in stabilizing the housing markets, neighborhoods of Baltimore bebut we’re also working very closely cause “they wouldn’t be happy with the Obama Administration to there.” I also saw my wife, a We are committed to diversity not help struggling families avoid foreHarvard-trained lawyer, attend law closure and keep their homes. firm luncheons at a downtown only because it’s the right thing to So I took the job because I club in Philadelphia and be unable wanted to lead and motivate a to walk in the front door with the do, but because it also makes good talented and committed workforce. other lawyers because women had I wanted to help the company business sense. to walk down a side alley and then contribute all that it could to the go in a back entrance. Through my nation’s economic recovery. And wife’s experiences, discrimination ment firms. I became President and CEO I want to help reshape and strengthen became more real for me. of UAM in 1997. In 2000, I was recruited Freddie Mac for a successful future once Who has shaped and influenced your thinking as to be CEO of Delaware Investments, and it emerges from conservatorship. Finally, I a business leader? in late 2002 I joined Putnam Investment realized that Freddie Mac has a great story One of my biggest and earliest influences Management. I became CEO of Putnam to tell, and I wanted to help tell it. was my father, who worked 6-7 days a week on November 3, 2003 as a result of a marat our storefront family business. Like so ket timing issue that eventually sparked a Were you aware of its D&I? many in his generation, he was focused on series of regulatory probes into the indus- Not initially, but I was really pleased to making a better life for the next generation. try’s business practices. From my very first learn about Freddie Mac’s long-standing He thought of it as the responsible thing day on the job, I was focused on saving commitment to diversity and inclusion, beto do. And my mother, too—in fact, she the firm, reassuring our employees that cause it’s something I’ve believed strongly continues to work at the family business Putnam would survive, and visiting our cli- in throughout my career. Freddie Mac every day. I have them to thank for instill- ents. It took a huge effort by a lot of good strives to be an employer-of-choice for ing in me a solid work ethic very early on people, but we successfully reorganized the workers of all backgrounds, by providing satisfying professional development opin my life. business and restored Putnam’s reputation. portunities, dynamic and comprehensive When the opportunity came along to apply How did you get to your present position? diversity training and education, strong that same skill set at Freddie Mac—a comWhat was your career path? compensation and benefits packages, and I grew up in Philadelphia, and was fortu- pany facing similar challenges—I thought an inclusive work environment. Its comnate to be the first in my family to be able I could help. mitment to a diverse and inclusive workto attend college. I knew that I wanted to How did you come to Freddie Mac? place is paying off: minorities make up over be successful in a traditional career, which I was intrigued when a search firm ap- 40% of our workforce, and more than 40% at that time meant business, medicine, or proached me about the CEO position. of our new hires last year were minorities. law. So I was pre-med as an undergradu- Of course, I knew about Freddie Mac ate, while studying economics, and later generally, because it had been in the news hedged my bets by going to business school and law school simultaneously. I graduated in June of 1974 and got incredibly lucky by finding work in the asset management business. The U.S. stock market peaked in 1966 at 1,000, when I graduated high school. By the time I finished graduate school eight years later, the Dow was in the 500s. So I got in at a good time and stayed, which turned out to be very fortunate for me. I joined an asset management firm in June of 1974 and worked with the same five partners for 23 years. We joined a company called United Asset Management, which eventually bought 53 different money manage-

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personal

Profile

Company

Who were/are your mentors? Are you mentoring anyone today?

Norton Reamer, the founder of United Asset Management Corporation, taught me a lot about management. Jack Bogle, the founder of Vanguard, has taught me a lot about ethics and investing. They were both important mentors for me. In some unofficial capacity, I’d say I am mentoring a young man who is in his first year at Yale Law School. His name is Damaris Walker, and his story is amazing. Entirely by chance, I got connected to him. He is from North Philadelphia and he went to Dartmouth, entirely on financial aid. He did so well there that he got into Yale Law School. We see each other 4 to 5 times a year and we stay connected by e-mail. My whole family has benefitted by knowing him. If you were in a roomful of colleagues, what might they say about you, your style, or your business sense?

I hope that they would say that I seek broad input and then decide. I also hope they would say that I was fair and direct. What books would you recommend for new leaders?

One of my favorite books is The Greatest Generation, by Tom Brokaw, because it speaks so well about the contributions made by my father’s generation. A book on leadership that I’ve always liked is Lincoln on Leadership: Executive Strategies for Tough Times, by Donald T. Phillips. How would you describe your concept and style of leadership?

First, ethics and integrity are essential components of my management style. Some people think there is a trade-off between business success and ethical behavior, but I believe high ethical standards and integrity are necessary pre-conditions for success. I want Freddie Mac to lead with integrity and ethics. In fact, I believe we can’t be successful unless we live up to that standard. Second, I believe in transparent and candid management. Of course, that’s easy to say but hard to do sometimes. But we have to be willing to be open and direct

Freddie Mac Title CEO Time in current position 9 months Education M.B.A., Harvard Business School, (Baker Scholar); J.D., cum laude, Harvard Law School; A.B., summa cum laude, Dartmouth College. Professional I am a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA), and currently Chairman of

with each other, and if there’s a problem, we need to deal with it directly. Openness, candor, transparency, and being direct are always the best approach. Were there any experiences that discouraged you about D&I implementation?

I sometimes get discouraged because talk is easy and it often doesn’t lead to action. Talking and training are necessary preconditions, and although it takes time to change behavior and see results, if you work hard enough at it, you can make a real difference. What has been your proudest moment as leader at Freddie Mac?

My proudest moment at Freddie Mac has been watching all the divisions throughout the company come together to support the Obama administration’s Making Home Affordable program. The hard work and passion of employees in support of keeping families in their homes has been amazing to watch. PDJ

the Board of Trustees of Dartmouth College. I also serve on the Harvard Business School Board of Dean’s Advisors, and formerly served on the Board of Governors of the Investment Company Institute. Age

61

First job I began my career at Cooke & Bieler, Inc., in 1974, where I was a Partner. Cooke & Bieler later became an affiliate of United Asset Management. Philosophy To be successful, we have to lead with integrity and ethics. Manage people the way you would like to be managed. What I’m reading Enough, by John “Jack” Bogle. Family Wife, Barbara, and three children. Interests Squash, paddle tennis, tennis, and golf.

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Questions & Answers

Freddie Mac

Some of Freddie Mac’s very busy ENGs in 2009: HOLA Hispanic Heritage Month Pictured (l-r) at our 2009 Hispanic Heritage Month Opening event: Gabriela Silva, HOLA Co-Chair; Carol Wambeke, HOLA Executve Sponsor; Ed Haldeman; Marie Ruiz, HOLA Chair; Eileen Torres, External Guest Speaker.

ARISE Black History Month Celebration Below (l-r): Chris T. Morris, VP, Mission Division—Strategy, Planning and Reporting; Jeanne Woods, VP, Human Resources Business Partner; Hyacinth Kucik, VP, Deputy General Counsel of Litigation; Bruce Witherell, COO (speaking); Wendell Chambliss, VP, Deputy General Counsel—Mission & Anti-Predatory Lending; and Preston Lee, Director, Industry Relations & Housing Outreach.

Above (l-r): Darren Sharpe, Managing Associate, General Counsel; Bruce Witherell, COO; Preston Lee, Director, Industry Relations & Housing Outreach; Hyacinth Kucik, VP, Deputy General Counsel of Litigation; Ed Haldeman, CEO; Jeanne Woods, VP, Human Resources Business Partner; Chris T. Morris, VP, Mission Division—Strategy, Planning and Reporting; Wendell Chambliss, VP, Deputy General Counsel—Mission & Anti-Predatory Lending.

ALPFA Beginning of Year Celebration Pictured (l-r) at the ALPFA (Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting) Beginning of Year Celebration: Gabriela Silva, HOLA Co-Chair; Marie Ruiz, HOLA Chair; Ross Kari, Freddie Mac CFO; Luisa Fernandez, ALPFA DC Chapter President; Maria Landesman, ALPFA DC Chapter Secretary; Tujuanna Williams, Freddie Mac Chief Diversity Officer; Camila Lorca, ALPFA DC Chapter Treasurer.

WIN & Sandwich Generation Network Pictured (l-r) at our 2009 WIN and Sandwich Generation Employee Network Event: Dr. Julia Wheeler; Rose Smith, on-site professional counselor at Freddie Mac; Linda Blossom, Sandwich Network Co-Lead; Karen Prante, WIN Network Secretary; Alice Deely, Sandwich Network Co-Chair; Anne Kaiser, WIN member; Hyacinth Kucik, WIN Executive Sponsor; Emily Belanger, WIN member; and Heidi Keller, WIN Chair.

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OUR COMPANY

>

THE SUM OF ITS PARTS

BE WHO YOU ARE. CREATE WHO WE’LL BE. UnitedHealth Group is working to create the health care system of tomorrow. One that will work better for more people in more ways than ever. A goal of this magnitude requires transformative ideas from a collective of diverse talent. At UnitedHealth Group, our commitment to diversity is clearly visible in the high-performing people we hire, in the health care services we provide, and in our dedication to social responsibility. We support and applaud the efforts of those who work to promote fairness, equality and opportunity. Uniting our individual efforts and abilities toward our common goal, we’re making a difference. Learn more about us at unitedhealthgroup.com

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V. UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment. © 2009 UnitedHealth Group. All rights reserved.


Supplier Diversity Best Practices As more and more consumers realize the impact businesses have on their individual communities, they begin to insist that these organizations do business with people in their community. In turn, the benefits organizations reap for partnering with Minority- and Women-owned Business Enterprises (M/WBEs) include: • Having a larger pool of qualified suppliers; • Having better products and services which result from more competition; and, • Having better community relations and greater product loyalty from consumers. We asked Supplier Diversity leaders to share what’s working for them, in the hope that their best practices will inspire some of your supplier diversity strategies.

Brenda Mullins

Chief Diversity Officer

Aflac How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? Departmental purchasing managers are requested to include diverse suppliers in their product selection processes, and each department’s use of diverse suppliers is tracked quarterly and reviewed by management. Quarterly supplier diversity expenditure reports measure each buyer’s department in terms of their respective percentage contribution to the overall corporate supplier diversity spend.

Headquarters: Columbus, Georgia Web site: www.aflac.com Primary Business: Supplemental insurance

Briefly describe any outreach programs you use to certify potential diverse suppliers: Aflac’s Supplier Diversity Manager is a member of the WBENC certification team sponsored by the Greater Women’s Business Council of Georgia, in addition to being on the board of the Georgia Minority Supplier Development Council (GMSDC), an affiliate of the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC), which certifies minority business enterprises. Aflac is also a corporate member of U.S. Pan Asian American and Georgia Hispanic Chambers of Commerce, Mexican American Chamber, and National Veterans supplier diversity organizations that use the certification services of WBENC, NMSDC, as well as their own processes. How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? In cooperation with the

University of Georgia Small Business Development Center, and formally with the Governor’s Mentor Protégé Program, Aflac provides mentors to small and diverse businesses in various areas of business. How are your supplier diversity goals linked with the goals of the organization? Aflac’s commitment to providing

opportunities to diverse suppliers is stated as an executive management imperative and monitored. Additionally, language is contained in all Aflac contracts stating our expectations of suppliers to support our supplier diversity initiative.

