Issuu on Google+

AUTUMN 2011 ISSUE 64


STAY JOYFUL.

Enjoy a delightfully lunch at any of our 6 splendid restaurants with “Discount your Age’’ You’re invited to be a part of the celebrations for our 6th year of excellence in hospitality. Count your age in years and get the same amount off.

. Offer is valid until 30 of December 2011 . Discount valid up to 10 persons only . Applicable on lunch time from 12:00 noon until 5:00 pm For reservations, call Holiday Inn Kuwait, Salmiyah 1847777 or 25760000 Fax: 25759809 Email: hik@hikwt.com Website: www.kuwait-hi.com Terms and conditions apply. ©2010 InterContinental Hotels Group. All Rights Reserved. STAY YOU.TM is a registered trademark of Six Continents Hotels, Inc.

holidayinn.com


‫ﹼ‬It is more than a living space....

It is a lifestyle

AAA, the leading Housing Management Company in Kuwait

AAA HOUSING Furnished Serviced ‫ﹼ‬It is more than a&living space.... It Apartments is a lifestyle

Providing high quality, western style furnished and Serviced Apartment Complexes in Kuwait

P.O Box 823 Safat, 13009 Kuwait Tel # +965 22465888 - +965 22452700 Fax # +965 22433625 Email: house@aaahousing.com - Web: www.aaahousing.comProviding high

AAA, the leading Housing Management Company in Kuwait

Catering to every aspect of Clients’ needs

AAA, renowned as the largest supplier

having over 1,500 units in prime residential locations

quality, western style furnished and Serviced Apartment Complexes in Kuwait

AAA, renowned as the largest supplier

having over 1,500 units in prime residential locations

satisfactying and meeting all our customers’ expectations.

satisfactying and meeting all our customers’ expectations.

Catering to every aspect of Clients’ needs

‫ﹼ‬I‫ﹼ‬Itt is a AA HOUSING is more moreAthan than a living living space.... space.... & Serviced It is ItFurnished is a a lifestyle lifestyle Apartments With Us

Pro Pro qua

P.O Box 823 Safat, 13009 Kuwait Tel # +965 22465888 - +965 22452700 Fax # +965 22433625 Email: house@aaahousing.com - Web: www.aaahousing.com


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

DISPATCHES Dear Friends,

2232 2038 2232 2040

Welcome back.

Since I know many of you

attended the BBF Intro to Kuwait on the 7th, I trust everyone is getting back in the swing of things here in Kuwait.

Dispatches and Advertising Manager

For newcomers, Intro to Kuwait is a great way to

Adriaan Vickery

discover what’s happening here in Kuwait. For

Telephone (+965) 6775 3962 Email dispatches.advertising@ bbfkuwait.com

good way to shake up any routines we’ve gotten

those of us who’ve been around for a while, it’s a into. I hope everyone found something new and interesting that will add to their quality of life

: Rose William 2232 2038 2232 2040 email business@bbfkuwait.com

here. Of course, Dispatches is also a pretty good resource for that as well.

In this issue you’ll

find information about our next to big events, probably the biggest event to hit London since 1948, some surprising “green” thoughts and a lot more. So, grab a cuppa and relax for a few minutes while you give Dispatches a read.

Sue

Take care,

British Business Forum

Susan Day Editor

The Voice of the British Business in Kuwait

2

DISPATCHES

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


Family, Adventure, Luxury, Private, Historical, Sport, Crewed Yachts, Cruises ………. Guaranteed. Best services. Best Prices.

For prices, booking and more information please visit us at Dar Al Awadhi commercial Complex, Mezzanine floor next to British Airways office Ahmad Al Jaber street, Sharq Email: travel@alghanim.com - www.alghanimtravels.com


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

DISPATCHES

DISPATCHES A

Dispatches

utumn 2011

Contents

4

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BBF Board of Directors 6 Letter from the Chairman 8 Letter from the Ambassador 9 BBF Sector Groups Defined 10 A Message from Baroness Nicholson 14 The BBF Awards for Excellence 15 This and That 16 BBF’s Popular Intro to Kuwait 17 Chill Out 24 A Message from the Duke of York 26 A Matter of Principle 30 Mentoring Strategies 32 Business Netiquette in Ten 36 The Language Every Successful Businessperson Needs to Know 37 How Green is my Data Centre? 42 One Smart Cookie: Anna Garforth 44 Consumerism, Environment & Art 46 Global Warming? 48 Meet Wenlock and Mandeville 50 Hosting the Games is GREAT 52 Dental Implants 56 KES Students Report on London Experience 58 NES Achieves BSO Approved Status 62 Love It or Hate It - an Unsavoury Dispute 63 Marmite’s Close Cousin 66 Seat Belts Save Lives Campaign 68 Car Care 70 Places of Interest 72 Carla in Kuwait 74 BBF Membership Information 76 British Embassy 82 Community Groups 84 Membership Form 96

Dispatches

Dispatches

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


I am heading to study Engineering at

I will be studying Psychology at

Purdue University

Scotland - UK

Indiana - USA

Hussein Al Kazemi

I am off to study Earth Sciences at

Imperial College London - UK

Isha Sharma

Stirling University

Khaled Ghazi

I have been offered a place at

Georgetown University Washington D.C. - USA

Hanan Gaith

Head Girl

I will be going to study Architectural Engineering at

Concordia University Montreal - Canada

Nayiri Bidanian

I applied to study Economics at

Columbia University New York - USA

Saeed Saeed

I am going to study Chemical Engineering at

TUM

Munich - Germany

Anugrah Ramadhan

I am planning to study at

LAU

Beirut - Lebanon

Michel Chiti

I am planning to study Journalism at

Leeds University Leeds - UK

Dimiter Dakov

I have been offered a place to study Pharmacy at

Kings College, London - UK

Ahmed Malik

I am heading to

Miami University Florida - USA

Akshay Jetwani Head Boy

Jabriya, Block 12, Street 1 Tel: (+965) 25318060 I Fax: (+965) 25319924 Email: admin@neskt.com

www.neskt.com DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

BBF Board 2011/2012

Paul McKay

Arthur Barber

Chairman Events

Vice Chairman Dispatches

Chris Baker

Graham Kenny

Treasurer

Donald Teale Director Sector Group

6

General Secretary Governance, Contracts

Brian Dawes Director Strategy

Pierre Banoori

Director Membership Benefits

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

Lesley Watson

Hanna Jerczynska

Director Commercial Activities

Director Membership

Director Press Relations

Administration Manager

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

Director

Jes Bunce

Musaed Al Najjar

Rose William

Linda Asfour

Director

Adriaan Vickery

Dispatches & Advertising Manager

George Mhawech Events Manager

7


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

Letter from the Chairman Many of you will be reading this on your return to Kuwait from your summer break or indeed as a newcomer to the country. If, so, I hope you had a relaxing and enjoyable time, and have arrived refreshed to face the excitement of a new season in the Kuwait business scene. Dispatches magazine is the ‘Voice of British Business’ in Kuwait and the British Business Forum (BBF) is the focal point of the community: both business and social. I hasten to add our BBF calendar year is one quarter complete and the work of expanding our membership continues unabated with a volume of new corporate members joining and packed audiences at all our monthly member’s meetings. Most immediately, as many of you will know, the BBF is on the move; I see our relevance in Kuwait growing in a fundamental and positive way. I am delighted to report that in the last two years we have progressed in meeting fresh and new objectives to increase our appeal and effectiveness as a business organisation. The Board of Directors made a commitment to develop a new strategy revolving around our core mission because we were convinced that doing pretty much the same was not enough. As part of that strategy, we will continue to engage with key business leaders, government officials and UK ministers giving us greater insight into the marketplace and supporting the good bilateral relations between UK and Kuwait. Trade remains an important pillar of our relationship. The creation of a UK-Kuwait Trade & Investment Task Force, a new commitment to double our trade to US$4 billion a year by 2015, and a Memorandum of Understanding on business, trade and technical co-operation will position British business as the partner of choice for Kuwait going forward in support of the National Development Plan. At a time of real dynamism in Kuwait, we are preparing to support a number of visiting UK Trade Missions including Railway and Metro, International Airport Development, Ports, Infrastructure & Construction, Education & Training, Finance & Banking, Bar Council, Oil & Gas and Public Private Partnerships. Featured in this Dispatches is a special BBF report on the first of the UK-Kuwait Task Force business meeting hosted by the Duke of York held at St. James Palace in June.

8

We have plenty more ahead of us in the coming season, and look forward to a further period of promoting British interests, to the mutual benefit of both countries. As many of you know there are three special BBF events in this period: the BBF Introduction to Kuwait Exhibition for expatriates and Kuwaitis at the Hilton Beach Resort in October, the BBF annual charity fund raising Poppy Ball at the British Embassy in November and the BBF Business Excellence Awards Gala Dinner in January. We hope you enjoyed the Intro Night and are looking forward to your participation in the Poppy Ball and Excellence Awards Gala. I cannot conclude my message without expressing my sincere gratitude to all the people who support our activities including the sponsors for the help they provide throughout the year. We are especially appreciative of the constant encouragement, inspiration and active support of H.E. Frank Baker, the British Ambassador. I am happy to say that there has never been such a fine sprit of commercial co-operation between the Embassy and the BBF. He has encouraged the BBF Directors towards further growth in its membership and activities, in the interests of promoting BritishKuwait trade and investment. I look forward to you joining us in our informal networking sessions, special business sector groups, monthly meetings, events and activities in the upcoming year. I am also keen to hear your thoughts on how to continue our progress and wherever necessary and possible, make improvements.

Paul McKay Chairman British Business Forum Kuwait

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


THE BRITISH EMBASSY



Message from the Ambassador HE The British Ambassador Frank Baker 

Welcome back from what I hope has been a relaxing

and enjoyable summer for you all. My staff and I have returned fully refreshed and ready to tackle what I

can confidently predict is going to be the busiest time

for bilateral business between the UK and Kuwait in our recent history. This will build and expand on the significant progress made over the last eighteen

months as we look to meet our self imposed target of doubling UK-Kuwait trade by the end of 2015.

Our planning already takes us to the end of this year and beyond as we look both to support British

business already in Kuwait and to encourage more UK companies to enter the local market. The strong

relationship we enjoy with the BBF will be an important

part of that strategy and I will shortly be discussing with the Board how we can expand still further our joint activity.

One strand will be the London Olympics - now less

than a year away. Staging the Games is a unique

once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to showcase the UK throughout the world and to showcase a legacy of

globally competitive and innovative businesses. The

Olympics will be a defining moment for the UK and

The BBF, working with the Embassy, has the

opportunity to help us

deliver this legacy by promoting UK expertise

internationally; identifying the opportunities for UK companies

to

export

their goods and services to other major events; and attracting high-value foreign direct investment using the unique selling point of our host status to underpin the opportunity to potential investors.

From the Royal Wedding to the Diamond Jubilee to

the Olympics and Paralympics, the UK has entered

a period that will see unprecedented levels of international attention on our country. It is for us to take advantage of the opportunities that this presents.

With this in mind, on September 21 Prime Minister David Cameron spoke to a business audience in New York to announce the government’s programme of activity to deliver the Olympic legacy and introduce

the new GREAT campaign, aimed at promoting the

UK overseas. As he said then the 2012 Games are

about three things: great sport, great legacy and

the Government – and a successful and sustainable

Great Britain.

significant public investment in the Games. Delivery

Of course, it is always great to be British. And the

economic legacy will be a tangible return on of these legacy objectives will depend on coordinated, effective marketing of the UK. This will include leveraging our status as Olympic hosts domestically

and internationally to deliver a substantial boost to

next year is going to be something very special in our country’s history. We are all looking forward to being part of those celebrations here in Kuwait.

the UK economy.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

9


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

BBF Sector Groups Defined

T

he British Business Forum of Kuwait currently has a range of sector groups, open to anyone who has an interest in the respective business sectors. Each sector group has a convener who is a point of contact for the group and who arranges periodic meetings throughout the year, normally at least once a quarter. The sector groups are usually the first point of contact for British firms looking for assistance in entering or doing business in Kuwait, and provide a useful forum for exchanging ideas for members with similar interests. The sector groups are seen as a key function of the BBF. If you are interested in joining any of the sector groups, or starting a new group, please contact either the sector group coordinator Donald Teale at donald.teale@bbfkuwait.com, or the respective sector group convener.

