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Also Featuring … WellPoint: A conversation with Angela Braly • Catalyst • Thought Leaders • Perspectives

Corporate PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL July / August 2010 • VOLUME 12 NUMBER 4

BETWEEN THE CHALLENGE AND THE SOLUTION, T H E R E I S O N E I M P O R TA N T W O R D : H O W.

Diversity. It’s not a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, you need fresh ideas. And unique perspectives. Delivering the most complete answers to solve complex problems is all a question of how. And it is the how that makes all the difference.

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also inside: 2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards


achieving success

Jan Tratnik Director, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs

A company that

Laura Coy Public Affairs Manager

is making a

together

Erin Ptacek Director, Corporate Brand and Reputation

difference We’re proud of Grainger’s Philanthropy Team, who have made a world

in your

of difference not only at Grainger, but in the communities we serve.

world and the

Their hard work and commitment have helped our 1.8 million customers around the globe get their jobs done.

every day.

world around you.

Kellie Harris Public Affairs Manager

Elizabeth Valdez Executive Assistant, Corporate Communications

Waste Management is a Fortune 200 company that is changing the world for the better. We are strongly committed to promoting diversity and inclusion and empowering our employees. We are working with the communities we serve to fuel innovative change—and we need your help. www.wmcareers.com

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We’re proud of Grainger’s Philanthropy Team, who have made a world of difference not only at Grainger, but in the communities we serve. Their hard work and commitment have helped our 1.8 million customers around the globe get their jobs done.


from the publisher notebook A editors notebook

Diversity Commitment

James R. Rector

As I sat paging through the proofs of this issue the other day, I must admit I felt a tremendous sense of pride. Of course, I’m always proud of the way our team pulls together a fine issue of the magazine. But this time I thought about the companies who had chosen to participate in the issue itself. I could not help but feel good about their commitment to diversity and their willingness to share that commitment with others. A great many companies have embraced the idea that diversity is a core value. Many manifest this commitment by empowering employee networking groups, instituting supply chain management policies that broaden diversity spending, offering multi-cultural training and so on. These are the firms who are eager to share their vision, experience and best practices with other companies by participating in the many free editorial opportunities Profiles in Diversity Journal puts before them. In contrast, it seems too many companies have had their diversity commitment shaken by the tumult of the economic storm that hit everyone in late 2008. Their silence in tough economic times makes one wonder if they are still with the program. If you are a CEO or chief diversity officer and you don’t see your own company anywhere in this issue, either in our editorial features, opinion columns or advertising pages, you should take notice. What kind of unintended message are you sending to your employees, vendors, shareholders and customers with your silence? After all the work you put into various diversity programs in the past, do you really want to be seen sitting out the game? Sharing both your commitment and expertise with others has many advantages, and we make it so easy for you! After all, our mission is to spotlight companies and individuals who are the change masters and thought leaders in business, industry, government and nonprofits. We support your diversity work by giving you a well-respected communications platform from which to tell your story. Countless diversity practitioners have told us that sharing produces learning, and learning produces growth. There is no easier or more cost-effective way to share your diversity work than by partnering with us to tell your story. Shouldn’t your company (or your CEO) be properly positioned at the forefront of diversity? If you have not yet developed a communication strategy that advances diversity at your workplace, I hope you will give us a call. We can help you formulate a plan that will help you achieve your diversity objectives. We want you to join the leading companies you’ll be reading about in this issue in sharing your successes with our readers. It’s time to get off the bench and into the game. We’re here to help you succeed!

James R. Rector Publisher

PUBLISHER / MANAGING EDITOR

Damian Johnson

MARKETING DIRECTOR

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contents

table of contents

Volume 12 • Number 4 July / August 2010

features

19

Wellpoint / Angela Braly Meet Angela Braly, Chair, President and CEO, of WellPoint.

28 Special Focus:

19

Innovations In Diversity

Here are this year’s winners of the Profiles in Diversity Journal 2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards.

38 Thought Leaders With travel to seminars and conventions being curtailed, we recognize that you still may not be able to get to the seminars and conventions this year. We bring 3 diversity thought leaders to you.

28

42 on the cover:

Corporate Philanthropy

Corporate philanthropy is alive and well. The examples in this feature prove it. Compassion is its own action item in the boardrooms of the largest companies.

42 DEPARTMENTS

perspectives 10 Culture Matters

6 Momentum

by Craig Storti

12 From My Perspective by Linda Jimenez, WellPoint, Inc. 14 Human Equity™ by Trevor Wilson, TWI Inc.

Diversity Who, What, Where and When

8 Catalyst 

16 Viewpoint by Pamela Arnold, AIMD 78 Global Diversity by Michal Fineman and Elizabeth MacGillivray, ORC Worldwide

80 Last Word by Marie Philippe, PhD

An Assessment of Talent Management Systems

76 Advertiser’s Index

Company Web Sites of Our Advertisers

Storti

4

JIMENEZ

WILSON

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ARNOLD

FINEMAN

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MACGILLIVRAY

philippe


momentum momentum who…what…where…when

Deloitte Names Alison Paul Leader of U.S. Retail Practice NEW YORK – Deloitte LLP announced today that Alison Paul has been appointed leader of the retail practice in the United States and elected a vice chairpaul man, effective immediately. Paul succeeds Stacy Janiak, who will continue to provide audit, internal control, merger and acquisition and other specialized services to Deloitte’s Fortune 500 consumer business clients. “Alison brings an impressive record of outstanding service to many of Deloitte’s retail clients, and her extensive experience and relationships in the industry have distinguished Alison throughout her career. I am thrilled that she will be taking on this new role and am confident that she will continue to elevate our retail practice,” said Bill Freda, Deloitte’s U.S. managing partner for clients and markets. Paul will be responsible for overseeing one of the largest industry practices at Deloitte, which includes more than 1,400 professionals. She will lead the development and oversee the implementation of key retail sector initiatives as well as work with senior management of the organizations’ leading clients. Paul is based in Chicago.  Paul currently serves as the president of the Network of Executive Women (NEW), an organization focused on attracting, retaining and advancing women and a diverse workforce in the retail and consumer products industries. 6

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Previously, Paul served on NEW’s executive committee as sponsorship chair, where she helped to double the number of the organization’s national sponsors. She was also a co-chair and founder of the organization’s Chicago chapter.

and retains a diverse group of faculty members. Previously, she worked as the manager of talent acquisition and operations in the Division of Human Resources. Brooks has worked at the university for the past two years. She is a doctoral student at Kent State.

Kent State Makes Three Appointments to University’s Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Belinda Duncan has been appointed equal opportunity and diversity training manager. Her position involves handling faculty and staff requests for reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities, as mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); training and development programs related to ADA, diversity, recruitment and retention; and providing support to colleges and divisions to ensure implementation of the affirmative action plan. Prior to this position, she served in the Division of Human Resources as the affirmative action coordinator. Duncan joined Kent State in November 2008. She has a master’s in psychology with emphasis in organizational development and diversity from Cleveland State University.

Dr. Alfreda Brown, Kent State University’s Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, is pleased to announce three appointments. Judith brooks Brooks, Belinda Duncan and Dr. Geraldine Hayes Nelson, all current Kent State employees, will now report to the Division of Diversity, Equity duncan and Inclusion. Kent State’s newest division manages the university’s diversity and inclusion programs and oversees the Student Multicultural nelson Center; Women’s Center; LGBTQ Student Center; and Pre-College Programs. Judith Brooks now serves as faculty recruitment and retention manager in the Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. Her responsibilities include ensuring that the university attracts

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Dr. Geraldine Hayes Nelson has been named assistant vice president of pipeline initiatives and diversity programming. In this role, Nelson will oversee university-wide pre- and early-college pipeline initiatives specifically targeting underrepresented students and first-generation college students. Nelson also will provide oversight for the Student Multicultural Center, Women’s Center and the Upward Bound Pre-College Programs, as well as coordinate with the LGBTQ Student Center. She will have responsibility for diversity programming at the divisional level and in conjunction


with individual colleges and departments throughout Kent State’s eight campuses. Prior to her promotion, Nelson was associate dean of undergraduate studies. She has received her bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate from Kent State.

Women’s Venture Fund Honors Women Business Leaders for their Professional Accomplishments and Commitment to Women Entrepreneurs

Lisa E. Davis is Metropolitan Black Bar Association’s “Lawyer of the Year” NEW YORK—Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz entertainment partner Lisa E. Davis has been named “Lawyer of the Year” by The Metropolitan Black Bar Association. davis Lisa Davis is a partner in the entertainment group at Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz. For more than 20 years, Ms. Davis has been recognized as one of the leading entertainment lawyers in America representing clients in the film, television, publishing, music, theatre, and media industries. “We are very proud that Lisa was named ‘Lawyer of the Year’ by The Metropolitan Black Bar Association,” said Frankfurt Kurnit founding partner Michael Frankfurt. “She has had a distinguished 22 years with us, and we look forward to many more.” “We are thrilled that Lisa Davis continues to be recognized as one of the leading entertainment lawyers in America representing our film, television, publishing, music, theatre, and media clients,” said Richard Hofstetter, co-Chair of the Frankfurt Kurnit Entertainment Group. PDJ

Standing left to right: Carol Evans (presenter - President, Working Mother Media); Sheila Murphy (honoree - Associate General Counsel, Metlife Inc.); Ellen Hives (honoree - VP, Capgemini); Maria Otero (presenter - Founder and President, Women’s Venture Fund); Gail Koff (honoree - Founding Partner, Jacoby & Meyers); Friday Abernethy (honoree - VP, MTV Networks); Katie Gummer (presenter - Partner, McCarter & English). Seated left to right: Nereida Perez (honoree - VP, National Grid); Rhonda Joy McLean (honoree - Deputy General Counsel, Time Inc.); Geeta Aiyer (honoree - President and Founder, Boston Common Asset Management, LLC); and Lesley Pinckney (honoree - General Manager, Essence Communications, Inc.).

NEW YORK—The Women’s Venture Fund, Inc. (WVF) has announced the recipients of its “Highest Leaf Awards” honoring nine women for their successful business careers and commitment to nurturing other women in business. This annual award celebrates trailblazing women business executives who have shown outstanding leadership and commitment to their respective industries and other women. The honorees were evaluated on their achievements in undertaking risky projects, the creative use of resources that had an impact and added value to the organization, and their commitment to mentoring others. “These remarkable honorees are women who have achieved significant business results for their organizations. They are courageous in setting high standards for themselves and their companies and in nurturing new talent. As business leaders in their respective sectors, they set a standard for aspiring entrepreneurs to emulate as they build their businesses,” said Maria Otero, WVF’s founder and president. The organization supports women entrepreneurs through training, coaching and small business loans. “The Highest Leaf Awards celebrate women who represent the characteristics we try to instill in our own clients: bold, strategic thinking, creativity, and the ability to deal with uncertainty in order to grow to the next level of success,” said Ms. Otero. “Our honorees understand the importance of developing talent around you while pursuing your business goals. The Women’s Venture Fund is proud to recognize these inspiring women.”

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www.catalyst.org

Women of Color in Accounting: Exploring the Intersection of Race/Ethnicity and Gender

A

By Catalyst

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, employment of accountants and auditors is expected to grow faster than average for all occupations through the year 2014. With women and people of color receiving certification in accounting and joining the accounting industry at an increasing rate, firms are faced with the job of creating more inclusive environments in a traditionally white, male-dominated, “up-or-out” culture. Although a certain amount of attrition is built into the business model for professional services firms, to stay competitive, accounting firms can no longer afford high turnover among talented professionals whom they train only to become regretted losses. In Women of Color in Accounting, Catalyst continues its investigation of the experiences of women of color in professional services firms, which are characterized by a client-service focus and firmly entrenched “old boys’” networks. In the report Catalyst benchmarks the experiences of women of color against other demographic groups in the workforce. This examination lets us better understand the “intersectionality” that women of color experience: that is, how a person’s different attributes and characteristics interact with one another and inform personal and professional identities, experiences, and expectations about privilege and disadvantage in the workplace.

Findings Women of color had more in common with men of color than with white women in their attitudes regarding exclusivity of the work environment and their perceptions that practices intended to support inclusion were not as effective as they could be. • People of color felt less included in the accounting firm work environment than did whites. For example, they were more likely to perceive low expectations from their managers and double standards regarding performance evaluation. They felt less connected with influential mentors who could help advance their careers; even those people of color with mentors were likely to feel that their mentors lacked influence as compared with those of their white colleagues. Perhaps because of this, people of color felt more challenged than whites in understanding organizational politics. • In judging the firms’ responses to diversity and inclusion challenges, people of color were less likely than whites to perceive accountability and commitment. This is consistent with earlier

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Catalyst research that found that people of color tended to perceive diversity practices at their firms as well-intentioned but suffering from “imperfect execution.” • Some people of color believed that work-life practices at their firms lacked racial sensitivity. There were a few areas in which women of color and white women had similar experiences and perceptions. For example, they both perceived some level of social exclusion from the “old boys’” network and also perceived a lack of support from firms for their family responsibilities. Most importantly, women of color experienced “intersectionality” in that they faced many barriers to a greater extent than did white women or men of color. Many of these barriers relate to difficulty in navigating a client-based environment, and include lack of similar role models, stereotyping, a greater level of exclusion from networks, and difficulty in accessing high-visibility assignments and business development opportunities.

Methodology This study consisted of both qualitative (interviews and focus groups) and quantitative (survey) data collection. We conducted six interviews with senior partners and nine focus groups of professional employees at participating firms. For the quantitative portion of the study, a web survey was distributed to a sample of employees at some of the 20 largest (by revenue) accounting firms in the United States. One-half of the firms in the sample were from the top four accounting firms and the remainder came from the rest of the top twenty. Participating organizations fielded the survey between December 2006 and May 2007. The survey was sent to a total of 3,918 individuals, and 1,424 of them responded, for an overall response rate of 36.3 percent.

Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit corporate membership research and advisory organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive workplaces and expand opportunities for women and business. To download free copies of this and other Catalyst reports, visit www.catalyst.org. You may also sign up to receive our monthly email updates at news@catalyst.org.


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Supporting diversity, from our stockrooms to our boardrooms. At Sam’s Club®, we know important contributions can come from many different sources. That’s why we’re committed to recruiting exceptional candidates, regardless of their gender or race. We’re also committed to giving candidates the opportunity to advance—because those who work in the aisles of the Club may someday reach the halls of upper management. And after all, not only is promoting the success of a diverse workforce the right thing to do, but it strengthens Sam’s Club at every level.

SM


culture matters

You Can’t Say That By Craig Storti

A

An occupational hazard in my field, usually referred to as the field of intercultural communications, is the practice of generalizing. And the problem with generalizing, a perfectly legitimate activity, is that it feels uncomfortably close to and is often confused with another, quite unsavory activity: stereotyping. As we will see, these are in fact two very different activities, but the terms are often used interchangeably, and the latter has understandably given the former a very bad name. So much so that otherwise clever and savvy trainers, HR professionals, and, come to think of it, anyone who oversees or works with a multicultural workforce – these good folks are all a bit wary of the whole cultural conversation because they don’t know how to talk about culture, about distinct groups, without generalizing. And they’re right: It isn’t possible to talk meaningfully about culture and cultural differences – the shared values, mindset, and, to a lesser extent, the attitudinal and behavioral predispositions of a particular group or subgroup of people – it’s not possible to talk about culture without making sweeping general statements. I have done it repeatedly in the first five columns in this space (on India, Russia, China and Brazil), scores of excellent books do it all the time, and any honest practitioner will tell you that to deliver effective cultural training, you have to venture far out onto the slippery slope of generalizing. And before you know it you’re fending off charges of stereotyping. So what are we to do, we who aspire to help people of different nationalities understand their differences and work together more effectively? We who aspire to making the world a better place by showing people how to bridge the cultural gaps that divide us? The first thing we should do is to clearly distinguish between generalizing and stereotyping, and then not be afraid of the former, while studiously avoiding the latter. The essential difference is that while generalizing confines its observations to distinct groups of people with broadly shared characteristics, stereotyping is making judgments – 10

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positive and negative – about individuals based on previous experiences with their type. To put it another way, while we can safely make general statements about the Chinese or the Germans, let’s say, we cannot safely make generalizations about any particular Chinese or German national. As long as we realize the limitations of generalizations, that they only apply to groups and not to individuals, then they are a useful way of categorizing information. In making cultural generalizations, it’s usually a good idea to bring up the bell curve and note that while a particular generalization may apply to a lot of people in the middle of any given curve, it will not apply to whole swaths of folks on the right and left side of the bulge. And it will not always apply to anyone anywhere along the curve. Whenever I do intercultural training, I always note that in order to identify significant differences between people from different cultures – which is usually essential to addressing the issues that have given rise to the training in the first place – we have to make sweeping general statements. And then I tell participants that while “the observations we make today will be true in general, you will never meet a general person and you will never be in a general situation.”

But if you put cultural generalizations

in perspective—into the universal, cultural, personal continuum—you allow people their individuality (the personal dimension) even as you introduce the notion of cultural similarities. Under other circumstances, it should be noted, these same similarities are readily acknowledged, proudly celebrated, and fiercely defended; think ethnic food and dance, national pride (in the Olympics, for example), or shared outrage at national slurs.


And then I often add that the single most important factor influencing behavior in any given situation is not culture but the circumstances. All other things being equal, you may be able to guess how someone from a given culture is going to behave in a given situation based on cultural generalizations, but all other things are almost never equal. This does not render cultural generalizations meaningless; it just means that they are only one of several factors to keep in mind in any particular situation, albeit one which many people may not be aware of and would not otherwise take into consideration. It’s also important in any conversation about culture to place the subject of national or ethnic identity in context. I usually use a graphic like this:

TYPES OF BEHAVIOR

UNIVERSAL

CULTURAL

Eating

Eating from one’s own plate

And then I point out that in some ways, we are all alike, no matter what cultural, racial, religious, ethnic, generational background we come from. We are one species, homo sapiens, and we share numerous characteristics common to all human beings. This is why many interactions between people of otherwise vastly different cultural and personal backgrounds go smoothly: because we have a great deal in common. Then there are some ways that we are different from everyone else but like the group, subgroup, clan with whom we share a common background, usually referred to as “the people like us.” We are not like them in all ways, of course, but we are closer to them in many ways than we are to the people of other groups, subgroups, and clans with whom we have no shared history or background. And finally there are countless ways that we are like

no one else, including the people like us and the rest of the human race, because ultimately we are all individuals. Which means we would be like everyone in some ways, like the people like us in some ways, and quite unique in many others. While we can generalize about the middle group, we can never know if a generalization is going to apply to any particular individual. To insist that it does is what most people mean by stereotyping. All that sounds pretty reasonable, you may be thinking, so why does generalizing make people so nervous – apart, that is, from the similarity to stereotyping? I think it’s because people, especially Americans, are very attached to and protective of their individuality, and generalizing – putting people into boxes – threatens that sense of uniqueness and generates a strong reaction. But if you put cultural generalizations in perspective – into the universal, cultural, personal continuum – you allow people their individuality (the personal dimension) even as you introduce the notion PERSONAL of cultural similarities. Under other Eating in circumstances, it should be noted, front of these same similarities are readily acthe TV knowledged, proudly celebrated, and fiercely defended; think ethnic food and dance, national pride (in the Olympics, for example), or shared outrage at national slurs. It’s only when culture is put forth as defining the whole person that it is rightly rejected as stereotyping. So we should not be afraid of the cultural conversation; we should just be clear about the context. Indeed, as long as people are afraid to bring up culture in our politically correct world, then we ignore one of the major influences on behavior. That makes about as much sense as a baking show that never mentions flour. You can hear the critics now: “But all flours aren’t alike.” Right. I’ll try the cake with flour. PDJ Craig Storti, a consultant and trainer in the field of intercultural communications, is the author of seven books. His latest, Speaking of India, describes the common cultural flashpoints when Indians work together with North Americans and western Europeans. He can be contacted at craig@craigstorti.com.

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11


from my perspective…

What is Your Crucible Moment? By Linda Jimenez

R

Chief Diversity Officer and Staff Vice President – Diversity & Inclusion WellPoint, Inc.

Recently I was involved in a planning session with a group of peers and colleagues. We were discussing “crucible moments.” Crucible moments are those that define the relationships between a leader and followers, a leader and peers, a leader and superiors, and they also characterize the leader in their own individual capacity. Throughout our discussion, it was apparent that we each had very significant moments that covered the gamut of work-life experiences and emotions, and interestingly there was a central theme in all of them – the willingness to unequivocally confront a major anxiety or area of concern.

officials are desperately seeking a “leader” to step up and assume responsibility for the myriad aspects of the disaster. Local officials, residents and many Americans across our nation blame not only BP, but also the dozens of U.S. federal agencies involved. There is clearly a lack of leadership as the local efforts to clean up the oil and prevent more from reaching the shore are hindered by a maze of regulations and poor coordination. In corporate America, “crucible moments” can occur without forewarning and can involve many people, or may simply be the interaction between two people. They can arise because of external events such as downturns, layoffs, hostile takeovers, and bankruptcies, or simply materialize during a regularly scheduled staff meeting where the discussion suddenly becomes tense and confrontational. Such triggers may be positive or negative and can vary in terms of moral and emotional intensity, especially if there is a diversity component attached, such as race, gender, religion, age, sexual orientation, or language, to name a few. Such incidents can cause internal struggles where individuals strive to retain a sense of self and order as they deal with the anxieties associated with instability, disorder, and unpredictability. In these crucible moments, people want to believe that someone will step up to be a leader and take responsibility.

We’ve all witnessed examples of “crucible moments” and observed leaders who stepped forward, while we have seen others fail to seize the opportunity. For years, the paragon of “crucible moments” was the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Exxon experienced significant loss of corporate reputation and suffered severe financial loss because of its leadership’s failure to appropriately handle the oil spill and its detrimental effects. Most of us can also recall President George W. Bush and Mayor Giuliani rising to the occasion after the 9/11/2001 attacks and how each exhibited leadership and strength that helped inspire a nation to deal with this large catastrophe.

People want role models displaying strengths, providing hope, and showing progress – simply put, they want courageous leaders. In my perspective, courage is the emotional strength that involves the exercise of will to accomplish goals in the face of opposition.

Two weeks after Hurricane Katrina flooded New Orleans, when the federal emergency response was still woefully lacking, TIME magazine’s website published a cartoon of a man standing waist-deep in water, holding a sign that implored, “Leadership Please.” The next day, Michael Brown, the embattled head of FEMA, resigned, which was the culmination of another moment when an opportunity to lead was not seized.