How do you identify and verify companies that qualify as minority suppliers? Suppliers are required to register on Aflac’s online portal if they wish to establish a business relationship. This allows diverse suppliers to identify their diversity category and certification agency. Departmental purchasing managers access this portal to identify and select diverse suppliers for opportunities. Aflac also has access to the WBENC and NMSDC databases of certified diverse suppliers. How do you ensure the continual supply of goods and services from minority suppliers, as well as the trust and confidence of your vendors, customers, employees, and shareholders? The Aflac business case for supplier diversity emphasizes the continuous development of significant business opportunities for

diverse suppliers, not only as a commitment to corporate social responsibility, but as a strategic contribution to the bottom line. 38

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PDJ


Supplier Diversity Best Pr ac tices

Sherri Macko

Manager, Diversified Supplier Program

American Airlines How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? Commodity Managers actively participate in M/WBE events to identify potential M/WBE suppliers, and they actively engage these suppliers in bid opportunities. M/WBE suppliers are part of their Value Strategy for their specific commodity. Commodity Managers are required to attend Supplier Diversity training that is conducted bi-annually, and are recognized by their Purchasing Leadership team for meeting or exceeding M/WBE spend goals. Briefly describe any outreach programs you use to certify potential diverse suppliers: Our Supplier Diversity Manager and a Senior Commodity Manager serve on the Certification Committee for the DFWMSDC (regional NMSDC Council), and actively participate in site visits to certify MBE suppliers. How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? We work with some of

our current M/WBE suppliers to help them grow and expand their product offerings. Also, we open doors for our M/WBE suppliers to become a supplier to some of our large Prime suppliers. How are your supplier diversity goals linked with the goals of the organization? American Airlines realizes that

doing business with M/WBEs is a good business decision, and that it is the right thing to do. The Supplier Diversity Program goals align very closely with overall Corporate goals. These goals and successes are reviewed annually with the Board of Directors Diversity Committee to ensure we are aligned and making a positive impact to the company. As a business and as a good corporate citizen, we know that it’s important for our supplier base to reflect our customer base and to provide economic opportunities to women and diverse suppliers. Therefore, our Supplier Diversity Program is closely linked with our Diverse Segment Marketing teams and our Employee Resource Groups in the community.

Headquarters: Fort Worth, Texas Web site: www.aa.com/supplierdiversity Primary Business: Transportation

How do you identify and verify companies that qualify as minority suppliers? We sponsor and participate in many different M/WBE events that provide opportunities to meet certified M/WBE suppliers. We are also active in the Certification Committee of our local NMSDC Council. Also, we require our M/WBE suppliers to register on our Supplier Diversity database, and provide us with their M/WBE certification. We understand the value of utilizing a certified M/WBE supplier. We often conduct training sessions to various minority organizations on “How to do business with AA,” and “Why certification is important.” PDJ

Liveda Clements

Senior Manager, Business Relations & Supplier Diversity

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts (BCBSMA) How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? Supplier diversity is integrated into our procurement practice. Business leaders are required to include at least one minority- or women-owned business enterprise (M/WBE) in all qualifying competitive bid opportunities. The Business Relations and Supplier Diversity department is fully responsible for identifying and validating diverse businesses for inclusion in bids. We primarily use our Supplier Diversity vendor database, and the databases of the National Minority Supplier Development Council, the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, and the State Office of Minority and Women Business Assistance to source competitive suppliers. How is their performance measured? BCBSMA establishes an annual percentage goal for supplier diversity that is tracked as a percentage of total spending. Supplier Diversity supports our business areas by providing spend analysis to set goals and highlight business opportunities. The divisions that increase or maintain a high percentage of spending with diverse businesses are recognized at our annual supplier diversity awards events. Do you have scholarships and/or training programs for minority companies? We have partnered with Next Street

Headquarters: Boston, Massachusetts Web site: www.bluecrossma.com

Financial (NSF), a reputable merchant bank and business advisor, to establish the Business Development Primary Business: Program. Our company gives partial scholarships to the selected program participants. Through the Health Insurance Business Development Program, companies have access to NSF’s customized financial and management advisory services. As a result of the Program, participants have been able to more effectively focus the strategic direction of their businesses and enhance the competitive positions of their companies in the marketplace. Additionally, we have offered vendors a second business development program, the Future Focus workshop series. Future Focus is facilitated by leaders from NSF, and consists of four customized workshops that provide participants the frameworks and tools to address growth and profitability through business strategy and talent management, and the unique opportunity to strategize with other business leaders. How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? We recently launched a Mentor Program in which our team of

internal consultants, the Business Consulting Group (BCG), mentors one of our diverse business partners. For 12 months, BCG volunteers their core skills, providing strategic advice and leadership to the CEO of a selected minority- or women-owned business. PDJ Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Supplier Diversity Best Pr ac tices

Nita Smith

Supplier Diversity Manager

CDW LLC. How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? Our diverse suppliers are included in quarterly bid processes relating to specific technology products. CDW engages in strategic planning to consolidate multiple technology brands to diverse suppliers when applicable, and we maintain supply chain scorecards for top diverse distribution partners. Briefly describe any outreach programs you use to certify potential diverse suppliers: Through our semi-annual supplier database reviews, minority- and women-owned companies that are not certified are identified for possible certification. Depending on the supplier’s response, CDW will assist with the certification process. To date, CDW has supported four suppliers in achieving certification. How do you monitor and measure the purchasing department’s use of diverse suppliers? Spend is tracked

quarterly throughout the entire organization and includes: spend by dollar by certification type (i.e., MBE,WBE,VBE, etc.); spend by department (from executive down to manager); spend by ethnicity; and spend with number of diverse suppliers (i.e., spend is with 1 company or 5).

Headquarters: Vernon Hills, Illinois

How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? CDW is engaged in a

Web site: www.cdw.com Primary Business: Information technology hardware, software, advanced solutions, and services

formal mentor-protégé program in the State of Texas. Currently, we are mentoring a small, woman-owned business in areas relative to marketing and strategy planning. How are your supplier diversity goals linked with the goals of the organization? Some of our goals at CDW

include increasing revenue, acquiring and retaining customers, and maintaining costs. Supplier diversity assists and supports all of these initiatives. It is also important to note that, by leveraging diverse suppliers in the supply chain process (from bidding to contract award), CDW is benefiting from superior products and service which can have a direct or indirect positive impact to the customer. Suppliers are also our customers. Although we may not be able to use each diverse supplier on each opportunity, we hope to build longlasting relationships for reciprocal purposes. We have seen cost savings and process improvement from current diverse suppliers. The small nature of these companies allows for increased flexibility, a willingness to impress, and ability to deliver superior results.

How do you ensure the continual supply of goods and services from minority suppliers, as well as the trust and confidence of your vendors, customers, employees, and shareholders? Each supplier engagement, regardless of diversity affiliation or not, includes an extensive review that focuses on ability to supply,

financial strength, current supply, and customer base. Depending on the opportunity, extensive research is done to qualify a supplier or identify any concerns prior to contract engagement. PDJ

Denise Coley

Director, Global Supplier Diversity Business Development

Cisco Systems, Inc. How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? The internal business partners are always involved, with the direction of the strategic sourcing team. Indirect spend opportunities within the Cisco organization are available using the Internet, and matchmaking meetings at industry events. How is their performance measured? The Strategic Sourcing Management team is measured on a

continuous basis. The company has a policy, the “Inclusion of Diverse suppliers in every RFX” process released through our Procurement organization. The RFX events and types are tracked and reviewed for compliance with this internal policy. The Global Supplier Diversity team members are measured to initiatives set forth by management at Cisco at the executive level.

Headquarters: San Jose, California Web site: www.cisco.com/supplier/diversity Primary Business: Information communications technology

Do you have scholarships and/or training programs for minority companies? We give partial scholarships to diverse suppliers to participate in the UCLA MDE program. This four-day program offers entrepreneurs a premiere educational opportunity to develop essential skills needed to increase their business’s productivity in the marketplace. How do you monitor and measure the purchasing department’s use of diverse suppliers? We monitor and measure

our diverse spend quarterly. Our systems also allow us to analyze our top 10 diverse suppliers and conduct a gap analysis. We review our top 100 diverse suppliers on a quarterly basis, to make sure that the suppliers are receiving scorecards. We also participate in cross-functional activities, watch the spend amounts, and document any new services being procured by our business function stakeholders.

How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? We have an Executive Mentor Protégé Program that includes

direct Procurement, indirect procurement, and partners/resellers. This program includes Cisco executives who mentor CEOs of diverse businesses about Cisco’s expectations, business strategy, and potential opportunities for increased spend. How are your supplier diversity goals linked with the goals of the organization? The overarching initiative of Cisco is that we commit to spending 10%

of our total spend with diverse suppliers. This is an executive-level initiative for the company. How do you ensure the continual supply of goods and services from minority suppliers, as well as the trust and confidence of your vendors, customers, employees, and shareholders? This process is executed through the Supplier Performance Management (SPM) program on a quarterly basis. The objective is a

future stake schema for sourcing excellence. This enables us to proactively provide feedback to all stakeholders about their suppliers. 40

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Supplier Diversity Best Pr ac tices

Luis J. Diaz

Chief Diversity Officer

Gibbons, P.C. How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? The professionals with purchasing power at our firm—for example, those in charge of facilities, information technology, client financial services, human resources, library, marketing, and other professional services—consider diversity an important purchasing criteria, and they assess vendors based in part on their commitment to diversity and certification as a W/MBE by appropriate certification bodies. Briefly describe any outreach programs you use to certify potential diverse suppliers: In the ordinary course, we conduct education sessions to assist potential suppliers with certification. We actively participate in workshops to teach and promote best practices and promote visibility for minority- and women-owned businesses. Training programs conducted by the Gibbons Diversity Initiative, via its Program & Events Committee, include the very popular “Diversity Makes Cents” presentation. At this program, diversity experts provide valuable insight on best practices that organizations can implement to develop a successful Diversity Initiative, discussing ways to measure an Initiative’s success through various means, including its impact on a company’s bottom line. How do you monitor and measure the purchasing department’s use of diverse suppliers? Our formal supplier

diversity program, GDI-123, launched in 2009, facilitates the monitoring and measurement of firmwide use of diverse suppliers. GDI-123 was designed to make it easy for Gibbons clients committed to diversity to accomplish seemingly conflicting objectives: the utilization of diverse Gibbons attorneys and W/MBE vendors to provide excellent service quality at great value.

Headquarters: Newark, New Jersey Web site: www.gibbonslaw.com Primary Business: Legal Services

How do you identify and verify companies that qualify as minority suppliers? As mentioned above, the supplier diversity program within our firm’s Diversity Initiative is designated GDI-123. In terms of process, vendors must register by completing a comprehensive survey in which they must also present credentials that satisfy the certification requirements of city, state, or federal agencies; the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC); the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) through their regional partners and affiliates; and other, similar certification bodies. We consider other certifications on a case-by-case basis if the proposed vendor meets the nationally recognized certification standards of at least 51% ownership, management, and control by minority and/or women group members. If a company is certified, and its products or services are relevant to our needs, it is input into our approved vendor database for consideration for future engagements. PDJ

Ramie Dingle

Supply Chain Manager, International Sourcing

Halliburton How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? Robust Supplier Diversity training is provided to employees with purchasing responsibility. Employees with buying and/or influencing power actively participate in the Supplier Diversity initiatives, including National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) and Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) functions and activities to identify potential sources and opportunities. We have also established a Supplier Diversity Advocates Council, which encompasses several key supply chain professionals in active roles of engagement to support the Supplier Diversity initiative. Do you have scholarships and/or training programs for minority companies? Yes, scholarship funds are allocated

at both a regional and national level through NMSDC and WBENC. Our BEST Program (Business Education and Supplier Transformation) is a three-year program committed to engaging, building, training, and mentoring key strategic suppliers to grow and develop with Halliburton. In addition, our internal development and training programs are extended to our strategic M/WBE supply base as appropriate. How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? In addition to our BEST

program, we have implemented Conductivity Coaches—senior level executives who mentor diverse suppliers on all areas of their business.

Headquarters: Houston, Texas and Dubai, United Arab Emirates Web site: www.halliburton.com Primary Business: Energy Services

How are your supplier diversity goals linked with the goals of the organization? Halliburton’s Global Supplier Initiative supports the corporate strategy

by positioning the company as a supplier of choice for our customers. The Supplier Diversity Executive Advisory Board, consisting of senior level executives, assists the Supplier Diversity Team in establishing annual goals for the organization and is reflective of the organization’s overall goals. How do you identify and verify companies that qualify as minority suppliers? By exhibiting and participating in national and regional conferences and tradeshows, networking with members of our industry council and with peers, publicizing our supplier diversity initiative through national and local advertising to recruit new suppliers, and contracting with a third party provider that maintains a database of qualified suppliers. How do you ensure the continual supply of goods and services from minority suppliers, as well as the trust and confidence of your vendors, customers, employees, and shareholders? The award of business is evaluated and based on the total value proposition, and does not differ from our established supplier

selection and performance criteria.