Aviation, Travel & Hospitality The Aviation, Travel & Hospitality group is the most active sector group within the BBF with regular quarterly meetings. The ethos of the group is to mix business with pleasure in a nice environment. This has been achieved by meeting in some of the most prestigious hospitality establishments in Kuwait. The format typically includes a presentation from a member of the industry followed by an informal networking session over dinner. Previous presentations have been delivered by representatives from airlines, hotels, and travel companies, and even a concert exclusively for the group by internationally renowned violinist, Michal Cwizewicz. If you are interested in joining this group or wish to attend the next meeting, please contact the sector group convener Hanna Jerczynska at hanna.jerczynska@bbfkuwait.com

10

Banking and Finance The Banking and Finance Sector Group is open to any members of the financial industry sector including banking, insurance, investment companies, and related services. The group is a forum for exchanging ideas and latest industry and market information, assisting both companies entering the Kuwait market and Kuwait companies wishing to do business in the UK. The financial industry sector in Kuwait is one of the largest in the region and a major contributor the Kuwait GDP after the oil and gas industry. If you are interested in joining this group or wish to attend the next meeting, please contact the sector group convener Geoff Webster at geoff.webster@jw-vca. com

Construction and Consultancy The Construction and Consultant Sector Group is one of the original groups within the BBF, lead by Jeff de Lange, who recently hosted HRH Prince Andrew on his trade mission to Kuwait. Construction is a key pillar of the Kuwait Five Year Development Plan generating large scale opportunities for British industry. British companies are already successfully involved in projects such as the new Kuwait Metro System, the new terminal at Kuwait Airport, and numerous other major infrastructure projects included in the Kuwaiti Five Year Development Plan. The sector group meets roughly once a quarter and meetings are usually arranged around site visits to innovative and

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

interesting construction sites in and around Kuwait. Meetings last year included a visit to the Al Hamra Tower in Sharq, the tallest building being constructed in Kuwait. Jeff and the group seem to have a desire to be the first members of the public to drive across the Sheraton Roundabout fly over, showing an admirable confidence in their profession. This group covers a range of sectors, including construction, design, power, and professional consultancy services and is a focus for networking amongst BBF member and other interested parties, as well as providing a support for visiting British trade delegations. If you are interested in joining this group or wish to attend the next meeting, please contact the sector group convener Jeff de Lange at jdelange@gckuwait.com

Defence The defence sector in Kuwait is one of the cornerstones of Kuwait-UK relations. Since 2003

Britain has approved 444 defence related export licences for Kuwait, worth a total of £102.3m. This cascades into opportunities for UK defence related service companies to assist in the training and development of Kuwaiti companies. This group is open to any member interested, either directly or indirectly, in the defence or security industries within Kuwait. If you are interested in joining this group, please contact the sector group coordinator Donald Teale at donald.teale@bbfkuwait.com Fashion Building on the successful “Best of British Fashion” show, held at the embassy last summer, the BBF have started a new sector group dedicated to those involved or interested in fashion. Kuwait has an unusually high number of informed consumers in this area with shopping being one of the most popular local pastimes. If you are interested in joining this group or wish to attend the next meeting, please contact either of the sector group conveners Linda Asfour or


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

Hanna Jerczynska at linda.asfour@bbfkuwait.com or hanna.jerczynska@bbfkuwait.com

Healthcare is one of the key pillars of the Kuwait National Development Plan, looking at meeting the needs of an increasing population and providing services to regional customers. The UK has already been very successful in developing links between high profile UK hospitals and institutions and Kuwait companies to develop joint venture opportunities to bring high quality care services to where they are in demand. This sector group has brought some of these success stories to the wider interest of the BBF membership, resulting in British Excellence Awards for two individuals from Great Ormond Street Hospital for their work in developing a palliative care centre for children in Kuwait. If you are interested in joining this group or wish to attend the next meeting, please contact the sector group convener, Dr. Linda Asfour, at linda.asfour@bbfkuwait.com

It is probably no surprise that the oil and gas sector group is the largest sector group in the BBF, with many British companies and nationals providing a range of services to the industry. The members include representatives from all the major UK and international companies working in Kuwait. The group meets quarterly at a variety of locations around Kuwait and is an informal networking opportunity for people in the business. In the last twelve months the group has hosted several trade delegations from the UK and has lead the BBF’s interest in developing a forum for those interested in doing business in Iraq, including a round table workshop chaired by Emma Nicholson, the Baroness of Winterborne (Chairperson of the IBBQ). Presentations have also been delivered by the country leaders of a broadrange of international oil and petrochemical companies. If you are interested in joining this group or wish to attend the next meeting, please contact the sector group convener Brian Dawes, at brian.dawes@bbfkuwait. com

Information Technology

Training and Education

The information technology sector is open to anyone with an interest in the subject and industry, whether it be key users such as company CIOs or service providers. Kuwait and the Middle East are now becoming the focus of attention of many large IT organisations looking for new and developing markets. Last year Kuwait and the UK moved closer together signing a Memorandum of Understanding on collaborative actions to fight cybercrime in order to combat terrorism. This sector group meets on an informal basis, typically once a quarter to discuss innovations in the industry and development in the local market. If you are interested in joining this group or wish to attend the next meeting, please contact the sector group convener Ian Mills at Ian.Mills@ bbfkuwait.com

Training and education is one of the most successful UK exports to the Middle East, building on the prestige of high quality services available from UK nationals. The group meets regularly in informal surroundings to discuss a wide range of industry related topics, including the long term training requirements of the country, the impact of Kuwaitisation on recruitment, and the evolution of mentoring. The group intends to produce a series of articles for the BBF magazine Dispatches this year. If you are interested in joining this group or wish to attend the next meeting, please contact the sector group convener Dr. Sean Toner, at tonersq8@hotmail.com

Healthcare

12

Oil and Gas

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

A Message from Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne

I

t gave me great pleasure to present awards to the winners and recipients at last year’s British Business Forum (BBF) Kuwait Excellence gala dinner event.

I have been impressed by the quality and variety of applications that the Forum receives each year. I welcome this opportunity to offer my warmest congratulations to all past winners. They have made an important contribution to Britain in Kuwait and I applaud their hard work and commitment to sustaining and growing their businesses. I hope their success serves as encouragement to other high performing organisations and individuals to apply for a BBF Award in 2011. I would like to encourage any individual who is active in the field of UK business promotion to consider nominating

14

themselves or someone they know for this year’s prestigious awards ceremony. I also congratulate the BBF Kuwait for playing its role in fostering UK and Kuwait business relationships. Well done and I wish you all success for another year.

Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne House of Lords

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

British Business Forum

The BBF’s Awards for Excellence: criteria

About The Voice of the British Business in Kuwait

The BBF’s Awards for Excellence have been operating in various forms since 1997, developing over the years into the current format. Attracting high profile support and involvement, the Awards publicly recognise individuals for outstanding achievement and companies for contributions to promoting and enhancing British Business Excellence.

British BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS

2O11

Since applications are judged solely on merit, there is a wide variety of individuals and companies applying and winning each year, with enterprises varying in size from large international companies to small businesses comprising just a couple of employees to individuals. The Excellence Awards aim to recognise and reward business people across all sectors, private and public. Open to organisations of any size, entries are encouraged from those who feel they have a made a discernible difference to create a business edge. By entering for the awards, business people gain recognition and publicity for their achievements and accomplishments along with the opportunity to promote and celebrate success.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

Any entrant may submit an application on behalf of him/herself or another business person. The overriding principle being the heart of every nomination is clearly demonstrable British business success. Entries are invited across all business disciplines such as marketing, customer service, IT, innovation, PR, sales, staff training, process improvement, projects, entrepreneurialism, corporate social responsibility and international expansion to name but a few. Each entry must include a photo of nominee in high resolution digital format and supporting documentation, e.g. data and examples that support innovation and business value, any client testimonials, recommendations, personal profile, business and product summary, brochures, press awards, certificates, past awards, etc. Nominations will close 31 December 2011. An independent, bespoke, judging panel will review each entry. If you would like more information about the awards please email the BBF Office at business@ bbfkuwait.com or visit the office at Dar Al Awadi Mall & Tower, TQLS Head Office, First Floor of Shopping Mall (+965) 2232 2038 or (+965) 6684 1114 Presentation ceremony will be conducted at the British Embassy on Friday 27 January 2012 at a black tie gala dinner under the patronage of the British Ambassador.

“Whoever I am, or whatever I am doing, some kind of excellence is within my reach” This information is correct at time of publication. For additional information please contact business@ bbfkuwait.com

15


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

This and That From 31st October British Airways will be serving the Kuwait – Heathrow route using a Boeing747-400. This aircraft will offer 14 suites in First Class, 52 Club World flat bed seats, 36 premium economy seats, and 235 World Traveller economy seats daily. Offers in our continuously updated BBF Membership Benefits package represent true value. Astute members should easily be able to recoup their membership subs. Quid pro quo, participating suppliers look to a mutually beneficial upturn in business. Underlying mantra? Use it or lose it! Dispatches Editor – Sue Day – plans a feature on “How much do I need to retire (to UK)?” Compared with information available to US nationals there is, apparently, a paucity of such information available to Brits. If you know different and can add to the discussion, please contact Sue via business@ bbfkuwait.com In similar vein, articles and short editorial contributions to Dispatches are always welcome. Interesting, different, amusing, topical, human, business, Kuwaiti, - why not give our regulars some respite? Our Sector Groups are intrinsically essential to our core support of British business interests, and rely entirely on members’, and their colleagues, support and participation. We focus on a wide variety of special interests for all types of like minded individuals. Convenors aim to encourage useful, informative, sometimes social networks. Getting to know you, through your participation, can only enhance the BBF’s ability to effectively advise, inform, and to direct opportunities, within Kuwait and from the UK. BBF events are proving to be ever popular. Last minute applications are oft denied on a “first come first served basis”. Deadlines are governed by security and related issues. Advice is to book and pay early to avoid disappointment! A full house September monthly meeting featured a presentation on the UK Bribery Law and its US equivalent. With gentle humour and a lawyer’s realism Orlando Vidal of SNR Denton guided us through the essentials and essence of individual and corporate

16

responsibilities, how to deal with the issues, the liabilities and the penalties. Members are able to add value to their membership by helping to point us to potential advertisers and sponsors, amongst their employers and networks. The Board and our Events and Dispatches team will eagerly respond to any leads or advice. Membership numbers, new and retained, corporate and individual, are encouraging. Response to applications, on occasions patchy in the past due to workload strains, is greatly benefitting from Jes Bunce’s attention to improving database and website linked administration.