When a crucible moment emanates from a diversity tension, a diversity leader is acknowledged by his/her bravery in that defining moment by facing the threats, challenges or fierce conversations. Courageous leaders speak up for what they think is right even when there is opposition from followers, peers, superiors, customers or others. They show persistence and will always overcome obstacles to complete challenging tasks or projects.

When Don Imus made his infamous remarks about the Rutger’s women’s basketball team in 2007, and was subsequently fired, three companies responded to their “crucible moment.” Procter & Gamble, American Express and General Motors, led by their unwavering sense of commitment to diversity, withdrew their advertising dollars from the radio show. Their collective action ultimately resulted in the cancellation of Imus’s program and his termination from the station.

A courageous leader is one who, in the face of a “crucible moment,” has earned the right to lead not by relying on the use of hard power, detailed supervision, or control mechanisms, but through internal strength of character. PDJ

It’s been more than ninety days since the BP oil well exploded and began spewing crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Angry local 12

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Linda Jimenez is a native of San Antonio, Texas, and attended the University of Texas at Austin where she received her B.A. with honors. She is also a graduate of the University of Texas School of Law and has spent 20 years specializing in labor and employment law.


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human equity™

Human Equity and Talent Differentiation By Trevor Wilson Author and Global Human Equity Strategist TWI Inc.

“I am convinced that along with being the most efficient and effective way to run your company, talent differentiation also happens to be the fairest and kindest. Ultimately it makes winners out of everyone.”

I

In our last article I wrote about why focusing on talent is the most important element of moving an organization beyond diversity to human equity, where we maximize on the unique difference of the total workforce. In this article, we explore the concept of talent differentiation as the vehicle for this transition. Talent differentiation first showed up in the widely quoted 1997 McKinsey & Company report “The War for Talent.” This ground-breaking report described the challenges faced by companies today, such as increased competition to attract and retain talented people where the economy is growing and the natural workforce supply is on the decline. The report predicted an unprecedented war for talent which would force organizations to work harder at identifying and retaining their best performers. This is where talent differentiation strategies came in. Properly implemented, talent differentiation becomes a key element of an effective strategy to maximize on the potential of everyone in the workforce. As shown below, the core of talent differentiation is to determine the strategies that ultimately lead to the most effective management and use of these various categories of talent in the workforce. • High Potential/High Performers represent up to 20% of the workforce. This group delivers up to 80% of productive output and is the key retention threat as the labor market heats up. In light of their contribution, the management strategy for the high potential/high performers is one of investment, i.e., do anything it will take to avoid losing them to the competition. Ironically our Talent Differential Chart

—Jack Welsh

experience shows that most managers spend the least amount of time with this group, thinking they are self sufficient and require little management attention. • High Potential/Low Performers represent approximately 30% of the workforce. This group requires the most development, as these individuals are critical to future succession planning and if handled well become the next stars of the organization. • Low Potential/High Performers represent approximately 40% of the workforce. These solid performers are critical to an organization’s success. Although they may lack the potential to grow beyond their current position, they are important contributors to the organization’s success. Management needs to find creative ways to reward their contribution in order to keep them engaged while avoiding the dreaded Peter Principle (i.e., promoting good employees to their level of incompetence). • Low Performers/Low Potential represent about 10% of the workforce. They operate as a drain on productive output because they frequently require management attention but for the wrong reasons. In our experience, management spends too much time with these individuals by responding to the associated problems caused by their under-performance. This is the group that should be acted on quickly because they poison the environment for the other productive employees. As Jack Welsh states, “protecting under-performers always backfires.” For talent differentiation to work, managers have to be shown how to better utilize the natural strengths and talents of their employees by first conducting a talent differentiation analysis. This is where the SHAPE V talent model highlighted in the last article can help. In our next article, we will continue to look at SHAPE V and the innovative tools that make it work. Done properly, talent differentiation can go a long way toward bringing human equity to life and unleashing the full potential of the entire workforce. Human equity means talent differentiation. PDJ In 1996 Trevor started TWI Inc. to specialize in the area of equity and diversity as a business issue. In the same year, Trevor published a highly acclaimed book entitled Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity. The firm’s clients include some of the most progressive global employers. TWI’s Human Equity™ approach was instrumental in catapulting Coca-Cola’s South African division to the top performing division worldwide. Visit www.twiinc.com for more information.

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CAREERS AT SHELL The most successful problem solvers look at things differently and see solutions no one else can. Who would have thought to use fish protein to stop gas freezing in subsea pipes? One of our people did. And right now we’re looking for more people who can bring a fresh perspective to the energy challenge. We’ll provide training, support and career choices to develop your potential. We’ll get you working with some of our most accomplished problem solvers. And together we can help build a responsible energy future. Think further. For more information and to apply online, please visit www.shell.com/careers. Shell is an equal opportunity employer.

“Shell provided me with the opportunity to handle challenges and manage issues in a dynamic refinery environment. I count it a privilege to be part of this globalized entity and I was convinced that my journey in Shell will be filled with continual learnings, growth and never-ending opportunities to contribute.”

“With the open career progression opportunity, every employee of Shell can choose his/her own field as per their interests.”

“The best thing about working in Shell is the balance between life and work; between exposure and depth of experience offered to employees, and between making profits and caring for its employees and the community.”

Gloria Wang Environment Officer – HSSEQ Department

Jasmine Tiwari Senior Associate Researcher

Kishoore Jehan Marketing Executive


viewpoint

Diversity in the Workspace: Creating an Engaging Generational Culture of Success

W By Pamela Arnold,

President

American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc.

When leading and managing four generations (yes four!) within an organization’s workspace, it is important for the success of the organization to keep in mind that “one size does not fit all, or one single approach does not fit all” when creating an environment that recognizes and embraces generational diversity. Realistically, a team’s dynamics – whether it’s a team of four or fourteen – can be multigenerational, intergenerational or cross generational at the same time. Organizations that leverage these differences and similarities are able to hire and retain talent, remain competitive and create new markets. The American Institute for Managing Diversity, in partnership with Tyson Foods, completed a research study on “Approaches to Cross–Generational Employee Engagement” which defines the following terms:

• Know the demographics of the company and community. • Acknowledge differences in generations’ perception of leadership and align to goals and objectives of teams and departments. • Leverage the generational differences and embrace diversity of thought. • Partner with Employee Resource Groups for on-going feedback and information. Tailor the Management Approach •O  btain board and leadership support. •B  uild programs for management/leadership on-going learning and application. •T  hink skills – not age! •M  anage and motivate talent. Develop Programs and Provide Resources • Develop a variety of mentoring programs – promoting two way learning experiences.

Multigenerational – Several generations coexisting in an environment or place.

• Offer flexible work /benefit options – flexible work schedules, family leave, telecommuting.

Intergenerational or cross generational – Dynamics between or across generational groups in an environment.

• Offer flexible learning and development options – learning and using technology, computer based and instructor-led training, seminars, conferences.

You may have teams that fit some or all of the generational descriptions above. How do you harness the similarities, differences, experiences and behaviors together to yield the creativity and innovation that brings success for the employees? Leaders? The organization? The Community? Just as navigation systems can guide you to your destination, having a strategy that connects to the organization’s vision, mission, goals and objectives, can help you achieve a culture that successfully leverages generational engagement for strong business results. Some guidelines that can help your organization: Identify the Organization’s Generational Challenges •C  onduct meetings with leaders on how to identify cross generational conflicts. •C  onduct employee assessments to identify areas of conflict, disagreement and similarities. •D  etermine approaches to assess generational challenges. •A  sk Questions – Who and what is in the workplace mix? Why is there a conflict? What is the cross generational conflict? Understand the Cross Generational Differences and Similarities •U  nderstand and acknowledge the needs of each generational group. 16

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Organizations recognize the need for having a strong infrastructure that includes having open communication, recognition and rewards programs, measurement and a diverse recruitment strategy. These are critical building pieces for successful cross generational engagement. There are companywide benefits to creating an engaging generational culture. The guidelines listed will give you a framework to start with and can be worked on simultaneously. HR, talent management, chief diversity officers, learning teams and the managers will benefit from the engagement of the generational teams and will see the benefits of the various initiatives in the productivity of PDJ the work and the quality and engagement of the associates. Reference Tran, N. & Harrington, M. 2009, A Study of Approaches to Cross Generational Employee Engagement

Pamela W. Arnold is President of the American Institute for Managing Diversity, Inc. The organization is a 501 (c) (3) public interest non-profit dedicated to advancing diversity thought leadership through research, education, and public outreach. AIMD works to strengthen our communities and institutions through effective diversity management. For more information, please visit www.aimd.org.


Bring It!

Your Talents. Your Ideas. Your Passion. Thu, Verizon, Marketing

At Verizon, we want you to bring your diverse talents, experiences, backgrounds, and viewpoints to work. It’s your smarter leadership, bolder innovations, and faster results that will move our business forward at the speed of FiOS! So, bring it in and bring it on – bring your diversity to work at Verizon!

Verizon Diversity Leadership. Innovation. Results.


Thanks to You,

A beautiful day at the park feels like a lifetime of sunshine.

It's just one more place we see the benefits of doing what we do. WellPoint salutes all the recipients of the 2010 International Innovation in Diversity Award for their commitment to identifying new and unique ways to make diversity and inclusion part of the fabric of the American workplace. WellPoint is proud of our dedication to diversity. Still, with all that we've achieved, we will always strive to better attract, retain and develop top diverse talent. One way is through our Associate Resource Groups (ARGs), where employees work to develop and sustain our culture of inclusion, enhance and maximize customer relationships, and create and leverage leadership opportunities for all of our associates. At WellPoint, diversity is more than just the 'right thing to do.' It's the way we approach business, how we interact within our communities, how we mobilize our employees and, more than anything, why we appreciate moments like this. For more information, visit: www.wellpoint.com/diversity 速 Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. 速Registered Trademark, Profiles in Diversity Journal 速 Registered Trademark, DiversityInc Media LLC 息 2010 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved. EOE


A conversation with

ANGELA BRALY

Serving approximately 34 million Americans in its affiliated health plans, WellPoint is the nation’s largest health benefits company by membership. COMPANY Name: WellPoint, Inc. Headquarters: Indianapolis, Indiana Web site: www.WellPoint.com Primary Business or Industry: Health Benefits 2009 RevenueS: $60.8 billion

Its mission is to improve the lives of the people it serves and the health of its communities. Every associate helps achieve that mission by meeting the needs of the company’s diverse stakeholders – employers, members, physicians, shareholders and the multicultural markets in which the company does business. Leading that charge is Chair, President and CEO, Angela Braly, who has built a diverse workforce that reflects the varied communities WellPoint serves. PDJ sat down with Braly to find out why diversity and inclusion isn’t just a strategy, but a fundamental way of doing business at WellPoint.

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Interview

Angela Braly

WellPoint, Inc.

WellPoint Chair, President, and CEO Angela Braly helped plant a community garden at a Boys and Girls Club facility in Indianapolis during WellPoint’s annual Community Service Day.

Questions and Answers

What D&I innovations has WellPoint, Inc. planned for 2010? WellPoint recognizes that innovative solutions to today’s health care challenges are driven by the needs of a diverse marketplace with multicultural and multi-generational customers. At WellPoint, our mission is to improve the lives of the people we serve and the health of our communities. We see our role as simplifying the connection between health, care, and value for our customers. In health care, how people understand these connections – and how their communities manage these connections – are very different across racial, cultural, gender, and economic lines. Addressing health care disparities is one of the ways WellPoint is committed to improving the health of our communities. For example, WellPoint has conducted extensive research among its African-American and Hispanic members, with the ultimate goal of enhancing its diabetes management programs by making them more culturally relevant. We are working on creating culturally relevant communications in easy-to-understand language to more effectively engage multicultural populations, offer education and support, and empower them to adopt healthier lifestyles and take charge of their health. Most company leaders say diversity drives business results. What part did diversity and inclusion play in your company’s 2009 growth/earnings? I think that for business people, remembering that diversity produces positive business results is critical. WellPoint recognizes that by continuing to incorporate diversity into the company’s culture, we are better positioned to deliver innovative solutions to our customers. My team and I have a steadfast commitment to fostering a diverse work environment in which 20

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racial and ethnic minorities, women, people with disabilities, and LGBT individuals enjoy an atmosphere of inclusion and respect. WellPoint’s Strategic Diversity Model is based around three areas of focus – our workforce, our workplace, and our marketplace – because it is a fundamental part of how we do business. One diversity initiative we launched in 2009 that will help us drive growth is our Life division’s national gold-level sponsorship of The Wounded Warrior Disabled Sports Project. The project provides year-round sports programs for severely wounded service men and women, including ski and water sports events. This is one example of how our company fulfills our mission to improve the lives of the people we serve and the health of our communities, while increasing our market visibility to help us continue to grow.

GLOBAL / MARKET ISSUES Please describe WellPoint’s global presence: WellPoint is the largest health benefits company, by membership, in the U.S., with approximately 34 million medical members. One in nine Americans receives coverage for their medical care through WellPoint’s affiliated health plans. WellPoint is a Blue Cross or Blue Cross Blue Shield licensee in 14 states, and we offer a broad range of medical and specialty products. WellPoint’s dental subsidiary, DeCare Dental, is the first American company to offer dental benefits in Europe, and it also manages the DeCare Dental International Emergency Dental Program, which is available to clients throughout Europe, Africa, South America and Asia. In early 2008, WellPoint formed a partnership with other health plans and entered the

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market in China to begin providing third-party administrative and other consultative services to insurance companies operating in China. In today’s marketplace, are there any particular challenges selling or producing your products? Rising health care costs put a burden on hardworking individuals and families, and now, more than ever, our customers are looking to us to create more value for their health care benefits. Also, health care reform has created questions for our members about how it will impact them. And with all of these issues, the rapidly changing demographics of the markets we serve demand that we have a workforce that reflects these markets. Our diverse workforce optimizes our ability to deliver on our mission, as associates from different backgrounds, with different life experiences can offer fresh perspectives on emerging health care challenges and opportunities. We ask ourselves each day what we can do to improve health, improve care, and improve value for our diverse customer base, which includes employers, individuals, and seniors, as well as educational and public entities, labor groups, federal employee health and benefit programs, national employers, and state-run programs servicing low-income, highrisk and under-served markets. How does a company in an industry as fastchanging as yours keep up with diversity development throughout the organization? In a large, established organization like WellPoint, one key challenge for leaders is to design the organization as a system that can grow successfully, keeping in mind the ever-changing dynamics of diversity within the workforce, the workplace, and the marketplace. Minorities, women, and immigrants currently


Interview

Angela Braly

WellPoint, Inc.

I am so proud of our focus on diversity—from the grassroots efforts of our Associate Resource Group and Ambassador programs to the

commitment at the highest levels of our company.

— Linda Jimenez, Chief Diversity Officer and Staff Vice President—Diversity & Inclusion

make up more than 50% of the U.S. workforce, and these groups are projected to make up approximately 85% within the next ten years. Moreover, the workplace is becoming ever more global. The opportunity for WellPoint associates to share unique experiences and perspectives offers WellPoint the promise of innovation and growth. WellPoint’s diversity strategy seeks to address three primary questions: 1. How do we ensure that we are attracting and retaining top talent that is representative of our diverse markets? 2. What obstacles exist that may prevent people from participating fully, working effectively, and developing relationships and alliances in the context of diversity? 3. How can we create conditions that enable differences to be used as a resource for learning within groups and across business units? Are there unique opportunities for you in implementing diversity programs? Absolutely. Diversity management is a fundamental part of how we do business at WellPoint. Approximately one-in-three residents of the U.S. self-identify as African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific American, or Latino. The communities we serve are experiencing demographic changes and economic challenges that necessitate having a workforce that reflects and understands our customers’ needs. We know from the Institute of Medicine that racial and ethnic minorities receive lower-quality health care. As a result, we are creating outreach programs that help WellPoint to identify, analyze, and reduce these health inequalities. In particular, we have partnered with physicians to increase their awareness of health disparities, and to provide resources to help guide better, more culturally competent care. Diverse perspectives, experiences, and ideas allow us to deliver innovative products and services. One case in point is our telemedicine

programs in Georgia, Virginia, and California, which increase access to specialty health care and improve the timeliness of diagnosis and treatment for traditionally underserved rural patients. These are just a few examples of how our diversity enables us to simplify the connection between health, care and value for our customers.

LEADERSHIP What resources are allocated on diversity? We have a dedicated Diversity and Inclusion Team, managed by WellPoint’s Chief Diversity Officer, Linda Jimenez. The team includes a diversity program manager, an EEO compliance consultant, and an affirmative action plan consultant. We also recognize that diversity is a “shared responsibility” among all associates in the organization. We have more than 200 Diversity and Inclusion Ambassadors, deployed enterprise-wide, who volunteer to infuse the corporate diversity strategy in their unique work locations. We also have seven associate resource groups (ARGs) that support, not only personal and professional development for their members, but also the company’s overall business strategies. We utilize a Customer InSights Team to develop links with our multicultural customers, and we have a team dedicated to understanding and addressing health care disparities/health care equities from a multicultural and multigenerational perspective. How do you believe D&I impacts your company’s bottom line? We recognize that diversity is not just a “nice thing” to do or a stilted response to compliance demands, but that diversity makes good business sense and is good for the bottom line. Diversity influences every aspect of our business – from member care and service, to new business development and supplier relationships, to recruitment and career advancement – and ultimately helps WellPoint keep a competitive advantage. More importantly, superior

performance begins with superior talent. Thinking differently and appreciating diverse thinking in others is a strategic cornerstone for leveraging top-notch talent. Being inclusive and responding to the perspectives of a broad range of people when solving today’s competitive business challenges is a survival skill, not a luxury. What qualities do you look for when hiring management? How do you measure attitudes? When evaluating managerial talent, WellPoint assesses the skill sets the individual can bring to our organization, the diversity of thought and experiences they will share with our team, and the leadership shadow they will cast upon those around them. There are many dimensions to strong leadership, and at WellPoint, living our core values demonstrates the key qualities that make a manager successful in our organization. By consistently living our core values of Customer First; Integrity; Personal Accountability for Excellence; One Company, One Team; and Continuous Improvement, our managers are able to get results by knowing what really matters. In order to be effective, we know it means that the managers we hire need to have a strong awareness – of themselves and of those around them. Leaders must recognize that diversity has an impact on organizational performance, and by leveraging diversity of thought and culture, their teams will continue to enjoy great success together. WellPoint measures the attitudes of our associates and managers annually in the context of our Associate Engagement Survey. In 2009, results from our survey showed a 77% Manager Effectiveness score, which demonstrates that our managers are exhibiting the right behaviors and showing up in the right way for our associates. Who chairs your company’s diversity council? Does your lead diversity officer report to you directly? Members of the Executive Leadership Team

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Interview

Angela Braly

WellPoint, Inc.

WellPoint attends or sponsors multiple diversity career fairs each year, such as the annual Military & Disabled Veterans EmployAbility career fair at Wright State University.

serve as executive sponsors of our various Associate Resource Groups (ARGs) or as members of the executive steering team for review and approval of business plans for prospective ARGs. WellPoint’s Diversity team reports to the CEO through the Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer. What accountability do you employ to meet diversity objectives? How is this linked with compensation? We link manager compensation to diversity and inclusion by cascading goals to increase minority representation in leadership, from the CEO down to my direct reports and their leadership teams’ performance plans. There is also a goal to increase supplier diversity partners in the performance plans of the CEO, CFO, and CDO. In addition, our health services director and CDO have a shared goal to increase cultural competency across our workforce and to reduce ethnic health disparities. We work very hard to ensure that we don’t set arbitrary diversity goals across the company; instead we seek to ensure that the right goals are integrated into respective business units so that it becomes a natural way for us to conduct business. Do you create and maintain management continuity rosters for promotable individuals? How do you ensure diversity candidates are included? Our enterprise-wide succession planning process for our top 2,200 associates provides robust resume and assessment information that helps us identify and support our most talented leaders. High potential talent and their career paths are discussed at least annually in team talent 22

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review sessions held in all parts of our business. Our succession planning and Diversity and Inclusion teams work closely to track and report (including reporting to our Board) our progress on identifying, developing, promoting, and retaining diverse leaders. Our executive development program also includes long-term development planning, coaching, and mentoring – and we consistently select a highly diverse group for inclusion in that program. We also strive to present a gender- and racially diverse candidate slate for open leadership positions at all levels – using a variety of internal tools to identify possible candidates, and a variety of external agencies to help us source diverse external talent. What factors make you confident that you and your team have developed momentum for the organization in the right direction? What is the vision for the company? At WellPoint, we are proud of, and encouraged by, the many recognitions we have received for our efforts to promote diversity and inclusion. We think our success is due to the fact that we see diversity management as more than just a strategy – it’s a fundamental part of how we do business. Focusing on diversity helps us to better understand and meet the health care needs of the unique communities we serve – while actually becoming part of their cultural fabric. I am so encouraged that a commitment to diversity is shared by my leadership team. In the January/February 2010 issue of this Journal, a member of our legal team shared that our General Counsel, John Cannon, approached him shortly after joining our company and asked him to help establish a diversity team within our Legal department. That is the sort of individual initiative and commitment that makes diversity a reality in a company and not just an aspiration. Our vision for the future is to ensure that managing diversity is seen as a strategic business

practice, not just a set of projects or initiatives. For example, understanding what impact the lack of cultural competence or health disparities has on the quality, access, and cost of care for an increasingly diverse customer base – that’s at the core of our business. We take diversity very seriously, and that’s why we will continue to work hard every day – through diversity – to improve the lives of the people we serve and the health of our communities.

EMPLOYEE INCLUSIVENESS How are employees more involved in the company than they were two years ago? How do the human stories circulate in-house / celebrate success? Associate Resource Groups (ARGs) play a key role in building a culture of inclusion and in surfacing personal stories and successes of our associates. In the last couple of years, seven ARGs have formed at WellPoint: • ABLE (Abilities Beyond Limited Expectations); • ANGLE (Associate Network for Gay and Lesbian Equality); • PRIDE (African American ARG); • SOMOS (Hispanic/Latino ARG); • VOW (Veterans Organization of WellPoint);

WellPoint’s “Challenge Coins” are distributed to WellPoint associates in the armed services or to associates with family members in the armed services.

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Interview

Angela Braly

WellPoint, Inc.

Jim Bixler (center), WellPoint Vice President and executive sponsor of the Veterans of WellPoint (VOW) Associate Resource Group, presents a check for $100,000 to Larry Muncie, President of the United Service Organization (USO).