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Supplier Diversity Best Pr ac tices

Jean-Jacques Beaussart

Chief Procurement Officer

KeyBank National Association How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? At Key, our inclusion strategy is a collaboration amongst procurement, the lines of business, and supplier diversity. The Supplier Diversity team meets monthly with all procurement managers, and quarterly with our line of business partners. These teams also meet annually to analyze purchasing trends and establish corporate goals and business opportunities for the coming year. Each team is represented on our internal Supplier Diversity Advisory Council (SDAC). How is their performance measured? Corporate Procurement and each line of business have unit and/or individual supplier diversity goals. These are assessed during performance reviews and can affect incentive compensation. Do you have scholarships and/or training programs for minority companies? Key has supported Partners First, a

minority business mentoring program affiliated with the Northern Ohio Minority Supplier Development Council (NOMSDC). Our goal was to bring majority and minority companies together to help develop minority businesses, share best practices, and increase business relationships. This partnership generated significant business opportunities and resources for participating M/WBEs. Most recently, we have been engaged with the Greater Cleveland Partnership’s MBAccelerator 2.5+, a program focused on growing the size, scale, and infrastructure of African-American- and Hispanic-owned MBEs with annual revenues of at least $2.5 million, in a 16-county area of Northeast Ohio.

Headquarters: Cleveland, Ohio Web site: www.key.com Primary Business: Financial services

How do you monitor and measure the purchasing department’s use of diverse suppliers? To challenge our business units to maintain momentum and

continue to improve performance, Corporate Procurement and Supplier Diversity partner to establish a forecast of M/WBE spend. We then prepare an opportunity analysis to review with each line-of-business executive. The line of business and Procurement agree on a spend goal that supports Key’s corporate-wide spend goal. Results are reported monthly and shared with the CEO and senior executives. How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? We are currently working with 44 financial services institutions

across the country to develop a strategy for diverse suppliers in non-traditional areas. How do you ensure the continual supply of goods and services from minority suppliers, as well as the trust and confidence of your vendors, customers, employees, and shareholders? Key attends regional and national tradeshows across our Maine-to-Alaska footprint to identify qualified minority- and women-

owned businesses. We also encourage certified and viable M/WBEs to register on our website at www.key.com.

Nancy Calderon

PDJ

National Partner in Charge, Operations

KPMG LLP How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? Our buyers are actively engaged in our Supplier Diversity program in several ways: through compliance with KPMG LLP’s Supplier Diversity Policy, as participants in our Supplier Diversity Task Force, and through their participation in periodic training events. Do you have scholarships and/or training programs for minority companies? KPMG provides subcontractors with

training opportunities as required, for specific skill development or other firm requirements. Briefly describe any outreach programs you use to certify potential diverse suppliers: KPMG engages with diverse

Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.us.kpmg.com Primary Business: Audit, tax and advisory services

business advocacy groups who certify diverse businesses, including our Corporate Partners the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC), Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC), National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC), and U.S. Business Leadership Network’s Disability Supplier Diversity Program (USBLN DSDP). We also engage our diversity networks to act as volunteer members of certification committees and site visitors with these organizations. Furthermore, our Supplier Diversity Policy requires us to “encourage eligible suppliers to participate in a certification or classification process operated by a recognized agency” (defined to include the organizations listed above). How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? KPMG attends major

national Supplier Diversity events and targeted local events to provide guidance to prospective suppliers on areas of potential demand within the firm. How do you ensure the continual supply of goods and services from minority suppliers, as well as the trust and confidence of your vendors, customers, employees, and shareholders? Our Supplier Diversity Policy is the foundation of our program, and highlights the firm’s approach and commitment to Supplier

Diversity as well as the support of senior leadership. KPMG’s Supplier Diversity program is a significant and crucial component of our Sustainable Procurement strategy. We seek to engage our employees in Supplier Diversity at every opportunity, with a particular focus on the alignment of our diversity networks with the diverse business advocacy organizations we support. Our Supplier Diversity Task Force seeks to provide genuine access to opportunities by increasing the visibility of our procurement pipeline to potential suppliers, and conversely, increasing the visibility of diverse businesses’ capabilities to those individuals within the firm who are ultimately responsible for our choice of suppliers. PDJ 42

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SEE IN US WHO YOU ARE

At New York Life we believe that people’s differences can be their greatest attributes. We recognize that employees’ unique qualities often lead to innovation, positive change, and a more productive and dynamic workplace. If you are looking for a new company or career, choose one that is committed to providing a challenging and rewarding experience, where every individual has the opportunity to succeed.

For more information about a career with New York Life visit us at www.newyorklife.com/diversity NEW YORK LIFE. THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.® © 2010 New York Life Insuranace Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010 EOE/M/F/D/V


Supplier Diversity Best Pr ac tices

Nancy Deskins

Director, Corporate Agreements & Supplier Diversity

Lockheed Martin Corporation How are your buyers engaged in your Supplier Diversity program? Lockheed Martin Corporation conducts face-to-face Supplier Information Sessions (SISs) and virtual SISs a total of 8 times a year. These two-way forums offer suppliers the opportunity to learn about Lockheed Martin business areas, and business area representatives can directly engage with potential new suppliers.

The virtual Supplier Information Sessions provide an opportunity for small business suppliers to share information on their company via web interface to buyers and small business liaison officers from across Lockheed Martin Corporation, without incurring travel or time-away costs. All technology and access costs are paid for by Lockheed Martin. Do you have scholarships and/or training programs for minority companies? As a Billion Dollar Roundtable

member, Lockheed Martin purchases over a billion dollars annually from minority- and women- owned businesses. To achieve this goal, there is a heavy focus on training. Lockheed Martin’s participation in the Mentor Protégé program has led to innovation in the development of new technologies at small, diverse businesses, with 25 current or pending agreements. Lockheed Martin’s training and technology resources assist these businesses in advancing their technology.

Headquarters: Bethesda, Maryland Web site: www.lockheedmartin.com

How are your supplier diversity goals linked with the goals of the organization? In 2008, 86% of our corporate

Primary Business: Aerospace and Defense

sales were to the agencies of the U.S. Federal Government. All of our contracts with the government contain small business participation requirements. To be successful in meeting our contract goals, we must have strong small business participation as subcontractors. One key facilitator for recognition of performance to goals is the Comprehensive Subcontracting Plan (CSP) that is negotiated annually. The CSP is signed off each year by the Director, Corporate Agreements and Supplier Diversity, as well as by the Vice President, Global Supply Chain Operations. In addition, the goals and actuals are reviewed semi-annually by Bob Stevens, Chairman of the Board and CEO, to ensure we are on track in meeting our diversity goals.

How do you identify and verify companies that qualify as minority suppliers? Lockheed Martin utilizes its internal database and, under penalty of the law, asks businesses to self-certify their small, disadvantaged business and women-owned small business statuses. These self-certifications are crossreferenced with the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) database. PDJ

Annette Ficucello

Assistant Vice President, Supplier Diversity

New York Life Insurance Company Briefly describe any outreach programs you use to certify potential diverse suppliers: New York Life is an active member of the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC), the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC), and the National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC). These organizations provide a direct link between their corporate members and the suppliers. They have very strict certification procedures, enabling us to maintain the integrity of our program. How do you monitor and measure the purchasing department’s use of diverse suppliers? Our 2009 spend with

Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.newyorklife.com

diverse suppliers is 8% of our total sourceable spend. We are very proud of this accomplishment and continue to strive to build on this success and improve on these numbers. We have consistently increased our year-over-year spend with diverse businesses since the Supplier Diversity Program’s formal inception in 2002. We have also experienced a dramatic increase in the number of diverse suppliers who are participating in our procurement processes. In 2009, we engaged the services of a data management firm (an MBE) to assist us in more accurately identifying all of our diverse suppliers. How do you mentor diversity suppliers to support non-traditional areas of the business? This question is best

answered by one of our biggest success stories, Liberty Power Corporation, which is Hispanic-owned. These days too many people still perceive of diverse suppliers as small companies, providing the more traditional products and services like printing and promotional items. At New York Life, we focus on expanding the process to include non-traditional areas. Power contracts are rarely handled by diverse suppliers, however, the deregulation of electricity in New York enabled us to accept bids for our electricity supplier contract; Liberty Power was invited to participate in the bidding process and won. They subsequently won a second contract with New York Life’s Westchester office. It is a partnership that has lasted approximately 7 years.

Primary Business: Insurance

How do you ensure the continual supply of goods and services from minority suppliers, as well as the trust and confidence of your vendors, customers, employees, and shareholders? In addition to regular communication in employee newsletters and intranet postings, the Supplier Diversity Program meets

regularly with individual departments to emphasize the benefits of working with diverse suppliers—these regular meetings are a good open forum to discuss the program and ways to broaden the use of diverse suppliers, and as a result leads to new opportunities. Externally, representatives from the Supplier Diversity Program regularly attend conferences and networking events, participate on committees, and evaluate advertising opportunities and sponsorships to increase community awareness and outreach efforts. The Supplier Diversity Program is also recognized by diversity organizations and publications as a top program. PDJ 44

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CHEVRON, the CHEVRON HALLMARK and HUMAN ENERGY are registered trademarks of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC. Š 2009 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

Our people are as diverse as their ideas.

tplace, rldwide marke To work in a wo represents workforce that Chevron has a siness, we rever we do bu the world. Whe r our y is essential fo believe diversit cause Be . d partners alike employees an human ts of view, our with more poin . er es even strong energy becom om. visit chevron.c To learn more,


Diversity is Our Competitive Advantage. We, at ITT, are committed to building a workforce that mirrors the world in which we do business. With operations in over 60 countries and customers on seven continents, ITT is well positioned and making a difference on a global scale. As we continue to grow, we look first to create an environment where our talented employees can succeed and make the world a better place through their unique contributions. We embrace diversity, which includes but is not limited to race, religion, gender, disability, nationality, age, sexual orientation, and ethnic background. Our culture, work practices and programs enable an inclusive and innovative workforce and workplace resulting in premier performance in the global marketplace.

www.itt.com/careers We are an equal opportunity employer m/f/d/v.

The “ITT Engineered Blocks” symbol and “Engineered for life” are registered trademarks of the ITT Corporation. © 2006


Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Celebrating

Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month

May* is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

We wondered what unique challenges and experiences diversity leaders of

Asian-Pacific Islander descent may have experienced in their careers, and asked for their thoughts and opinions about leadership, diversity, and mentoring. Many are first-generation immigrants, and not surprisingly, their unique cultural experiences gives them a personal insight into the importance of having a diverse and inclusive workforce. * The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. (The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants).

Lan Hoang

Director

Gibbons P.C. Headquarters: Newark, New Jersey Web site: www.gibbonslaw.com Primary Business: Law firm Employees: 426

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why?

John “Chuck” T. Dolan, (one of the founding partners of Gibbons P.C.) showed me, through experience and by example, how to practice law with the utmost professionalism, the highest ethical standards, and the greatest sense of humor. Education: J.D., Seton Hall University Law School; Legislative Law Journal, Editor-in-Chief; B.S., Trenton State College, cum laude What I’m reading: The Help, by Kathryn Stockett My philosophy: “A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.” -Jackie Robinson Interests: Family, charitable organizations, sports.

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success?

My parents have had the most impact on my success. You learn by example. My parents came to the United States in 1975 from Vietnam with absolutely nothing. They put themselves through college and have worked hard since, sending all three of their children to college. My success as an attorney, and as an individual, is a direct result of their hard work and determination. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

My advice to young leaders: 1. Work hard—it does pay off; 2. Remember your heritage and your history—whether you are diverse or not, there is always something in your upbringing and experiences that makes you stronger; and 3. Always be professional and ethical—your reputation always precedes you.

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Thao Nguyen

Vice President/ Chair of the Asian Pacific Islander Initiative

Comerica Bank Headquarters: Dallas, Texas Web site: www.comerica.com Primary Business: Banking Employees: 9,500

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why?