Future Editions The countdown to the London Olympics and Paralympics 2012 is in motion. We hope to explore the massive benefits which will accrue in many areas – prestige, business, tourism, travel, and massive worldwide exposure. June 2012 will see the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, a remarkable milestone. Following on from intense worldwide interest in the Royal Wedding earlier this year, not least of all in Kuwait, we are planning and preparing a very special edition of Dispatches for publication immediately after the great event. December’s edition will see a feature on the Kuwait Fire Service – Marine Division which, in November, is expecting to take delivery of the world’s largest fire fighting vessel. Kuwait International Airport faces an interesting future. We are invited to an inside view of upcoming developments and improvements, to existing facilities, and, the major New International Airport. English – the business language of the world? Strongly influenced and enhanced, arguably sometimes denuded, by other cultures and nationalities. Suitable topic(s) to discuss? We intend to! Continuing the prevailing corruption theme we aim to examine the Kuwait Transparency Group its “raison d’etre”, its operations & ramifications, in Kuwait and internationally.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


2

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

Introduction to Kuwait

1

17


3 BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

F

riday 7th October turned out to be a momentous occasion in the BBF calendar. The One, that popular Friday breakfast venue for Brits, was deserted. Everyone, it seems, was at the Hilton Resort in Mangaf, indeed more than 2000 turned up for the 16th annual “Introduction to Kuwait” show, a combined business and family event, designed to acquaint newcomers, and all, with what is available in Kuwait and where to find it – new friends, new pursuits and pastimes. 4 Aside from the informational aspect, there was music and entertainment by the young people of the British Academy of International Arts and the Kuwait English School Band. There was shortbread and oatcakes, cream cakes and dainty sandwiches, silly hats and balloons, a bagpiper, and the traditional raffle. Seemingly, there were London cabs everywhere! Indeed The Ambassador, Frank Baker, turned up in one! Despite only having returned from London that morning, in order to be at the show, and having cut the traditional ribbon, he insisted on visiting all 60 display stands, included a short concert, and seemed to be enormously popular with one or two of the younger generation! His support and involvement helped, in no small way, towards a successful event.

18


5

6

7

8

ESF ad_2011.pdf

1

5/11/11

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

10:02 AM

9


10

12

11

13

14

Sponsors of the event, Wataniya Telecom and Burgan Bank, supported by London Limo, Gulf Insurance and the Printshop, actively and enthusiastically, played their part, as did the whole BBF team. The ultimate expressions of appreciation, the smiles and satisfaction, came from the many who attended. The impressive press and TV presence will surely ensure that the day will be well remembered.

20

15

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


18

17

16

BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

PHOTO CAPTIONS: 1) Emad Nasser Al Mossawi, General Manager of London Limo and Austen Read - Executive Chef, The Regency 2) Eman Abbas 3) Welcome Ambassador! 4) A London Limo welcome for Paul McKay 5) Hanna Jerczynska, Arthur Barber and Fiona McKay 6) BAIA’s Patricia Whelan 7) Adrian Holis and Frank Baker 8) Anne Napier and Beefy

9) Piper Bader Mohamed 10) Top to Toe 11) Lisa Marchant with Carl Hakim and Hannah Crockett 12) Michael is EEK! 13) Gulf Bank’s Latifa and Mohannad 14) With Gulf Insurance 15) Mohamed Adel Boresly of Wataniya Telecom receiving a Certificate of Appreciation 16) Musaed Al Najjar 17) Hisham Khalil, British Council

19

18) Iddris Seidu from the Arab Times 19) Abdulaziz Bestaki and Jinan Al Kassem 20) Raffle winner Boris Barna 21) Rachel from Top to Toe receives a Certificate of Appreciation 22) Frank Baker with Majed Al Jaleel, Chairman of Burgan Bank 23) With the Holiday Inn team


20

22

21

23

22

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

Chill Out – A Night of Smiles

T

here was a full house at the first big occasion of the BBF year and, by all accounts, it was a very successful evening. Our events manager, on his first outing, paced around nervously but visibly relaxed as the evening wore on, the atmosphere developing to the point where nobody wanted to go home. “We should have one of these every month!”


Switchback sang their own song “You� for the first time and performed a whole range of new material in a programme of all genres of music spanning the tastes of the generations, as evidenced by a continually crowded dance floor. Laser lighting and a professional stage set-up created a most enjoyable ambience. Security restrictions allowed only limited photography but we hope that we captured most that came through the front gate. In additional to the pictures here, the complete gallery will be placed on the new website Plaudits aplenty are due to George Mhawech and his team of professionals at GM Event Management who acquitted themselves well in what we hope will be a the first of many in a successful partnership. On to the Poppy Ball!

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

25


BUSINESS NEWS

Business Opportunities between the United Kingdom and the State of Kuwait - The Duke of York hosts a Seminar at St James’s Palace London.

F

ollowing discussions with the Amir and the Prime Minister of Kuwait during an official visit to the State in 2010, The Duke of York decided to hold a high level seminar at St James’s Palace to highlight to British companies the opportunities afforded by Kuwait’s ambitious National Development Plan. The Plan includes £93 billion for infrastructure projects in a sequence of projects which look forward to 2035. UK companies have already secured £2 billion of contracts in connection with the Plan. The seminar was attended by both the Kuwaiti and British Ministers of Trade and Industry, Dr Amani Bou Resli and Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint. Dr Bou Resli was accompanied by a delegation of over 30 Kuwaiti business leaders from a range of sectors including financial services, health, education, energy, transport and infrastructure. The British Government was also represented by Gerald Howarth MP, Minister for International Security Strategy and Lord Marland of Woodstock, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Energy and Climate Change. The Kuwaiti Ambassador HE Mr Khaled Al Duwaisan and HM Ambassador to the State of Kuwait Mr Frank Baker were guests. The event, which was attended by over 100 leaders of British businesses, was chaired by Dr Gerard Lyons, Chief Economist at Standard Chartered Bank, and included the following speakers: In the chair, Dr Gerard Lyons highlighted the many business sectors involved with the development of Kuwait: Health, Construction, Education, Defence & Security, and Financial Services. He then introduced the Kuwaiti Minister for Commerce and Industry, HE Dr Amani Khalid Bou Resli who expanded on the theme and noted the numerous laws that were being extended and introduced to help Foreign

26

The commercial relationship between the State of Kuwait and the United Kingdom is strong and growing. The Duke of York opens the seminar at St James Palace.

Direct Investment (FDI). These included PrivatePublic Partnerships (PPP) laws in support of the work being done by the centralised Partnerships Technical Bureau (PTB), who have been supported from time to time by Infrastructure UK – a subset of HM Treasury. Such moves should improve the climate for doing business in Kuwait across the board.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

From right to left HE Dr Amani Khalid Bou Resli Minister of Commerce & Industry, Jeff De Lange Deputy Managing Director Gulf Consult & BBF Member, Keith Clarke Chief Executive Officer Atkins Global, Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint Minister of State for Trade & Investment, Dr Gerard Lyons Chief Economist and Group Head of Global Research Standard Chartered Bank, Ali Al Ghanim President Kuwait Chamber of Commerce & Industry (KCCI), Adel Al Roumi President Partnerships Technical Bureau (PTB)

The chairman then expanded on his opening statement before introducing the panel; emphasising in particular: • The demographics of Kuwait and other Gulf States were such that the increasing ratio of young to old and the threat of unemployment were a strategic issue for the Kuwait Government and one of the underlying causes for the current civil unrest across the Arab world. • Diversification downstream and/or away from the oil and gas industry was recognised by most Gulf States but alternative business models disassociated from the finite resource of oil and gas had yet to be properly addressed. • Differentiating one country from another amongst those associated with the Arab Spring, if not essential, certainly needed to be recognised, and faith maintained in those who were well-placed politically, socially, ethnically, and culturally from those who were not. Kuwait should not be considered in the same way as others. A similar parallel might be the UK in relation to the rest of Europe, notably Greece and others defaulting over loans.

Lord Green outlined UK’s foreign policy drive led by exports, commercial diplomacy and the role of UKTI. He highlighted the roles Embassies must play in developing potential High Value Opportunities (HVOs). The Chairman of the PTB and the Chairman of the Kuwait Chamber of Commerce & Industry (KCCI) both pointed to the opportunities associated with the Kuwaiti Development Plan, notably those involving PPP/BOT. One of the main elements of the Plan is to restore the leading role of the private sector, primarily through the introduction of various reforms and incentives, to stimulate private investment. Accordingly, half of the envisioned investment outlays under the Plan are anticipated to come from the private sector, either as direct investments or in the form of Public-Private Partnerships (PPP). The Chairman of KCCI recommended any company going to Kuwait should call on the Chamber as a matter of course. Keith Clarke and Jeff De Lange, the latter a long-term resident in Kuwait and convenor of the BBF Construction Sector Group, made the point that the companies that have succeeded the most were those who had remained in Kuwait. The days of carpet baggers were over. If a company wished to progress in the long-term there was a need to maintain a presence. The discussions at the Seminar concluded the following: • International trade is crucial for the UK’s economic growth and the British Government has put HE Dr Amani Khalid Bou Resli Minister of Commerce & Industry talks of the national development plan and the numerous laws that were being extended and introduced to help Foreign Direct Investment (FDI).

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

27


BUSINESS NEWS

commercial relations with the Gulf at the centre of this strategy. • Energy has been a key part of Kuwait’s economic success but the country needs to diversify its economy to boost the private sector and create jobs for its growing population of educated young people. • Kuwait is at a ‘tipping point’ with a long term vision for 2035 and a series of ambitious development plans. There are improved signs of the Kuwait Government’s commitment to implement vital reforms with a number of new laws already passed and it moving from its role as an operator to that of a regulator. • The Kuwait market and particularly the National Development Plan, present UK businesses, large and small, with genuine opportunities for engagement in a diverse range of sectors. Specific High Value Opportunity (HVO) projects included; o Kuwait International Airport Development o Kuwait City Metro and GCC linking Rail Network o Kuwait Hospitals & Healthcare Development Plans o Boubyan Island & Ports Development o Public-Private Partnerships Schemes

• Government and the private sector are looking for turnkey solutions, rather than offerings which form individual parts of a project solution. British companies need to work together in consortia to provide tailored packages that provide for the design, construction, management, training and service delivery of a project. In this context medical solutions were discussed as a potential area for consortia. • Achieving the ambitious objectives the Kuwaiti development programme will require significant levels of external support. Kuwait is expected to adopt a focus on packaged solutions for major and complex projects in the future. The UK reputation for quality and robustness is highly regarded but is often outweighed by packaged consortium proposals from elsewhere. It is clear that UK companies must be more willing to cooperate together and deliver solutions to complex developments. • Companies should not expect to sell yesterday’s equipment and technology. Kuwait is a highly competitive market, and only the best will survive. To succeed, offerings must be world class. • While Kuwait is not the easiest market to work in, and there are significant challenges, including transparency, nevertheless it is certainly worth UK companies engaging in Kuwait.

• Under the National Development Plan Kuwait will build on three strands of infrastructure: o Hard Infrastructure – construction of hospitals, schools, transport links o Soft Infrastructure – human capital (education, training, skills transfer) o Institutional Infrastructure legislation etc

regulation,

There is much that UK can win in the market as Kuwait needs British expertise in moving forward.

Right to left Ali Al Ghanim President Kuwait Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Adel Al Roumi President Partnerships Technical Bureau responds to questions on Doing Business in Kuwait

28

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

Duke of York closes the seminar - Kuwait market and particularly the National Development Plan, present UK businesses, large and small, with genuine opportunities for engagement in a diverse range of sectors.