• WOW (Women of WellPoint); and • HYPE (Healthcare Young Professional Exchange). It’s great to see the energy and synergies that these groups have generated. In such a large organization, in which many associates work remotely and many are based at different locations than their managers and teams, these groups are truly creating a sense of community. Associates are connecting across the enterprise; they are getting involved in business projects outside of their respective areas; they are learning about the business, and they are having meaningful conversations about mentoring, and about barriers for inclusion and for growth and advancement within the organization. Success stories are being spread through these networks, and associates are finding more opportunities to showcase and develop leadership skills by getting involved in the ARGs. In addition, the success of our Diversity and Inclusion Ambassador Program, which has been in place for a number of years, was recently highlighted through the establishment, in 2009, of the annual Ambassador of the Year and Team of the Year awards. These awards highlight the exceptional local efforts and contributions under our diversity initiative by WellPoint volunteers and diversity champions. Sometimes diversity is referred to as a ‘numbers game’ – how does your company know its culture is not just tied up in numbers? Johnetta Cole, a prominent diversity advocate, is often quoted as saying, “We need to move beyond counting heads to making sure that every head counts,” and she is absolutely right. The point of measuring our progress under workforce demographics as it relates to our organizational culture is in order to drive change. Many mindsets are working within the organization and until you measure them, you don’t know exactly what they are and what

WellPoint Chief Human Resources Officer Randy Brown (pictured front left) meets with the leaders of WellPoint’s Associate Resource Groups (ARG) at the company’s headquarters as part of the ARG Summit.

they influence. We want to know if people perceive our organization as having a glass ceiling, or sticky floors, or compressed walls. In other words, we want to know what are the obstacles to moving upward, forward, and toward more satisfaction in our workplace? Diversity and numbers – it is not about representation but about utilization. Diversity isn’t something to be finished. It’s an ongoing aspect of organizational culture. The real value from diversity is using differences to the company’s advantage. It’s not about having the company look different, but having it work better.

a voice; therefore inclusiveness, rather than exclusiveness, is the hallmark of our diverse workplace environment. Can you describe your method for orienting new hires into your culture, and enriching employees’ awareness or introducing new issues? Our core values of Customer First; Integrity; Personal Accountability for Excellence; One Company, One Team; and Continuous

How do you deal with those who may perceive inclusion programs for underrepresented groups as being exclusionary for others? WellPoint’s definition of diversity is allencompassing and embodies racial and gender diversity, along with age, religion, disability, work/life experiences, military status, etc., just to name a few. In support of this definition, all our Associate Resource Groups are all-inclusive and open to any WellPoint associate. Achieving diversity is not simply a matter of advocating the position of a particular group; it is equally important to engage all associates from Associate Jamison Torok, a founding member of many different WellPoint’s ABLE Associate Resource Group for people backgrounds. It is with disabilities, was named “Employee of the Year” in important for all our 2009 by CAREERS & the disABLED magazine for associates to have his extensive volunteer work. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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Interview

Angela Braly

WellPoint, Inc.

WellPoint executive vice presidents Dijuana Lewis and Wayne DeVeydt (front row) at the 2010 Bowling for Scholars fundraiser for the Indiana chapter of the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). WellPoint raised more than $47,000 to benefit 60,000 students. (Pictured in the back row from left to right: WellPoint Staff Vice President Beau Garverick, Senior Vice President John Gallina, and Vice President Tracy Nolan.)

Improvement, are integral to how we conduct business and serve our members. It is very important to ensure everyone in our organization shares and understands the rationale behind these values and the behaviors supporting them. Starting before ‘day one,’ we provide our new hires online access to information and resources about the company, our people, and our corporate culture. New hire orientation takes place at the local level on a weekly basis, and we educate our new associates on our mission and the values we believe enable us to deliver against that mission. Over 92% of WellPoint associates have completed a one-day Culture Workshop, focused on defining our business strategy and our core values and linking them to actual behaviors and attitudes in the workplace. After the onboarding period, these messages are reinforced in many different ways so that our associates stay connected and aligned. We have an online associate newsletter published three times a year, and a robust and dynamic internet and intranet site, which is refreshed daily with internal as well as external features which are relevant to our associates, our company, and

our industry. This is particularly important, because WellPoint’s workplace environment is becoming increasingly virtual, with many ‘work at home’ associates, virtual teams, and larger project teams that rely on collaboration of associates enterprise-wide. How are employees’ opinions solicited/ valued? Do you have an employee ‘suggestion box’ or system, and how is it monitored and responded to? We solicit associates’ opinions annually through our associate engagement survey. We also provide several means for associates to provide feedback, suggestions, and ask questions, both through our intranet site and our company ombudsman. From time to time, we receive questions about our diversity and inclusion initiatives and our diversity management practices. Associates either use our Corporate Diversity Shared Mailbox or write directly to our corporate diversity staff. Our intranet Diversity site contains a Diversity Mailbox where we post questions and responses on a regular basis. Several business areas also utilize the White Board technology to spark innovative business approaches and solutions and capture ideas from associates. In late 2008, WellPoint launched the effort “Building A Better WellPoint,” and we asked associates to send us ideas for ways to improve our efficiency and effectiveness across the enterprise. Hundreds responded, and we are already implementing many of those ideas. In addition, the Executive Leadership Team meets regularly with our Associate Resource Groups, and every quarter, I schedule personal meetings with groups of associates.

Can you name specific ways WellPoint supports upward development toward management positions? A robust succession planning process is pivotal to our efforts to diversify and strengthen our talent pipeline. Succession planning includes WellPoint directors and above. Our top 2,200 leaders have a year-round opportunity to share their resume information and to express interest in positions at any level and in any area of the company. The Executive Leadership Team carves out time to engage in robust talent calibration sessions where each of my direct reports solicits feedback on their team members. It’s a forum for us to have rich discussions about our talent and the strengths and opportunities of our pipeline. We definitely look at our diversity representation during these talent calibration discussions. How does WellPoint bring women and minority employees into the fabric of the organization? What programs are in place to advance women and minorities? WellPoint is truly committed to recruiting people of color, women, people with disabilities, veterans, and other diversity dimensions into its workforce. The Executive and Leadership Recruitment Team has a goal of improving racial/gender representation in front-line, mid-level, and staff VP and higher positions. In addition, we have a dedicated diversity and inclusion team who work in collaboration with our Talent Acquisition team to build and execute sourcing strategies in support of EEO/ AAP utilization needs for targeted areas by state and by job function.

WellPoint Vice President Tammy Truxillo Tucker accepts a plaque from LATINA Style magazine’s publisher, Robert E. Bard, in recognition of WellPoint being named to the “LATINA Style 50” 2009, a list of the fifty best companies for Latinas to work for in the United States.

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Interview

WellPoint attends more than 50 career events on an annual basis, partnering with numerous professional organizations and career conferences, as well as a wide array of colleges and universities, and also takes full advantage of diverse job boards and social networking sites. Some of WellPoint’s best practices for retention are focused on career development and encouraging all associates to excel in their careers. All participants in WellPoint’s accelerated leadership programs have access to mentors and executive coaching to help them focus on skills, competencies, and behaviors that will help them continue to be successful in their careers.

SUPPLIER / COMMUNITY / CUSTOMERS What is your commitment to minority suppliers? Do you set specific percentage or dollar targets? How do you measure success? Diversity in our supplier base is an important part of WellPoint’s commitment to diversity. A wide range of suppliers is needed to support our business operations. Through our Supplier Diversity Program, we are dedicated to diversifying our supplier base to include minority-, women-, veteran-, service disabled veteran-, and LGBT-owned businesses wherever possible. We actively work to include diverse suppliers in every bidding opportunity. Over the past year, our program has continued to grow and become an integral component in all areas of the enterprise. Supplier diversity continues to be a requirement for all procurement opportunities, including requests for proposals and contracts. We have increased the number of Tier One suppliers reporting Tier Two diverse spend to us by 80% over 2008. We leveraged Supplier Diversity Champions in our business areas. All of the Champions are senior leaders (Vice Presidents and above) in their business areas. Our supplier diversity initiative is one of the building blocks that support WellPoint’s overall success. We look forward to continued growth in our program. How do you educate/promote diversity and inclusion for vendors, customers, or the general public? WellPoint identifies and increases its annual supplier diversity goal each year. The Supplier Diversity Champions have the responsibility

to communicate with their associates on how they can assist WellPoint in meeting these goals and expectations in every sourcing opportunity. In addition, Supplier Diversity created a business case that has been communicated to the Executive Leadership Team and Supplier Diversity Champions. The value of supplier diversity has also been incorporated in the ELT members’ performance goals, as well as the overall performance goals for our business units. WellPoint also supports the training of diverse suppliers financially through our sponsorships and memberships paid to advocacy organizations like the National Minority Supplier Development Council, Womens’ Business Enterprise National Council, National Association of Women Business Owners, and others who host business and development programming for diverse suppliers. WellPoint has provided booth space at opportunity fairs for diverse suppliers and has invited suppliers to join us as guests at tables we sponsor

Angela Braly

WellPoint, Inc.

Service Day to address direct needs in our diverse communities. In 2009, approximately 3,500 associates, and their families and friends volunteered time to more than 180 projects in 107 cities spanning 29 states and the District of Columbia. Volunteer tasks were developed in partnership with the March of Dimes, United Way, and many other nonprofit organizations, including staffing March for BabiesSM walks, supporting efforts to reduce obesity in children with the Boys & Girls Clubs, cleaning up parks, engaging children in health activities, disaster preparedness, and assisting at community health clinics that serve the uninsured. In 2007, WellPoint introduced an enterprise-wide initiative – the Healthy Helpings Food Drive – to support our local and regional foods banks. In 2009, over 22,967 pounds of food was donated by WellPoint associates, which represented a 47% increase in contributions collected in 2008. During the 2009 holiday season, WellPoint made a generous

Diversity and numbers – it is not about representation but about utilization. Diversity isn’t something to be finished.

It’s an ongoing aspect of organizational culture.

— Angela Braly, Chair, President, and CEO

at Supplier Diversity advocacy organization events. In 2009, WellPoint’s commitment to diversity was featured on The Profiles Series, an award-winning television series hosted by Lou Gosset, Jr., airing on public television stations. Are there additional ways you demonstrate your commitment to the communities you serve? Established in 2000, the WellPoint Foundation is a private, nonprofit philanthropic organization, wholly funded by WellPoint, Inc. Every year, WellPoint associates give generously to not-for-profit organizations across the country through our Associate Giving Campaign. The WellPoint Foundation matches 50 percent of those dollars to provide even greater financial support to these organizations. Our associates do more than just open their wallets and get out their checkbooks. We established WellPoint’s annual Community

donation in the name of all WellPoint associates to Feeding America, the leading domestic hunger-relief organization that operates more than 200 regional member food banks nationwide. WellPoint’s donation helped provide more than 2,000,000 meals to those in need in our local communities. Additionally, WellPoint made a donation on behalf of all WellPoint associates to the United Service Organizations (USO) for military personnel being deployed. A portion of the proceeds was used to support the USO’s Care Package Program that provides a box of personal care items to each soldier deployed to a combat zone. The remaining portion of the proceeds supported the USO’s United Through Reading® Military Program, which helps ease the stress of separation for military families by having deployed parents read children’s books aloud via DVD for their child to watch at home. PDJ

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profile angela braly Was there a pivotal experience that helped shape your view of diversity and inclusion?

As a first-year law student at Southern Methodist University, I learned, on the first day of orientation, that my class was 50 percent female. However, I was also told that it would be another 40 years before women would make up half of the legal profession. That prediction made me grateful for having the opportunity for education and career, but also aware that there was still a great need, and potentially long road ahead, to continue to focus on diversity, not just related to gender. Who has influenced you as a business leader?

Many people have helped shape my thinking as a business leader, but a very impressive woman leader once gave me some very good advice that had a major impact on my career path. I was the CEO of a regional health plan at the time and had just been asked to become the General Counsel for WellPoint. Sounds like an easy choice, but it meant that I would have to leave the profit and loss job that I had – and loved. I went to an event where WellPoint was being honored for being a great place for executive women, and one of the attendees told the story of her career and said, “Whatever you do, don’t give up your P&L.” She pointed out that women often succeed in ‘staff ’ roles in companies, but don’t always have the same opportunities in key operational P&L jobs. So, while I agreed to become General Counsel of the parent company, I asked for, and was shortly thereafter given, in addition to the General Counsel position, the P&L for the federal government business for WellPoint. The woman who gave me that advice was right. Her name is Ellen Kullman, and she recently became CEO of DuPont. What was your career path to your present position?

Getting to this point in my career was not part of some grand master plan. In fact, the truth is that I didn’t even plan on a career in health care. I was a lawyer in a law firm, and that was my plan: to be a partner in a law firm – forever. When I was first invited to join a health plan in Missouri as their General Counsel, I said no. But after agreeing to serve in that role on a temporary interim basis, I fell in love with the people and their compassion, their mission to improve the lives of the people they served; all in the face of the complexity and importance of health care. That set me on the path to where I am today. So, one of the most important lessons I have learned in my professional life is that the only constant is change. The best thing any of us can do for ourselves is to be open to opportunities that can and will present themselves, and to embrace change. I came to work at WellPoint because I worked for a health plan in Missouri that was 26

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acquired. In fact, that plan was acquired twice. Today, I am the CEO of the combined company. I like to say getting bought, even a couple of times, can in fact turn out okay. The world’s economy is dynamic and full of exciting possibilities and opportunities. You must always be focused on what you can do to improve your skill set and add value to the organization you belong to. What has been your proudest moment at WellPoint?

The most rewarding experiences for me are when I meet with our members and customers and hear them talk about how our associates have gone the extra mile for them. Stories like those often get drowned out of the public discussion about health care, but I get to hear them frequently; and it fills me with admiration for all of our dedicated customer service advocates, care managers, nurses, and other associates who help improve the lives of our members every day. Who were/are your mentors?

I attribute much of my success to the individuals with whom I have worked over the years. I have had wonderful and diverse mentors, and each has taught me unique lessons that I apply every day. I often encourage young people to seek out mentors who they admire for both their business acumen and their ability to balance their careers with their home lives. One inspiring mentor gave me the important advice that “all roads cross more than once.” I have found that to be so true. If you are respectful to people in each and every situation, it may benefit you much later in life. If you were in a roomful of colleagues, what might they say about you?

personal Company

WellPoint, Inc. Title

Chair, President, and CEO Time in current position 3 years Education

J.D., Southern Methodist University School of Law; Undergraduate degree, Finance, Texas Tech University. Philosophy

Do the right thing. Do it for the customer. Do it right the first time. Family

I have a wonderful husband and three beautiful children. Interests

I love spending time with family, and I try to really be with them, whether we’re riding bikes or taking a walk. Favorite Charity

United Way – it matches my personal and professional belief that when we come together, there is nothing we can’t accomplish. Each of us can contribute much to charitable efforts – whether as donors and fundraisers or as volunteers for causes that mean the most to us.

How would you describe your style of leadership?

I hope that they would say I am honest, straightforward, and always seeking opportunities to improve myself and our company. Every day, a leader is faced with important choices, some small and some large, and the best leaders focus on always doing the right thing, staying focused on the customer, and continuously improving. It is also important to learn from these decisions going forward – just because you reach a leadership position doesn’t mean you stop growing professionally.

I follow three principles that have guided me for years: First, do the right thing. For me, this is gravity. It is at the core of everything we do. Second, do it for the customer. In meetings with our associates, I emphasize that our customers are the reason we’re here. We want to provide them with the very best possible health care experience. Third, do it right the first time. I know that’s not always possible, but our customers expect us to and that is our goal. If we don’t do it right the first time, we will improve our processes so that the next time we will.

What business books would you recommend?

What advice do you have for young leaders?

I love quotes, and one of my favorites comes from the book Good to Great, by Jim Collins: “The kind of commitment I find among the best performers across virtually every field is a single-minded passion for what they do, an unwavering desire for excellence in the way they think and the way they work.” I think that’s a pretty good definition of success.

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My advice to young leaders is simple: work hard, always be yourself, commit to something you feel passionate about, think about who your customer is and serve them, and always do the right thing. I also encourage young leaders to seek out mentors who can help them learn how to accelerate their leadership growth. PDJ


A look back as we go forward On April 3, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr. said, “Something is happening in our world.” In 2009, these words have fresh meaning — reflecting mountaintops reached and new hopes born. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina celebrates Black History Month. In honoring the past, we appreciate the present and find inspiration to create our future.

An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. U6325, 1/09


1. UPMC 2. New York Life Insurance Company 3. KPMG LLP 4. WellPoint, Inc. 5. Sodexo

6. ARAMARK 7. ConAgra Foods 8. Cisco Systems, Inc. 9. Kaiser Permanente 10. Royal Dutch Shell

Awards of Excellence American Airlines • Aon Consulting CACI International Inc. • Ecolab • Georgia Power • Gibbons P.C. Nationwide Financial • University of the Rockies

The companies above have distinguished themselves by virtue of the innovative approach they have taken to advance diversity in the workplace and in the communities they serve. In almost all cases, their efforts can be imitated and implemented by others who are still searching for the spark to ignite their own programs. We like the fact that there is so much, well, diversity, among the initiatives described here. We sincerely hope you’ll read them carefully, and then try to identify what you can do at your own business, regardless of its size. We congratulate these companies for their unwavering and creative commitment to diversity and inclusion. They are making the world a better place to live for all of us.


Profiles in Diversity Journal

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2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Dignity & Respect Campaign – A Community Initiative

The Dignity & Respect Campaign is an awareness campaign designed to join individuals, community leaders, community organizations, educational institutions, businesses, and corporations under the common notion that everyone deserves dignity and respect. In November of 2008, The Center for Inclusion at UPMC introduced the concept of Dignity and Respect to the employees of UPMC. Employees were tasked with taking a pledge to demonstrate their commitment to treating others the way they want to be treated and providing their opinion on behaviors that represent dignity and respect in the workplace. Based on their feedback, “30 Tips of Dignity & Respect” were created, which highlight behaviors that can easily be incorporated into everyday activities. Awareness about the campaign spread throughout the Pittsburgh community, as the Center for Inclusion partnered with community leaders on efforts around community unity, cultural competency, and multicultural awareness. On October 1, 2009, the Dignity & Respect Campaign was launched as a community initiative, with the Mayor of the City of Pittsburgh declaring October Dignity & Respect Month. The community campaign kicked off with the launch of a city-wide pledge drive, which engaged over 50 community organizations and awarded a day of service to the organization that received the most pledges. The launch also included the unveiling of the Dignity & Respect Campaign website. To engage the community, several ideas were created to ensure that dignity and respect are at the core of what UPMC employees do every day: The D&R Pledge and D&R Tips: Visit the Dignity & Respect Campaign website and take the pledge. The D&R Month: Organize a launch event, promote a D&R pledge drive, and award a day of service to the organization in your community that receives the most pledges. The D&R Journey: Champion inclusion within your organization by joining the D&R Journey. The Journey enables organizations to highlight best practices and share them with the D&R community. D&R Campaign National or Local Sponsorship: Promote inclusion in your organization and community while associating your brand with the Dignity & Respect Campaign by becoming a national or local sponsor. What began as a workplace initiative to promote dignity and respect at UPMC soon became a local community effort in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and has now become a national initiative dedicated to driving inclusion. PDJ

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Teaching Important Lessons About Family Security

New York Life agents who work in offices across the country are offered a unique model to engage the community around an important need: its Child ID initiative. This initiative offers agents the ability to attend community events and provide all children who attend a complimentary identification card, complete with his or her photograph and fingerprints. Parents can keep the ID card on file and share it with police in the unfortunate case the child goes missing. Child ID events are a unique way to align the families’ focus on protecting their children with the services New York Life agents provide. The goal is two-fold. First, it is to give every family access to a Child ID event. The second goal is for New York Life agents to engage with local families around the topic of protection, offering them a way to build ties to potential clients. These events are an easy, smart way to network and enhance an agent’s professional reputation in selected markets. The most important benefit New York Life achieved was their increased Since the connection to the Korean communilaunch of ty. The community has embraced this Child ID added step of protection and the peace events in 2008, of mind it brings. Child ID events are a way for agents to provide a valuable life insurance service to families and businesses in the community. New York Life agents cases among agents serving have always been uniquely connected to the communities they serve, but the Korean Child ID has even further solidified that connection. Child ID events have community increased the dialogue in the Korean have increased community to be proactive about protecting their loved ones. Protection 10 percent. first comes in the form of a getting a Child ID card and can also extend to speaking to a financial professional to take the necessary steps to protect their loved ones. Since the launch of Child ID events in 2008, life insurance cases among agents serving the Korean community have increased 10 percent. In addition, agents in New York Life’s New Jersey and Virginia offices have been given certificates of appreciation from local schools, which were accepted with great pride by our local agents and employees as another validation of the safety and security that New York Life has provided to families for 165 years. PDJ

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Profiles in Diversity Journal

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2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Straight Allies Campaign

In June 2009, KPMG launched a firmwide Straight Allies Campaign because they believe straight allies at work are crucial in transforming and promoting an open and inclusive workplace. Timed to coincide with the firm’s annual commemoration of Gay KPMG and Lesbian Pride Month, the initiative launched introduced new resources designed spea firmwide cifically to inform and promote awareness among its partners and employees Straight Allies about what it means to be a straight ally, Campaign and the important role allies play in ensuring KPMG remains a great place because they to build a career for all our people. believe straight The new resources developed for allies at work the Straight Allies Campaign include an internal Web site comprised of edu- are crucial in cational resources, guidance on simple transforming ways to be involved as a straight ally, and KPMG employees sharing their and promoting personal experiences as an LGBT pro- an open and fessional or a straight ally. The initiative inclusive also enables members of the pride@ kpmg Network to register their interest workplace. in finding a mentor, and helps the firm identify a pool of professionals willing to serve as mentors to their LGBT colleagues. Firm leadership kicked off the campaign and set the tone by serving as the “faces” of the initiative. Wearing t-shirts that affirmed their very personal connections to the LGBT community – the shirts stated emphatically “My sister is gay,” “My daughter is gay,” and even, “My mentee is gay” – KPMG’s vice chair of Tax, vice chair of Human Resources, and national managing partner, Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility, joined by several other partners and employees, appeared together on posters, in communications, and on the new Straight Allies Web site. By “coming out” as straight allies to their own colleagues, friends, and family members, these leaders brought the initiative to life and sent a clear message that reaffirmed KPMG’s commitment to their LGBT partners and employees, and their allies. As a result of their efforts and the overall campaign, to date, nearly 100 KPMG partners and employees have signed up as straight allies. PDJ

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Bring Your Whole Self To Work – Gender Transition in the Workplace