Education: B.A., Finance, graduated Magna Cum Laude What I’m reading: Leadership and Self Deception: Getting Out of the Box, by The Arbinger Institute My philosophy: You only live once, so live life to the fullest. Interests: Music, travel, and food.

My most influential mentor was my credit manager, with whom I worked in my first year in banking. I admired his “lead-by-example” leadership style and his great sense of humor. He was highly respected for his excellent character, fairness, and the ability to lead and motivate others. He provided an inviting and comfortable working environment where employees felt welcome to share ideas and challenges. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Leadership is not an entitlement, but something one earns through trust and respect. To earn trust and respect, one must demonstrate knowledge, common sense, honesty, and fairness. Good communication skills are necessary to achieve these tasks. A good leader also needs to listen to, and act upon suggestions and recommendations. My advice to young leaders is to invest heavily in your character. It takes years to build trust and respect, but a moment to destroy it. Given the chance, would you do anything differently?

Given a chance, I would not do anything differently. I believe the accomplishments I’ve achieved so far were done through hard work and perseverance. I’m grateful for the opportunity to work with great people at Comerica, and enjoy the endless support from my family.

Sagrario (Sagra) W.C. Cabrera

Senior Vice President/Regional Manager

Comerica Bank Headquarters: Dallas, Texas Web site: www.comerica.com Primary Business: Banking Employees: 9,500

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why?

Education: Attended community college What I’m reading: The Fifth Discipline, by Peter Senge My philosophy: Have a disciplined approach to your work. Interests: Family and reading.

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One of my most influential leaders, if not the most influential mentor, is the one I currently have— my boss, Betty Tucker. She’s taught me the importance of wearing multiple hats in order to achieve the aims of any project. It starts with the importance of accepting and understanding that changes will always take place. Although the paths may change, provided we’re on the same team, the essential objective is the same. Betty has shown me different ways to inspire my team and has reminded me that we are only winning when the entire team is winning. Betty has demonstrated to me how to be a servant leader. We can’t lead if we don’t know how to follow. What’s the worst fault a leader can have?

The worst fault a leader can have is lack of compassion towards others. If they are not listening to their employees and only dictating orders, then their leadership role will soon vanish. There are those ‘leaders’ who don’t create the necessary environment of “wanting to win” from others. They don’t bring out the best in people. Their only objective is themselves, and having such a self-absorbed attitude will only get them so far.

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Tony Park

Director of Human Resources, International Business

Abercrombie & Fitch Headquarters: New Albany, Ohio Web site: www.abercrombie.com Primary Business: Retail—Apparel Employees: 100,000

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment?

Landing a job at Abercrombie. Come on, I get to wear distressed jeans and flip-flops to work! What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Build trusting relationships with a few peers who will have the green light to be honest with you. I was lucky enough to have someone early in my career tell me, “Tony, you are failing…” It was a wake-up call.

Education: Political Science, B.A.; Juris Doctorate

What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take?

What I’m reading: The Big Short, by Michael Lewis

Being confident in their ideas. Many of us have sat in that conference room, overly concerned about having our thoughts/ideas criticized or dissected. We need to speak up and be willing to put our ideas out there. A second risk is having the courage to be authentic. People respond to being real and genuine.

My philosophy: “Turn the page”—learn from your mistakes, but don’t dwell on them.

What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership?

Interests: Tennis, golf, biking, theatre and eating at restaurants.

Understanding that I will never be that perfect leader, no matter how many books I read, or mentors I speak to. I just need to be conscious of it and work at it every day.

April Oh Park

General Counsel and Managing Director

CitiFinancial, part of Citigroup Inc Headquarters: Baltimore, Maryland Web site: www.citifinancial.com Primary Business: Consumer finance Employees: 9,500

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success?

My parents, because they encouraged me to believe in myself. Looking back, I never once thought that being a girl, first generation immigrant, or coming from a family of moderate means, was ever a deterrent to my achieving my goals. My siblings and I were taught that you could do anything if you put effort into it. For a very long time, I thought everyone had the same abilities, and that differing results (e.g., grades, tests) were only due to varying degrees of effort. While I do now appreciate that some are more gifted than others, I greatly admire people who work extra hard to take full advantage of every opportunity. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

For me, this quote from Jim Rohn rings true: “The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.” Given the chance, would you do anything differently?

Not at all. I feel very fortunate to have a job where I get to practice law, lead a team, and also be a part of the business senior management. While I had the opportunity to join the company much earlier in my career, I do appreciate the 12 years I spent at a law firm. I had a great mentor who guided me and taught me the importance of having mentors.

Education: J.D., University of Maryland, with honors; B.A., Political Science, Western Maryland College, magna cum laude, phi beta kappa What I’m reading: What is the What, by Dave Eggers, Unaccustomed Earth, by Jhumpa Lahiri, and The New Yorker My philosophy: Trust your instinct. Look for the best in people. Interests: Bikram yoga, golfing, and cooking with my husband.

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Jennifer Adams

Engineering Director

Harris Corporation Headquarters: Melbourne, Florida Web site: www.harris.com Primary Business: International communications and information technology company serving government and commercial markets Employees: 15,000+

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success?

My mother always pushed me to be the best that I could be and told me that there wasn’t anything I couldn’t do. Since both my parents were pharmacists, they made sure I was never afraid about getting into a technical career. Education: B.S., Computer Science, Pennsylvania State University What I’m reading: The Eragon series, by Christopher Paolini My philosophy: Make the most of everything you do and strive to do your best. The energy and commitment that you convey helps motivate others to reach their peak performance. Interests: Volleyball, scuba diving, jet skiing, traveling.

What is your definition of leadership?

Leadership is the ability to effectively bring people together to achieve a common goal/accomplishment. Key traits include communication skills, integrity, being motivational, and a team player. What’s the worst fault a leader can have?

Inability to communicate and make decisions. Communication and listening are key to successful leadership. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Don’t be afraid to think out of the box and propose something different. Seek out leaders that you respect, and learn from their experiences and actions to model your own leadership style. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take?

A leader needs to be a self-starter and demonstrate courage in the decisions that he makes. It encourages and inspires others on the team to step out of the box.

Cito Mamaril

Vice President, Indiana Business Market Manager

Harris N.A. Headquarters: Chicago, Illinois Web site: www.harrisbank.com Primary Business: Financial services Employees: About 7,000

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why?

Education: B.S., Butler University, Economics; Dalhousie University, MBA (expected completion in 2012) What I’m reading: Anything pertaining to my MBA curriculum; The Economist; and The Downhill Lie, by Carl Hiaasen My philosophy: Never be complacent; strive to be content. Interests: Golf, travelling.

Early in my career, one of my first managers was Dave Schmitz. He was, by far, my most influential leadership mentor. Dave gave me insight to the “street” knowledge and experience necessary to become a successful banker. He also taught me how to laugh at adversity and see humor in life. These are invaluable skills that I still use today—and I hope I continue to use them for years to come. What is your definition of leadership?

To me, leadership is about being a role model, as well as an advocate, for a cause greater than oneself in order to motivate people and achieve the best possible outcome for that cause. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment?

My most rewarding professional accomplishment took place in 2009, when my team of Relationship Bankers in Indiana became the top performing group within the Harris Small Business Banking segment. As a leader, it was fulfilling to be able to help those I lead realize a common goal and achieve success. Having said that, I think continuous improvement is critical to success. Given the chance, would you do anything differently?

If I could go back and do something differently, it would be great if I could make myself grow a foot taller to fulfill my dream of being in the NBA!

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Jason Jue

Director, Marketing

Dell Corporation Headquarters: Round Rock, Texas Web site: www.dell.com Primary Business: Information Technology Employees: 95,000

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success?

My mother, who sacrificed and encouraged us to do more. My father, who, with only a high school education, taught me business fundamentals at his grocery store. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Allocate time every week to interact with customers. Get to know the individuals that sum up to the reports or segments. Early in my career, I spent a lot of time listening in on sales or market research calls. Now, I get similar information online. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership?

I took time off from the corporate world to live and work in different regions of the U.S. The goal was to learn about multiple walks of life and how those differences can be harnessed for success. I worked as a Montana ranch-hand, inner-city teacher, and health researcher for older-adults studies. The one consistent theme I learned about leadership is that passionate people who work together as a team on a singular mission achieve extraordinary results. For example, for a short time, I worked in a disadvantaged school in Birmingham, Alabama, where the graduation rates and test scores were near the top for the state. From janitors to teachers to principals, everybody excelled at their jobs, but they also stepped out of their roles to help each other.

Eddy Setiawan

Education: Harvard College What I’m reading: Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet, by Jeffrey Sachs My philosophy: Passionate people working together can achieve anything. Interests: Piano, tennis.

Global Business Director, Chlorinated Organics

The Dow Chemical Company Headquarters: Midland, Michigan Web site: www.dow.com Primary Business: Manufacturer of technology-based products including specialty chemicals, advanced materials, agricultural products and plastics. Employees: 52,000

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success?

No doubt my wife has had a tremendous impact on my career and my success. In the last decade, my family has lived in four countries on three different continents. We moved from Asia to Europe to North America. The relocation means we have had to adjust to continuous and significant changes in culture and lifestyle. My wife’s dedication and flexibility to supporting my growing family through change has allowed me to focus on my career. My wife has played a pivotal role in my success and remains my key and most valuable collaborator. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take?

A leader needs to be prepared and willing to make hard and unpopular decisions. You will have to make more and more difficult decisions as you progress in your career. Take the risk and make informed decisions. Make sure you have all the information you need to make a sound decision. Keep in mind that not all the decisions we make will bring success or please everyone. Sometimes, they may not be the right decisions. When that happens, it’s important to take responsibility for those decisions and learn from painful failures. These are what make you a better leader.

Education: B.S., Chemistry, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia; M.B.A., Northwood University, U.S.A. My philosophy: The sky is the limit—never stop learning and improving. Interests: Golf, tennis, basketball.

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Munish Nanda

Vice President, Integrated Supply Chain—Fluid & Motion Control

ITT Corporation Headquarters: White Plains, New York Web site: www.itt.com Primary Business: Multi-Industry Engineering and Manufacturing Employees: 40,000

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why?

My late father. He had an innate ability to identify opportunity and to simplify the complex; he was fabulous with people and a super coach. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment? Education: Bachelor’s in Engineering & Master’s in Business What I’m reading: Three Cups of Tea, by Greg Mortenson & David Oliver Relin; Outliers,by Malcolm Gladwell My philosophy: Live like there is no tomorrow. Plan like you’ll live forever. Interests: My family, semi-classical Hindi music, walking.

A few times in my career I have enabled underperforming organizations to realize so much more of their potential. Having the privilege of leading teams that, from a position of disadvantage, went on to create extraordinary value for their constituents (customers, the organization, and employees) has been most rewarding. What’s the worst fault a leader can have?

Lack of mental flexibility, and the inability to recognize the fine line that separates self-confidence from arrogance. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Engage. Lead with confidence, especially in tough times. Learn every day. Anticipate. Shoot for the stars, but keep your feet well grounded.

Pascal Nguyen, CRPC, CLTC

Specializing Retirement Planning for Orange County

New York Life Insurance Company Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.newyorklife.com; www.nylpascal.com Primary Business: Insurance Employees: More than 8,600 (Domestic)

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success?

Education: B.S., Finance, George Mason University What I’m reading: Blink, and The Tipping Point, both by Malcolm Gladwell My philosophy: If it is to be, it is up to me. Interests: Martial Arts, movies, spending time with my ladies (wife, Claudia; daughters, Melina and Holly).

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My parents have had the most impact on my success. As refugees in their mid-thirties, they came to the U.S. with four young children. I learned a strong work ethic from their struggles. My father is a tremendous inspiration to me and has instilled in me the necessary courage to take risks, while at the same time teaching me to welcome setbacks and to learn from them, using them as opportunities. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment?

My most rewarding career accomplishment is not one experience; it is that I have chosen a career for myself that has given me the opportunity to mature and evolve in a very competitive and challenging industry. And my career for the past 21 years has, at the same time, been very personally rewarding because, just as my family is most important to me, I am able to help other families and businesses in my community protect their loved ones. Given the chance, would you do anything differently?