The BBF Chairman was invited to the seminar as a voice of British business in Kuwait and afterwards to a lunch reception at the Kuwait Embassy hosted by the Kuwaiti Ambassador HE Mr Khaled Al Duwaisan. The BBF was prominently represented in discussions with its construction sector group convenor and former BBF Vice Chairman, Jeff De Lange contributing as a keynote speaker on the panel. Whilst UK companies are well placed to secure significant business from the numerous development opportunities which the Kuwait Government has planned for the next few years, there are a number of real or perceived issues in doing business in Kuwait. In broad terms these stem from: a lack of accurate knowledge; concerns about corruption and procurement processes; the real need for longterm commitment; and the importance of working collaboratively with other UK or international partners. These are issues that both Kuwait and UK will need to consider how best to address but there are signs that Kuwait’s bureaucratic process is improving as the government moves from operator to regulator roles under Law 7/2008 which sets the foundation for the implementation of infrastructure PPP projects. The state has also ratified the UN Convention against Corruption in 2007, adopted a National anticorruption strategy in 2008 and recently a series of new draft laws were presented to establish a national anti-corruption authority.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

But it is not all about current issues. Since Kuwait’s independence in 1961, the UK has lost market share – to the USA, Germany, France, Korea and China; the UK needs to re-establish its position as Kuwait’s Partner of Choice. UK is not number one anymore with economic relationships not as strong as its political ties. Kuwait has compared the lack of support of the British Chamber of Commerce to stronger competition from other Chamber of Commerce and offered suggestions on how British companies might be better able to contribute. The British Government and our British companies need to be firmly committed to closer economic co-operation in hand with Kuwait’s political changes, as is the need of the BBF and its business community in forging closer relationships, networks and partnerships as the leading British Trade Association in Kuwait. Kuwait places great emphasis on trust and the importance of the family. It is therefore imperative that UK companies understand and consider local culture and expectations when seeking business, especially the importance of forming strong personal relationships with potential partners and procurement bodies, long before business is finally sought. Kuwaiti buyers naturally favour proposals from known and trusted individuals. The relationship-building process takes time and several visits may be required before that can be attained. Once a relationship is formed, business growth will be rapid. British companies that come to Kuwait will need a local partner, and should plan to be in Kuwait for the long term. The business relationship is based on personal relationships, one to one. Those who flit in and out will not gain business. The BBF advice is to be patient, establish a local presence, and foster a relationship of trust with your Kuwaiti partners. Many British SME firms offer products and services that are highly attractive in the Kuwait market, but they simply lack the knowledge and resources to exploit the opportunities and to compete successfully. If you are therefore expanding into Kuwait for the first time then you will need to be supported by expert advice. The BBF can help. Working closely with the British Embassy UK Trade and Investment the BBF can provide impartial and dependable business assistance from within its expert members working across the many business sectors. Contact us at business@ bbfkuwait.com.

29


BUSINESS NEWS

A Matter of Principle

W

ith the world in general and the region in particular in turmoil, it is only too understandable that corruption; however provocative and volatile a subject to discuss, first needs to be addressed effectively and then generally brought under control. It is the menace that plagues effective functioning of governments in democratic and authoritarian forms of governance. It is an insidious disease that reflects patronage, nepotism, red-tape, ineffective revenue generation, under counter payments in procurement and failure in service delivery. Corruption shines through in business, in politics and in the street. Corruption is as deadly as the HIV/Aids virus – it’s a cancer, whether it is the 12 official signatures needed

on a license, the official taking bribes at the border or

the goods that are paid for but not delivered (Bono,

The Guardian 23 May 2006).

Two thirds (of surveyed FTSE 100 companies) said it was not possible to do business in some countries

without being involved in bribery. The World Bank estimates that widespread corruption can cause the

growth rate of a country to be 1% point lower than that of a similar country with little corruption. It is

is ranked 15th, UK 20th, USA 22nd and France

the costs of government procurement, and frequently

counties but behind its GCC neighbours. The World

estimated that systemic corruption can add 20-25% to results in inferior quality goods and services and unnecessary purchases. A conservative estimate of the annual total of bribes paid worldwide is US $1

trillion; roughly the amount that the UN believes is needed to eradicate global poverty.

Transparency International’s Corruption Perception

Index 2010 rates countries according to the perception of corruption in the public sector. Denmark, New

Zealand and Singapore are the good countries at the top of the list; bringing up the rear is Somalia, slightly

trailing Myanmar, Afghanistan and Iraq. Germany

30

25th. The same index rates Kuwait 54th out of 178 Bank’s Ease of Doing Business index also places

Kuwait 74th out of 183, trailing the GCC despite being classified as a high income economy.

Kuwait is an exciting place to be and it’s a fascinating

period, offering business opportunities with its ambitious national development plan, yet its business

reputation is at stake with everyone talking about the corruption we are living with. It is argued that, on average, approximately 70% of central government

expenditure turns in one way or another into contracts. Contracts are sources of power to those who give

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

them out and targets of ambition for those who may

As a result of corruption, private mansions are

prone to abuse at the expense of public need. The risk

dug instead of irrigation systems; funds destined to

receive them, making public contracts particularly of corruption in public contracting exists even before

the contracting process has started, perhaps even at

the moment when public budgets are allocated, and it perpetuates beyond the awarding of a contract to its

implementation. Massive market inefficiencies can also arise from corruption and, in the extreme, lead to the destruction of development opportunities. In many business dealings, corruption is exacerbated by large amounts of red tape and bureaucracy.

Bribery is increasingly subtle. Until recently bribery

was seen as a normal business expense which could be claimed for tax deduction purposes. That has all changed. The UK has reinforced its reputation as

one of the least corrupt countries in the world with the UK Bribery Act that came into force in 2011. The Act introduces a corporate offence of failure

to prevent bribery by persons working on behalf of a UK business, makes it a criminal offence to give, promise or offer, or accept a bribe and increases

the maximum penalty for bribery from seven (7) to ten (10) years imprisonment with an unlimited fine.

The British Business Forum featured anti-corruption as its subject at its September members’ meeting.

Corruption has now become something to be scared of to those who engage in it.

Corruption is almost an inescapable aspect of daily life

and experience of ordinary people. A major difficulty in fighting against corruption is due to the inherent

paradox that the cost of corruption is invisible and

spread over a large number of people whereas the visible benefits are limited to a few corrupt people in power positions. Getting even a lobby to fight against

corruption is thereby a difficult proposition. There is

also widespread public cynicism in our community about

anti-corruption

intervention.

being built instead of bridges; swimming pools are run hospitals and buy medicines find their way into

the pockets of corrupt officials; economic growth is held back; and public trust in government is

undermined (OECD/ADB ‘Curbing Corruption in Public Procurement in Asia and the Pacific).

Most certainly there is a silver lining. There are signs that Kuwait’s bureaucratic process is improving as the government moves from operator to regulator roles under Law 7/2008 which sets the foundation

for the implementation of infrastructure PPP projects. Kuwait has also ratified the UN Convention against

Corruption, has adopted a national anti-corruption strategy and recently a series of new draft laws to establish a national anti-corruption authority.

The

world has also observed the Arab Spring with Islamist movements quickly mobilizing national campaigns

designed to unveil a new image. Paranoid rhetoric about Muslim identity has given way to a younger, better educated, better informed society with political

messaging that could have been lifted from any western democracy.

Corruption is a problem that all counties have to

confront. It is not enough to merely point an accusing

finger at corrupt officials, tax evaders and criminals in

the annual trillion-dollar illicit-money equation. The recipient side of the equation must be highlighted as well. Solutions can only be home grown. Leaders need to take a stand. Civil society plays its key role

as well. The British Business Forum, the voice of

British business in Kuwait seeks to engage with and support all officials and business people to ensure a more level playing field for companies seeking business opportunities in Kuwait.

Political

indifference, bureaucratic inertia and citizen’s apathy make anti-corruption effort much difficult.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

31


BUSINESS NEWS

Mentoring Strategies in Context: Human Resources or People Dynamics?

I

n a previous article for Dispatches I mentioned how mentoring, peer mentoring, E mentoring and group mentoring are ways in which we can grow or develop people. People development is presently seen as important, if not essential, for a company’s HR programme. Training is only one route to knowledge and skill acquisition, others might include short or long term coaching and mentoring. This is why companies are even renaming ‘Training Department’ as HR Talent Development. The shift of emphasis, of course, has given rise to a

thought and discussion is the meaning of the phrase

occurs naturally in certain people or is it something that

workstations or computers, to be considered in the

food for thought. It is generally accepted, however,

really and truly the essence of business growth and

and developed. Another issue that requires a lot of

for’ ?

discussion of the nature of talent. Is talent an asset that

“Human Resources”. Are “Human Resources,” like

can be developed? The question certainly provides

budget as another static overhead or are your people

that we all have talents but they need to be nurtured

therefore need to be continuously ‘grown and cared

We

cannot

benefits

consider

of

a

the

mentoring

strategy without putting it into the context of how we view HR. My own understanding

of HR, having worked within it for some years, and, like

everybody else, having had to interact with it over a working lifetime, is that there are two

arms to it: Administration and People Development. Administration

and

the

bureaucracy that is required

to make it work has little to do with growth and development

and in my view should be

32

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

quite separate to HR and People Development.

Given that our businesses will, in future, run a

of people, is more of a recent addition but many

to seek a dynamic way of growing our people. To

The second arm of HR, which is the development companies still regard this as a burdensome extra,

often using excuses such as: ‘Our staff are already

qualified when they are recruited. Why should we develop them?’

My views on HR and on mentoring in general were greatly affected by results from my research into peer

department called People Dynamics, then we need me there is no better way of doing this than by using the natural process of everyday dynamic interaction,

harnessing the learning power in this process by

putting people into pairs or teams to learn from each

other. In this way we imitate the growth of a child into an adult.

mentoring when I realized that people are so unlike

Psychology has supplied plenty of evidence that

please them or inspire them. They change every day.

influence than learning from elders. Peer pressure

‘a resource’ that no one intervention will all the time They are all different, they all have their own approach

to professionalism, they all have their moods, likes, dislikes, and preferred ways of learning. But, more

than all of that, they are in no way static. They have to interact with people of different persuasions every

day and this is a dynamic interaction. The thrust of the way they learn from each other is dynamic.

Jump now to a phrase that a friend used during one summer holiday in Greece. I was asking some Greek friends how they referred to Human Resources in Greek. They had to think a little because it is not a

concept that permeates Greek business life; it has not ‘taken off’ in Greece yet. However it dawned on one of them what the Greek equivalent is. ‘Anthropiko

points to peer learning being a much more powerful creates this dynamic environment whereby people

want to learn, compete and grow. This competitive learning dimension kicks in when the young child

is starting to ‘go out on its own’ and does not need to have its hand held any more. A rapidly changing

world creates a requirement to keep up with the

changes and with the pace within and outside of an organization. The learner will do this through adapting

to peers and absorbing the skills and aptitudes of those who naturally need to expand their thinking and stay ahead. What we can say about peer mentoring in this way is that the more diverse the staff, the more

opportunities to learn, whether it be cultural, skill based or attitudinal learning.

Dynamiko’ he said, ‘That’s what we call it’. Dynamos

Needless to say, we should employ facilitators who

means ‘exhibiting power, movement and growth’. In

harness this dynamic growing potential. These

in Greek means essentially ‘power’ and dynamiko this case I think the word is exactly right.

Ironically, in a country where they don’t invest a

great deal in HR, I got the title that best matches a business approach which goes to the heart of the

matter – ‘People Dynamics.’ Developing people is a dynamic process because people themselves are

dynamic. This leads me to my supposition that HR should really be called People Dynamics (Human Dynamics sounds too much like a subject studied in medicine or physics).

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

have the wisdom and experience to know how to people are the super mentors, those who realize that their own body of knowledge and skills is limited and

easily or quickly outdated. Any attempt at traditional

mentoring could be a transfer of dated knowledge and skills. These super mentors are better off helping

their mentees by allowing them to learn from each other in a form of collaborative learning. Further to

this, the super mentor uses wisdom to place them in small groups or pairs where they are able to learn

strengths that they do not yet have: the more diverse the backgrounds in a group, the more the learning

33


BUSINESS NEWS

opportunities. The super mentor also has to have the wisdom and skills to facilitate goal setting, glean and note what has been learned and to lead discussion between peer mentors on the quality of learning.