WellPoint understands that the LGBT community possesses notable purchasing power and consumer influence. In order to effectively attract, serve and retain the LGBT market, WellPoint believes they must have members of the workforce that clearly reflect and understand their needs. In 2009, WellPoint partnered with several of its Associate Resource Groups to include new questions on its annual employee survey asking employees to self-identify under several diversity lenses. Thirty-three of the 32,810 respondents self-identified as Transgender individuals. ANGLE (Associate Network for Gay and Lesbian Equality), WellPoint’s Associate Resource Group for LGBT individuals, has been actively involved in guiding the company’s corporate culture towards greater inclusion of transgender expression. In 2008, ANGLE was instrumental in having gender identity added to the company’s EEO policy statement. In 2009, as a growing number of transgender employees openly acknowledged that they were transitioning on the job, ANGLE collaborated with WellPoint’s corporate Diversity & Inclusion team to develop and launch new Gender Transition Guidelines and Gender Transition Training for managers and employees. Generally, employees can choose whether to disclose certain personal information at work. Transgender individuals who plan to stay with the same employer while transitioning do not have that option. Given that a transitioning individual is obligated to “come out” to his/her employer in order to satisfy the requirement to live full-time in his/her new gender role for at least a year before irreversible surgery, employers must become involved in the employee’s transition. WellPoint and ANGLE worked collaboratively to ensure that the gender guidelines and training provided managers and employees enough information to understand the transgender experience and to break down the fear, stereotypes, and misperceptions that follow those who gender-transition on the job. WellPoint’s gender training creates an opportunity for managers and colleagues, with the assistance of the transitioning employee, to ask their questions – from when to use the employee’s new name, to when to engage using the new pronouns, and how to address the bathroom issue in an open environment. This initiative has clearly provided greater understanding and awareness and fosters social support for transgender employees. PDJ


Profiles in Diversity Journal

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2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Sodexo Women’s International Forum for talent (SWIFt)

In June 2009, Sodexo launched SWIFt to advance the organization’s global gender strategy by gaining consensus and traction. Led by Adrienne Axler, General Manager, West South Europe, Motivation Solutions; and Rohini Anand, Senior Vice President and Global Chief Diversity Officer; the primary goals of SWIFt are to expand representation of women at the top levels of the organization and increase the engagement of all women. Comprised of 20 senior women executives, representing 12 nationalities, SWIFt is focused on identifying specific actions and outcomes necessary for Sodexo to achieve a level of between 23% and 25% female representation in its Top 300 by 2015. Working together as a team, SWIFt meets quarterly and has outlined a three-year strategy to advance Sodexo’s global gender strategy. SWIFt members are broken into four work-

Working together as a team, SWIFt meets quarterly and has outlined a three-year strategy to advance Sodexo’s global gender strategy. streams or areas of focus. The workstreams meet more often and are responsible for identifying specific actions to advance SWIFt’s mission in their designated area. The key objectives of SWIFt are to: • Make recommendations to Sodexo Group’s Executive Committee; • Identify priority actions, targets and a road map to meet goal; • Identify best practices internally and externally; • Communicate the strategic importance of diversity and inclusion; and • Develop a network based on cooperation. SWIFt is helping to advance Sodexo’s global gender strategy through education, training and awareness building. SWIFt is championing the business benefits of gender balance as well as pinpointing some of the barriers that currently exist. Through SWIFt, Sodexo is identifying which actions will accelerate progress on gender balance. PDJ

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The Program of Labor Inclusion for Persons with Disabilities

The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) team of ARAMARK Chile has created The Program of Labor Inclusion for Persons with Disabilities as part of its focus on employee advocacy, commitment to enhancing the local environment, and respect for diversity and inclusion. This program is a cooperative initiative between ARAMARK and local organizations that develop rehabilitation and labor intermediation initiatives for Persons with Disabilities. ARAMARK’s CSR team first identifies the location where a new employee will work. This new team member then meets the rest of their team and begins the “practice process,” or trial period, where they learn all of the skills necessary to be successful. Throughout this three month period, the new team member has bi-weekly reviews with the affiliated organization. At the end of the practice process, that organization submits a final report to ARAMARK. If there is a good fit between the new member and ARAMARK, then a job offer is made. The Program of Labor Inclusion for Persons with Disabilities strengthens ARAMARK’s overall recruitment process by promoting diversity and inclusion. This program demonstrates ARAMARK’s value for candidates from all backgrounds, perspectives, and experiences and provides valuable employment opportunities and economic benefits to a group that represents 12.9% of Chile’s population. ARAMARK Chile has also created a School Training Program to promote rehabilitation and increased autonomy for people with disabilities. This program offers a basic culinary education to young persons with disabilities who are already a part of a regular education system. The aim of this program is to contribute to the training of these young people in subjects such as basic pastry making, hygienic handling of food, and general gastronomy. Such training supports autonomy, labor development, and future incorporation to the world of work. ARAMARK is proud to contribute to an improved quality of life for the Persons with Disabilities hired to work in its various operations. Fifty-three employees have been hired since the Program of Labor Inclusion for Persons with Disabilities was implemented. PDJ

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Profiles in Diversity Journal

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2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Leveraging ERNs to Develop Emerging Leaders

In June of 2008, ConAgra Foods launched an initiative to leverage their six Employee Resource Networks (ERNs) to broadly develop the leadership capability within the diverse employee population. The six ERNs include ConAgra’s Asian Network, Black Employee Network, Latino Network, Young Professionals Network, Illuminations (LGBT employees and allies), and Women’s Leadership Council (WLC). The approach focused in four action areas. Network Leader Appointment – The Human Resources Leadership Team collaborates to identify emerging leaders to fill ERN team leader roles, which rotate every 18 to 24 months. To augment the development process, each ERN is assigned a sponsor from the CEO’s team who collaborates with the ERN team leader to develop and execute the annual plan. This exposure increases senior leader engagement with emerging leaders at lower levels in the organization, while providing a unique opportunity for employees to engage senior leaders. Knowledge and Nourish Sessions – Each network hosts, plans, and executes quarterly development sessions over lunch. Topics are determined through member surveys and executive sponsor recommendations based on their observation of developmental gaps. The sessions, using internal and nationally known facilitators, are open to non-network members throughout the company. The latest in technology enables the company to broadcast these sessions across all locations. Mentoring – Each network has access to mentoring circles to enable senior leaders to share insights and provide coaching to small groups of employees. The WLC launched a 12-month Mentoring pilot in 2009 with 220 participants using an innovative computer-matching technology. Annual Leadership Conference – In 2009, the annual recognition dinner hosted by their CEO was expanded to include a day-and-a-half Leadership and Learning Lab. One hundred leaders across all ERNs were invited to participate to increase their capability to lead through influence and to develop strategic plans tied to business objectives. Since the launch of this initiative, three of the six ERNs have seen their team leaders promoted at least one career level during their leadership tenure. Eighty-eight percent of the Mentoring Pilot participants found it valuable in helping them grow professionally, and as a result, ConAgra Foods will launch the mentor matching tool for company-wide use this summer. In addition, ERN participation has increased exponentially during this period, from 100 employees to over 1500. PDJ

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Inclusive Advocacy Program

In November 2008, Cisco launched the Inclusive Advocacy Program (IAP), an innovative approach to leadership development with the goal of increasing opportunities for its globally diverse, high-potential employees to advance to senior-level There are positions. By deliberately matching and many pieces to pairing diverse high-potential employees with influential Cisco leaders and the program, creating close working relationships, but the heart IAP increases the employee’s visibility of it is the and exposure, and helps to accelerate their growth, recognition, and career relationship opportunities. IAP leverages Cisco’s between the collaboration technology, including matched pairs WebEx and Cisco TelePresence, to create enhanced engagement opportuni- which is nurties and facilitate the development of tured through “advocacy” relationships with senior executives outside of the employee’s regularly existing work function, network, and scheduled pair geography. meetings. IAP specifically addresses the challenge of helping high-potential diverse employees in mid-level managerial roles expand their networks, navigate, and advance their careers without being limited by their current roles and locations. There are many pieces to the program, but the heart of it is the relationship between the matched pairs, which is nurtured through regularly scheduled pair meetings. To date, 64 employees including 32 senior leaders, or “advocates,” have participated in IAP. One employee was promoted in Europe and another was given a new assignment as a result of their participation in the program. The second round of the program is currently underway with additional participants, and Cisco expects to see an increased impact on the participants’ careers. A few unexpected benefits for both participants and advocates included: • Elevated & more strategic thinking; • Improved ability to influence & communicate across cultures; • Increased insight into other parts of Cisco’s business, resulting in better decisions; and • Expanded and enhanced networks. PDJ


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2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Diversity Leadership Development Program

Kaiser Permanente’s formal mentoring process is designed to last 18 months and focus specifically on facilitating development of people from diverse backgrounds who are underrepresented in the leadership pipeline. All of the participants who are selected as protégés aspire to higherlevel leadership positions and have strong performance ratings. To demonstrate full executive support and sponsorship for the formal mentoring process, Kaiser Permanente executives volunteer to be mentors. Prior to beginning the formal

To demonstrate full executive support and sponsorship for the formal mentoring process, Kaiser Permanente executives volunteer to be mentors.

mentoring program, all of the executive mentors participate in a formal advancement training to improve their ability to mentor others as well as expand their understanding of the culture from which their protégé belongs. Similarly, protégés receive training and information on how to give upward feedback, how to dialogue and meaningfully exchange ideas with senior leaders, and how to create an effective development plan. Protégés fully own and facilitate the process with their mentors. This includes scheduling monthly meetings, providing feedback to the mentor regarding the effectiveness of the interactions, updating their individual development plan, directly making requests and asking for support, and educating their mentor on the cultural differences and challenges they confront. Kaiser Permanente found that the Diversity Leadership Development Program makes a significant impact on both the development of protégés and growth of their executive mentors. The program has been implemented in four of their eight regions and the Finance business function within its National Headquarters. Results are significant in that 61% of all participants in the program have had a job promotion or job expansion. This is recognized as a fundamental program in leadership development within the organization. PDJ

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“P&T Jam” – Building an Inclusive Global Culture

With the appointment of Peter Voser as Royal Dutch Shell’s CEO in 2009, a major change was the creation of a new Projects & Technology (P&T) business which encompassed 8200 employees One aim of across multiple global geographies. the P&T One aim of the P&T leadership was to leadership was build a truly inclusive global culture. To this end, Shell sponsored an online to build a truly discussion forum running continuously inclusive for sixty-five hours over a three day period. It was a global interactive event global culture. referred to as the “P&T Jam.” The P&T Jam objectives were to: • Create affiliation among P&T – to be a part of building the new P&T; • Build cohesiveness through a foundation of global (virtual) connections; • Locate and brainstorm new ideas for cheaper, better, faster and safer alternatives to existing methods of working; • Demonstrate the “new way of working” (i.e., focused, fast, virtual, high tech); and • Demonstrate 1 to 2 actionable results/successes prior to the 2010 Shell People Survey. P&T Executive Leadership Team members hosted the forum throughout and formal handoffs between the executives in hub locations around the world occurred at scheduled times to assure senior leadership was continually connected and engaged. The Jam started with four predetermined discussion topics which were carefully selected to ensure they were meaningful and relevant to participants and leadership. Over the course of the three days, more than 9900 logins and 4206 posts were made by employees across 117 countries. One business leader who hosted part of the Jam highlighted how he was struck by the diversity we have in the organization and the richness of thoughts resulting from the Jam. “It was fascinating to see how the discussions developed over the three days – from simple opinion-sharing to joint problem-solving. I very much appreciated the honesty and constructive challenge brought forward by all participants. We have seen many remarks on empowerment, and the power of leaders who are giving clarity on what to achieve, as well as trust and freedom on how to achieve this.” PDJ

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Awards of Excellence

Profiles in Diversity Journal is proud to honor the following companies with our Award of Excellence for their innovations in diversity. They are presented here in alphabetical order.

Award of Excellence The Power of ERGs In late 2009, American Airlines announced it would begin service to Beijing, China from its Chicago O’Hare airport. The company’s Asian Pacific-Islander Employee Resource Group (APIERG) approached the company to help out in positioning the new route for established success in the market. With the assistance of Tom Del Valle, Sr. V.P. Airport Services and executive sponsor for APIERG, they teamed up with various departments at the company to determine where they could focus their efforts and help with strategy. With having an established employee resource group (ERG) familiar with both the market being served and the product serving the market, the food and beverage department tapped into the knowledge of APIERG to create a menu which would appeal to the customer demographic. After reviewing marketing collateral for cultural relevance and sensitivity, APIERG helped position American Airlines by: • Participating in the 2010 NYC China Town Parade and 2010 Lunar New Year Celebration to provide visibility and promote the market; • Meeting with the Beijing sales team to provide insight on strategy and help define focus areas; • Obtaining sponsorship from American Airlines to the United States of America-China Chamber of Commerce (USCCC)—a not-for-profit, bi-national membership organization dedicated to developing increased U.S.China trade and investment activities; and • Developing training guides/resources and Chinese phrases for frontline employees to educate and assist them with our Chinese-speaking customers. Utilizing a communication strategy, APIERG leveraged the media by developing short videos for YouTube and a Facebook page to promote the route. In addition, at least three APIERG ambassadors will fly the inaugural flight to create high-level engagement, and each ambassador will video blog their experience. PDJ 34

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Award of Excellence Unmatched Teams Initiative One of Aon Consulting Employee Benefit Outsourcing’s (EBO) three strategic imperatives is to “Engage [their] diverse workforce—recognize talent, nurture it, and promote it.” Essential to this effort is creating a culture that does not simply accept diversity, but values it. Executive Vice President and Practice Director Ken Haderer and his leadership team partnered with Novations, a leading provider of employee engagement and diversity training, to develop a learning curriculum to build awareness of the need for and power of diversity and inclusion in the workplace. To ensure an integrated approach, Aon merged Novations’ Appreciating Differences program with Aon’s own performance management tools and their Leadership Model. When the need for continued reinforcement and further engagement became clear, Aon Consulting EBO selected a team of Diversity Champions from across the business to develop and drive continued education and learning. The programs they developed included half-day follow-up sessions, continuing education for managers, and a two-hour program for non-managers and new colleagues. Today, Aon’s Diversity Champions are developing a continuing education program that requires every manager to deliver their own on diversity and inclusion to colleagues through team meetings, monthly management calls, brown bag lunches, and newsletters. To symbolize and publicly declare this commitment, teams of managers drew images of their commitment to diversity and inclusion, and Aon Consulting has them on display throughout their offices. Haderer stated that due to these programs “the Aon journey has resulted in higher levels of performance across the organization as measured by individual and team key perforPDJ mance indicators of productivity and service quality.”


Profiles in Diversity Journal

2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Award of Deploying Talent – Excellence Creating Careers In an initiative designed to expand the company’s diversity by reaching out to members of the U.S. Armed Forces, CACI’s President and CEO, Paul Cofoni, founded an innovative diversity program to hire disabled veterans. Deploying Talent – Creating Careers is a company-wide initiative designed to provide meaningful careers for talented veterans with disabilities. Mr. Cofoni recognized that the re-employment of wounded soldiers is a nationwide challenge and a bold, fresh approach was required to welcome them back into the workforce. CACI works with veterans in transi- An internship tion centers and military medical facili- initiative ties to prepare them for civilian employprovides ment. An internship initiative provides on-the-job on-the-job experience and training for wounded soldiers interested in learning experience new career skills before they transi- and training tion out of the military. CACI also for wounded collaborates with veterans’ organizasoldiers tions to provide resume writing and interested interview training, and has partnered with the Department of Labor to cre- in learning ate semi-annual corporate immersion new career events for wounded soldiers at Walter skills before Reed Army Medical Center and the they transition National Naval Medical Center. These out of the innovative events provide one-on-one training in job fair and interviewing military. skills to veterans, bringing together military hospitals, private industry, and government employers to create comprehensive employment training experience.  Participants are immersed in role-playing situations to practice interview techniques and receive immediate feedback from interviewing employers.  CACI hired 210 disabled veterans over the past two years, including 58 directly through the Deploying Talent − Creating Careers program. PDJ

Award of The Power of a Grassroots Excellence

Approach to Culture Change

In 2008, Ecolab’s senior management launched an initiative to accelerate progress toward a more diverse, inclusive and productive culture. Top managers worked together to define the cultural characteristics that would be vital to Ecolab’s success in the future. In 2009, with management’s support, the seeds for grassroots action were planted and twentyeight employees, representing a cross-section of roles, business units and functions, were selected to serve as Ecolab’s Inclusion Change Partners. Their mission was to dramatically accelerate the rate of culture change by using the concept of peer-to-peer leadership. Their role was to help create a “tipping point” by engaging 10 other people, called Inclusion Change Allies, in the change process. An extensive training program was offered, providing the Inclusion Change Partners with knowledge and tools to lead these teams and their departments in adopting behaviors that contribute to an environment that empowers employees to contribute their best. Once trained, the Inclusion Change Partners began to lead monthly meetings with their Inclusion Change Allies. These meetings provided regular dialogue focused on learning together and applying new skills and mindsets to their day-to-day work. In addition, the Inclusion Change Partners introduced the eight key cultural characteristics to their groups that senior management identified as critical to Ecolab’s sustained success, including workplace flexibility, empowerment, open dialogue and active listening, teamwork, development, multi-cultural diversity and respect for all. The pace of change will be measured in many ways, including the company employee engagement survey, regular surveys of the Inclusion Change Partners and Allies and key performance indicators, such as sales growth, customer satisfaction and associate retention. Thus, the reach and impact of each Inclusion Change Partner is multiplied. And the result is the inclusion effort will survive leadership changes, difficult economic times, and other business challenges. PDJ

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Profiles in Diversity Journal

2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Award of Job Selection Excellence Training for Employees In 2009, Georgia Power launched a review of the company’s internal hiring procedures with a goal of improving trust in the job selection process and managers who make hiring decisions. A Job Selection Task Force made up of 33 employees from across the company recommended that all employees be educated on how the job selection process works and what their roles and responsibilities are throughout the process. The company responded by developing separate training classes for managers and individual contributors with that result in mind. The Job Selection for Employees The company Web-Based Training (WBT) course is responded by highly interactive and uses a combinadeveloping tion of three different types of media. It begins with a videotaped message from separate trainthe CEO in which he expresses his com- ing classes for mitment to increasing employee trust managers and in the job selection process one person individual at a time. The workshop also uses procontributors fessionally-acted, videotaped scenarios based on real events that occur within with that result in mind. the company. Its objectives are to increase employees’ understanding of the job selection process, increase their understanding of their individual job selection responsibilities, and enhance their ability to use job selection information, resources and tools. The expectation is that employees not only understand the process and the role they play, but also apply what they learned so that there will be improved trust in the overall process. That, in turn, will help sustain an inclusive environment where every employee feels valued, respected and productive. The course launched in the fall of 2009. To date, 4,700 employees have completed it. It is required training and all current employees must complete it by the end of 2010. Survey results from those who have taken Job Selection Training are largely positive. PDJ 36

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Award of Gibbons’ Diversity Initiative’s Excellence Supplier Diversity Program Supplier diversity programs have largely focused on the procurement of goods, which, unlike services, are subject to objective qualitative management standards like ISO 9000. Recently, many supplier diversity programs have started capturing spend in professional services, such as legal and accounting. In these professional categories, corporate leaders have established important workplace diversity objectives to ensure that diverse professionals thrive and create opportunities for M/WBE vendors. In light of the above, the Gibbons Diversity Initiative (GDI) features a brand-new supplier diversity program, GDI123, that is responsive to the different objectives of the various constituencies involved in the vendor/client relationship. GDI-123 was designed to help Gibbons P.C. and their clients realize a triple bottom line: • Meeting diverse spend goals with qualified M/WBE vendors; • Utilizing diverse Gibbons attorneys with total quality management of services; and • Obtaining competitive blended rates for legal services and/or optimum prices for other products and services. GDI-123 is client-friendly: Gibbons directs the entire business process to ensure that no administrative burden is placed on clients. Diverse spend and resource utilization goals are set with clients on a project basis. The GDI-123 Administrator oversees the assignment process for both internal and external resources. Gibbons also mentors the M/WBE providers as required and generates periodic client reports on diverse resource utilization and spend. Positive Change Outcomes: Through GDI-123, Gibbons also mentor suppliers and assists with certification. Despite being in its infancy, GDI-123 has so impressed the clients to whom they have presented it that they, in turn, have disseminated the program within their own companies and beyond as an integrated diversity solution with a triple return. PDJ


Profiles in Diversity Journal

2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Award of Diversity Learning Excellence Partners Program In support of the diversity and inclusion strategy, Nationwide Financial re-launched the Diversity Learning Partners Program with defined structure, roles, participant criteria and a formal selection process. All members of the Nationwide Financial senior leadership team are paired with associates two to three levels below and across differences. Together the pairs are tasked with meeting the following objectives: • Increase their understanding, comfort level and appreciation of differences. • Establish a personal connection to create a level of trust that encourages open and honest communication. • Bridge the gap between personal views and workplace perspectives to facilitate ongoing behavioral change. • Present views to senior leaders that represent individual, group or broader cultural viewpoints. Introduced in 2009 through a communication from the Nationwide Financial President, associates were invited to self-nominate to serve as an associate learning partner. Following an application screening and interview process, associate learning partners were selected based on criteria such as interpersonal savvy, command skills, managerial courage, commitment to the organization’s diversity and inclusion initiative, and ability to maintain confidence. Resources were provided to help set goals, identify and plan learning activities, and facilitate open communication. Goals for each of the learning partners are unique and based on their individual interests. Collectively they encompass ethnicity, nationality, culture, gender, sexual orientation, religious beliefs and thinking style. Through a variety of activities including participation in cultural events, discussion of academic and market research and with support from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the learning partners are expanding their individual awareness and comfort levels around diversity and also exploring opportunities to impact business processes. PDJ

Award of Imagine the Possibilities – Excellence Measure the Outcomes Recognizing that diversity issues are integral to the successful and ethical functioning of higher learning institutions, University of the Rockies, a graduate school specializing in psychology programs online and at its campus in Colorado Springs, Colorado, established an Office of Diversity. The mission was to engage administrators, faculty and students about what it means to be a world-class center of excellence in diversity management. An innovative, holistic Diversity Learning Map was created as a platform to measure the university’s diversity initiatives, including institutional and programmatic outcomes. Competencies – including vocabulary, meaning, reflection and advocacy – are applied to Global Perspective, Organizational Diversity, People, Legal Requirements, Scholarship and Social Justice to gauge viability of each program. From December 2009 through March 2010, mandatory training sessions were held with the objectives to develop a shared definition of diversity and its application at the university; create awareness about what it means to be diversity chal- Seventy-five lenged; and provide education about percent said the complexity of intercepting value their knowlsystems. Each activity comprising the edge and skill course was purposefully aligned with level increased objectives and analyzed based upon the Diversity Learning Map. Ninety-three at least 50 percent of participants said the training percent after would improve their job performance. the training. Seventy-five percent said their knowledge and skill level increased at least 50 percent after the training. Currently, more than 40 percent of students at the university belong to an underrepresented group. Since the Office of Diversity began utilizing the Diversity Learning Map, the Diversity Task Force membership has more than doubled. Although the university has grown exponentially, proportionately there has been a decrease in diversityrelated complaints. PDJ Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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thought thoughtleaders leaders

Profiles in Diversity Journal continues to bring you the ideas, opinions, and profiles of leaders in the field of Diversity & Inclusion in our ongoing series, thoughtleaders. We once again invited prominent diversity thought leaders to share the latest thinking regarding the workforce diversity and inclusion topics with which they are most active.

thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders

Understanding Privilege By Alfred J. Torres Vice President, Talent Management and Diversity Verizon

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The concept of privilege is an ambiguous topic. Depending with whom I speak, if the word privilege is mentioned, the response may be enthusiastic nods of agreement, scowls of disagreement, eye-rolls of disbelief, or simply quizzical looks. When we talk about privileged groups, we take a mental shortcut to what it means, or what is familiar…to us. We often forget that groups are made up of individuals, and those individuals rarely see themselves as privileged. Regardless of how we define privilege or who we perceive as privileged, the opportunity we have is to help others understand what it really means to be so. I offer this insight. Privilege is really about the context within which we define it. Our acquired level of expertise and/or status allows us to exert some influence and impact numerous situations and people, and that makes us privileged. Essentially, the defining moment for each of us comes when we understand that the success and influence that come with privilege can be utilized productively by passing it on. Over the past year, we have partnered with a non-profit group called the All Stars Project of New Jersey in their Development School for Youth (DSY) – which focuses on providing inner-city youth with exposure to corporate America. The students come to a corporate setting, learn things about the company, and discuss topics like diversity, leadership, finance, resume-writing, interviewing…the basics

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of functioning in a corporate environment. There is also a summer internship program so they can practice what they’ve been taught and learn more about performing in a corporate environment. As a result, the students leave with a broader understanding of what corporate culture is, and with a new expectation – that they can work in that culture and succeed. Before the DSY, many of these young people did not know what life was like in a corporate environment, let alone if they could succeed in one. Having a student remark that they had never been so far from Newark, NJ, or in a building so big, or been higher than the 20th floor of a building, reminds me that not everyone has the benefit of exposure and context. Some of us first-generation executives in the corporate world may have grown comfortable in our own success and formulated subjective views about privilege in our own minds. My DSY experience has served as a reminder of how it is that one becomes privileged and what responsibilities privilege carries. I have found that the best way to understand what being privileged means, is to work with someone who isn’t. It quickly awakens one to the reality that often, privilege comes as a result of opportunity granted to people by other people who are willing to lend a hand and help someone else succeed as well. When we recognize the privilege we have achieved, we will also recognize the opportunity it provides. Privilege is opportunity in waiting…it’s about each of us helping someone else. PDJ


thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Diversity Communications 101: One Size Does Not Fit All

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By Tisa Jackson Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion Union Bank, N.A.