The advice I would give to young leaders comes from the Dalai Lama: You can’t change the past because it is gone. You do not worry about the future because it is not yet here. However, you can learn from the past to make wise choices in the present for a better future.

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Vince Verde

Co-Managing Shareholder

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. Headquarters: Greenville, South Carolina, and Atlanta, Georgia Web site: www.ogletreedeakins.com Primary Business: Law firm Employees: 900

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment?

As a more senior lawyer, I am being asked to speak to junior lawyers in a mentoring capacity. I never really thought of myself as a role model, but as I look at some of the younger lawyers, I can’t help but remember the times when I was navigating work- and life-related issues and wished I could turn to a mentor for advice. Having someone ask for my help, and understanding that I may actually be in a position to help, has been very rewarding—I consider that to be a very important career accomplishment. What’s the worst fault a leader can have?

Losing touch with the people who you are suppose to lead, and failing to learn from earlier mistakes. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

You can’t be paralyzed by fear of the unknown and you should have confidence in your own ability to navigate beyond your comfort zone. Developing a broad database of experience, while solidifying your core expertise, can only benefit you in the long run. Given the chance, would you do anything differently?

No. I would not do anything differently. I have a rewarding and intellectually stimulating job in a profession that performs a critical function within society.

Education: J.D., Boston University School of Law; B.A., University of California, Davis What I’m reading: I am a history buff, particularly World War II history. I am currently reading Stalingrad, by Antony Beevor My philosophy: I am a firm believer of the saying, “Keeping my side of the street clean.” Making sure that I have acted properly, whether professionally or personally, has always ensured that I can hold my head high in all situations. Interests: Family activities, travel, and martial arts.

Matthew Prajna Dennis Johnson

Managing Director

KPMG LLP Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.us.kpmg.com Primary Business: Big Four Accounting firm providing audit, tax, and advisory services Employees: 21,000

What is your definition of leadership?

Leadership is consistently using actions, words, and behaviors to help others, while being guided by a strong moral compass and supported by strength of character. Strong leadership is exemplified by unbiased behaviors, principled approaches to decision making, clear communication, and an ability to genuinely connect with people. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Develop the leader within you—starting now! You’ll likely need to continue developing your technical and soft skills, but first understand what gives you a sense of fulfillment or purpose in your life. If you can align your career, employer, and job responsibilities with what you enjoy doing, you will experience a sense of purpose, and your work will enable you to build a more fulfilling life. Take charge of your career; don’t wait for it to happen. Create a vision statement, share it with your teams, and be accountable to it. If you don’t want to be the best at whatever it is you’re doing, then you should probably try doing something a little different if you want to be successful. Don’t define yourself by a title or metric; work hard doing what fulfills you and you’ll enjoy success. Have a global perspective and learn from those who have different cultural or socio-economic backgrounds. Give back generously, and lead with integrity.

Education: B.S., Business Administration, Accounting; Master of Accountancy, University of South Carolina What I’m reading: SuperFreakonomics, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner My philosophy: I am thankful to have the opportunity to work with those around me. As a leader, I am in a better position to serve and uplift others. Interests: Activities with my three children, travelling (I’ve been to more than 40 countries to date), reading, mentoring, and college football.

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Jennie Chin Hansen

President (The highest ranking volunteer at AARP)

AARP Headquarters: Washington, D.C. Web site: www.aarp.org Primary Business: Founded in 1958, AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization that helps people 50+ improve the quality of their lives. Employees: 2,154

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment?

Education: Boston College; University of California, San Francisco; Honorary Doctorate, Boston College What I’m reading: John Adams, by David McCullough My philosophy: Work hard, with integrity and respect for others, on what you care about and which helps to make a difference to society. Interests: Reading, orchids, mini get-aways, international travel with husband.

Tracey Doi

Having spent nearly 25 years with the San Francisco program, On Lok Senior Health Service. The program started in our Chinese, Filipino, and Italian communities, and was designed to help elders stay in their own homes and community with culturally appropriate services. I am so proud that this locally designed health program that originated from an ethnic community became a mainstream Medicare program which today operates in 31 states. We were able to change and create policy, from the ground up, that has meaning, value, quality, and accountability that continues to grow. What’s the worst fault a leader can have?

A leader is at risk when she feels that she has THE answer without always understanding the context of the situation and recognizing that others have important points of view that matter. I subscribe to the school of servant leadership, wherein one is constantly aware that it isn’t about me but about the us and the mission at stake. We will all have opportunities to be the team leader and the team member. One is not “better” than the other, but is simply what is needed at the time based on the work at hand to be done.

Group Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. Headquarters: Torrance, California Web site: www.toyota.com Primary Business: Automotive Employees: 40,000 employees in North America

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success?

My mom has been a tremendous inspiration throughout my life, demonstrating that it is possible to have a challenging career and a healthy, happy family at the same time. I am very lucky to benefit from her wisdom and advice, and to have her participate so actively in our children’s lives. Education: B.A., Business Economics, UCLA What I’m reading: Tuned In, by Craig Stull, Phil Myers, and David Meerman Scotty

What is your definition of leadership?

A leader paints a vivid picture of the future, and provides the strategy, resources, and motivation to achieve inspiring goals together. What’s the worst fault a leader can have?

My philosophy: Cherish what’s important in life—family, friends, community—while continuing to grow and develop professionally.

If a leader doesn’t listen, derailment could be near. When I get pushback, I try to listen more closely, ask more questions, and dig deeper. The additional insight can be critical to the success of the team.

Interests: Spending time with my family, reading, volunteering for non-profits.

Build your own Board of Directors. Rather than seek out one mentor, look for multiple advisors that can provide input for different facets of your life. It often helps to have a sounding board to double check that you’re staying true to your core values and to provide advice when you stumble.

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What advice can you provide for young leaders?

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Kerwin M. Higashi

Vice President, Business Development, Education Services

Sodexo Headquarters: Gaithersburg, Maryland (North America) Web site: www.sodexo.com Primary Business: Global provider of integrated food and facilities management services Employees: 125,000 (North America)

Who in your family had the most impact on your success?

My grandmother. She was a “giver.” Her parents (my great-grandparents) emigrated from Japan to work in the sugar plantations in Hawaii. Together they successfully raised four college-educated children. Her door was always open to anyone and everyone who needed a helping hand. Her saying was, “We are truly blessed—we may not have much, but we can share. So give—and truly give—don’t expect to get anything in return. If so, don’t—that’s not true giving—give from the heart.” What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Never stop learning. Try new things, volunteer for new opportunities. Don’t be afraid to fail. If you fail, learn from your mistakes—don’t dwell on them. Get up and move on. Seek out success and successful people. Sign up for Toast Masters!

Education: B.A., Business Administration, Seattle University What I’m reading: The Necessary Revolution, by Peter M. Senge Interests: Coaching Little League softball, physical fitness, and golf.

What are the personal and/or professional sacrifices to being leader?

By putting clients, customers, and employees first, it’s been tough to balance my personal life. I have to work harder at scheduling family events and school activities than at executing a new business partnership! I could not do what I do without the love and support of my wife and my two daughters. I am truly blessed to have their support, and have them at my side.

Liz Kinniburgh

Director, Business Development, Corporate Services

Sodexo Headquarters: Gaithersburg, Maryland (North America) Web site: www.sodexo.com Primary Business: Global provider of integrated food and facilities management services Employees: 125,000 (North America)

What is your definition of leadership?

To me, leadership is about creating a way for people to contribute toward a common vision, achieve common goals, and to share the rewards of success. What is your most rewarding career accomplishment?

The most rewarding career accomplishment was when I was leading a team in an operation and I was able to develop and eventually promote a couple of people, helping them move their career forward and mentoring them along the way. It felt good to have made a difference in people’s lives. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Respect is earned. Greatness can be developed. Keep learning. Find a mentor or two. Be generous with your time and energy. Deliver your promises. What are the personal and/or professional sacrifices to being leader?

Personal sacrifices are mostly related to losing time for yourself or for your family. Professional sacrifices could involve not getting what you want, but what the team wants.

Education: B.S., Dietetics and Food Administration, California State University, Long Beach What I’m reading: Golden Leaf, A Khmer Rouge Genocide Survivor, by Kilong Ung My philosophy: Do what I say I will do. Giving is a greater blessing than receiving. Life is too short to not make time for people. Interests: Traveling and learning about diverse cultures, tennis, gardening.

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Sam Kim

Vice President, U.S. E-Commerce Group

W.W. Grainger, Inc. Headquarters: Lake Forest, Illinois Web site: www.grainger.com Primary Business: Distributor, Maintenance, Repair, and Operating Supplies Employees: 18,000

What is your definition of leadership?

A great leader is able to harness the power and wisdom of a diverse team. You need a vision and a strong imagination that enables you to transfer innovation from outside the box into the box. A leader needs to listen, observe, and question. Education: B.A., Northwestern University; M.B.A., Northwestern, Kellogg School of Business What I’m reading: The Tipping Point, and Outliers, both by Malcolm Gladwell; The Innovator’s Dilemma, by Clayton M. Christensen My philosophy: Leaders come in all different styles, but what they all have in common is people who are following in support of their vision. Interests: Coaching my two boys in baseball, woodworking, water activities with my family.

Meeta Kratz

What advice can you provide for young leaders?

I tell young people to be the best at what you do right now, but always think like an owner or CEO. You need to anticipate the needs of your colleagues, and it’s very important to invest in yourself with further education, seeking help from mentors, and reading books. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership?

I was in college when my mother died in a car accident, and that was when it really sunk in to me that I had a promise to fulfill. That moment of realization still influences how I act every day, reminding me of my obligation to further better myself. Given the chance, would you do anything differently?

Life is funny when you think back upon what could have been if you had made different choices. But I have no regrets, I feel privileged to be where I am, and I just wish my mother were still alive.

Director, Strategy—Government & Healthcare Business Unit

W.W. Grainger, Inc. Headquarters: Lake Forest, Illinois Web site: www.grainger.com Primary Business: Distributor, Maintenance, Repair, and Operating Supplies Employees: 18,000

What is your most rewarding career accomplishment?

Education: B.S., Kettering University; M.B.A., University of Illinois What I’m reading: The Exceptional Presenter, by Timothy J. Koegel My philosophy: Every challenge is a learning opportunity. Like water, you need to adapt to any environment. Interests: My family (twin four-yearold girls), reading, travel.

What I value most is seeing people I mentored or worked with succeed. Personally, it has been very rewarding to work with Grainger in understanding the value of our name and what our brand stands for. This is a very humble organization, but we are changing our culture because, leveraging who we are will help us grow in the future. What are the personal and/or professional sacrifices to being leader?

Time is the major sacrifice. You have to change your mindset about the value of time and give up one thing to get another. In choosing a working career, I have learned to be very deliberate about the quality of the time I spend with my family; not just the quantity. What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership?

I was a member of a literary society in college, when I first realized I had a natural ability to influence people. I discovered that the direction of a group of people could be shaped without being the formal leader of the group. I had never thought that of myself until I saw it materialize. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

My advice early in your career is to be deliberate, to take the time to decide where it is you want to go, and to map out how to get there. If you don’t have an end game, you will find you lack direction when you are making some of your early career decisions. 56

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Pritha Mehra

Vice President, Business Mail Entry and Payment Technology

United States Postal Service Headquarters: Washington, D.C. Web site: www.usps.com Primary Business: Postal Service Employees: 600,000 Career Employees

Who is/was your most influential leadership mentor and why?

Winston Churchill, who once said: “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” No doubt some of his spirit was the result of his keen interest in spirits; but nonetheless, he never fails to amuse and inspire. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Be fearless in presenting your ideas and vision for solving problems; and be equally willing to work hard for these. Seek mentorship and build relationships across all stakeholders to effect enduring change. Build diversity of thought, background, and outlook into all your teams. What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take?

Be willing to speak your beliefs with conviction, to anyone, regardless of their position. Openness is the best course of action, both professionally and personally. Given the chance, would you do anything differently?

Like anyone, I would wish I could have learned the lessons of team-building and leadership even earlier.