The job of super mentor should be a full time job

and could involve the facilitation of learning for many more than one person (since the super mentor is not

actually leading mentoring sessions with any of the mentees.)

strategy for growing their people since this kind of collaborative learning lends itself to dynamic professional growth. Every day we interface with so

many others whose strengths and skills are different

from our own. Another suggestion is to employ super mentors (as opposed to supervisors) who facilitate

this growth by helping to set goals, to provide learning

opportunities and to collate and assess the quality of learning.

This kind of peer mentoring is dynamic or powerful for a number of reasons:

Dr Sean Toner is a Kuwait - based consultant in

Education and Training. His particular interest lies

• Research in psychology indicates learn better from peers

that people

in the area of Mentoring and Coaching. The above

article is written specifically for Dispatches but will,

like others in this series of articles, be the ground

• There is an everyday and all day interaction • Healthy competition comes into play • The wider the peer contact the more the potential for learning

work for chapters of a book he is writing on the

Power of Peer Mentoring. In a future article he will

expand on what he means by peer mentoring and

give several real life examples taken from his action

research data.

• Natural and dynamic in a multi-cultural business environment

prevails today

such

as

• Avoids passing on dated/ one

tracked

skills

or

knowledge (as possible in traditional mentoring) • Allows and

from

for

negative

colleagues

positive

input

(learn

from mistakes as from successes)

To sum up I recommend changing the term ‘Human Resources’

to

People

Dynamics and I recommend companies

to

advocate

peer mentoring as the main

34

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

First the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Business Netiquette in Ten Now You!

S

ince its founding, the internet has truly become a ‘community’ and, like most communities, rules have evolved to ensure that members of the community know what is consider to be acceptable behaviour and what is not. This code, unofficial of course, defines the appropriate “netiquette” for ‘net users – specifically those using the internet in business situations.

Rule #1: Do not spam. Rule #2: Do not rely solely on e-mail. Sometimes you need to tackle a situation face-toface.

You will appear to be constantly reachable

to colleagues, and too eager to clients or

Rule #3: Similarly, balance work-related e-mails

upper management. Unless it is urgent

with telephone calls. E-mail may be more

wait a couple of hours to respond so you

efficient in the short run, but relationships

can form a plan, and keep focused on

are built faster and stronger with personal

your task at hand.

contact.

Rule #4: Be aware that e-mails can sometimes

Rule #8: DO NOT TYPE IN ALL UPPERCASE. This is the ‘net equivalent of SHOUTING.

read rude. Be careful.

Rule #5:

Send professional messages at work unless you know the recipient personally as well. A professional acquaintance may

question the ability of a colleague who sends a :-) in business e-mail.

Rule #6: Spelling counts! So does grammar and punctuation!

Rule #7: Don’t respond to e-mail immediately. It is

easy to hit the reply button and type up a quick response, but this has downsides.

36

Rule #9:

Do not type in all lowercase either. Best case scenario, it looks unprofessional; worse still, it makes you look lazy, ignorant or both.

Rule #10: Use the same salutation at the beginning

of an email as you would if you were addressing the recipient in person.

While e-mails may feel more informal, you should wait until you are asked by the recipient before using a first name or nickname.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

The Language Every Successful Businessperson Needs to Know . . .

I

and it’s not English

f a colleague emails you that a company of interest is LOPSOD but you still omit DD that may be a CLM due to a very big WOMBAT. after a network outage blamed on careless backhoe

Are you lost? It’s not a surprise. For a long time, Internet lingo was the purview of kids and techies. Of course, at that time, the Internet itself was dominated by kids and techies. Today, however, things have changed. Ten years ago, 513 million people – 8.6% of the world population - used the internet (which was a huge jump from December 1995, when only 16 million people used the ‘net). As of June 2011, 30.4% of the world population used the internet, that’s 2,110 million people. Last year, Amazon alone did $9.91 billion in sales. eBay reported 1st Q 2011 earnings o f $2.5 billion. An Australian research group estimates that approximately 4% of all US retail sales are ‘netbased; they predict that the sales forecast for 2014 will reach $240 billion. Doing business online is inevitable AFAIC, so you may want to take a few moments, CYA, and work on translating the acronyms that are creeping in from text messaging and on your Net Lingo (courtesy of www.netlingo.com). You may be surprised to learn that there is a word or phrase for most of what you experience online. YW. Administrivia Refers to the administrative details that are found on a Web site. For example, the legal, copyright, liability, and licensing information. In the past, privacy issues were also categorized as “administrivia”, however, with the increased awareness for security on Web sites, privacy is viewed as a more prominent topic. Backhoe day The information industry’s equivalent of a snow day, or what happens when employees are sent home

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

work along the buried fiber line. CEO-speak a.k.a. ceo speak

This is the language of corporate leadership. “CEOspeak” explores the metaphors and persuasive strategies used by leaders of the corporate world, for example “The current downturn reached sufficient strength this quarter that we could not power up against it,” and “We are an issues-focused firm with high-end engagements across the board and we want to be the market leader in the industries we serve.” Dog whistle Business jargon used to describe a situation in which a client cannot see the difference between a professional graphic designer’s work and that of an amateur (or competent) graphic designer. For example, if a client is evaluating two new logo designs and the professional one costs $30,000 and the amateur design costs $2,000 but they look somewhat similar, the client may perceive the $30,000 one to be twice as good as the $2,000 design, but not 30 times better. Elvis year The peak year of something’s popularity. “Barney the dinosaur’s Elvis year was 1993.” Fat finger To make an error in typing, as in, “Oops, I didn’t see that misspelling. I must have fat fingered it.” Idea hamster Someone who always seems to have his or her idea generator running. “That guy’s a real idea hamster. Give him a raw concept and he’ll turn it over ‘til he comes up with something useful.”

37


BUSINESS NEWS

Jitterati

New Top 50 Popular Acronyms Used in Business:

A play on the term digiterati, this is what the digital generation becomes after drinking too much coffee.

1. AFAIC - As Far As I’m Concerned 2. ASAP - As Soon As Possible 3. BHAG - Big Hairy Audacious Goal 4. BOHICA - Bend Over Here It Comes Again 5. CLM - Career Limiting Move 6. CYA - Cover Your A** 7. DD - Due Diligence 8. DQYDJ - Don’t Quit Your Day Job 9. DRIB - Don’t Read If Busy 10. EOD - End Of Day -or- End Of Discussion 11. EOM - End Of Message 12. EOT - End Of Thread (meaning: end of discussion) 13. ESO - Equipment Smarter than Operator 14. FRED - ****ing Ridiculous Electronic Device 15. FUBAR - ****ed Up Beyond All Recognition (or Repair) 16. FYI - For Your Information 17. GMTA - Great Minds Think Alike 18. HIOOC - Help, I’m Out Of Coffee 19. IAITS - It’s All In The Subject 20. IANAL - I Am Not A Lawyer 21. KISS - Keep It Simple Stupid 22. LOPSOD - Long On Promises, Short On Delivery 23. MOTD - Message Of The Day 24. MTFBWY - May The Force Be With You 25. MYOB - Mind Your Own Business 26. NRN - No Reply Necessary 27. NSFW - Not Safe For Work 28. NWR - Not Work Related 29. OTP - On The Phone 30. P&C - Private & Confidential 31. PDOMA - Pulled Directly Out Of My A** 32. PEBCAK - Problem Exists Between Chair And Keyboard 33. PITA - Pain In The A** 34. QQ - Quick Question 35. RFD - Request For Discussion 36. RFP - Request For Proposal 37. SBUG - Small Bald Unaudacious Goal 38. SME - Subject Matter Expert 39. SNAFU - Situation Normal, All F***ed Up 40. SSDD - Same Sh** Different Day 41. STD - Seal The Deal 42. SWAG - Scientific Wild A** Guess 43. TBA - To Be Advised 44. TBD - To Be Determined 45. TWIMC - To Whom It May Concern 46. TIA - Thanks In Advance 47. WIIFM - What’s In It For Me 48. WOMBAT - Waste Of Money, Brains And Time 49. WTG - Way To Go 50. YW - You’re Welcome

Kevork A term which means “to kill” or “put something out” it can be used in the present or past tense; for example, “We kevorked that project last week.” Loser error (also spelled as: luser error) A play on “user error,” this refers to an error caused by a user who, in turn, blames it on the computer. Meatloaf Unlike spam, which is unsolicited commercial e-mail (UCE), meatloaf is unsolicited personal e-mail. It’s circulated by friends or office mates via group e-mail lists. Meatloaf consists of jokes, anecdotes, and other trivia. The term is a variation on spam to reflect that these messages are “homemade.” Office drone The classic definition of a “drone” involves several aspects including (1) Male honeybees which gather no honey; (2) One who lives on the labors of others; a lazy, idle fellow; and (3) That which gives out a monotonous tone or dull sound. Leave it to the worker bees to come up with a term called “office drone.” It is a nickname given to the laziest person in the cube farm, or the one who tries to pass off as much work as possible while still maintaining the semblance of productivity (see also: throw it over the wall). In other words, if your life resembles a Dilbert character, your colleagues may be secretly calling you the office drone behind your back. However most office drones are keenly aware of their sluggardness and openly acknowledge it, for example “As the token office drone, I am constantly looking for ways I can break free of the monotonous, death pit of EntryLevel Temp Work.” Plutoed a.k.a. to pluto something In reference to the fact that the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union decided Pluto no longer met its definition of a planet, “to pluto something” or “plutoed” refers to demoting or devaluing someone or something. This term was chosen as the Word of the Year for 2006 by the American Dialect Society; it won in a runoff against “climate canary.”

38

Netlingo (thanks to www.netlingo.com)

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

Ransom note a.k.a. CAPTCHA, security letters

Whack-a-mole

A string of letters or numbers that dynamically appears on some Web pages, ransom notes require that you type this sequence of characters exactly as they appear into a form field below the image in order to gain access to another Web page. The reason ransom notes exist is because some search engines and Web sites have become abused by bots and automated services, so they employ ransom notes to ensure that an actual human is accessing or requesting this information. Often seen on link submission pages, this type of submission process has been designed to prevent people from being able to make automated submissions. Ransom notes generally resemble the image as seen here, and are accompanied by an instruction such as “Enter the Following Code to View More Results” at which point you must enter the code in order to advance to subsequent pages.

The “game” one has to play to quickly close the interstitial ads and other windows that pop-up on some commercial Web pages (especially porn sites). These pages will sometimes generate new windows every time you close a previous one, creating a situation similar to the action in the popular arcade game “Whack-a-Mole.”

The term CAPTCHA (for Completely Automated Public Turing Test To Tell Computers and Humans Apart) was coined in 2000 by Luis von Ahn, Manuel Blum, Nicholas Hopper and John Langford of Carnegie Mellon University.

In Japan, they have replaced the impersonal and unhelpful Microsoft error messages with Haiku poetry messages. Haiku poetry has strict construction rules, each poem has only 17 syllables; 5 syllables in the first, 7 in the second, and 5 in the third. They are used to communicate a timeless message, often achieving a wistful, yearning and powerful insight through extreme brevity (and are much better than “Your computer has performed an illegal operation.”) Here are some:

Send storm A deluge of private chat messages while one is trying to do something else online. “Sorry, I’m currently the victim of a send storm. I’ll be with you in a moment.” The farmer died A phrase used to reflect a major change in management that, up until that point, had been the same for a long time. For example, if there is executive turnover at a dot-com resulting in a change of business plans (or M&A of the company), then it can be said, the farmer died. It comes from the time when a farmer made all of the decisions regarding his land, and when he died, someone else decided what to grow or whether or not to sell the operation. Vulcan nerve pinch a.k.a. three finger salute or quadruple bucky Slang for keyboard commands that tax the hand’s ability to reach all of the appropriate keys. For instance, the soft boot for a Mac II involves simultaneously pressing both Control keys, the Command key, and the Power On key. On a PC it refers to pressing the Ctl-Alt-Del buttons on your keyboard at the same time.