“The problem with communication…is the illusion that it has taken place,” George Bernard Shaw once said. Making sure communication does take place is particularly challenging for diversity leaders because misconceptions, ambiguities, myths and simple misunderstandings often complicate the process of implementing diversity initiatives. As you develop a communications strategy targeting various audiences, keep in mind that this is no place for shortcuts, and a onesize-fits-all approach generally will not work. The people you want to reach represent not only many different cultures and backgrounds, but are also at different places along the continuum of awareness and understanding. For these reasons, it is especially important to know your audience. You have multiple stakeholders, internally and externally, and your message should be tailored to fit each group. Following are some other key points to keep in mind as you develop your diversity and inclusion communications program:

• Start at the beginning. Step one in any communications strategy is making sure you clearly define what diversity means to your organization. If you don’t define it, people will define it for themselves, and it will be more difficult to establish the common vision that is important to achieving your goals. Defining diversity and clarifying your vision and objectives are part of the often-neglected process of developing a framework or context for your diversity and inclusion efforts. Allow ample time for this process. At Union Bank, we spent the time to deliberate and refine our definition of diversity, which reads: “Diversity at Union Bank is an appreciation and respect for all of the ways that people are both similar and different.” The executives on the bank’s Diversity Council closely examined every word before sending this definition to another council headed by our president and chief executive officer for approval. There was a great deal of discussion about respecting similarities as well as differences. We decided to include this point, because similarities provide common ground that makes it easier to appreciate differences and empathize with others. • Choose the right messenger. Top executives should certainly be among those who deliver your messages, but sometimes a middle manager or employee leader may have an even greater impact. • Keep it simple. Information overload is rampant today,

so communicate in stages. Start by talking about your definition of diversity. Next, focus on your vision, and then your objectives. Provide bite-sized chunks of information. This allows for dialogue at each stage in your communication process, which leads to greater understanding and encourages everyone to get involved. • Always include a call to action. It may be as simple as asking people to reexamine their own ideas in light of your company’s definition of diversity. Your call to action will be different for each audience. Ultimately, you want all executives and employees to understand how they can contribute to the success of the company’s diversity and inclusion initiatives. Your communications plan should also make strategic use of nonverbal messages. This is particularly effective in building credibility in your community. For example, you can make a powerful statement about your firm’s commitment to diversity by consistently filling your tables at community events with a multicultural contingent of company leaders. Also, ensuring a wide range of diverse employees at all levels – from entry level to executive management – helps to reinforce true commitment to diversity and inclusion. Effective communication can make or break a company, a product, or a diversity initiative. As a diversity leader, you are well-qualified to develop and execute a strategy that demonstrates understanding of your diverse audiences. PDJ Tisa Jackson, vice president of diversity and inclusion for Union Bank, N.A., has more than 13 years of experience in this field, as well as strategic human resources management, community development and organizational development. She is founder of the Professional & Technical Diversity Network (PTDN) of Greater Los Angeles, a diversity consortium comprised of companies committed to diversity and inclusion. Union Bank, N.A., is a full-service commercial bank providing an array of financial services to individuals, small businesses, middle-market companies, and major corporations. As of May 10, 2010, the bank had 397 banking offices in California, Oregon, Washington and Texas and two international offices. UnionBanCal Corporation is a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd., which is a subsidiary of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, Inc. Union Bank is a proud member of the Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group (MUFG, NYSE:MTU), one of the world’s largest financial organizations. Visit www.unionbank.com for more information. Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

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thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders thoughtleaders Jack of All Trades, Master of Some: Leading Your Organization to Empowerment By David Casey

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Vice President and Diversity Officer CVS Caremark

Looking at my computer to check the time, I was surprised to see it was only 10:00 a.m.

Already, I had met with a human resources colleague, sales and marketing, supply chain management and government relations. How could all of that have happened before lunch? But I shouldn’t have been surprised – it actually was a pretty typical day. As diversity management practitioners, we have a hand in most of the strategies that play out across our organizations. And recognizing this is key to the important transition from champion of diversity management to leader of a company’s multi-pronged approach. I know that my own awareness of the cross-functional requirements of successful diversity management early in my career led to an even more important conclusion: CDOs cannot and should not be positioned to have sole ownership of diversity management in an organization. Instead, the diversity management practitioner’s role in many ways is that of an educator, enabler, consultant and facilitator – someone who can connect the dots for business leaders in every department.

ment team have the rare ability to scan the horizon and “connect the dots” across the entire enterprise. Build and leverage relationships to drive solutions that are wins for everybody: a win for each department – including yours – and a win for the company. • Develop a role as a go-to consultant and confidante for senior company leaders outside the “official” channels of meetings, e-mails and reports. As these opportunities arise, use them to demonstrate to your company’s top executives that you understand the complexity of their jobs and that you can help simplify some of their decisions through good counsel. • Don’t rely on a top-down approach – get everyone involved. The first thing any diversity management strategy needs is structure. From grass-tops to grass-roots, tap into the talent and expertise of your entire organization. Steering committees and oversight task forces are important at both the executive level and at middle management. For rank-and-file employees: resource groups, ad hoc project teams, annual surveys and community projects can help surface new ideas and bring more arms and legs to the company-wide goal of diversity management.

While having a clearly defined leader of the function is essential, at the end of the day, all employees own their company’s collective success in diversity management – it should be viewed and treated as a business process, not just a departmental function.

• Don’t forget to measure. Every initiative should begin with the establishment of well-defined quantitative and qualitative metrics that can track progress and tie diversity results to business results.

Here are several key elements to establishing a sustainable platform for managing diversity at the highest, most strategic level while enlisting the full capabilities of your company to deliver results:

Remember, while it’s important to establish a defined leadership role for this work, no one person or one team should be seen as “owning” your organization’s success in managing diversity. Think about it – nobody expects the Chief Financial Officer to personally manage each cost center every month. CFOs are accountable for developing and leading sound strategies, policies and processes, but everyone has a role to play in managing the company’s resources. The charge for the Diversity Officer, then, is the same thing: know enough about the business of your business to lead the strategy, then empower and equip the entire company to execute. PDJ

• Chart an approach to diversity management that is informed by a deep understanding of the company’s most important business imperatives. Initiatives must be grounded in top-level business strategy and have a clear connection to the most important business objectives. To get there, diversity practitioners need to know what matters most to the collective leadership, not just what’s most important to you. • Manage the intersections. As a strategic partner to various departments, the CDO and diversity manage40

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[ Bank of the West ]

WANT TO WORK FOR A TRULY GREAT BANK?

AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED. Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.


Corporate

Philanthropy It is extremely encouraging to learn that companies are continuing to reach out and make a difference to those less fortunate. A few months ago we asked some of the world’s major organizations to share with our readers the one philanthropic success story that they feel most proud about. Keeping in mind that these organizations give millions and millions of dollars each year to those needing a helping hand, the stories they offer here shine great light on the depth of their commitment, the diversity of their reach, and their boundless creativity. Even though money and volunteerism in themselves are a tremendous help to communities, they are only part of the story; the intangible benefits of philanthropy are what’s really exciting. The following pages contain snapshots into the organizations giving back to their communities; the ways are as unique and varied as the companies themselves. We are honored to share these examples of their generosity and volunteerism with you.

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Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Bev Dribin Vice President of Community Relations ARAMARK

ARAMARK Building Community (ABC)

Through ARAMARK Building Community (ABC), the company’s signature philanthropic and volunteer program, ARAMARK harnesses its resources and employee expertise to help strengthen local community centers. Through ABC, the company is helping people of all generations to learn, earn and thrive by linking the capabilities and reach of local community centers with our company’s core competencies – lending workforce-related skills training expertise to educate and connect youth and adults to the workforce, providing health and wellness awareness information so families can live healthier lifestyles, and supporting access to basic human needs. “ARAMARK is committed to developing long-lasting, meaningful relationships in the thousands of communities where we work and our people live,” said Bev Dribin, Vice President of Community Relations at ARAMARK. “Working together, ARAMARK and local community centers truly enrich people’s lives.” In 2007, ARAMARK began its partnership with Neighborhood Centers, Inc. (NCI), a Houston-based non-profit organization with more than 50 community centers serving more than 200,000 individuals and families each year. Through this partnership, more than 1,000 ARAMARK employees have taken part in large-scale volunteer projects which have included revitalizing the facilities of several community centers. In addi-

tion, ARAMARK has mentored 500 students, placed 30 interns, counseled over 2,000 families on healthy lifestyle choices and provided 3,000 volunteer hours. In November 2009, 100 ARAMARK volunteers spent their day split among five Houston homes whose residents were either displaced or suffered great personal loss as a result of Hurricane Ike. Through a joint effort, that included NCI, UMCOR (the United Methodist Committee on Relief ), and United Way, volunteers repaired five homes – fixing ceilings, painting, cleaning up yards and, in one case, gutting a home so that it could be restored to its original condition. “You all were standing right there with helping hands and loving arms and I just want to say thank you,” said Ms. Imogene Clay, homeowner. Since its inception in 2008, ARAMARK Building Community has reached 35 cities in the U.S. and internationally. Nearly 8,000 ARAMARK volunteers have refurbished community centers, hosted food and clothing drives, and supported career and health fairs in these communities. Throughout 2010, ARAMARK is developing additional relationships with community centers in 40 cities. PDJ

ARAMARK More than 400 ARAMARK employees have donated their time, talent and energy to revitalize NCI’s facilities and help Houston residents return to their homes through ABC Center Enhancement Days.

Headquarters: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Web site: www.aramark.com Primary Business: Professional services. Employees: 255,000

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Laura Sanford President, AT&T Foundation AT&T Inc.

AT&T Helps Students Connect to Possibilities Through Job Shadow While she wasn’t expecting it, 17-year-old Abril says it was as if something just “clicked.” She realized it was time to start pushing herself to make better grades if she wanted her dreams to come true. Like thousands of other students, Abril’s motivation was sparked by her participation in the AT&T/Junior Achievement Job Shadow Initiative – part of AT&T Aspire, a $100 million philanthropic initiative to strengthen student success and workforce readiness. Abril and her classmates went to AT&T’s offices to “shadow” employees. There, the students learned about career opportunities and the skills they will need to succeed on the job. To date, 17,000 employees have volunteered close to 145,000 hours, helping almost 47,000 students. This experience opened Abril’s eyes. “Before Job Shadow, my grades were just B’s, and I thought that was good enough.

After spending time with AT&T employees, and learning how they were achieving their dreams, I realized that I’d better start pushing myself if I wanted to get anywhere in life. I did it! Now I am on the A honor role, and give 100 percent of the credit to them for helping me wake up,” she says. “We are deeply concerned that one-third of America’s high school students drop out before graduating,” said Laura Sanford, president of the AT&T Foundation. “One of the best ways we can help young people succeed is to help them understand the importance of education and prepare them for the workplace.” For the AT&T/JA Worldwide Job Shadow Initiative, AT&T partners with Junior Achievement on their largest corporate job shadow initiative to date. AT&T’s goal is to provide opportunities for 100,000 students over five years – and the initiative is making an impact and changing attitudes. Student feedback shows that after participating in job shadow, 99 percent of students think it is important to graduate from high school. Job Shadow also helped strengthen Abril’s commitment to attend college, and she tells other teenagers: “Pay attention and work hard, because what you do now will reflect what you do later in life.” PDJ

An AT&T employee helps students learn what it takes to be successful in the workplace.

AT&T Inc. Headquarters: Dallas, Texas Web site: www.att.com Primary Business: Wireless, Wi-Fi and high speed Internet and voice services. Employees: 276,280

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JA students at AT&T for a Job Shadow event.

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OUR COMPANY

>

THE SUM OF ITS PARTS

BE WHO YOU ARE. CREATE WHO WE’LL BE. UnitedHealth Group is working to create the health care system of tomorrow. One that will work better for more people in more ways than ever. A goal of this magnitude requires transformative ideas from a collective of diverse talent. At UnitedHealth Group, our commitment to diversity is clearly visible in the high-performing people we hire, in the health care services we provide, and in our dedication to social responsibility. We support and applaud the efforts of those who work to promote fairness, equality and opportunity. Uniting our individual efforts and abilities toward our common goal, we’re making a difference. Learn more about us at unitedhealthgroup.com

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V. UnitedHealth Group is a drug-free workplace. Candidates are required to pass a drug test before beginning employment. © 2009 UnitedHealth Group. All rights reserved.


Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Anne Marie Axworthy Director of Community Development and President of the Avista Foundation Avista Corporation

Fallen Hero’s Dreams Kept Alive with the Help of Avista The unthinkable happened on Feb. 1, 2003. But since then, hundreds of people, organizations and businesses have turned the tragedy into dreams come true. When the Columbia Space Shuttle crashed to earth on Feb. 1, 2003, seven astronauts perished. Lt. Col. Michael P. Anderson, the payload commander, was among the heroes on board. In his last interview in his hometown of Spokane, Washington, Anderson, an African American, said, “This is what I’ve wanted to do since I was a little kid. If you apply yourself, work hard to be persistent, and don’t give up, you can achieve anything you want to achieve.” Avista, the region’s major energy utility, served in a leadership role and provided the lead gift for a campaign to honor Anderson that started in eastern Washington. The region, with a minority population of less than 8 percent, is not known for its ethnic richness. However, the loss of a native son, a national hero, drew the community together in extraordinary ways to honor him – cross-cultural performances, church music events, civic presentations, and school-based penny drives, among others – and garnered more than $125,000 to fund a bronze statue of Anderson that graces Spokane’s Riverfront Park, and to fund a college scholarship for children of color to inspire all children to follow their dreams in the same positive way Anderson did.

of Washington in 2008. Seattle-based Alaska Airlines pilots joined the campaign committee, and the Alaska Air Group and Boeing made significant donations to the campaign. More than $150,000 was raised for a memorial to Anderson that was dedicated in 2009 at the renowned Museum of Flight in Seattle, which has more than 400,000 visitors annually. In February 2010, seven years after the Columbia tragedy, the first annual Michael P. Anderson Memorial Aerospace event was held at the Museum of Flight. Nearly 40 children of color from Spokane and Seattle spent the day learning about flight dynamics and navigation in hands-on, state-of-the-art labs and simulators, mentored by African American aviation professionals and members of the Tuskegee Airmen. Avista continues to work with volunteers to raise money to endow the Michael P. Anderson Aerospace Program at the Museum of Flight, so that children of color in the state of Washington, who might otherwise be at risk in their education, can feel the excitement and inspiration that comes from Anderson’s legacy of hope, hard work and community support. PDJ “Michael worked to open doors for children to succeed. We’re pleased to play a role in helping children in Washington walk through those doors to realize their dreams of success.” Scott Morris, chairman, president and CEO of Avista Corp.

Washington Governor Chris Gregoire served as honorary chair as the campaign to honor Anderson crossed the state Morris Children and mentors at the first annual Michael P. Anderson Aerospace Program at Seattle’s Museum of Flight gather around the memorial statue of Anderson who perished in the 2003 Columbia Space Shuttle disaster.

Avista Corporation Headquarters: Spokane, Washington Web site: www.avistacorp.com Primary Business: Electric and natural gas utility and energy services.

The memorial to Lt. Col. Michael P. Anderson that graces Spokane’s Riverfront Park.

Employees: 2,435

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Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Carol Kurzig President, Avon Foundation for Women AVON

The Avon Foundation for Women: Recruiting One Million Women to Partner With Breast Cancer Scientists The Avon Foundation for Women – the largest corporate-affiliated philanthropy dedicated to women’s causes globally – joined forces with the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation in 2008 to launch the Love/Avon Army of Women research initiative. The Army’s goal is to recruit healthy women of all ages and ethnicities to learn more about and participate in research studies seeking to unlock the key to preventing breast cancer. Army members receive frequent email notices of new studies. If a member decides she is interested in participating in a study, each of which undergoes a scientific, safety and ethical review, she contacts the researcher or a designated Army of Women research center to take part. Participation in the studies might entail completing a questionnaire or providing a sample of blood, urine, breast fluid, or breast tissue. An example of the Army’s power occurred in May 2010 when the Army announced a study by the Washington University School of Medicine to learn what genetic factors may play a role in the development of breast cancer in women under 40. The study was seeking 5,000 women; by the end of the month, nearly 6,150 women had responded to that call for study participants and more than 1,200 enrolled.

tion research,” said Joan Young, Army of Women volunteer. The Love/Avon Army of Women is integral to the Avon Foundation for Women’s mission to improve the lives of women and their families, with a focus on breast cancer and domestic violence. The Avon Breast Cancer Crusade has raised and donated more than $640 million in more than 50 countries to advance access to care and accelerate breast cancer research, with a focus on assisting the medically underserved. The Foundation raises funds and awareness through the sale of Avon pink ribbon products, the U.S. Avon Walk for Breast Cancer series, the Walk Around the World for Breast Cancer in more than 50 countries, free educational literature distributed by more than 6.2 million Avon Representatives, and other special events. Today, 320,000 women – healthy women, women at high risk of breast cancer, and breast cancer survivors – have joined the Army. Women who are interested in learning more or joining the Army of Women can visit www.armyofwomen.org. PDJ

“Being a part of the Army requires a little more effort than writing a check. Having done both, I know writing a check doesn’t feel as gratifying as being a part of breast cancer prevenRenowned breast surgeon Dr. Susan Love accepts an Avon Foundation for Women check for $1.2 million to fund the Love/Avon Army of Women. Avon Walk for Breast Cancer walkers at the closing ceremony of the 2010 Avon Walk for Breast Cancer Boston in May 2010.

Avon Headquarters: New York, New York Web site: www.avonfoundation.org Primary Business: Direct seller of beauty, home and fashion products. Employees: 42,000

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Rebeca Rangel Vice President, Community Affairs Manager Bank of the West

Free Tax Preparation Returns $2.4 Million to Bay Area Residents Maria Carranza, a mother of two children, heard about the Mission Economic Development Agency’s (MEDA) tax program from posters in the community. “I was so relieved to benefit from their free tax preparation because other places were going to charge high fees, which I could not afford when I make so little to begin with,” said Maria. “MEDA and their volunteers are welcoming, competent and respectful.” MEDA processed $2.4 million in tax returns during its first year of providing free tax preparation services to low-income residents in California’s Bay Area. Half of these returns – $1.2 million – were processed at Plaza Adelante and benefited primarily San Francisco’s Mission District residents. Since 1973, MEDA has been dedicated to improving the economic and social conditions of San Francisco’s immigrants and working class families, with an emphasis on the Latino community and the Mission. The grand opening of Plaza Adelante, a collaboration of several nonprofits, was spearheaded by MEDA and coincided with this year’s tax season. Plaza Adelante allows nonprofit organizations to share space, streamline administration and lower costs; it also allows the community a single point of access to

$1.2 million in tax returns were processed at Plaza Adelante during its inaugural tax season.

Bank of the West Headquarters: San Francisco, California Web site: www.bankofthewest.com Primary Business: Banking. Employees: 10,422

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critical services like homeownership counseling, microenterprise development, financial education, and computer training in order to maximize the benefit for families seeking ways to build prosperity. Bank of the West’s $25,000 contribution to fund free tax preparation services at Plaza Adelante this year was based on a partnership with MEDA, Human Services Agency, and the United Way of the Bay Area and its “Earn It! Keep It! Save It!” program. It demonstrates the powerful results organizations can attain when they decide to collaborate to address a community need. Bank of the West Community Affairs Manager Rebeca Rangel also volunteered as a tax preparer at Plaza Adelante. One of the clients she served was Maria Carranza, who received a $7,000 refund and plans to pursue financial education and computer classes at Plaza Adelante. Maria says, “My plan is to open a savings account for my children’s college education with my refund.” PDJ


energized by

Diversity

With more than 7 million customers and 27,000 employees, National Grid is one of the largest investor-owned utilities in the world. And, our greatest strength comes from the power of inclusion and diversity in our workforce. The value of an individual’s skills, special talents, multicultural experiences, and alternative life styles is an integral part of our corporate culture. So is our commitment to preserving the environment as we address the energy needs of our customers. Whether you are interested in future employment, or are a small business entrepreneur, we welcome your perspective. Learn more about career and business opportunities at www.nationalgridus.com.


Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Alice J. Campbell Senior Director of Global Community Relations Baxter International Inc.

Inspiring Tomorrow’s Science and Technology Leaders

According to the Nation’s Report Card, only 29 percent of U.S. fourth- and eighth-graders and 18 percent of 12thgraders perform at or above a proficient level in science. Just 39 percent of fourth-graders and 34 percent of eighth-graders perform competently in math. As a science- and technology-based company, Baxter has a responsibility to ensure that current students as well as future generations have every opportunity to learn and be inspired by math and science. In 2008, the company launched Science@ Work: Expanding Minds with Real-World Science, a multi-year partnership with the Chicago Public Schools to support teacher training and student development in biotechnology. During the 2008-2009 school year, more than 24,000 students and 350 teachers in 109 Chicago Public Schools took part in Baxter-sponsored lab tours, lectures and symposia, where Baxter volunteers shared their passion for science, explored examples of real-world applications of biotechnology and encouraged students to consider careers in science and other health-related fields. The program’s success prompted Chicago Public Schools to name Baxter an “Outstanding Partner of the Year” in 2009.

at the company’s headquarters in Deerfield, Illinois, and worked with Baxter employees on a problem-based learning project to develop a prototype home dialysis machine for teen patients. Throughout the 2009-2010 school year, Baxter has expanded the Science@Work program through the opening of Muchin College Prep High School in downtown Chicago, attended by underserved students from more than 40 zip codes. Additionally, the company is providing internships for low-income students to work side-by-side with scientists at The Field Museum and Chicago Botanic Gardens, and offering lectures and lab tours with Baxter scientists and experts. In fall 2010, Baxter will help open Instituto Health Sciences Career Academy, a new high school located in the city’s Pilsen neighborhood that will specialize in training students for healthcare careers. Through these programs, the company anticipates that Science@Work will provide real-world science experiences to an additional 5,000 young minds and 100 teachers. PDJ

The cornerstone of Baxter’s support is its partnership with Lindblom Math and Science Academy in Chicago’s Englewood community. Baxter adopted Lindblom and established the Biotechnology Center of Excellence, providing lab supplies and critical teacher training to enrich biotechnology curricula throughout Chicago Public Schools. In 2009, Lindblom students toured Baxter’s Round Lake, Illinois facility, attended a career day Baxter International Inc. Headquarters: Deerfield, Illinois Web site: www.baxter.com Primary Business: Medical devices, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. Employees: 49,700

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Baxter International Chairman and CEO, Robert L. Parkinson, Jr. visits with Lindblom Biotechnology students. The students explained current projects that they were working on to Mr. Parkinson.

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Baxter Distinguished Scientist, Dr. Barrett Rabinow and the Biotechnology Center for Excellence’s Hortense Brice. Dr. Rabinow presented nanotechnology as part of professional development for teachers.


Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Susan B. Towler Vice President, The Blue Foundation for a Healthy Florida, Inc. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida

One Man’s Vision of Seeing Clearly Becomes Reality

By age 51, Daniel Caliabria’s vision problems were so debilitating that he was forced to move in with his sister and stop working. Blind in one eye and nearly blind in the other, he found the help he needed in August 2009, when the Clay County Health Department referred him to The Way Free Medical Clinic.

Like The Way, VIP is dedicated to providing quality healthrelated services to people in need. Specifically, Vision Is Priceless is committed to preserving the vision of First Coast residents through screening, early detection of potential eye disease and follow up care.

An all-volunteer non-profit, The Way Free Medical Clinic provides basic medical services to the uninsured and impoverished people living in Clay County, south of Jacksonville. Opened in 2006 to serve the Hispanic migrant population in the area, The Way, or El Camino, as it is called in the Hispanic community, fills a gap in medical services for people who might otherwise go without medical care. Today, The Way has clients from many backgrounds and ethnicities. All, however, are without insurance and qualify financially at or below 200% of the federal poverty guidelines.

Support from committed volunteers and funders like The Blue Foundation, the philanthropic affiliate of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida (BCBSF), enables both organizations to serve the people who often need help most.

Thanks to a 24-month grant from The Blue Foundation for a Healthy Florida to the Vision Is Priceless Council (VIP) in 2008, volunteer eye care professionals traveled to The Way clinic to screen and subsequently diagnose Caliabria with severe cataracts and low vision. He received free prescription eyeglasses and eye drops to help improve his vision. What’s more, VIP arranged for Caliabria’s cataract surgery – donated by an eye care provider in VIP’s network of ophthalmological practices.

Caliabria’s story is just one from the nearly 140 patients VIP has helped at The Way clinic since The Blue Foundation’s grant. The Blue Foundation also provided funding to The Way clinic for its women’s health program. Employees of BCBSF serve on the boards of directors of both non-profits. PDJ

“Through grants, such as the one Vision Is Priceless received to help Mr. Caliabria, The Blue Foundation exemplifies BCBSF’s commitment to helping people and communities achieve better health.” Robert I. Lufrano, M.D., chairman and CEO, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc.

Lufrano Volunteer eye care professionals travel to The Way Free Medical Clinic to conduct free vision screenings.

BCBSF Headquarters: Jacksonville, Florida Web site: www.bcbsfl.com Primary Business: Health insurance. Employees: 5,800

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Pamela P. Flaherty President and Chief Executive Officer of the Citi Foundation Citi

Citi Foundation Helps Posse Scholars Succeed in College Regina Chagolla may be the last of seven children, but she is the first among them to graduate from high school, the first to attain a college degree and, this spring, became the first to receive a master’s degree, which she completed in education at the University of California, Berkeley. An American-born citizen with Chicano roots, Regina grew up in South Central, Los Angeles. Despite the many distractions of her historically underserved neighborhood, Regina focused on her studies and on being a positive agent of change within her community. Her efforts paid off. In her senior year of high school, she won a four-year, full-tuition scholarship from the University of Wisconsin-Madison thanks to The Posse Foundation. “My mom – who never received a high school diploma but worked so hard to make sure that I could go to a good school – is my inspiration,” Regina said. “When I got the Posse Scholarship, she was so proud, she cried.” “I had the honor of being Regina Chagolla’s teacher and mentor while she attended Rosemead High School and have remained her mentor to the present,” says Michael Cohen, a teacher at Rosemead. “Regina is amazing! She is dynamic, intelligent, creative, highly motivated, and caring. She has a unique combination of drive and ability that convinces me that she will accomplish great things.”

most comprehensive college access and youth leadership development programs in the United States, The Posse Foundation identifies, recruits and trains public high school students with extraordinary academic and leadership potential to become Posse Scholars. The Foundation extends to these students the opportunity to pursue personal and academic excellence by placing them in supportive, multicultural teams – Posses – of 10 students. These students – many of whom might have been overlooked by traditional college selection processes – receive four-year, full-tuition leadership scholarships from Posse’s partner colleges and universities. Most important, Posse Scholars graduate at a rate of 90 percent and make a visible difference on campus and throughout their professional careers. The Posse Foundation is one of Citi Foundation’s key grantees. Pam Flaherty, president and CEO of the Citi Foundation, said, “We recognize that a college degree is one of the most effective ways to help young people move up the economic ladder and achieve success. The Posse Foundation is committed to helping students obtain a degree and we are pleased to support their outstanding work, and we congratulate Regina on her outstanding academic achievements.” PDJ

Regina is one of 3,148 public high school students from cities across the country who have been awarded the Posse Scholarship since The Posse Foundation’s founding in 1989. Among the

Citi Headquarters: New York, New York

Thanks to The Posse Foundation, Regina Chagolla received her bachelor’s degree in 2008 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her master’s in education in 2010 from the University of California, Berkeley.

Web site: www.citi.com Primary Business: Financial products and services. Employees: 265,000

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CHEVRON, the CHEVRON HALLMARK and HUMAN ENERGY are registered trademarks of Chevron Intellectual Property LLC. Š 2009 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

Our people are as diverse as their ideas.

tplace, rldwide marke To work in a wo represents workforce that Chevron has a siness, we rever we do bu the world. Whe r our y is essential fo believe diversit cause Be . d partners alike employees an human ts of view, our with more poin . er es even strong energy becom om. visit chevron.c To learn more,


Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Red Cavaney Senior Vice President, Government Affairs ConocoPhillips

ConocoPhillips and Rebuilding Together Join Forces to Help Low-Income Families Across the Country Since 2006, ConocoPhillips has supported Rebuilding Together in its efforts to improve homes and lower utility bills of low-income families across the country. With funding from ConocoPhillips, Rebuilding Together produced on-line educational tools, seminars and training curricula to teach volunteers and affiliates about green building and energy-efficient techniques. In addition, ConocoPhillips’ employees participated in Rebuilding Together projects across the country. In Ponca City, Oklahoma, one homeowner was living on social security benefits and caring for her adult handicapped daughter and grandchildren. She lived in a small wooden frame house with rotting windows and no storm doors or exterior windows. While volunteers installed energy efficient windows and doors as well as framework and other improvements, they discovered the home was not insured due to faulty and substandard wiring. Everything was run from a series of extension cords connected to two wall outlets. The house was rewired, new electrical outlets and a fuse box were installed, and the house was brought up to city code.

“ConocoPhillips is helping us reach our goal to make projects green and energy efficient,” said Tiffanie Kinney, associate director of Green Housing at Rebuilding Together. “Low-income homeowners across the country will be reminded of ConocoPhillips’ support when they see the savings on their utility bills.” “We are honored to work with Rebuilding Together, whose people are doing magnificent work, in support of the Energy Efficient Homes Initiative,” said Red Cavaney, senior vice president of Government Affairs and Rebuilding Together board member. In 2009, ConocoPhillips invested approximately $80 million in its local communities through charitable contributions and other community investment projects as donated through its company-operated businesses, as well as various joint ventures and equity affiliates. PDJ

The heating and air bills have been cut by more than 50%, and the homeowner no longer worries about an electrical fire. She can insure her home for the first time in more than ten years.

Volunteers in Houston delight in a job well done after a day of painting and landscaping.

Employees and friends of the Alliance Refinery in Belle Chasse, Louisiana helped neighbors in the Ironton community rebuild following Hurricane Katrina.

ConocoPhillips Headquarters: Houston, Texas Web site: www.conocophillips.com Primary Business: Oil and gas. Employees: Approximately 30,000

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Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Doug Hutcheson President and CEO of Leap Wireless International Cricket Communications

Rebuilding Together and Cricket: Transforming Our Communities Cricket Communications, Inc., a leading provider of unlimited wireless services, is a national sponsor of Rebuilding Together, a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving homeownership for low-income residents. Cricket has chosen to partner with Rebuilding Together for one simple reason: Rebuilding Together focuses on revitalizing the very same communities where our customers and employees live and work. The corporate partnership with Rebuilding Together is a natural extension of Cricket’s commitment to its customers and communities. In 2009, the first year as a premier sponsor, more than 2,700 Cricket employees and their friends and families logged some 25,000 volunteer hours. With Rebuilding Together’s expertise in home repair and modification, Cricket completed 69 projects for America’s low-income neighborhoods and revitalized community centers and non-profits that serve more than 7,600 clients. “Cricket is proud to be a part of Rebuilding Together’s efforts to help strengthen and sustain our communities,” said Doug Hutcheson, president and CEO of Leap Wireless International, Cricket’s parent company. “We are delighted to help families across the country through the partnership, and it’s especially gratifying to see the smiles and tears of joy on their faces when they see the improvements to their homes.” Through their collaboration, Cricket and Rebuilding Together have had an extraordinary impact in local communities, resulting in more than $4.3 million in home repair and modification services. In St. Louis, for example, Cricket refurbished the new home of The Demetrious Johnson Foundation, a charitable organization that is getting its first-ever official home after working with inner-city kids for close to 20 years. Cricket stepped in

with volunteers to restore the new center’s basketball court and weight room and to create a lounge for teenagers. The foundation offers mentoring, financial and vocational programs, such as Champions of Change, which works with the juvenile courts to place youth in Job Corps. “This is a dream opportunity for us,” said Demetrious Johnson, founder and namesake of the foundation and a former NFL player. “It’s going to give them pride to come to a facility they can call their own.” Across the country, Cricket continues to build on its commitment to bettering local communities. In the first half of 2010, more than 300 volunteers pitched in to help residents in Baltimore, Charleston, Colorado Springs, Dayton, Fayetteville, Greensboro, Kansas City, Lake Charles, Las Vegas, Lincoln, Macon, McAllen/Brownsville, Milwaukee, New York, Oklahoma City, Pittsburgh, Raleigh, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, Savannah, St. Louis and Tulsa. Cricket has upcoming Rebuilding Together projects planned for Chicago, Denver, Houston, Philadelphia, Phoenix, and San Diego. “Our work with Rebuilding Together has given us an opportunity to touch our communities in a real and tangible way,” said Cricket national field marketing manager Tonja Jones. “It’s been great to see our team come together on a national scale and respond in a way that exceeds all our expectations. The fact that a record number of Cricket employees participated in this single service project makes me proud to be part of what we call the Cricket Nation.” PDJ

Cricket Communications Headquarters: San Diego, California Web site: www.mycricket.com Primary Business: Telecommunications.

Putting in some sweat equity – Brandie Johnson, indirect sales specialist.

Employees: 4,200

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Kris Taylor Vice President of Community Relations Ecolab

Partering With Genesys Works and Humboldt School

“Building partnerships strengthens our community,” says Doug Baker, chairman, president and CEO of Ecolab. “Connecting Ecolab’s resources to the community is very important – we work hard to support organizations that can make an impact that lasts, and we help by providing talent as well as money.” For Ecolab, this focus manifests in a thriving partnership with Genesys Works, a non-profit partner dedicated to building bridges between economically disadvantaged teens, businesses seeking skilled workers and public schools – in this case, St. Paul Public Schools’ Humboldt School, Ecolab’s partner school for over 20 years. In 2008, Genesys Works approached Ecolab with a funding request for its summer program. Under the leadership of Jeff Tollefson, Genesys Works was branching out to St. Paul from its Houston headquarters. Ecolab was interested in the partnership potential beyond just supporting the teen work training sessions. “We saw this partnership as multi-faceted and a win-win for all of us,” comments Kris Taylor, Ecolab’s vice president of Community Relations. The outcomes of this partnership are comprehensive. Since 2008, six students have interned with Ecolab’s IT department, all Humboldt students, and 50 computers have been donated. Two interns have gone on to receive local and national awards and over $60,000 in college scholarships.

Ecolab Inc. Headquarters: St. Paul, Minnesota Web site: www.ecolab.com

Brittini Wickstrom, Dionne Griffin, and Myranda Ketcham receiving Genesys Works’ certificate of achievement and completion award at the Breaking Through Ceremony.

Primary Business: Development, manufacturing, sales and service of products that clean, sanitize and promote food safety and infection prevention. Employees: 26,000 worldwide

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Both students came from disadvantaged backgrounds. One was a gang member, whose mother urged him to sign-up for the program. He eventually realized there was an opportunity for him to turn things around. And he did. Now he is a freshman in college and a full-time Ecolab employee. The second student, just a year ago, spent most of his days contemplating if he should shoplift from local stores. Instead he “chose to dream and allow the spark inside…called ambition, to proliferate like wildfire.” He too has received scholarships and is on his way to college. Taylor concludes, “These stories make me realize the work Ecolab does in the community truly makes a difference. We never know how many lives will be positively influenced by these students or what great things they may go on to do in our community. The investments are well worth it.” PDJ “Building partnerships strengthens our community. Connecting Ecolab’s resources to the community is very important – we work hard to support organizations that can make an impact that lasts, and we help by providing talent as well as money.” Doug Baker, chairman, president and CEO of Ecolab

Baker


SEE IN US WHO YOU ARE

At New York Life we believe that people’s differences can be their greatest attributes. We recognize that employees’ unique qualities often lead to innovation, positive change, and a more productive and dynamic workplace. If you are looking for a new company or career, choose one that is committed to providing a challenging and rewarding experience, where every individual has the opportunity to succeed.

For more information about a career with New York Life visit us at www.newyorklife.com/diversity NEW YORK LIFE. THE COMPANY YOU KEEP.® © 2010 New York Life Insuranace Company, 51 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010 EOE/M/F/D/V


Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Derica Rice Executive Vice President, Global Services, and Chief Financial Officer Eli Lilly and Company

Midwestern Pharmaceutical Company Supports Local Minority Youth Pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly and Company and the Lilly Foundation believe that future innovation is in the minds and hands of the best and the brightest youth. The company makes it a priority to support organizations and activities that celebrate the contributions of diverse populations and that encourage employee interaction with multicultural communities. Lilly partners locally in Indiana with the Center for Leadership Development (CLD). A unique non-profit, CLD provides minority youth a realistic picture of how to achieve their goals while striving for excellence and encourages young people to prepare to become professional, business and community leaders.

While there is no question that CLD is making a positive impact on the community, the organization was struggling to meet the increasing demands for its programs and services. That’s when Lilly stepped in with a $1.4 million donation to help fund a new CLD center in 2007. “Because of Lilly’s support we’ve been able to dramatically improve the way we perform youth development services,” said Dennis Bland, president of the Center for Leadership Development.

“Lilly is very proud of its long-standing partnership with the Center for Leadership Development,” said Derica Rice, executive vice president, Global Services, and chief financial officer at Lilly and CLD board member. “They are succeeding in investing in and producing the next generation of leaders.”

CLD has expanded its facility and currently serves 2,700 students. With Lilly’s support, the organization has been able to open a college development resource center providing extended high school and college counseling services beyond school walls and into the community. “Lilly has positioned us to be able to speak to and offer answers on area problems in a very specific and tangible way,” said Bland.

The CLD program prepares Indianapolis-area AfricanAmerican youth for college and career success by focusing on self-discovery, service and commitment to high expectations and achievement, and by providing parent education and support. CLD prepares youth for achievement by emphasizing CLD’s core principles for success: character, education, leadership, service and career.

The two partners also come together once each year to host a Corporate Youth Summit at Lilly’s global corporate offices. Students and parents have an opportunity to interact with Lilly executives, tour the C-suite, and attend workshops geared toward exposing youth to corporate America. “Kids literally have a seat at the table – Lilly’s boardroom table – so they can envision themselves here one day filling my shoes,” said Rice. PDJ

Rob Smith, Lilly’s senior director of Corporate Social Responsibility, said the Lilly Foundation supports organizations like the CLD that have a “well-defined sense of purpose, a demonstrated commitment to maximizing available resources, and a reputation for meeting objectives and delivering quality programs and services.”

Eli Lilly and Company Headquarters: Indianapolis, Indiana Web site: www.lilly.com Primary Business: Pharmaceuticals. Employees: 39,000 employees worldwide

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Derica Rice, executive vice president, global services, and chief financial officer (left) and Mr. John Lechleiter, Ph.D., chairman, president and CEO (right) present a check to the Center for Leadership Development at their 2007 Minority Achievers dinner.

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Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Jim Vella President, Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services Ford Motor Company

Henry Ford Academy Opens Doors for Talented, Underserved Students In the fall of 1997, a new kind of public high school opened on the grounds of The Henry Ford – a National Historic Landmark founded by Henry Ford. This innovative school – Henry Ford Academy – became the nation’s first charter school created jointly by a global corporation, public education and a major non-profit cultural institution. Henry Ford Academy was developed through the partnership of Ford Motor Company Fund, The Henry Ford and the Wayne County Regional Educational Service Agency. The first classrooms were housed in the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. Classrooms were later renovated with the latest technology thanks to a $6 million grant from Ford Motor Company Fund. Students are selected by lottery for the 140 seats available for each freshmen class. The majority of students come from the nearby city of Detroit and represent diverse backgrounds. The student body is predominantly African American, but includes Arab American, Latino and Caucasian students.

Over the years, Ford Fund has provided an additional $4 million in support as the program evolved. Teachers and students at Henry Ford Academy follow a project-based curriculum that shares the essential elements of Ford’s Partnership for Advanced Studies (PAS). Also during each semester students engage in a design challenge that encompasses multiple disciplines throughout the grade levels. “The focus is on real-world learning and problem solving,” said Jim Vella, president, Ford Motor Company Fund. “Students often work together in teams, much like a true business environment.” “Students, many from homes of very limited means, leave here fully prepared to continue their education and career development at a level equivalent to public and private schools,” said Enright. “Ford Fund has been instrumental in helping us prepare students for success in the 21st century.” PDJ

“Our charter stipulates that our metrics be higher than their home school district,” said Rick Enright, assistant principal, Henry Ford Academy. “Today our attendance and graduation rates average about 95%, and 100% of our graduates are accepted into college. Our graduates are enrolled at Michigan State University, Arizona State, Kentucky State, the University of Michigan and other top schools around the country.”

Henry Ford Academy students build frames for urban garden beds.

Teamwork and communication skills are sharpened at Henry Ford Academy.

Ford Motor Company Headquarters: Dearborn, Michigan Web site: www.ford.com Primary Business: Automobile manufacturing. Employees: 176,000 employees

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Patrick C. Dunican, Jr. Chairman and Managing Director Gibbons P.C.

A Special “Jeans Week” at Gibbons P.C.

One Friday per month, all Gibbons employees are invited to wear jeans to work, paying a small fee for the “privilege” of wearing jeans that day. Employees suggest the charities that are supported by these fundraisers. Jeans Days have proven exceptionally popular and raised more than $21,000 last year. Our biggest Jeans Day success story was actually a full “Jeans Week,” which took place in July 2009.

way up to Director (partner) by 1998. John was going through a particularly difficult time when his house was destroyed; his mother was critically ill in the hospital and, ultimately, passed away only two days after the storms that claimed John’s home.

At 11:30 on the night of July 7, high intensity thunderstorms ripped through a narrow corridor of New Jersey towns. One that hit the town of Rivervale blew down a 100-foot oak tree, which fell directly onto the home of John Schank, a Gibbons Director and longtime employee. Thankfully, John and his family (wife Dani and two daughters, Jacqueline, age 6 at the time, and Eliza, age 8) were at the Jersey shore that night and not in the house when the tree effectively cut it in half.