Education: B.S., Computer Science, University of Maryland; M.B.A., Georgetown University What I’m reading: Founding Brothers, by Joseph J. Ellis; Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?, by Michael J. Sandel My philosophy: Happiness is here and now. Be the change you want to see. Interests: Indian cuisine and promoting healthy whole foods, reading, writing, community service, adventure travel.

Quintin Lew

Senior Vice President

Verizon Headquarters: New York City Web site: www.verizon.com Primary Business: Communications Employees: 200,000+

Who in your family has had the most impact on your success?

My parents were a tremendous influence on me, and have had a great impact on me. First, they taught me, by example, the importance of hard work and focus. They emigrated from China and worked in Chinese laundries and restaurants for most of their adult lives striving to create a better life for our family. I believe that this focus and strong work ethic has been central to my character. Another valuable perspective was the belief that education is a central ingredient for success. They actively supported my academic growth, gave me self-confidence, and provided me the means to pursue my educational ambitions. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

You should always strive to continuously learn. The moment you lose that desire, you’ll stop your potential to grow. Everyone should explore new opportunities, experiences, and try to learn new functions. You should also look to network with colleagues, peers, and executives. Finally, you need to manage your own career—and don’t expect anything to be handed to you. Good things will only happen if you create the opportunities.

Education: M.B.A., New York University, Stern School of Business; B.S., SUNY Albany What I’m reading: The Psychology of Winning, by Denis Waitley My philosophy: Think big. Act with integrity and responsibility. Interests: Reading, golf, and travel.

What are the personal and professional risks a leader should take?

You need to be willing to step at least slightly outside of your comfort zone. Show that you have the selfconfidence to take on new assignments, create new relationships, and promote your successes. You can gain this through cross-functional experience and learning new skills. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage

Colin Owyang

Senior Vice President and U.S. General Counsel

National Grid Headquarters: London, England Web site: www.nationalgrid.com Primary Business: International energy delivery company Employees: 27,000

What is your definition of leadership?

Doing the right thing when no one’s looking. What’s the worst fault a leader can have?

Not knowing one’s self. If you don’t know who you are—what makes you who you are, and drives you to who you want to be—I don’t think you can responsibly lead anybody else.

Education: B.A., Yale College; M.A., Yale University; J.D., University of Michigan Law School

What was the defining moment in your life in which you understood your leadership?

What I’m reading: Whatever looks good in the ‘new fiction’ section at the library. My philosophy: Live in the moment.

Given the chance, would you do anything differently?

I was a Chinese literature major in college which was an intellectual interest and important for my own self identity, but it didn’t exactly give me a lot of different ways to earn a living. If I had to do it all over again, I would have double majored in math too (no minors where I went to school). Then again, if I did that, I might never have gone to law school and had the privilege of being a federal prosecutor before coming in-house.

Interests: Parenting, running, reading, and being outside.

Rona Berinobis

The first time I had to stand on my feet in front of a jury and say “objection” was when it hit home, in a very real way, that I was responsible for making sure the right thing was done. It was a defining moment of taking ownership for delivering an outcome. We are all measured by the results we deliver.

Director of Workforce Inclusion

Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield Headquarters: Des Moines, Iowa Web site: www.wellmark.com Primary Business: Health Insurance Employees: 2,000

Who in your family had the most impact on your success?

Education: B.S., Psychology, Upper Iowa University; M.A., Leadership, Bellevue University What I’m reading: The Speed of Trust, by Stephen Covey My philosophy: Seek the unknown, learn, appreciate. Interests: Cultures, running, family, diversity.

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My parents. They taught me the value of hard work, the importance of a positive attitude, and how to respect and treat others. Their own life experiences helped me to appreciate how embracing different cultures enriches each of us. In the spirit of my culture, I try to leave those I interact with feeling a sense of ‘the aloha spirit.’ What is your definition of leadership?

Effective leadership involves having mutual respect and treating colleagues and team members as partners and collaborators. Leadership is the ability to inspire and motivate people to give the best of themselves. It means never making judgments without facts, and requires having the capability to deliver the tough messages in a respectful and meaningful way. Successful leaders are defined by their actions. What advice can you provide for young leaders?

Respect, accept, and appreciate all generations. Technology is a wonderful tool and serves a significant role in communicating, but be sure not to lose sight of the value and power of face-to-face meetings.

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© 2010 Lockheed Martin Corporation

B E T W E E N T H E C H A L L E N G E A N D T H E S O L U T I O N, T H E R E I S O N E IM P O R TA N T W O R D : H O W.

Diversity. It’s not a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, you need fresh ideas. And unique perspectives. Delivering the most complete answers to solve complex problems is all a question of how. And it is the how that makes all the difference.


thought thoughtleaders2010 leaders Our ongoing series, designed to bring leading diversity professionals’ thoughts and ideas directly to you.

What would you like to learn from our thoughtleaders? Send your suggestions to damianjohnson@diversityjournal.com

thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders

Beyond the Diversity Office: Building a Culture of Inclusion By Steven Schulman

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Senior Vice President, Human Resources AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company

It can be argued that having a diversity and inclusion functional area itself can pose a challenge to creating an inclusive culture. While a diversity office is essential to building a foundation where differences are not only acknowledged, but embraced, perception can be that it is simply the responsibility of that team alone to create a diverse and inclusive workplace. If a diversity office is seen as a separate business area, it may take a company’s employees longer to embrace their own responsibility for creating an inclusive environment—not because they don’t believe in it, but because they believe it is already being addressed. To overcome this myth, the diversity office must be viewed as a partner, rather than the sole driver of a company’s culture of acceptance and inclusion. It should be the foundation upon which an inclusive culture is built, by the support and strength of senior management, human resources, and employees.

Human Resources (HR) must provide an infrastructure that allows diversity and inclusion to thrive as an integral

Pro f i les i n D i ve rsit y Journal

But even with the support of a diversity office, senior management, and HR, a company will not successfully build an inclusive culture. Employees must drive the creation of a workplace that embraces the uniqueness of everyone and the benefits this brings to them individually and to the company.

Employees, through their pride in what makes them distinct, will naturally create a culture where people feel valued for their differences. Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are invaluable in helping employees mobilize around I’m not suggesting that similar passions and channel their eninto efforts that support business organizations do not ergy objectives, engagement, and professional development. ERGs can help need a diversity office— build confidence; foster respect for diversity; and promote new ideas from quite the opposite. all employees through active support of diversity initiatives.

For maximum impact on a company’s success, diversity and inclusion must be embedded into all areas of the business to transform these ideals into core business principles. Senior management commitment is critical. But commitment is not just something that senior executives can talk about—they must demonstrate it by their own engagement and personal accountability. They must set measurable goals for themselves and their teams, and be accountable for achieving them.

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part of the organization. To start, companies must have an employee base that represents the communities they serve. HR must ensure that there is a diverse population of talent joining the company; that there are development opportunities for all employees at all levels; and that there is a pipeline of talented individuals of all backgrounds primed for leadership roles.

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I’m not suggesting that organizations do not need a diversity office—quite the opposite. The office is needed to raise awareness, and provide guidance and support, while facilitating understanding of, and appreciation for, differences. But a diversity office alone cannot be expected to weave diversity and inclusion into the fabric of an organization; that can only happen with the drive, commitment, and accountability of an organization’s people—senior management, human resources, and employees. PDJ


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleader Developing and Sustaining a Culture of Diversity & Inclusion on University Campuses By Dr. Philip M. Orlando

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Director of Academic Affairs University of Phoenix, Harrisburg Campus

Civilization’s vanguard is forged by cultures within societies whose collective fabric is a tapestry of diverse individuals, concepts, customs, and inclusive relationships. Handed down first in oral folk traditions, then visually graphic, later written, and now digitally electronic—the microcosmic primitive anthropological settings have come full circle in the vast array of global communications traveling at the speed of light.

One of the greatest challenges or dilemmas facing higher education and, in particular university campuses, is how to develop and sustain a culture of diversity and inclusion throughout all elements of campus life. The need for this continual organic evolution on university campuses necessitates faculty, advisors, administrators, staff, and executives to deliver strategic planning and development, leading to an outcome of diversity and inclusion for all stakeholders. Curriculum, faculty, staffing, and enrollment are all fertile areas in which we can guarantee the strategic actions and ongoing training which will ultimately ensure cultural, curricular, intellectual, generational, gender, and spiritual diversity and inclusion.

Building bridges among diverse constituencies and stakeholders is core to our future development as a global society. The cultural collages of the 1960s-’70s evolved more fully into more diverse and inclusive tapestries and fabrics of the 1980s-’90s, in which the diverse constituencies and ideas became interwoven, and strengthened the institutions in ways that the peaceful, but objective coexistence of the earlier decades of the Civil Rights Movement had only initiated. This divergence of thought, complementary thinking styles, and pluralistic concepts manifests itself throughout education in the 21st century through diverse learning modalities, learning styles, and instructional styles. Of particular note is higher education in the 21st century as a paramount example of these three tenets reflected in the diversity and inclusion of all aspects of the University of Phoenix in both its real time and virtual campus settings. At our university campuses, in real and virtual environments, the rich diversity of our academic culture is imbued with the layers of diversity that permeate campus environments, integrating the lives, roles, and career paths of our students, and all other stakeholders. The iconic Nelson Mandela, Mahatma Gandhi, Mother Teresa, Caesar Chavez, Dahli Llama, and Dr. Martin Luther King

shine as beacons whose personal trials, struggles, and triumphs have impacted humanity in radiated waves of concentric circles of diversity. The unmistakable symbiotic relationship among diversity, inclusion, and human rights is evident in the transcendent impact that each of these individuals continues to have upon our global society, and civilization epitomized in the sphere of higher education. Engaging communities in diversity is an implied essential responsibility of the social mission and outreach of our University. Modeling diversity through training and active engagement by faculty, staff, administration, and the student body is essential to developing the culture of diversity that we, as a University, continually seek. The mirroring effect that campuses may employ as they embark upon a continual journey to reflect their community culture sometimes takes on the converse role of forging a diverse campus environment as a model for communities. From melting pot of the world to the dynamically integrated synergistic global nation that we have become, the United States maintains a social responsibility to model diversity. The University of Phoenix exists as a diverse microcosm. Unlike much of the nation’s higher education community, University of Phoenix looks like America—both in terms of our student body and our faculty. We stand as a model of diversity for higher education, as evidenced in the data contained within our Academic Annual Report 2009. At University of Phoenix, almost half of our enrollment consists of students from underrepresented racial or ethnic communities, and is above the national average for colleges and universities. We enroll more women than the national average as well. The University’s responsibility to embrace, nurture, and advance diversity and inclusion is implicit and central to its mission of “social responsibility,” conceived of, propagated, and modeled by our founder, Dr. John Sperling. Ultimately it becomes the strategic solutions that are sought, identified, and enacted upon that will continue to guarantee that diversity and inclusion are embraced and championed throughout all of the campuses of the University of Phoenix, world-wide. PDJ

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Diversity: Employees Are Marketing Tools, Too By Nathan Cox

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Senior Vice President, Commercial Banking Manager Bank of the West

Although many businesses understand that their media advertising needs to include a diverse range of ethnicities and genders, I think there’s less acknowledgement of the importance of the staff mirroring the marketplace. And that’s a shame, because marketing is not confined to media. Diversity is not just about more representations of people of color; it’s about ensuring that all of our employee constituents are represented. Everything a potential client sees about a business sends a message. If we want to build trust, it’s not enough that our marketing materials present faces that resonate with the audience. Our staffs need to represent the communities in which they work.

As our country’s demographics evolve and the Baby Boomers age and retire, there’s been an increase in women- and minority-owned businesses. The business opportunities from succession planning and wealth transfer to these market segments are significant. Effectively marketing to Baby Boomers makes sense, as they stand to generate lots of new business for the company. Financial services firms continue to tailor their marketing material to properly reach those demographic segments (an Asian entrepreneur in a wealth management ad, an African-American woman in a small business ad, and so forth), which is exactly what should be happening. Having “in-language” brochures is another sign of commitment to diversity, as is attending community events with employees who represent that community.