40

Xerox subsidy Euphemism for swiping “free” photocopies at one’s workplace. Zen mail E-mail messages that arrive with no text in the message body. Haiku poetry error messages

The Web site you seek Cannot be located, but Countless more exist.

Yesterday it worked. Today it is not working. Windows is like that.

Chaos reigns within. Stay the patient course. Reflect, repent, and reboot. Of little worth is your ire. Order shall return. The network is down.

Program aborting: Close all that you have worked on. You ask far too much.

Three things are certain: Death, taxes and lost data. Guess which has occurred.

Dispatches invites all readers to adopt this approach when responding to difficult situations and submit any Haikus that you compose in the process. Email submissions to business@bbfkuwait.com.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


How Green is my Data Centre? Ian Mills

T

here are conflicting opinions about global warming, fossil fuel usage and the associated energy consumption. However it is clear that energy usage is increasing, and the corporate “bête noire” is the traditional data centre. UK corporations that consume more than 60 megawatts of power must now report on that usage, together with their efforts to reduce their carbon emission, either in absolute total or per unit of production. Failure to comply can result in fines. A recent Hewlett Packard report on sustainability cited an EPA report estimating that data centres will consume a total 100 billion kilowatt hours of energy by 2011, compared to 61 billion kilowatt hours in 2006 – an increase of over 60% in 5 years. Other sources estimate that the manufacturing, use, and disposal of information and communications technologies generate about 2% of the world’s CO2 emissions, rising to 3% by 2020.

Carbon tax uncertainties have negative effects on growth: the Financial Times reported on 28 August 2011 that “Memset, a web and IT hosting provider, had cut back plans to build its own centre in the UK due to the uncertainty of Carbon Offset taxation.” Another FT article: “IT Sector Fears Impact of Carbon Targets” presents a gloomy future - such development opportunities might go to Ireland (tax incentives there) or France (cheaper electricity).

UK taxes on high power consumers?

So what can individuals do?

The corporate data centres are the bête noire but they link in turn to hundreds of desk top products used to access a range of corporate and Internet applications, used extensively on a 24/7 basis. In the UK there are questions about the taxation that would be applied to the higher power consumers. Efficiencies may be improved by consolidating several smaller data units into a larger overall construction.

What can any individual do to save the planet from IT consumption of power? Well there is a useful guide for individuals and companies - EPEAT® styling themselves “the definitive global registry for greener electronics.” (See www.epeat.net) They provide world wide registration for environmental rating of electronic products, providing environmentally sustainable manufacturing and usage. Education initiatives in Kuwait

42

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


Shown here pushed back looking like a normal socket. The concept is cube-shaped socket developed by Russian art collective Lebedev Studio that pulls out to reveal four more connections. My information is that it is now available only as the DIN standard (European) shown here.

Education is also a key. Kuwait is incorporating environmental awareness education into its schools curricula to change the cultural perception. The long term goal is to teach the future generations an awareness of environmental sustainability. The K companies (KPC, KOC, et al) have launched corporation wide projects on environmental awareness, developing teams of qualified professionals in a range of areas including Green IT, where the training and certification is provided by the British Computer Society. (See www.bsc.org/greenit/promo) At home It is easy to leave the IT system switched on all night – especially in Kuwait with very cheap local energy. Best practice - Switch It Off. Other best practices taken from international standards help, such as using a correctly fused and moulded BS1363 plug for power lines to your PC equipment rather than wedging a (DIN standard) 2 round pin plug into the square socket on the wall. The average 21st century home – and office - has a wide range of items charging, on stand-by and otherwise requiring a mains connection. This can often outstrip the sockets provided in your apartment or villa and so extension leads and adapters become useful and provide evidence of capacity limitations. This leads to webs of wires behind shelves or cupboards housing TV, PVR, Hi-Fi and such core components of the home electronics. The capacity planning of most works spaces does not keep pace with the proliferation of devices that “must” be supported. Power systems management is still

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

constrained by design / build of typically 20 years ago. One neat solution to reducing these wandering leads is an original and functional design known as Rozektus 3D, Electric cars? One significant point about electric cars – often overlooked – they maybe cheap to run in terms of gas emissions, but have significantly high costs of production, maintenance and eventual disposal, all of which use additional energy. The car to watch, however, is the new Vauxhall Ampera reckoned to be the stuff of fantasy in the real world – “an electric vehicle for everyday driving, its revolutionary Voltec propulsion system gives the Ampera up to 50 miles of battery-powered driving with zero tailpipe emissions and the extended range technology (ERT) can give you up to an extra 310 miles between re-charging.” (see www.vauxhall-ampera.co.uk) The ERT is giving you about 175 mpg from the generator that takes over running the electric engine but still with a low CO2/km emission.

Ian Mills has 30 years experience in Kuwait as an IT Systems Consultant. This is a synopsis of an original longer paper. The complete paper can be obtained from Ian Mills at igmills@qualitynet.net, tel: 9964 9504 or 2561 6303. He is also available for any discussions through Facebook his handle is GreenMilo (what else!)

43


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

One Smart Cookie: Anna Garforth

I

n a recent article Fast Company brand identity expert David Brier presented “an amazing talent who uses the world around her as a canvas, injecting as much magic as an episode of Harry Potter.” The subject of such a strong description? Anna Garforth, in his words, “the latest phenomenon to come from England.” Anna Garforth is an urban land artist, who mixes an interest in urban ecology and sustainability in her creative practice. She works with a diverse range of materials and skills to create experimental work, often typographic, for events, community projects, workshops, campaigns, publications and exhibitions. With a satisfied client list that includes Nature Valley, Albion advertising, Arte TV, the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and Deutsche Bank, the 26 year old artist from East London is making her mark on communication by integrating typography with unusual media, such as cookie dough, moss, and honey. “My respect for the wild merged with my love of the city,” explained Garforth. “As a result, the essence of my work is inspired by the juxtaposition of urban and natural environments.”

44

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

Two projects demonstrated this juxtaposition. ‘Head gardener’ is a guerilla gardening project that turns milk bottles into plant containers. Showcased around urban areas, these containers are treated like characters with overflowing plants doubling as hair. ‘rethink’ is an installation set up in front of London’s Regents Canal which is an electrical power site with two main resources: gas and water. “The word communicates a need to rethink what our society consumes Gary Moranand how we collectively use Membership Director our resources.”

Stephen Jones

Business Relations Director

Geoff Webster General Secretary


Consumerism, Environment & Art Mlle Dominique Malarde

D

uring the sixties, new artistic practices concerned with environmental, ecological and consumerism issues began to appear. The aim was to highlight the importance of the relationship between man and his environment.

46

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

Termed variously Environmental Art, Land Art, Earth Art, Eco Art etc, the pieces use natural elements – leaves, wood, and rocks – to allow an artist to bring the environment into the gallery. Others worked in the landscape, using digging, ploughing, excavation to create large-scale pieces often set in remote locations. British artists were among the leaders in this radical new art form; e.g. Goldsworthy, Long, and others produced delicate works from wood, leaves, rocks, set in the landscape, while In the United States, one could begin to discover monumental artworks consisting of reforestation, depollution, the reintroduction of flora and fauna in deserted areas. Within the Land Art genre artists have develop ways to draw attention to issues of pollution, recycling, consumerism and waste. Observers can renew their experience of the natural environment and landscape,

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

drawing attention to ecological and environmental disturbances. Such observation offers opportunity for study, and can support solutions for sustainable development and urban planning. Here in Kuwait AUK students have identified issues of local and global pollution, recycling, ecological protection, the protection of animals, and the waste of consumerism. Their project work with Mlle Dominique during the summer has produced a number of entertaining, though-provoking and visually significant and attractive pieces and installations. Exhibitions are planned later this year in several locations in Kuwait.

Mlle Dominique Malarde is a professional artist based in the American University of Kuwait. Dominique is currently supervising students’ work for a new exhibition later in October featuring environmental art and installations. For more information call mobile 66944361 or email: domiart2008@gmail.com.

47


Global Warming? An Alternative Business Approach? Arthur Barber

I

t is announced that the US Government appears to be softening – back-tracking? - their previous hard stance on global warming. The previous demands on industry to limit carbon emissions are now being relaxed, based on the argument that business will suffer. There is much support for this view on this side of the Atlantic. It is argued that excessive carbon emission from industry contributes to the “global greenhouse” warming effect and there has been pressure on growing economies – China, India – to play their part in limiting emissions and “saving the planet”. (Pessimistically, it’s actually about saving ourselves – the planet will continue with or without us). It is a moot point on how the new industrial giants will perceive the new message from the USA. Do they now feel that they have the freedom to go ahead unchecked? Environmental scepticism However, not all scientists agree with the carbon emission arguments. One such sceptic is Bjorn Lomborg, the Danish political scientist who published his controversial “The Skeptical Environmentalist” a few years, ago and has since been heavily criticised for his contrary views.

48

Mr. Lomborg’s later publications indicate that he does now accept the reality of global warming after his initial caution, based on the science. However he maintains that the current approaches, following the Kyoto Protocol etc, will not work, arguing that: • taxes on carbon emissions will not work; • they will cost a lot and will achieve little; • the burden of cuts to carbon emissions falls unevenly on individual countries;

• the associated international negotiations are increasingly more divisive and fraught with uncertain outcomes; and

• the present technological approach is also flawed.

An alternative approach As an alternative, Mr. Lomborg recently published a study from the Copenhagen Consensus Centre which he directs. A panel of more than 20 economists, including 3 Nobel Laureates, reviewed a number of research papers. Various techniques for managing climate change were ranked by the group, based on their effectiveness and cost:

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


BUSINESS NEWS

• Geo-engineering – the use of technology to change the climate;

• Increased

investment

in

alternative

energy

technologies – bypassing fossil fuels – oil, coal

- but also excluding the environmentally-clean but cost-inefficient solar, wind and geothermal

solutions.

• Carbon capture was also identified as a possible cost-effective

method

for

reducing

carbon

emissions – this is technology to route excess carbon towards natural ‘sinks’ i.e. subterranean, submarine.

Carbon tax – a non-starter Critically, the Copenhagen group also opined that setting global taxes on carbon emissions – through a market mechanism evolving as part of a cap-and trade system, currently ranging from USD1 up to USD 68 per ton, is possibly the worst way to a solution; if the tax is too low there is no effect on the atmosphere; if too high the people become impoverished in return for insignificant benefits. Summary In summary, it seems that Mr. Lomborg will continue to be an outspoken advocate for technology-based solutions to global warming, and rejecting the present conventional market-based approaches. To his credit his voice is growing; and it has to be said that there is no room for error in this crucial matter which is already affecting all of us. This open, critical and rigorous debate must be encouraged as urgently as possible. Sources and references: “The Skeptical Environmentalist”, 2001 “Cool It”, 2007 Various press and syndicate papers (e.g. Al Watan English version; International Herald Tribune).