In response, Gibbons designated the entire first week after the accident a Jeans Week, with proceeds going to the Schank family to cover immediate, basic, and, in many cases, completely unforeseen needs while they awaited insurance assistance. In addition to several thousand dollars of cash raised by firm employees, the Gibbons Women’s Initiative rallied to replace some of the lost articles of clothing for John’s two daughters. They also gathered stuffed animals, games, and toys to bring back some of what was lost. As John put it, the outpouring from Gibbons provided comfort and support at a time when it was most desperately needed. PDJ

The Gibbons family immediately rallied around the Schank family, and John, who was in his 25th year with Gibbons at the time of the accident, having started out as a mailroom employee the summer before his first year of law school and working his

“John may not recover the damaged family piano or lost childhood baseball card collection, but Gibbons gave him new articles of remembrance when perhaps he needed it most.” Patrick C. Dunican, Jr., chairman and managing director

Gibbons P.C. Headquarters: Newark, New Jersey Web site: www.gibbonslaw.com Primary Business: Legal services.

Gibbons employees raise money for worthy causes by dressing down on the firm’s monthly Jeans Days.

Employees: 373

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Corporat e Phil a nth rop y David O’Brien Executive Vice President, Government Services and External Affairs Highmark Inc.

Families Find Hope At the Highmark Caring Place

After his mom’s sudden death in 2004, 8-year-old Terry Waters III just went numb. “He was in a distant place,” his father, Terry Sr., recalls. “He was on the verge of shutting down altogether.” His father took a schoolteacher’s advice and called the Highmark Caring Place in Pittsburgh. “It was the warmest welcome that a person could ever have,” Terry Sr. says. “I said, ‘we’re home.’” The Highmark Caring Place, A Center for Grieving Children, Adults and Their Families, offers child-focused, family support for children and their adult caregivers who have experienced the death of a close family member. With significant funding from the Highmark Foundation, a charitable organization funded solely by Highmark Inc., Caring Place services are offered at no cost to families, regardless of their insurance status. Every other week, families gather at the Highmark Caring Place for its 10-meeting program. First, they share a meal together; then, they break into groups, with parents and guardians together, and children, grouped together by age. The children engage in a variety of activities, from making memory boxes to creating “feeling” masks, to releasing balloons with messages to the person who died. The Caring Place allows children the opportunity to grieve alongside their peers, according to Program Manager Andrea

Lurier, Ph.D. “This takes away the feeling that ‘I’m so different and alone,’” she explains. “And through the sharing and playing, they discover hope again at a very tragic time in their lives.” As for Terry III, “the fourth time here,” his father says, “he started opening up, letting me know what he was feeling. Then, everything started falling back into place.” Schoolwork, friendships, even his bowling score skyrocketed. “The love pours out of the walls,” Terry Sr. adds. “That’s why it’s called the Caring Place. A lot of care goes on here. A lot.” Explains David O’Brien, Highmark executive vice president of Government Services and External Affairs, “One in 20 children will experience the death of a parent before graduating from high school. Where do you turn? In Pennsylvania, the Highmark Caring Place offers an answer, in four locations across the state.” Since 1997, the Highmark Caring Place has served more than 30,000 community members at its facilities in Pittsburgh, Warrendale, Erie and Lemoyne, Pennsylvania. It has also become a replicable model for other facilities that are serving the needs of grieving families in Pennsylvania. For more information, please visit Highmark Caring Place, www.highmarkcaringplace.com. PDJ

Highmark Inc. Headquarters: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Terry Waters, Sr. and son Terry III, turned to the Highmark Caring Place for healing after Terry III lost his mother at the age of 8.

Web site: www.highmark.com Primary Business: Leading provider of health, dental and vision insurance. Employees: 20,500

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Carrie Varoquiers Vice President, Corporate Citizenship McKesson Corporation

McKesson Partners with the American Diabetes Association to Help Stop Diabetes McKesson’s ICARE Shared Principles are brought to life every day through efforts to improve the health of the healthcare system, support those in need, take steps to protect the environment, maintain a diverse workforce and treat employees fairly. Through these actions McKesson employees demonstrate their deep commitment to each other, customers, government, investors and communities every day. Community Days, McKesson’s all-employee volunteer week, was launched in San Francisco in 1998 with support from CEO John Hammergren and the rest of McKesson’s Executive Committee. During Community Days, employees are encouraged to participate in coordinated group volunteer projects developed by the Corporate Citizenship team. For Community Days 2010, more than 14,000 employees in 161 locations created 32,000 Stop Diabetes Packages for 4th and 5th grade students. These packages contained items such as a jump rope, pedometer, water bottle and comic book. They were developed with the American Diabetes Association to encourage students to adopt healthier eating habits and a more active lifestyle in order to help them prevent or manage type 2 diabetes.

in the future,” explains Pat Blake, executive vice president, and group president, McKesson Technology Solutions, and 2010 Community Days executive champion. He’s especially interested in diabetes prevention because his mother suffers from diabetes. McKesson employees delivered the Stop Diabetes Packages to elementary schools throughout the United States. A Teacher Implementation Guide included with the packages helps teachers to spread the Stop Diabetes message to their students. “Community Days is a great opportunity for employees across the company to break away from their everyday routine and have some fun, get together and get to know one another outside of their usual business experience,” says Carrie Varoquiers, vice president, Corporate Citizenship. “It also provides everyone with a really good feeling because you get to give back to the community where you live and work.” PDJ

Community Days is focused on diabetes because the McKesson Foundation is in the middle of a three-year strategic commitment to support diabetes management programs. “This project gives us a unique opportunity to get with students at a very young age and educate them about diabetes, and how the choices that they make today can help avert this disease Employees and their families enjoy McKesson’s 12th Annual Community Days held during National Volunteer Week in April.

A McKesson volunteer creates a Stop Diabetes Package for 4th and 5th grade students.

McKesson Corporation Headquarters: San Francisco, California Web site: www.mckesson.com Primary Business: Healthcare. Employees: 32,000

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Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Eileen Sweeney Director, Motorola Foundation MOTOROLA

Girl Power: Motorola Enables the Innovation Generation Did you know that women represent 49.9 percent of the total workforce but only 27 percent of the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) workforce and only 11.5 percent of the engineers? Developing an early interest in STEM is critical to girls’ success in these subjects. And our future depends on developing a pipeline of talent to solve the world’s pressing issues through science-based exploration – from bolstering our crumbling infrastructure to combating major diseases and developing clean technologies. As a company of engineers and scientists, Motorola is dedicated to nurturing the next generation of inventors. In 2009, the Motorola Foundation provided $5 million in Innovation Generation grants to non-profit organizations that give young people – especially girls – the hands-on experiences in STEM that spark a life-long love of these areas. Motorola is especially focused on inspiring girls in science because diversity is absolutely critical to helping Motorola – and

indeed all companies – meet the needs of a diverse world population. Motorola employees serve as mentors who show girls that they are not alone in their STEM interest and open their eyes to the possibilities that await them in the STEM fields. “Without a doubt, the Innovation Generation program has aided Girl Scout councils around the country to give girls a safe, all-girl environment to explore the field of robotics, learn about related careers and build confidence in themselves to perform this type of engineering just as well – if not better – than the boys,” said Kate L. Pickle, national STEM program manager, Girl Scouts of the USA.   “Traditional approaches to science education are failing to ensure access for students of color, girls and students who are poor, despite decades of interventions aimed at leveling the playing field,” said Dr. Gabrielle Lyon, co-founder and executive director, Project Exploration. “Motorola’s Innovation Generation grant has supported Project Exploration’s unique personalized approach, which combines science education and youth development to offer a model for engaging students of color and girls as well as students who are struggling academically with science.” Motorola is excited about the opportunities that abound for girls in STEM and the company’s role in encouraging the Innovation Generation. PDJ

A member of the Girl Scout FIRST Robotics team – The Space Cookies – works quickly to reterminate a battery to hopefully solve the team robot’s power problems between matches.

Motorola Headquarters: Schaumburg, Illinois Web site: www.motorola.com Primary Business: Wireless and broadband communication. Employees: 53,000

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Chad Jester President of the Nationwide Foundation Nationwide Insurance

Nationwide Insurance Fights Hunger – its Employees Help Make the Difference Ten years ago, Deb Rico’s husband was injured at work and lost his job. They had two young children and needed help providing food for their family until Deb could find a full-time job. Luckily, the Ricos were able to receive food three times a month from a local food pantry supported by the Mid-Ohio Foodbank. After a few months, Rico found a job. She promised to return the favor one day and now is one of thousands of employees at Nationwide Insurance who support hunger-relief initiatives through volunteerism and donations. “I know what it’s like to be on the other end,” said Rico. “That’s why I volunteer as a trainer at the Foodbank.” Recently, Feeding America honored Nationwide Insurance with its 2010 Group Volunteer Service of the Year Award for the work of Nationwide employees like Deb Rico. In 2009 alone, more than 2,200 Nationwide associates donated more than 5,800 hours at the Foodbank, sorting and packing food that is distributed to food pantries, soup kitchens and homeless shelters in the Foodbank’s 20-county footprint. Nationwide volunteers accounted for nearly one-fourth of all Deb Rico, Nationwide Insurance employee.

Nationwide Insurance Headquarters: Columbus, Ohio Web site: www.nationwide.com Primary Business: Nationwide offers a full range of insurance and financial services. Employees: About 33,000

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Foodbank volunteers. Nationwide employees also provide leadership to the Foodbank by holding board seats and lending their expertise on various committees. “Too many people in our community are struggling to put food on the table, and Nationwide employees are making a difference,” said Chad Jester, president of the Nationwide Insurance Foundation. “This award is a direct result of the passionate service of employees like Deb Rico and their desire to address a critical need in our community.” Additionally, Nationwide raised more than 1 million meals for the Foodbank’s 2009 “Operation Feed” community food and funds drive – representing 30 percent of the campaign total. “We’re so proud of what our employees are doing in the community,” said Jester. “Unfortunately, more and more families are requiring hunger assistance, so we feel our partnerships with the Mid-Ohio Foodbank and Feeding America are a great use of our volunteer and philanthropic resources.” PDJ


Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Cheryl Horn Manager, Corporate Citizenship Northrop Grumman Corporation

Go Weightless with Northrop Grumman

In 2007, eighth grade science teacher Shina Oshinuga participated in the Northrop Grumman Foundation’s Weightless Flights of Discovery (WFOD) program. It was the second year of the program and he saw it as a good experience, especially for anyone not enrolled in NASA’s space program. He had been teaching at Roosevelt Middle School in Compton, California, for several years. After applying and being accepted, he prepared his students by doing in-class experiments, the same ones he would perform in flight at zero gravity. Finally, it was flight day. Oshinuga and 59 other teachers flew out of Long Beach, California, for the experience of a lifetime. The flight changed Oshinuga’s entire teaching experience. He has been rejuvenated. The program, he says, “really boosted my morale, so much that I went back to school for my doctorate in education.” The students have also responded favorably. When they watch the WFOD post-flight video, they are amazed to actually see their teacher, now Dr. Oshinuga, floating. “Since the weightless flight, the student enrollment in Roosevelt Middle School’s Math Engineering Science Achievement (MESA) program has dramatically increased to becoming one of the largest in California,” reports Oshinuga. The school’s MESA program has also been recognized by the former State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Jack O’Connell, as the best in the state. Many students have also since expressed interest in pursuing careers in science. Even Oshinuga’s daughter

was so motivated after seeing his WFOD experience that she has decided to study space engineering. The Northrop Grumman Foundation WFOD program for public school teachers and university students is part of the company’s ongoing commitment to help the nation maintain a strong technical workforce. “The program is a way to say thank you to the teachers and enable them to develop innovative ways to make science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education exciting,” says CEO and President Wes Bush. To date more than 1,100 educators have flown, bringing this one-of-akind experience to an estimated 450,000 students nationwide. In 2010, the program, which targets underserved communities, will give 180 teachers and future teachers the opportunity to participate in this unique development program. To learn more, visit www.northropgrumman.com/goweightless. PDJ

Wes Bush, CEO and President

Bush

Dr. Oshinuga enjoying his weightless experience.

Northrop Grumman Corporation Headquarters: Los Angeles, California Web site: www.northropgrumman.com Primary Business: Global Security. Employees: approximately 120,000

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Chris Park President, New York Life Foundation New York Life

Scholarships for Spring Fellows Part of Grant to Fund 12 Students in 2010 Throughout Berta Gonzalez’s life she was told that education was the way to enhance one’s opportunities in life. But coming from a low-income family and watching her parents work two to three jobs just to afford basic living expenses, Berta knew that her family could never afford to send her to college. Furthermore, Berta thought that because she was a minority student, college wouldn’t be sufficient enough for her to increase her chances of getting a job once she graduated. She not only needed money but experiences that would prepare her for life once she graduated. Berta’s situation changed when The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars announced that a $45,000 grant from the New York Life Foundation would fund scholarships for up to 12 college and university students in elite, semester-long internships in 2010. These Diversity Scholars would gain valuable work experience at government agencies and private for-profit and nonprofit organizations based in Washington, D.C. Diversity Scholarships were awarded to Berta Gonzalez, Ana Lopez, Marco Ramos, Manu Srivastava and Brittany Vesey for the 2010 spring semester. Additional scholars will be named for the summer and fall semesters. The New York Life Foundation Diversity Scholarships target students who would otherwise not be able to participate at The Washington Center, helping to defray their costs while participating in the Center’s programs. Selection is based on an applicant’s academic major and performance, professional interests, letters of recommendation and internship placement.

New York Life Insurance Company Headquarters: New York, New York Web site: www.newyorklife.com Primary Business: Insurance. Employees: 9,013

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Missing from the photo are: Manu Srivastava from Lexington, KY, a student at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH, who is interning at the Financial Services Roundtable; and Ruchika Agrawal from Tucson, AZ, a student at the University of Arizona, who is interning at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

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“Internships are critical to the start of an emerging professional’s career and the diversity scholarships provided by the New York Life Foundation make life-changing experiences available for our students,” said Michael B. Smith, president of The Washington Center. “The New York Life Foundation is a true champion of our organization and we greatly appreciate their continued support for our program and students.” “We are pleased to continue to partner with an organization that has played an important role in preparing young people for leadership and civic participation,” said Chris Park, president, New York Life Foundation. “We continue to support The Washington Center because they encourage all of their participants to be informed, public-spirited and civically engaged.” Since 2002, the New York Life Foundation has given $435,000 to support scholarships for more than 100 of The Washington Center’s New York Life Foundation Diversity Scholars. PDJ

Pictured left to right: Marco Ramos from Dublin, OH, a student at Franklin University in Columbus, OH, is interning with the Enlisted Association of the National Guard of the United States; Berta Gonzalez, from Washington, D.C., a student at Mount St. Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, MD, is interning at the National Hispanic Medical Association; Brittany Vesey, from Bettendorf, IA, a student at the University of Iowa, is interning at the United States Department of Treasury; and Ana Lopez, from Roselle Park, NJ, a student at Stevenson University in MD, is interning at the Organization of American Studies.


Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Kathleen Ryan Mufson Vice President, Pitney Bowes Foundation Pitney Bowes Inc.

Developing the Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow – Pitney Bowes Supports Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship’s Summer BizCamps and E-clubs Numerous challenges are faced by youth in lowincome communities across our nation. To help these students succeed in school, and to increase their career aspirations and business knowledge, the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) offers interactive learning opportunities with a focus on entrepreneurship. These programs incorporate technology, field trips, games and volunteer involvement to connect classroom learning to the real world.

Both the BizCamp and E-club programs help enhance the lives of young students by improving their business, academic and life skills. The summer BizCamp is offered to students interested in entrepreneurship and small business. The curriculum offers them an opportunity to help gain advanced entrepreneurial knowledge. The camp also aims to show students the benefits of education, framing learning in a personally relevant and financially rewarding context.

To help NFTE achieve its mission in reaching these young students, the Pitney Bowes Foundation has been proud to support NFTE’s summer BizCamps and Entrepreneurship Clubs (E-clubs) for the past two years. The summer BizCamp program offers Pitney Bowes employees an opportunity to volunteer and effect important change in the community. Both programs help close the achievement gap, one of the Foundation’s strategic philanthropic focus areas within its interests in literacy and education.

Three NFTE E-clubs in the Boston area were supported by the Pitney Bowes Foundation in 2009. The E-clubs are designed to support active NFTE students and alumni through the implementation phase of their business after graduating from the NFTE “mini-MBA”-style program. They serve as a follow-up to the business plan development curriculum from NFTE and are facilitated by NFTE teachers.

“I was a young entrepreneur and I know from my own experience that starting a business helps students learn the interdisciplinary skills necessary to succeed in life. The company’s support of NFTE’s Summer BizCamps and Entrepreneurship Clubs helps these students apply what is learned in a classroom to realworld business scenarios.” Murray Martin, chairman, president & CEO, Pitney Bowes Inc.

Martin Pitney Bowes volunteers participate in a Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship BizCamp that took place in Stamford, CT last year. NFTE’s Summer BizCamps help students learn interdisciplinary skills in entrepreneurship while providing working professionals the opportunity to mentor area youth.

The entrepreneurship education offered by NFTE and supported by the Pitney Bowes Foundation helps young people from low-income communities build academic, professional and life skills through entrepreneurship. With the BizCamps and E-clubs, Pitney Bowes and NFTE collaborate to develop a strong, steady pipeline of innovators and self-starters who represent our nation’s future business leaders. Through this collaboration, they are helping form a brighter tomorrow for the students and the communities in which they live. PDJ

Pitney Bowes Inc. Headquarters: Stamford, Connecticut Web site: www.pb.com Primary Business: Provider of software, hardware and services that integrate physical and digital communication channels. Employees: 33,000

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Frazier Wilson Vice President, Shell Oil Company Foundation and Manager, Social Investment Shell Oil Company

Collaborative Effort Drives Science and Math Excellence For Shell Oil Company, a long-term commitment to an innovative educational project brings twofold rewards: it benefits the communities in which Shell employees live and work, and it helps build the pipeline of potential engineers and scientists that is essential to the energy industry’s future.

The impact can be seen in both improved student test scores and increased interest in science and math studies. As one teacher explained, “My students this year were able to understand concepts faster using the hands-on activities and higher-order thinking questions I learned through TRC.”

Shell began supporting the Texas Regional Collaboratives for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching (TRC) in 1996 and stepped up its involvement in 2005 with a $1 million multiyear grant. Based at The University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Science and Mathematics Education, TRC is a nationally recognized network of 60 partnerships that provide sustained, high-intensity professional development to science and mathematics teachers, who then mentor other teachers. Part of the grant from Shell went toward initiating two regional collaboratives in Louisiana, where Shell has a large workforce.

Ongoing support from Shell has included additional funds for specific projects and a significant volunteer commitment. “An impact of this scale only happens because a lot of people put their shoulder into it,” said Wilson, crediting AT&T, El Paso and Toyota as other corporate sponsors.

“TRC is one of the crown jewels of Shell social involvement,” said Frazier Wilson, manager of Social Investment. “It has a track record of success, it aligns with our business goals and it engages our employees in developing the energy workforce of the future.” Since 1991, the program has trained more than 18,000 math and science teachers and reached more than 2 million students. About 60 percent of students served are Hispanic or African American, two groups that are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math careers.

Shell Oil Company

(subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell)

Headquarters: Houston, Texas Web site: www.shell.us Primary Business: Energy and petrochemicals.

TRC professional development for teachers emphasizes hands-on learning tools.

Employees: (U.S.) 20,100

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TRC founder and executive director Kamil A. Jbeily, Ph.D., praised the involvement of corporate partners and organizations such as the Texas Education Agency, a major TRC funder. “It takes everyone,” he said. But, he added, “It is hard to think of TRC without thinking of Shell and the significance of its commitment.” PDJ

Engaging students is the first step to creating tomorrow’s math and science professionals.


Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Bob Brunn Vice President of Investor Relations & Public Affairs, and Executive Director of the Ryder Charitable Foundation Ryder System, Inc.

Ryder’s Volunteer Match Portal

Supporting and improving the communities where Ryder people work and live is an ongoing commitment for the company. Since 1991, Ryder has been a significant philanthropic partner of the American Red Cross, providing financial support as well as supplying in-kind donations of trucks, sponsoring local Red Cross events and supporting local disaster relief efforts. In June of 2009, Ryder made its largest commitment by declaring the Red Cross as its national charitable partner, and announced it had committed $1 million over the next three years to support national and local disaster preparedness and response efforts, making it one of the newest members of the American Red Cross Annual Disaster Giving Program. Since making the American Red Cross Ryder’s national charitable partner, the company has been able to improve employee engagement in support of the Red Cross, enhance its relationship with the organization, and implement a number of successful charitable and volunteer programs.

“Whether it’s through financial support, vehicle donations, or volunteer time from our employees, we want to do all we can to help increase the efficiency, capacity, and cost effectiveness of American Red Cross operations so the organization can continue to prepare and respond quickly and effectively in times of disaster.” Greg Swienton, Ryder’s chairman and chief executive officer

Ryder presents the American Red Cross with a $1 million donation. Pictured left to right: American Red Cross Greater Miami & Keys CEO Sam Tidwell; Curtis Sommerhoff, Director, Miami-Dade Dept. of Emergency Management; Robert Sanchez, EVP and CFO of Ryder; Bob Brunn, VP of Investor Relations & Public Affairs for Ryder; Matti Herrera Bower, Miami Beach Mayor; and Jeff Towers, American Red Cross chief development officer.

Swienton

In 2010, Ryder launched a national employee Red Cross volunteer campaign for all of its U.S. employees. Red Cross volunteer kick off events were held at all of Ryder’s large employee population centers in Miami, Florida, Atlanta, Georgia, Novi, Michigan, and Ft. Worth, Texas, and volunteer kits were sent to over 1,500 employee facilities in the U.S. To make it easy for Ryder employees to identify Red Cross volunteer opportunities that meet their interests and schedules, Ryder launched a custom online volunteer portal with Volunteer Match. In addition, Ryder leveraged its logistics expertise to help improve Red Cross disaster operations by giving 23 American Red Cross employees at the Red Cross Services Maintenance Center in Austin, Texas Ryder’s Lean Six Sigma Red Belt training. The training was conducted by a Ryder manager in the company’s Supply Chain Solutions continuous improvement group. In February of this year (2010), the Company’s employees, together with the Ryder Charitable Foundation, made an additional $100,000 donation to the American Red Cross to support disaster relief efforts in Haiti. The donation was the result of a nationwide employee giving campaign that raised $42,000 and a match exceeding this amount of $58,000 provided by the Ryder Charitable Foundation. More recently, in April, more than 70 Ryder employees participated on a running team in the annual Mercedes Benz Corporate Run in Miami, benefiting the American Red Cross. PDJ

Ryder System, Inc. Headquarters: Miami, Florida Web site: www.ryder.com Primary Business: Transportation and supply chain management solutions. Employees: 23,000

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Stephen J. Brady President of the Sodexo Foundation Sodexo, Inc.