The seeds of credibility and trust are

A commitment to As the demographics of built by a business that mirrors the diversity is shown when our marketplace change, a company not only the manner in which we marketplace and speaks to it in a hires employees that serve those markets must represent the commualso change. Research language it recognizes. nity but encourages data has shown that eththeir contributions to nic market segments respond positively to faces that resemble their own. The seeds of credibility and trust the success of the organization, whether it’s through are built by a business that mirrors the marketplace and community involvement or excellent customer service. speaks to it in a language it recognizes. For example, if Diversity councils and committees allow for a crossI am doing business in an area that has a predomi- pollination of ideas that create a natural, free flowing nantly Asian population, I want my staff to represent exchange of innovation and information. Ultimately, the Asian population accordingly. I would like my staff that exchange leads to a more culturally sensitive and to be Hmong, Cantonese, or whatever the local popu- hopefully, more successful organization. PDJ lation is. What’s more, I would like them to speak the language of that local population.

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Diversity Isn’t Just the Right Thing to Do. It’s Good for Business, and Here’s Why.

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By now, every seasoned diversity practitioner appreciates the importance of making the case for diversity in this way—using the language of business, tying proposed investments to results, and following up with quantitative analyses of how the needle moved and why that mattered to the bottom line. It is critical that we as diversity practitioners and champions continue to build on our successes in establishing diversity as a true business imperative. But in and of itself, this argument is not enough; not anymore. As we continue appealing to “the head” with the strong business case for diversity, the time has come to also renew our focus on “the heart” of the matter— the personal and emotional underpinnings of the diversity conversation. Why now? Because the balance sheet no longer tells the whole story for any company. Organizations today increasingly are judged as much for their contributions to society as they are their returns to shareholders. The pursuit of profit without regard for a company’s broader role in society today is a losing strategy in the marketplace, where stakeholders, ranging from customers to employees, increasingly say they prefer companies that share their values. We should also understand that the people in our companies are thinking about the moral and emotional aspects of diversity, whether or not their diversity teams acknowledge them. If we don’t openly and proactively acknowledge this and create opportunities to explore the emotional experience of difference in our workplaces, then we are not having a very complete conversation about diversity at all. And so we find ourselves as diversity practitioners in a very interesting place, one that our predecessors may not have anticipated, coming out of the Civil Rights movement. In those early years of our field, diversity practitioners learned that the moral argument by itself was not enough to move business leaders to action. Today, having thoroughly established the business case for diversity, and with the C-suite focusing both on value and values, we can start framing our message this way: Diversity isn’t just good for business. It’s the right thing to do, and here’s why. I have had some of these discussions over the course of my career. I remember them as “courageous conversations,” because they required me to leave my comfort zone—my spreadsheets, my PowerPoint decks, my org charts—and to ask senior executives also to leave their comfort zones so we could have frank

By David Casey Vice President and Diversity Officer CVS Caremark

and thorough conversations about managing diversity and its related tensions and complexities. Let’s face it—if we, the people responsible for driving the conversation about diversity in our organizations, don’t make the connection between the numbers and the people they represent, who will? It takes courage to talk openly and constructively in a business setting about personal topics like religion, ethnicity, and gender identity. And it’s up to diversity professionals to foster these conversations by modeling this courage and making it easier for others to follow suit. How to Have Courageous Conversations

• First, establish a foundation of trust. - Don’t preach or scold, - Admit that none of us gets it right all of the time, - Provide personal examples from your own life when you fell victim to cultural assumptions or stereotypes and “got it wrong.” • Explain that the goal isn’t the suppression of assumptions and stereotypes, but rather a process for acknowledging them and dealing with them. - Give people the right tools to feel more comfortable in discussing these issues openly. • Explain the critical importance of emotional intelligence for managers and employees in diverse environments. - People are not robots—we cannot turn off our emotions, - It is possible to talk about emotions in the context of business, - There is no either/or choice to be made between rational and emotions-based conversations about diversity—both types of thinking are necessary for diversity work to be truly sustainable and strategic. Business cycles evolve and the practice and discipline of diversity management is no different. We have gone from making it all about the “heart” to doing our level best to leave the emotions out of it and “get to the business.” There is no better time than now to not only engage the spreadsheet, but to also get to the heart of the matter. PDJ

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Bolstering Engagement through Employee Networks By Robert Powers Senior Vice President, Human Resources Textron Systems Corporation

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Recruiting and retaining the best talent is a business imperative— setting up a tug-of-war in which companies target the same finite resources to fill key positions. This is particularly true in the defense industry, where Textron Systems is constantly on the lookout for people with the right skills and experience to help us create the high-technology products and services that America’s troops rely upon. Achieving this imperative requires a multifaceted approach, including compensation and benefits, advancement and educational opportunities, work environment, and employee engagement.

Our strategy focuses on affiliations that are commonly shared around our businesses. The groups are chartered and supported by the diversity councils seated at each of our operating units, and currently include: • A young professionals group at our Wilmington, Massachusetts, headquarters—also home of our Textron Defense Systems operating unit.

Traditionally, employee activities used to be informal and localized; for example, softball or bowling leagues. Today’s employee networks and resource groups address the many other areas in which colleagues share common interests and backgrounds. They build a sense of community and connectedness beyond the inherent mission of the company, as well as provide employees and leaders the opportunity to communicate across all levels and functions of the business.

• A women’s network at our Austin, Texas, Overwatch headquarters, along with a military veterans network, which is particularly apropos because more than 25 percent of employees at this operating unit are veterans.

If the work environment is an extension of one’s personal life, that is a valuable “gotcha” point. Engaged employees are the company’s best champions for a diverse, inclusive culture, as well as for recruiting like-minded talent. In addition, the groups themselves have an impactful presence on fellow employees, driving the messages of diversity and positive change across an organization more effectively than any policy or process.

Additionally, similar networks are being planned across various sites. The meetings I have attended have a palpable energy. People are excited to share their ideas and enthusiasm for the business and its continued success.

Informal mentorships also spring from resource groups. These relationships are a vital source of information-sharing, as well as an opportunity for professional growth and development of leadership skills.

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From a business standpoint, employee networks are critical to keeping people interested, engaged, and feeling valued. For all of these reasons, the Textron Systems executive leadership team considers employee networks and resource groups key elements of the company’s employee engagement strategy.

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• A women’s network at the Hunt Valley, Maryland, headquarters of operating unit AAI Corporation.

The template for these groups is simple—give colleagues the chance to come together from all areas of the business, based on topics of mutual interest. The employee engagement benefits unfold from there. What’s good for our employees is good for our business—and when we do our jobs well, the good extends to our ultimate customers, America’s men and women in uniform. PDJ


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders No Longer Invisible: The Power of LGBT Employees By Tisa Jackson

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Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion Union Bank, N.A.

Can I be myself? Can I be visible? Will I be accepted? If your lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees are able to answer “yes” to all these questions when they think about their workplace, you are on the right track. Although we’re seeing progress toward greater inclusiveness in corporate America, many companies have a long way to go to fully recognize and leverage the power of their LGBT employees and the potential of this important market. One way to assess how well your company is doing is to look at the criteria for the annual Human Rights Campaign (HRC) “Best Places to Work” list based on LGBT equality. The HRC’s Corporate Equality Index recognizes companies that take a comprehensive approach to inclusion of LGBT employees. This means including sexual orientation and gender identity in nondiscrimination policies and diversity training programs; offering domestic partner and transgender benefits; supporting the LGBT community outside the company through sponsorships and strategic corporate philanthropy; and providing internal support through an inclusive diversity council or LGBT employee group. Measures such as these make a strong company’s commitment to diversity, while employees as a valuable resource with the important contribution to business success. employees can:

statement about a recognizing LGBT power to make an For example, these

• Lead or participate in educational meetings and programs to foster greater understanding of the LGBT community among management and employees. • Point you toward the right organizations and networks to connect with as you recruit talent from this community. • Help you develop culturally competent campaigns that reflect the values, needs and expectations of LGBT consumers. Your LGBT employees can offer insights that will enable your company to tap into a market whose spending power in the U.S. is estimated to be as high as $712 billion—and growing. These consumers tend to be highly educated and have a higher level of disposable income than other segments, and they are known to be brand-loyal. According to Harris Interactive, a well known market research firm, 69 percent choose to do busi-

ness with companies that are actively involved in community outreach to support the LGBT community, and 55 percent prefer to do business with companies that have diversity initiatives promoting greater understanding and inclusion of this group. A crucial step toward leveraging the power of your LGBT employees is developing and demonstrating an understanding of the concerns and issues that are important to them. For example, there is greater diversity within this group than meets the eye. Whenever you take a one-size-fits-all approach to any community, you fall short and run the risk of excluding them, jeopardizing your brand, and ultimately losing business. One of the most effective ways to leverage this powerful employee base is by forming an Employee Resource Group (ERG). An ERG gives LGBT employees and straight alliances a way of connecting with each other, while respectfully and appropriately utilizing all talent. It can serve as a focus group and a source of knowledge about this consumer segment, and act as a place to test marketing strategies, identify new products and services, enhance existing products and services, and help improve processes. Take the time to proactively build your cultural competency and learn about the challenges facing transgender, as well as lesbian, gay and bisexual, employees, so you can help educate others within your company and promote greater workforce, workplace, and PDJ marketplace inclusion. No one should feel invisible!

Tisa Jackson, Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion for Union Bank, N.A., has more than 13 years of experience in this field, as well as strategic human resources management, community development and organizational development. She is founder of the Professional & Technical Diversity Network (PTDN) of Greater Los Angeles, a diversity consortium comprised of companies committed to diversity and inclusion. Union Bank, N.A., is a full-service commercial bank providing an array of financial services to individuals, small businesses, middle-market companies, and major corporations. As of May 10, 2010, the bank had 397 banking offices in California, Oregon, Washington and Texas and two international offices. UnionBanCal Corporation is a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., which is a subsidiary of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, Inc. Union Bank is a proud member of the Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group (MUFG, NYSE:MTU), one of the world’s largest financial organizations. Visit www.unionbank.com for more information. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders th Adopt a Game-Changing Mindset By Donald Fan Senior Director, Office of Diversity Walmart

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According to the 2009 survey of the Committee of 100, most Americans (73%) believe Asian Americans have made significant contributions to the American culture. By contrast, two Senate seats, six House of Representative seats, and only 1.5% of Fortune 500 corporate board seats are held by Asian Americans, while 33 out of 3,200 U.S. colleges and universities currently benefit from Asian Americans serving as president.

the plateau syndrome. This can lead us down a dangerous path of resistance to change, lost momentum, and choked aspirations.

As an Asian American, I find these statistics both intriguing and perplexing. Why does it appear that so many Asian Americans are successful individually, yet that same level of accomplishment does not translate collectively into the fabric of societal leadership represented by corporate America, politics, and education?

I dentify the authentic purpose for your life—who you are, where you are from, and what you value— and pursue your purpose with passion. Intentionally nurture a new mindset to lead with courage.

While it may seem easier to blame societal and other external factors, perhaps we can dig deeper to see if cultural roots may play a role in this seeming contradiction. As Asian Americans, this can help us see if there are ways that we can contribute even more to the society through the leadership competencies that are valued in a western culture. To extend our impact in building a better tomorrow, we must equip ourselves with the appropriate skills and techniques, and know when and how to apply what we have learned. Overcoming the Plateau Syndrome

From a very young age, Asian people are taught to respect and value wisdom, knowledge, and ability. We are told that a contented mind is a perpetual feast. Many Asian Americans equate success with becoming a subject-matter expert, a go-to-person, or technologically savvy. When we achieve the level of proficiency that we have set for ourselves, we can easily become enamored with our achieved level of contentment and fall prey to

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Can we overcome the plateau syndrome? Absolutely, especially from a professional development perspective.  urture self-confidence, self-motivation, and willN ingness to take calculated risks. Think aggressively and act assertively when it comes to your own development. Consider how your self-development can positively influence those around you.