Arthur Barber is based in Kuwait as an Environmental Consultant, and has followed Bjorn Lomborg’s progress and work for several years. Contact: arthur.barber@ bbfkuwait.com

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

49


LONDON 2012

Meet Wenlock and Mandeville: London 2012 Mascots

I

n the past Dispatches has published interviews with ambassadors, CEOs, members of the Royal family, and other dignitaries. However, it is doubtful that two individuals more bound for glory have ever been featured between our covers. Wenlock is the London 2012 Olympic mascot and his friend Mandeville is the Paralympic mascot. Dispatches (D): Welcome. I know that our readers are curious to know how you came to represent London 2012? Wenlock (W): We were created from the last drops of British steel used for the London 2012 Olympic Stadium. That’s why we’re so shiny, reflecting the people, places and things we meet along the way as we travel around the UK. Mandeville (M): You might see yourself reflected if we meet you! We’ll be capturing everything we learn

50

as we go – of course, we’re especially excited to find out about all the Olympic and Paralympic sports. D: What’s the significance of your names? M: My name is inspired by Stoke Mandeville in Buckinghamshire, the birthplace of the Paralympic Games. On the same day as the Opening Ceremony of the London 1948 Olympic Games, Sir Ludwig Guttmann held his own sport competition in Stoke Mandeville for World War II soldiers with spinal injuries. It was no coincidence – Sir Ludwig dreamed

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


LONDON 2012

of a ‘parallel Olympics’ for athletes with disabilities. The Stoke Mandeville Games grew and grew until they became the Paralympic Games. W: Like Mandeville, my name was also inspired by an important site in Britain. Much Wenlock in Shropshire is at the heart of Olympic history. In the 19th century, Baron Pierre de Coubertin was invited there to watch the ‘Much Wenlock Games’ inspired by the Olympic Games of ancient Greece. De Coubertin was inspired by the Wenlock Games too, and went on to found the modern Olympic movement. The Much Wenlock Games are still held annually to this day! D: How would you describe yourselves? W: Do you like the light on my head? It’s inspired by the lights on London’s iconic black taxis. The shape of the front of my head is based on the shape of the Olympic Stadium roof. My eye is a camera lens, capturing everything I see as I go. If you’re wondering about the three points on my head – well, they represent the places on the podium where successful athletes stand to receive their medals. I can’t wait to meet some of Britain’s London 2012 hopefuls – and I really hope they will achieve their personal best at the Games and get to stand on the podium too. M: My eye is a camera lens too. On my head are three prongs – they represent the three parts of the Paralympic emblem. Like my tail and my hands they’re aerodynamic, which is really important as I’m a ‘spirit in motion’, always rushing around. I’m constantly trying to beat my personal best – the personal best timer on my wrist helps me keep track, as well as making sure I’m focused on London 2012.

D: You haven’t said much Wenlock . . . W: That’s what I love about sports – the dedication to “try, try and try again.” I love all the Olympic sports – and can’t wait to find out more about them! I’ve got from now until summer 2012 to learn everything I can – there’s almost nothing I like more than discovering new things. The only thing better is making friends and seeing other people make friends. The bracelets on my wrists are friendship bands, in the colours of the five Olympic rings. I can’t wait to meet as many people as possible, around the UK and even the world. D: Mandeville, have you met any of the Paralympic athletes yet? M: There are some amazing people around the UK who are inspiring me to push harder than I ever thought I could – even when the going gets tough. And among those amazing people are the Paralympic athletes I’m meeting. Some people call them ‘athletes with disabilities’. I’m finding out that’s not quite the case – in fact, these are people with an almost superhuman ability. W: There are so many fantastic people who are positive and upbeat involved in the Olympics and Paralympics. They really inspire me to do my personal best. I will do everything I can to help you do your best as well! D: That’s a lovely thought on which to end. We all need to do our best don’t we? Thank you Wenlock and you too Mandeville. See you in London this summer.

I also love the light on my head – inspired by the lights found on London’s iconic black taxis! And it helps me see where I’m going, which is always useful. I’ll be honest – I’m on a mission. On a mission to be the best I can possibly be. Because that’s what it’s all about, isn’t it? There’s nothing I like better than having a go at something new – offer me a challenge and I’ll take it! And if at first I don’t succeed? Well, as they say, I’ll try, try and try again.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

51


LONDON 2012

Hosting the Games is GREAT

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom David Cameron

N

ext year, when the Olympic and Paralympic Games come to London, the most exciting show on earth will arrive in one of the most dynamic cities on the planet.

Hosting the Games is a great honour, and I am proud that Britain is all set to stage a spectacular summer of sport. But it is also a great opportunity; a chance for the world to re-discover everything our country has to offer. You might know us best for our castles and cathedrals, our history and our heritage – and yes, as we saw with the Royal Wedding earlier this year, tradition is alive and well in Britain. But that’s just one side of the British story. Today we’re a country that is modern, creative, one of the very best places in the world to visit, study, work, invest and do business. So I want to do more than simply invite Kuwait’s finest athletes to London next year. I want to extend that invitation to the whole of your country. If you are an entrepreneur or investor, it’s a chance to discover new opportunities in a country which is rolling out the red carpet for people like you. My government is determined to make the UK the best place to start up a new business. We’re cutting corporation tax to the lowest rate in the G7, we’ve increased tax incentives to favour start-ups and highgrowth companies, and we’ve brought in a new visa especially for entrepreneurs, to attract the best to our shores. You can now set up a company in Britain in less than two weeks – that’s twice as fast as the average time it takes in Europe. Little wonder that a new company starts up every 100 seconds in the UK.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

If you’re a student, 2012 is a chance to find out more about a country which has four of the top ten universities in the world. We’ve already got more than 80 Nobel Prizes for science and technology to our name – and with investments in science, research and innovation centres, we want to see that number grow. One of the biggest draws to Britain’s universities are their close links with major global brands in everything from pharmaceuticals to engineering. So if you’re looking for fantastic opportunities to learn and get on, see what we’ve got to offer. For everyone else – tourists and visitors – we’re inviting you to take a fresh look at Britain. This is a country where great home-grown bands like Coldplay and Radiohead play at buzzing festivals like Glastonbury. It’s a place with breathtaking landscapes and fascinating heritage, where you can walk in the footsteps of figures like Henry VIII and Winston Churchill. Three of the top five museums in the world are in the UK, and beyond that there is cutting-edge music, theatre and art to be enjoyed in every city and town. Above all, Britain is a country that is tolerant, open and friendly – a place where you’ll get a warm welcome. The British may be known for our reticence and reserve, but in 2012 we have plenty to celebrate, shout about, and be proud of. It will be a great moment for Britain, and we are determined to ensure that the whole world can be part of it. We look forward to seeing you soon.

53


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Dental Implants Dr Linda Asfour

A

dvanced dental science is offering artificial tooth roots which fuse with the jawbone to form a secure foundation for tooth replacement. This concept for oral rehabilitation was developed more than 45 years ago by a Swedish scientist and orthopaedic surgeon Professor Per Ingmar Branemark. Professor Branemark theorised that the titanium

elements inserted into the bone could support fixed prostheses. The first patients were successfully

treated this way in 1965.

Osseointegration is defined as a phenomenon of

a direct contact between living bone and a metal (titanium). This integration is done through the

titanium oxide which covers the surface of the

implant. Bone cells do not recognize the titanium as a foreign body if the implant is machined in a certain

way and under a very precise and aseptic condition. This allows the implant to be fixed permanently in the

bone and anchored to the crown, providing support for chewing.

is not replaced, shrinkage of the jawbone occurs, causing the face to appear older.

Other benefits include improved comfort, speech and

mastication. Since implants are anchored securely to the jaw bone, they feel, look, and function like natural teeth.

Finally, an implant helps maintain healthy adjacent teeth. With traditional treatment of a missing tooth,

two teeth adjacent to the missing tooth must be ground down to place a bridge. Dental implants eliminate the need to modify healthy teeth, resulting in a more conservative and aesthetic restoration.

In the case of a total loss of teeth in one or both jaws,

Benefits of dental implant One important benefit

of dental implants is improved

appearance

.Each tooth is made up

of a crown and a root. The crown is visible

a full denture may work for the short term, but without

tooth roots the jawbone slowly shrinks causing the

denture to lose its fitness. This can lead to discomfort.

Gradual loss of jawbone can also change the shape of

the face and appearance. With dental implants, once the implants are fused in the jaw can be restored with

a fixed bridge or over-denture and that will keep the

while the unseen root

bone healthy and the teeth securely in place.

the jawbone, providing

Treatment procedure

anchors the crown to stable support. Many options are available for replacing a crown but

56

only dental implants can replace its root. If the root

A comprehensive examination should be taken prior to implant treatment including panoramic x-ray and

CT scan to determine the bone quality and quantity, to

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

locate the vital structures, providing a guide for ideal

Absolute contraindications to dental Implants are:

are placed, they are covered with gum tissue while

lower jaw or under the sinus wall; bruxism (tooth

the implants will bond with the jawbone. Temporary

smoking and active chemotherapy. In case of

placement of the Implant. After the dental implants the bone heals. During the next three to six months, crowns, bridges or over dentures are optional during

this bone healing period. Once the dental implants

have fused with jawbone, a post is attached to each implant. While the gum tissue is healing, temporary

crowns, bridges or over dentures should be in place. When the gum tissue has healed an impression

is taken to be used in designing the final dental restoration.

Insufficient bone above the mandibular nerve in the

clenching); uncontrolled type 2 diabetes; heavy

insufficient bone an artificial bone graft or grafts from the iliac crest (hip) or from the chin can be used.

Dental implants can develop a condition called peri-

implantitis, which is defined as an inflammatory reaction with loss of supporting bone in the tissues surrounding an implant. The overall frequency of periimplantitis was reported to be 5%-8%.In individuals

with history of chronic periodontitis( Gum disease)

The success rate of the implant depends mainly on

the incidence of peri-implantitis was 4-5 times higher

of the patient and the patient’s general health. Studies

smoking, diabetes, poor oral hygiene are usually

the operator’s skills, the bone quality, the oral hygiene have shown a success rate of 95 percent for the fixture

implant and higher for the bridges they support.

than individuals with no history of periodontitis. Heavy associated with this condition. Treatment of peri-

implantitis consists of plaque control, mechanical and surgical instrumentation of the affected area

combined with systematic antibiotic and oral hygiene instruction.

Dr Linda Asfour is Convenor of the BBF Health Sector Group and practices as a Dentist in Kuwait.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

57


KES Students Report on London Experience (with help from Miss Clarke) Miss Clarke Head of Senior Music, Kuwait English School After hearing of this amazing opportunity for school bands within Kuwait to win a trip to record at the Metropolis Studios, I applied that Kuwait English School may be involved. We were granted permission to do so and the journey began. The bands within the school wrote their own songs and performed them at a public concert in the main hall attended by judges from the BBF. All the bands did very well and after a hard decision the judges decided the winning band was ‘The Lights’. During the following months the band rehearsed constantly improving and developing the song until finally the day of the trip arrived. Walking into the Metropolis studios was truly amazing and the students were all perfectly behaved and in awe of their surroundings. All members of the band worked hard when recording their individual parts and coped extremely well as the recording session took a total of 10 hours! The second day saw the sound engineer, Sam Wheat, working incredibly hard in order to record the best version of the song, and gave the students a valuable insight into the working of a recording studio that day. The end result was an amazing song and accompanying video and I am so very proud of the seven students that worked so hard. I would like to thank the BBF for this amazing opportunity and David Battersby for his organisation and company throughout this experience.