Kevin Williams: An Unstoppable Desire to Fight Hunger and Poverty 2010 national STOP Hunger scholar recipient Kevin Anthony Williams, 20, of Secaucus, N.J., founded the Wrap 4 A Smile Foundation, Inc., in 2005 to fight poverty and stop hunger. He started fighting hunger when he was 15. His efforts include coordinating annual fundraising events with local restaurants, serving as a guest speaker about hunger at after school programs, as well as setting up volunteer projects for companies and schools. To date Kevin has prepared and served 4,100 meals, raised $60,000, and coordinated volunteers to pack and distribute 45,000 hygiene kits and 13,800 clothing and stationery items for more than 20 emergency shelters and pantries. Kevin was recognized as a STOP Hunger Regional Honoree for his work with Wrap 4 A Smile in both 2008 and 2009 (before winning the national scholarship this year). Regional honorees are granted $1,000 to support the hunger-related charity of their choice. In 2008, Kevin used the money to: Implement a Winter Feeding program for 100 people at Penn Station in Newark, New Jersey, and more than 250 people at Tompkins Square Park in New York City. Purchase groceries, prepare and serve meals for 200 people at Hoboken Shelter in Hoboken, New Jersey, and PERC Shelter in Union, New Jersey. Purchase non-perishable food supplies for Trenton Soup Kitchen in Trenton, New Jersey, as part of a New Jersey 4 Day

Sodexo, Inc.

Kevin A. Williams at Family Connection After School Enrichment Program promoting public healthcare awareness and community service projects.

Headquarters: Gaithersburg, Maryland Web site: www.sodexousa.com Primary Business: Food and facilities management services. Employees: 120,000

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Summer Community Outreach program. Impact: more 550 people in five cities (and two states) received meals and food. In 2009, Kevin was able to: Continue the Winter Feeding program for 100 people at Penn Station in Newark, New Jersey, and over 250 people at Tompkins Square Park. Purchase additional groceries, prepare and serve meals for 200 people at Hoboken Shelter in Hoboken, New Jersey, and PERC Shelter in Union, New Jersey. Purchase hygiene supplies and distributed 500 hygiene kits for Hudson County, N.J., and Bergen County, New Jersey’s Project Homeless Connect. Impact: more than 1,050 people were helped. Plan for this year’s $5,000 grant: School year 2010-2011 Winter Child Nutrition Program to Help Fight Childhood Hunger! for 502 students that currently receive meals through the Reduced & Free Lunch program in the Secaucus, New Jersey School District. Healthy Snack program for 500 students who come from low income families in Hudson County New Jersey and are participating in after school programs. Impact: more than 1,000 people, mostly children, will be helped. Kevin is one of 20 national STOP Hunger Scholars and more than 40 regional honorees since the program began. PDJ


Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Laysha Ward President of Community Relations TARGET CORPORATION

Creating Inspiring Spaces for Students to Learn and Grow At Bishop Spaugh Community Academy in Charlotte, North Carolina, 90 percent of students live below the federal poverty line. The school’s dedicated staff is working hard to boost students’ achievement levels – and team members from 12 local Target stores are pitching in to help. School counselor Raukell Robinson said she was overwhelmed by the “ocean of red” that engulfed the school when more than 70 Target volunteers swooped in to kick off Bishop Spaugh’s Target School Library Makeover by cleaning, painting and moving furniture before school started. When the official one-day makeover occurred in September 2009, 52 Target volunteers donated 364 hours to tasks like building bookshelves, stocking the library with $6,000 worth of new books, and replacing the school sign, which was riddled with bullet holes. Today, Target volunteers continue to stay connected with Bishop Spaugh students through mentoring and other activities. Bishop Spaugh is just one example of the tremendous impact that Target School Makeovers are having on K-12 schools across the country. Since the program’s inception in 2007, Target volunteers have revamped more than 2,000 libraries nationwide and donated more than 1 million books through the program. Some libraries with the greatest needs – more than 40 so far – receive a complete Target School Library Makeover. With the support of Target’s store design and construction teams, these libraries undergo a transformation featuring completely redesigned spaces with light construction, new furniture and shelves, carpet, technology, 2,000 new books, and seven books for each child to take home and call his or her own.

Overcome with excitement, students rush in to explore their redesigned library for the first time, courtesy of Target.

“Walk into any kindergarten classroom in the U.S., and you’re likely to see dozens of young faces filled with energy and potential,” says Laysha Ward, president of Community Relations at Target. “Then, you step back and consider the reality. Research indicates that one in three of these students will not graduate from high school, and the odds are even worse for Hispanic and African American students – half of whom will not receive a diploma.” Target is committed to helping kids beat these odds. Since 1946, the company has given 5 percent of its income – more than $3 million a week – to the communities it serves. In 2009 alone, Target and its team members completely remodeled 18 libraries, contributed more than 400,000 new books and volunteered thousands of hours to help kids reach their educational goals. Big plans are also in the works for 2010, when Target will nearly double the number of extreme Target School Library Makeovers it conducts to include 32 libraries in 31 cities nationwide. In addition to these extreme makeovers, each of Target’s more than 1,700 stores and distribution centers will present a $500 Book Award to a school at which 65 percent or more students qualify for Free or Reduced Lunch. Clearly, big numbers like these make a big difference. But to really understand the impact of Target’s giving on students and communities, you have to focus on much smaller numbers – such as one school where the students know more than ever that the community cares; one teacher who now has the tools to help her students succeed; and one child who discovered that reading can send her soaring. PDJ

TARGET CORPORATION Headquarters: Minneapolis, Minnesota Web site: www.target.com/education Primary Business: Retail. Employees: 351,000

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py JAN TRATNIK Director, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs W.W. GRAINGER, INC.

Leveraging Our Charitable Activities Through Philanthropy With a Purpose Over the past decade, W.W. Grainger, Inc., has taken its corporate giving programs to a new level by bringing a strategic purpose to charitable contributions that aligns with the Grainger brand. The integration of our business and giving goals has enabled the company to leverage its strengths, and the enthusiasm of a diverse group of employees, to make meaningful contributions to the communities we serve. “Our employees want to help others,” says Jim Ryan, Grainger’s CEO. “It’s what they enthusiastically do for our customers every day. That same drive to serve extends well beyond the walls of our branches into the communities where our employees live and work.” Grainger’s charitable giving in 2009 amounted to more than $16 million in cash and in-kind, including disaster preparedness and response, local branch activities, technical education, and matching gift programs. Preparing and responding to disasters is natural for Grainger, given the ability to provide volunteers, through our U.S. branches, as well as essential products like generators, cleaning supplies, batteries, and flashlights. In 2001, Grainger began a strategic partnership with the American Red Cross, and in 2006 became the national founding sponsor of a premier workplace volunteer program called, “Ready When the Time Comes” (RWTC). RWTC has trained more than 10,000 volunteers from 460 businesses across the country and 1,000 of those volunteers are Grainger employees. RWTC engages Grainger employees and their families, as well as other businesses, in providing trained relief volunteers who are ready to respond quickly when a disaster strikes. W.W. GRAINGER, INC. Headquarters: Lake Forest, Illinois Web site: www.grainger.com Primary Business: Distributor, facilities maintenance products. Employees: 19,000

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Enrique Rogers, our South Florida Branch Manager, recently launched the RWTC program in his area, enlisting some two dozen employee volunteers in two days. Enrique joined Grainger 18 years ago after Hurricane Andrew wiped out his previous employer overnight. “Even though we weren’t trained, we volunteered to help the victims of Katrina, as well as the people in Haiti devastated by the earthquake,” Rogers says. “We approached the aid effort just like we work with our business clients – find out what’s needed and just do it.” Rogers is also leading his branch in a new grassroots initiative called “Engage Your Community,” whereby branch managers build networks within their communities and partner with notfor-profit organizations to meet local needs. In Rogers’ case, he joined with other Miami-area Grainger branches to partner with local food banks. “The diversity of people on our own staffs, which mirrors the ethnicity of our community, is incredibly important to understanding what our local needs are,” Rogers says. Another way Grainger aligns philanthropy with business is by supporting technical education aimed at producing the skilled trade workers needed to fill the jobs of the future. The Grainger “Tools for Tomorrow” scholarship program, in partnership with the American Association of Community Colleges, awards $2,000 for tuition to 150 students at 50 community colleges across the country. When the students complete their coursework, they receive a customized toolkit from Grainger. By the end of 2010, Grainger will have provided approximately $1 million to support technical education since we began the program in 2006. PDJ From left to right: Olugbenga Olufasola, Sarah Ann Ferguson, Community College of Rhode Island, 2010 Grainger Tools for Tomorrow® Scholarship Award Winners.


Corporat e Phil a nth rop y Margaret McKenna President of the Walmart Foundation Walmart

Walmart’s Hunger Relief Efforts Help Those in Need

Walmart and the Walmart Foundation recently announced a $2 billion cash and in-kind commitment, stepping up efforts to help end hunger in America. Through the end of 2015, the new initiative, “Fighting Hunger Together,” will include four key components: Donating more than 1.1 billion pounds of food from Walmart stores, distribution centers and Sam’s Club locations, valued at $1.75 billion; Awarding grants totaling $250 million to support hunger relief organizations at the national, state and local levels; Mobilizing Walmart associates and customers – for example, Walmart’s logistics team will lend their expertise to help food banks become more efficient in their operations; and Collaboration with government, food manufacturers and other corporations that are fighting hunger to increase impact and reach a greater number of families in need.

In 2009, when high levels of unemployment placed greater demands on U.S. food banks, Walmart doubled its food donations to Feeding America, becoming Feeding America’s first food donor to provide more than 100 million pounds of food in one calendar year. The 127 million pounds of food donated by Walmart in 2009 is equivalent to nearly 100 million meals for families, seniors and children in need. To support the 16 million children in the U.S. who are unsure where their next meal will come from, Walmart and the Walmart Foundation also helped feed more than 93,000 children in 2009 through a donation to the Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s summer feeding program. PDJ “Hunger relief is a cause that enables our company’s strengths to work for the greater good. From supporting summer feeding programs to donating food, we’re committed to doing all we can to help end hunger for the more than 49 million Americans who have found themselves in need.” Margaret McKenna, president of the Walmart Foundation

Walmart Headquarters: Bentonville, Arkansas Web site: www.walmartfoundation.org Primary Business: Retail. To ensure that food banks have the capacity to safely transport donations, the Walmart Foundation donated 69 refrigerated trucks to Feeding America food banks across the U.S.

Prof iles in Div er s it y Jou r na l

Employees: More than 2.1 million associates worldwide

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Co rp or at e P h i l anth ro py Lance Chrisman Executive Director, WellPoint Foundation, Inc. Wellpoint

WellPoint Foundation awards American Diabetes Association “Alerting a Nation” Grant WellPoint, Inc. cares deeply about the future of the communities it serves.

WellPoint Foundation’s “Alerting a Nation” grant has enabled the following:

“Our philanthropic efforts raise awareness of the long-term benefits of active and healthy living,” says Lance Chrisman, Executive Director of the WellPoint Foundation, Inc., the private, non-profit arm of WellPoint, Inc. “More specifically, reducing obesity rates, decreases the risks for many preventable diseases, including diabetes.

Innovative Diabetes Awareness Support – The WellPoint grant has helped the ADA create its first-ever online Diabetes Risk Test. This online tool encourages visitors to answer simple questions about weight, age, family history and other potential risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. The test then determines whether individuals are at low, moderate, or high risk for pre-diabetes or diabetes. The website recommends that those who are deemed high risk should follow up with their health care providers.

By aggressively targeting youth and families, we strive to instill life-long healthy habits at an early age – before unhealthy habits are established. A critical part of this message is understanding your family health history and taking the steps to self-diagnose to determine if you are at a higher risk for certain diseases.” This proactive philosophy has led the WellPoint Foundation to establish a key partnership with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) through a $1.5 million, three-year grant that helps motivate individuals to learn about and modify lifestyle and behavioral choices to prevent the development of prediabetic and diabetic conditions. The “Alerting a Nation” grant promotes heightened national awareness, in part by helping the ADA create consumer-friendly learning tools that support good outcomes for all individuals, but particularly those in higher at-risk groups. These high-risk groups include overweight and sedentary individuals; those over the age of 45 who have family histories of diabetes; African Americans; Latinos and Hispanics; Native Americans; Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders; and women who have had gestational diabetes or have had babies weighing more than nine pounds at birth. WellPoint Headquarters: Indianapolis, Indiana

Primary Business: Health benefits provider. Employees: Approximately 39,000 associates

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Improved Consumer Action Support for Diabetes Prevention – The WellPoint grant has helped the ADA create a diabetes toolkit of facts, statistics and posters that community based organizations can use to motivate consumers to know their risks and take action to get pre-screened. To date, 5,000 toolkits have been distributed to community-based organizations across the nation. “We are extremely grateful to the WellPoint Foundation for their strong support of our diabetes awareness and prevention efforts,” said Christine T. Tobin, RN, MBA, CDE; president, Health Care & Education, ADA. This American Diabetes Association grant is but one example of how WellPoint, Inc. and its employees routinely work with non-profits to support common goals that address preventable health concerns through strategic choices. “We are truly appreciative of the WellPoint Foundation,” said Larry Hausner, CEO, American Diabetes Association, “for their assistance in enabling us to enlist more community-based organizations to join us to stop diabetes.” PDJ

Web site: www.wellpoint.com

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Broadened National Spotlight on ADA’s Encouragement for Self-assessment – WellPoint’s support helped the ADA attract increased public visibility to its annual diabetes awareness Alert Day, specifically targeting individuals in high risk groups. This year’s March 23 event generated more than 192 million national media impressions, which helped drive 82,000 consumers to the Stop Diabetes website.

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advantage

advertiser’s index Bank of the West . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 41

National Grid. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 49

Vanguard HR. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 79

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Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC . . 27

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Chevron . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 53

PepsiCo, Inc. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 5

W.W. Grainger. .. .. Inside Front, 1

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Freddie Mac. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 13

Royal Dutch Shell . .. .. .. .. .. .. . 15

Walmart . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 9

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www.shell.com

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KPMG LLP . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 77

Sodexo. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3

Waste Management. .. Inside Back

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Lockheed Martin . .. .. Back Cover

UnitedHealth Group. .. .. .. .. .. . 45

WellPoint . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 18

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www.unitedhealthgroup.com

www.wellpoint.com


© 2010 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. 22368NSS

Building careers as diverse as our workforce. KPMG’s commitment to diversity helps us attract the best people. Our vast number of career opportunities helps keep them here. kpmgcareers.com

KPMG. A great place to build a career.


global diversity

Lessons from the Trenches: Best Practice Advice for Global D&I Leaders

G

By Michal Fineman and Elizabeth MacGillivray ORC Worldwide

Global corporate diversity programs have ceased to be a new phenomenon. Many companies have been applying diversity and inclusion concepts in their operations around the world for a number of years now, and much has been learned since early, naive attempts to simply export American-style programs to other regions. If nothing else, we’ve realized that there is no single right way to take a diversity initiative global. Nevertheless, despite, or perhaps because of, the variety of approaches to globalization we have encountered in our research and work with multinational organizations, a number of lessons have emerged: Global diversity strategy and structure work best when compatible with the company’s business, markets, and organization. Progress can be difficult in diversity for lots of reasons, but structural barriers can be addressed by ensuring that the D&I structure fits comfortably with what is happening at the business level. Because it is difficult to effect change from a distance, one leading organization devised a global diversity network structure with two company representatives from each region that help manage diversity in that region. In addition, each country has its own country representative to the network as well. Another global company has established a D&I working group comprised of 30 individuals around the business and from their three regions (US, EMEA, and APAC) responsible for providing leadership and progressing on accountability in diversity. The global diversity leader’s most important role is building relationships with local business and HR leaders. She acts, as one of our research subjects put it, as the “cultural translator,” listening carefully to local leaders and working with them to make diversity and inclusion concepts relevant to the local situation. In the process, she builds a network of local stakeholders who trust her and, by extension, the corporation’s D&I efforts and brings the message to their peers. Global diversity leaders also need to cultivate strong partnerships with other functions, such as talent management, recruiting, and corporate responsibility, at the corporate, regional, and business unit levels, since these are the individuals who control the 78

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processes through which diversity concepts are integrated. Some companies take structural measures to encourage these partnerships, such as assigning diversity accountability to local HR or employee relations managers or creating a community of practice that brings together local and corporate people with some diversity responsibility to share best practices and work together on corporate initiatives. Diversity goals cannot be dictated to local leaders based solely on the rationale in the headquarters country. Many of the companies we have studied have a global business case describing why D&I are corporate priorities. But most acknowledge that to capture the commitment of people on the ground, diversity and inclusion goals must respond to the strategic concerns facing each business unit and location. One company reorganized its diversity councils from a regional structure to one aligned with markets in order to ensure that diversity work is tied to relevant business and talent challenges. Another distributed its global business case statement to managers around the world and asked them to analyze it in light of local issues. Local managers and employees should be involved in determining both the global vision for diversity and inclusion and local priorities and strategy. Similar to the lesson above on setting diversity goals, setting strategy at the local and global levels must have local input to ensure that the strategy translates and is relevant. One financial services company uses regional and country-specific diversity councils that inform the corporate function on key issues for customers and employees, so that the strategy is responsive to both the local market and talent needs. Another vehicle for enabling local viewpoints to inform corporate strategy is through the use of affinity/employee resource groups that exist around the globe. Many companies are now sponsoring global employee networks that not only provide support to employees in those constituencies, but communicate the local needs of the employees and organization at various sites around the organization. To make lasting change at every level, D&I must be integrated with business and HR processes so that it becomes a part of the way decisions are made day-to-day. PDJ ORC Worldwide (ORC) is an international management consulting firm offering professional assistance in the areas of global equality, diversity and inclusion; talent management; global and domestic compensation; labor and employee relations; and occupational safety and health. Visit www.orcworldwide.com for more information.


Investing for the long term is important.

That’s why we need the right assets. At Vanguard, we invest for the long term—in the markets and in our talented employees, whose unique contributions energize our work. That is why we continue to be strong, and why we’re committed to providing opportunities for leaders like you.

Connect with Vanguard > www.vanguard.com/careers ®

Vanguard is an Equal Opportunity Employer. © 2009 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


last word

Performance Management for Inclusion By Marie Y. Philippe, PhD Corporate Vice President, Culture and Organizational Effectiveness The Lifetime Healthcare Companies

O

One size does not fit all in performance management if you want to maintain a productive diverse workforce. Companies tend to performance-manage to the two tails of employees’ performance bell curves. Either employees get lots of attention because they are non-performers and in need of performance improvement plans or because they are identified as having high potential for career growth. Those in the middle, the majority, tend to receive little to no attention. If your company desires to either move many of the minority employees from the belly of the curve to the high performance end or from low to acceptable performance, differences in managing their performance may be worth considering. All employees want to contribute to the success of their companies. Employee surveys generally reveal that minority employees wish to partake in the business success and do well personally, in the process. Therefore if they don’t, there are usually some major missing elements. There can be a multitude of reasons why any employee does not perform well. However, when analyzing determinants for successful performance management, a recurrence of primarily five factors seems to negatively impact the performance of minority groups’ employees: 1) Many employees in the minority groups feel that they must do so much more than their non-minority counterparts to receive the same level of recognition. Perceptions are one’s reality. Most managers to whom this concept is presented will argue their equity in recognition treatment. Some, however, after some introspection, will agree that performance standards are not always evenly applied. 2) When an employee is the only minority in a department that does not embrace the person’s uniqueness, the employee will eventually shut down. It is a psychological struggle to stay engaged and perform well when an apparent lack of appreciation for your contribution constantly faces you. 3) Effective orientation and integration starting at hiring plays a huge part in long term success. Navigating a 80

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corporate culture is no easy task without a mentor, formal or informal. For a minority employee, trial and error is often the only method by which to seek the appropriate resources to complete an assignment, for example, or find a shortcut to training access. This trial and error can translate occasionally, into a lower performance level. 4) The lack of clear job description and related expectations can also contribute to a real or perceived lack of high work performance. When an employee cannot clearly articulate what she/he is accountable for and doesn’t know the real priorities it is unlikely that they can perform well. Job-scope creep for minority employees who are reluctant to say “no” when given more tasks may lead to the vain effort of trying to be all things to all people, resulting in performance failure. 5) Assignments that challenge employees tend to maintain their enthusiasm and increase their performance. Great leaders take the time to analyze skill levels and match assignments with increasingly stretched goals within their teams, in order to keep developing strengths and reducing weaknesses. For many minority employees, the missing challenge factor becomes the norm, even if voiced to management. Thus with reduced enthusiasm comes reduced speed in delivery or reduced creativity, resulting in reduced performance. Obviously the list of identifiable touch points that can drive or maintain average-to-poor performance is much more expansive. The critical lessons to be learned are: 1) Managers of people in minority groups need to be made aware that performance management must take into consideration differences; and 2) If a minority employee is not performing well, the root cause for that outcome can often be misdiagnosed. To ensure a diverse, productive, and engaged workforce, performance management must be seen as a multi-faceted tool that capitalizes on differences. PDJ

Marie Y. Philippe, PhD is well known for her leadership contribution in corporate culture transformation through strategic diversity initiatives and organizational change management. She can be reached at marie.philippe@lifethc.com.


achieving success

Jan Tratnik Director, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs

A company that

Laura Coy Public Affairs Manager

is making a

together

Erin Ptacek Director, Corporate Brand and Reputation

difference We’re proud of Grainger’s Philanthropy Team, who have made a world

in your

of difference not only at Grainger, but in the communities we serve.

world and the

Their hard work and commitment have helped our 1.8 million customers around the globe get their jobs done.

every day.

world around you.

Kellie Harris Public Affairs Manager

Elizabeth Valdez Executive Assistant, Corporate Communications

Waste Management is a Fortune 200 company that is changing the world for the better. We are strongly committed to promoting diversity and inclusion and empowering our employees. We are working with the communities we serve to fuel innovative change—and we need your help. www.wmcareers.com

From everyday collection to environmental protection. Think Green.® Think Waste Management. www.thinkgreen.com


Also Featuring … WellPoint: A conversation with Angela Braly • Catalyst • Thought Leaders • Perspectives

Corporate PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL July / August 2010 • VOLUME 12 NUMBER 4

BETWEEN THE CHALLENGE AND THE SOLUTION, T H E R E I S O N E I M P O R TA N T W O R D : H O W.

Diversity. It’s not a goal. It’s a necessity. When facing down the most important projects in the world, you need fresh ideas. And unique perspectives. Delivering the most complete answers to solve complex problems is all a question of how. And it is the how that makes all the difference.

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also inside: 2010 International Innovation in Diversity Awards

Diversity Journal - Jul/Aug 2010  

Corporate Philanthropy and International Innovation Awards

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