Confront challenges. Seek opportunities through different jobs, community outreach activities, and cross-functional project assignments. This will spur unique insights and breakthrough ideas and also help you appreciate and thrive in an unpredictable and complex environment.  ursue the passion of diversity. Today, being a P connoisseur of talent is not enough. Proactively tap into unique viewpoints and approaches, and foster a culture that allows them to emerge and thrive. And learn to bring together divergent points of view, develop consensus and maintain credibility. This openness to diversity of thought will yield dividends far beyond your own capacity.  ave self-awareness and be honest with your H strength and vulnerability. Today, an organization’s success depends on a such a variety of talents and skills, that no one leader could possibly have all the answers. Leverage talents around you. Constantly solicit feedback, input, and constructive criticism to validate if you’re on the right track moving toward the true north.


houghtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtle

Why does it appear that so many Asian Americans are successful individually, yet that same level of accomplishment does not translate collectively into the fabric of

societal leadership represented by corporate America, politics, and education? Looking Back vs. Forward Thinking

With a cultural history that traces back thousands of years, Asian people appreciate rich historic experiences and lessons. This appreciation may lead many to search for conventional wisdom before starting a new journey. While history is a powerful teacher and can inspire thoughtful planning, overreliance on the past can hamper creative problem-solving and result in only incremental and marginal improvement. Looking back positions us defensively, whereas forward thinking positions us offensively. To become an effective leader and adopt a game-changing mindset, we need to become more forwarding thinking.  e a visionary architect of your future and the B future of your organization. In today’s world, filled with volatility and ambiguity, a clearly communicated purpose is essential for your organization’s success. Think like a CEO and maintain a balance between thoughtfulness and decisiveness. As an architect, you are responsible to keep the outcome in mind, not just to provide building blocks and to set the pace.  ess is more. Matthew E. May, author of the book L In Pursuit of Elegance, defines elegance as something that is simultaneously simple, but surprisingly powerful. Sometimes simplicity isn’t about what’s there, but what’s not. Drive for elegance by focusing your efforts and resources only on those compelling and impactful projects that are closely aligned with your purpose and strategy. Learn to do more subtraction than addition.  e a constructive contributor. Keep “all” in mind at B all times: people, community, and society. Seek to continuously improve and shape the world around you. Due to the long history of feudal ruling in many Asian countries, some people still believe social responsibility is part of government responsibility and obligation. The distorted concept of citizenship distances them from actively participating in fundamental societal changes.

Trade-off vs. Integrative Mindset

Traditionally, Asian people have been trained to focus on the practical, to find the most efficient path toward higher productivity. Carried to the extreme, this characteristic can lead to a trade-off mindset, where quick fixes and low-hanging fruit become preferable to seeking more complex, long-term solutions. In his book, The Opposable Mind, Roger Martin introduced integrative thinking: the ability to face constructively the tension of opposing ideas and, instead of choosing one at the expense of the other, generate a creative resolution by forming a new idea that contains elements of both opposing ideas, but is superior to each. Integrative thinkers embrace complexity, tolerate uncertainty, and manage tension in searching for creative solutions to problems. To become a more integrative thinker, consider the following: The solutions that are presented at the moment do not reflect reality; they are probably imperfect in some important aspects. When faced with unpleasant choices, the integrative thinkers don’t choose right away, but think through the problem hard enough, expansively enough, and creatively enough, to formulate a creative solution.  pposing solutions are the richer source of new O insight into a problem. The integrative thinkers leverage conflict solutions and perceive opposing ideas as learning opportunities to be appreciated, welcomed, and understood. It takes time and patience to ferret out a new and better solution from abstract hypothesis to concrete reality. The integrative thinkers take time to question conventional wisdom and define problems from a different perspective. That is why they can generate alternatives that others don’t even think about. By overcoming the plateau syndrome and striving to be a more integrative and forward-thinking leader, Asian Americans can become more effective individually, and as a collective group, to lead and contribute to the society, and PDJ to build a better tomorrow for all.


stories

microtrigger stories editors notebook

Have You Experienced These Kinds of Triggers?

By Janet Crenshaw Smith

Disturbing Behavior

Why the long wait?

Becoming a Nurse One of my biggest MicroTriggers MicroTriggers are those subtle Practitioner was one of the most is being seen after my appointment important accomplishments of time. This routinely happens when behaviors, phrases and inequities my life. I worked hard for my I visit my dentist. “Why make that trigger an instantaneous degree, graduated with honors, appointments?” I ask myself every and have seven years of clinical time I’m sitting in the waiting room. negative response. Here are some experience under my belt. For A five- to ten-minute wait is one samples for you to consider. about a year-and-a-half, I have thing, but 30-45 minutes (every worked at a busy practice with time) is another. If I hadn’t been an Ob-Gyn. I have noticed that patronizing this office for so long recently, since many of her regular patients have requested and I wasn’t so confident in my dentist’s abilities, I’d find to be seen by me, the Physician feels the need to be present another place to go. Who knows? Maybe I’m just a glutton at as many of my appointments as possible. She has a for punishment.” -Anonymous habit of correcting my wording and attempts to debate my methods of treatment in front of the patients. This undermining has to stop soon, or this practice will soon Questioning of Qualifications lose a valuable employee.” There are five doctors in my medical practice, of —Gigi Atkins, NP

Let Them Be Heard

I’m a Physician Assistant. Over the years, I’ve noticed

that a lot of the people who accompany elderly patients to appointments end up cutting them off mid-sentence while they’re speaking with their doctors. I understand that some people need assistance trying to communicate their ailments, pains, etc., but please let the self-sufficient speak for themselves. I always feel compelled to say something, but I feel it’s not my place.”

which I’m the youngest. I find that patients constantly make comments like, “You sure are young to be practicing medicine.” “When did you receive your degree?” And my personal favorite, “Are you an Intern or a Resident?” I work for a reputable practice, and I worked hard for my designation. Let me ask a question of my own—Why do I always have to stand trial when I’m simply trying to do my job?” —Darryl Baptiste, MD

PDJ

—Nicolette Hammond, PA

Janet Crenshaw Smith is president of Ivy Planning Group, LLC, a consulting and training firm that specializes in diversity strategy and leadership. Her book is titled, MicroTriggers: 58 Little Things That Have a BIG Impact. Have a MicroTrigger story to share? Send it to: JSmith@ivygroupllc.com. 68

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Our Promise To You: Profiles in Diversity Journal is the only magazine in the industry to guarantee free editorial space in each issue for you to share your corporate Diversity & Inclusion success stories, best practices, leadership, great ideas and innovations, and WomenWorthWatching速!

For more Diversity, visit www.diversityjournal.com


advantage

advertiser’s index Bank of the West . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 19

New York Life Insurance Co.. . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Vanguard . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 15

www.bankofthewest.com

www.newyorklife.com

www.vanguard.com

Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC . . . . . . . . . . .20

PepsiCo . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 5

Verizon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

www.bcbsnc.com

www.pepsico.com

www.verizon.com

Chevron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Royal Dutch Shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

W.W. Grainger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front,

www.chevron.com

www.shell.com

www.grainger.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 1

Freddie Mac. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

Sodexo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Walmart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

www.freddiemac.com

www.sodexousa.com

www.walmart.com

ITT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

UnitedHealth Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Waste Management. . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back

www.itt.com

www.unitedhealthgroup.com

www.wm.com

Lockheed Martin . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 59

University of Arkansas Pine Bluff. . . . . . .70

WellPoint . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 7

www.lockheedmartin.com

www.uapb.edu

www.wellpoint.com

National Grid. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .Back Cover www.nationalgrid.com

U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

ARKANSAS PINE BLUFF The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB), a mid-sized land grant university located in beautiful and scenic Southeastern Arkansas, is the second oldest public institution of higher education in the state. Founded in 1873, the University is a multi-cultural, land grant institution and one of 103 Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the United States. The university offers 42 undergraduate degrees and four graduate degrees-administered through four schools: Agriculture, Fisheries and Human Sciences; Arts and Sciences; Business and Management; Education; and University College. UAPB has a position in its Masters of Science Degree in Addiction Studies Program.

Associate Professor/Assistant P Professor (1 nine-month, tenure-track) Successful candidates must have terminal degrees in disciplines related to addiction studies (e.g. public health, nursing, social work, psychology, criminal justice, etc.). Preference will be given to candidates who have experience teaching in some of the following areas: bio-statistics; drug abuse; tobacco use and abuse; dual diagnosis; prevention and treatment of substance abuse and/or other forms of addictions, including gambling and food; research analysis; family and individual counseling techniques; case management; clinical models of addiction; domestic violence; counseling special populations; and professional ethics. Successful candidates will be expected to teach both at the undergraduate level and graduate level, develop research teams, maintain an active research program, guide students in research projects, and supervise research associates in the area of tobacco, alcohol, and other drug addictions. UAPB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer 70

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Position Available Addiction Studies Program

Review of applications will begin May 10th, 2010. Position will remain open until filled. Employment date is August 16, 2010 or negotiable. Salary will be commensurate with professional and educational experiences. More infotrmation on the position and the university may be obtained from the university’s web page (www.uapb.edu) or by contacting the Office of the Dean. Applicants for this position should send a letter of application, current curriculum vitae, graduate transcripts, and three letters of recommendation too

Office of the Dean

School of Arts and Sciences University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff Mail Slot 4818 1200 North University Pine Bluff, AR 71601 Telephone: (870) 575-8210 or (870) 575-8054 Fax: (870) 543-8055


last word

Is Your Organization Gay-Friendly? By Marie Y. Philippe, Ph.D.

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Corporate Vice President, Culture and Organizational Effectiveness The Lifetime Healthcare Companies

Despite the progress around inclusion demonstrated by the increase in ethnic minority groups being represented in the higher echelons of corporate America in recent years, for many organizations, similar efforts have been slow to non-existent regarding the inclusion of openly gay individuals.

the gay community? Do you regularly, and intentionally, present material to your employees to inform them about the company’s position on some of the relevant, critical issues or set up forums to discuss them with employees, gauging their opinion on gay marriage, for example? Training about gay equality is no longer limited to “the right thing to do,” but in truly engaging employees to think deeply about social justice and what it means in your work place.

While it is commendable for twenty-one states and the District of Columbia to have adopted laws closer to the spirit of the proposed federal Employment NonDiscrimination Act (ENDA) by prohibiting employment discrimination based solely on sexual orientation, and twelve states and D.C. also prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity—organizations in these states and others may still not embrace equality for all in their work environment.

What role does your organization play in the gay community? While an organization demonstrates financial accountability by sponsoring fundraising or educational events supporting the gay community, good citizenship is epitomized when openly-gay employees, in positions of corporate power, serve on various boards of community organizations and can represent your organization in a different capacity.

Compliance does not always imply embracement. The business case for inclusion applies for all differences. From limited recruitment of the best talent, to the loss of market growth opportunities due to a lack of human diversity embracement, your company can suffer. Companies that truly pursue talent from all communities, including the gay community, have included most of the following practices. What do your policies say? Before even considering working for an organization, potential employees are savvy enough to search companies’ web sites and ask around. Does your employment equality statement include gender identity, for example—a sign that you make an effort to embrace employees beyond the standard “sexual orientation?” Does your policies and benefits summary specify, for example, adoption assistance equally for same-sex couples as heterosexual ones? Do you have a policy regarding individuals in gender transition? How are employees educated about the rights of 72

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Do day-to-day practices ease the comfort of employees from the gay community? The experience employees live day-in and day-out in the work environment plays a significant role in their retention rate. Employees who feel accepted and free to be who they are tend to act very similarly, regardless of their diversity dimensions. Are employees who are members of same-gender families comfortable displaying photos of their families at their work stations? Do their partners attend the Christmas parties and feel free to dance, as do heterosexual couples? It takes more than good intentions, training, and policies to create the work environment that allows gay employees to blossom as individuals and as contributors to the success of your company. Take a look around and ask yourself, are we truly gay-friendly? PDJ Marie Y. Philippe, Ph.D. is well known for her leadership contribution in corporate culture transformation through strategic diversity initiatives and organizational change management. She can be reached at marie.philippe@lifethc.com.


James Thomas

Anita Wu

Kevin Shi

Financial Analyst

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Vice President, Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions

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With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.

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