58

Arnab Gogoi Yr 12, Singer Early in January 2011, music students at K.E.S were told about a fantastic opportunity presented by the British Business Forum. The opportunity to be able to compose our own song, perform it and possibly win an all-expense paid trip to London where we would go to the legendary Metropolis Studios to record the very song we composed with professionals. We were shocked and surprised; we even had a 2 minute silence after our music teacher told us! Nevertheless, we grasped the opportunity in our hands and got down to work from day one. I managed to bring together a few of my musical friends and we began rigorous composition sessions and eventually 3 months down the line came the day of the judging. I can certainly say, even though many of us have had much performance experience, we were petrified, especially with such a grand prize at stake. After two hours of intense and close performances, we pulled through and the adrenaline rush was terrific. We were going to London! How our band felt about going to London could probably not be described in words. We were overjoyed and full of anticipation of what was in store. Leading up to our trip was our end of year exams, and I can assure you that whilst we were in the hall, trying to solve the quadratic equation on the page in front of us, we must have ALL been thinking about London and just how amazing it will definitely be. We felt awe, shock, excitement and then, that sudden feeling of being surrounded by some of history’s greatest artists as we walked into the Metropolis Studios. Whilst being taken around the studio, we

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


FOR YOUR INFORMATION were shown exact spots where some famous artists sat, recorded, and spent their time and we felt SO honoured and amazed. But nevertheless, we never felt alienated. Being teenagers in a famous recording studio, we expected to be shunned or even ignored, but the people could not have been friendlier. They were all welcoming and extremely kind and never minded going out of their way to explain things around the studio. I think Sam Wheat, our producer and sound engineer, HAD to be one of the most enjoyable characters of the trip. He was extremely friendly and approachable and always shared his knowledge with us about the music industry and bands. Although the best part had to be, when he was awesome enough to let us try out the various instruments around the studio for ourselves and we had a dream come true for one afternoon. As the singer, my fondest moment was when I went into the ‘Dead Room’, which was the singer recording station, named after the fact that it is absolutely sound proofed and no sound echoes off the wall. The feeling just before I began to record, the feeling during my first breath before I started to sing, must have been the best of my life as I actually genuinely lost myself to the place right there. I actually felt like a famous singer of a band, recording one of his songs and that it just felt so surreal and unrealistic that I couldn’t help not smiling about later on in the hotel room. It was in that room, those few minutes that I felt like a true singer. Daniel Berger Yr 12 - Guitarist The BBF had decided to set up a song-writing competition for the first time which took place in KES, thanks to Miss. Clarke a Music teacher here. We had a deadline to write a song and then the judges would choose the best one, our band ‘The Lights’ won the competition and so we were on our way to London. I felt very nervous, anxious and excited at the same time I knew that this would a trip I would remember, a trip we’d all remember. I didn’t actually know what was going to happen in London, but I knew we’d have a great time.

homely, so were the people that worked there. They treated us as equals even though we were amateurs at this, although we did beat them once in a game of pool! Recording the song was probably the most memorable time I had in London, it was very new to me but I had a splendid time. We were all called down one by one to record each separate part of the song, which of course made me nervous - somewhat scared to make a mistake in front of a professional sound engineer. But in the end I was frightened for no reason, I had a blast and so did the rest of the band. I’d have to say the best memory of the trip was undoubtedly the time we all shared in the Studio A’s greenroom with the rest of the band just hanging out playing music and waiting impatiently for our own time to record. Hagop Momjian Yr 12, Drummer Originally ‘The Lights’ had no drummer. At the competition I had my own band; however, we only made it to second place. Arnab, the male vocalist from ‘The Lights’, then approached me and asked me if I would like to drum for them in London. I agreed to his offer and therefore went on the trip to London. I was so excited when I got to London. Getting there put everyone in their happiest mood. Seeing the beautiful views and the tall buildings in the city was simply amazing. You could sit and listen to the street performances for hours and still be entertained. I couldn’t believe it when we first walked into Metropolis Studios. The thought of students like us having a chance to record at one of the world’s best studios was unbelievable. It even gave me hope that in a few years time, maybe I could be a sound engineer in a studio that big. When we first walked into the ‘green room’, I was a bit nervous, but later on it was just a big thrill as we started the actual recording.

When I walked into Metropolis Studios I had the feeling of awe - the Studio was remarkable and had everything you would ever need in well, a Music Studio. It was quite exhilarating seeing a Studio as grand as the Metropolis and so I tried to take in every single detail I could. But not only was the building

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

59


FOR YOUR INFORMATION I really enjoyed the recording because it brought all of us closer together. In London we complained about how tired we were after spending long hours at the studio, but now I’m glad we did so. We went from being friends to becoming a family, and most importantly, we all had a fun time playing music, because after all, music is our passion. My favourite memory of the London trip was the time I played Freddie Mercury’s piano. The fact that I played his piano was amazing. I will never forget this trip. It’s a memory we will all keep with us for as long as we live. Bethel Embaie Yr 10 - Singer We formed a band called ‘The Lights’ when we competed in the song writing competition at Kuwait English School. We wrote the song ‘No Tomorrow’ and we won this recording trip to London. It was my first trip to London and it is certainly a remarkable city. The buildings are so marvellous and spectacular. Even after the exhausting 6 hour flight, I felt energised by the refreshing smell of clean air and the view of the green countryside. The moment I entered the Metropolis Studios, I was speechless with astonishment. I was overwhelmed by the fact that I was living my dream. It was magnificently built with original designs to dampen the sound. I learned many fascinating things about recording music that made me love it even more. Recording the song took some time but it was definitely worthwhile. I discovered strengths and weaknesses in my voice and musical skills, which helped me improve. I especially like jamming and trying different instruments while waiting! Moreover, recording the final piece was a tremendous moment as I felt like a star in the spotlight. I also loved seeing a live musical called ‘Blood Brothers’. It made me cry, what a fantastic show and

60

I was amazed to see the raw emotion and tears in the eyes of the cast as they took their bows. Aliak Bedirian Year 12 - Pianist The BBF and the KES head of Music had set up a song writing competition for bands around the school of any genre and age. In total, five bands wrote songs and performed them at this competition. The Lights got together for this competition, and we won, therefore getting the prestigious opportunity to record at a professional studio in London. I knew what to expect from London in terms of the area because I had been there before, but I had never actually been to a studio, so I felt extremely excited when I got to London, because of that prospect. When I first walked into the Metropolis Studio, my first emotion was nervousness. We were at a professional studio being treated like professionals and I didn’t want to mess something up and make a fool of myself. As we took the tour, I got a little bit more comfortable with my surroundings and actually enjoyed being at the studio, and one of the first thoughts that came to my mind was: “this is amazing!”. I really enjoyed the fact that recording had a whole different process to it, it was not like putting on a live concert. We had to record our parts separately, whilst listening to each other’s recordings on our headphones. Also, while we recorded the parts our headphones had a ‘click’ set up that kept us all in time when we recorded. I really enjoyed this whole system, and I don’t think there was anything I didn’t like about it. My favourite lasting memory of this trip definitely has to be playing and recording on Freddie Mercury’s piano. This was an incredible memory that I will definitely remember for the rest of my life.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


61


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

New English School Achieves BSO Approved Status

B

ritish schools overseas are a diverse collection of Institutions which in varying degrees provide instruction in English, have teachers who are native English speakers and which provide their pupils with a broad and balanced curriculum. Until now schools describing themselves as British have not received any formal approval or recognition from the British Government. The Government has put in place a voluntary inspection scheme and the intention of the scheme is to inform parents of pupils in British schools overseas how the standards in these schools measure up against the standards that apply to independent schools in Britain. Inspectorates approved by the Department and monitored by Ofsted will be authorised to inspect British schools overseas and produce inspection reports, which will be available to parents and prospective parents of British schools overseas. Schools need to demonstrate that they offer a broad and balanced curriculum and teaching that will equip pupils with the skills and qualifications to enable them to progress in the UK education system at school, college or university level as appropriate. In addition, British schools should be able to provide opportunities for a wide range of extra-curricular activities and strong welfare support. They should promote a general knowledge and understanding of modern British life, particularly in relation to the values of tolerance, democracy and respect for freedom of expression.

Schools are inspected against the criteria which are given in the ‘Standards that inspectorates must meet’ document. This scheme is voluntary and approval enables parents to acquire better information about the quality of provision within the inspected school and its compatibility with independent schools in the UK. The New English School is proud to announce that the recent inspection carried out by inspectors from Penta International gave the school the recognition provided by the scheme. Further information and the school inspection report at www.education.gov.uk.

The inspection covers the quality of the curriculum, quality of teaching and learning, the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils, student welfare, health and safety, the suitability of the proprietor and staff, the school’s premises and accommodation and a school’s complaints procedures. An essential part of the inspection is considering the extent to which the British character of the school is evident in the ethos, curriculum, teaching, care for pupils and pupils’ achievements

62

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Love It or Hate It – an Unsavoury Dispute

L

etter to the Times 26th May 2011 – Sir, The Danes should remember Prohibition (“Danes ban Marmite” May 25th). Within weeks there will be a thriving Marmite black market. The Danes will be overrun by Marmite racketeers, and secret dens serving hot toast and Marmite will proliferate. Copenhagen will become the Marmite Chicago There is no doubt that Marmite is controversial – and not just for its taste. At the end of May, a spate of media stories began to appear reporting that it had been banned in Denmark. Marmite is the dark, deeply savoury spread with a unique and controversial flavour. Invented by accident in the late 19th Century by a German scientist, Justus Liebig, who discovered that brewer’s yeast could be concentrated, bottled and eaten. In 1902 the Marmite Food Company was founded in Burton-on-Trent, Staffordshire, where the raw material was readily available from the town’s brewers. The original recipe contained salt, spices and celery. Later folic acid, vitamin B12, thiamin and riboflavin - vitamins which occur naturally in some foods - were added in high concentrations. The Marmite name is derived from that of a French casserole dish called a marmite (pronounced Marmeet). In the Normandy port of Dieppe, a popular fish stew is known as a Marmite Dieppoise. Ever since the 1920s the red and yellow label on the jar has had a picture of a marmite on it.

64

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Thus the story about how ‘the Danish Marmite ban’ was received by angry consumers became a rather bewildering saga in itself.

A sculpture has been built in Marmite’s honour. The sculpture, nicknamed Monumite,, takes pride of place next to the main library in Burton-on-Trent. The official Marmite website draws on the emotion and amusing hysteria surrounding the “Love it or Hate it” tag by dividing the site to reflect the two opposing opinions GPs often recommend it for people with vitamin deficiencies, busy lives or special dietary needs. The Danish authorities deem it too rich, however, with too high levels of folic acid. They are concerned that people may exceed their recommended daily intake of vitamins.

Edward De Bono advising the Foreign & Commonwealth some years ago suggested that Marmite was the missing link in the Middle East peace process. Tenuously, he suggested that a lack of zinc tends to make men belligerent. As most people get their zinc from bread, consumers of unleavened bread – such as flat pitta bread – are very low in yeast and, therefore, according to Professor Bono, more likely to be aggressive. The solution would be to make good the deficiency with Marmite. All unsold jars of Marmite, preferably XX Special Strength should be imported in to the Middle East at once.. There is, however, a flaw in the argument as reflected in a further letter to the Times 27th May 2011 – Sir, Your leading article (“Marmite is right”, May 26th) is typical of the short-termism that plagues global politics. You completely ignore the “You either love it or hate it “ paradigm. Spreading Marmite across the Middle East will cause divisions with global conflict ramifications..

As with the feelings about the spread itself, the response to the reported ban was extreme. Fans were outraged, threatening riots, setting up numerous groups on Facebook, including one declaring 6 June as ‘Ex-pats Marmite Day’. Some shops in Denmark became worried about the future of their business, and started a ‘Bring Back Marmite’ campaign. There was talk of smuggling it in from nearby Sweden or Germany. Nutritionists were up in arms. There were those who ventured the theory that banning Marmite was a plot by the Danish government, worried about immigration levels, to get foreigners to leave. Serious concerns for future of Danish economy without highly skilled foreign workers were voiced. Some proposed banning Danish bacon, Lego and Sandi Toksvig in retaliation – and only half-jokingly.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

65


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Marmite’s Close Cousin ALSO Stirs International Incidents As you will see from the article excerpts below, Marmite is not the only yeast extraction to create international incidents. A perfectly cordial meeting between Australia’s Prime Minister Julia Gillard and US President Barak Obama was almost marred by Vegemite in March. More recently, Aussie Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd ran into problems with US Customs and again, the culprit was Vegemite . . .

CBC News Report (excerpts)

. . . Vegemite also was a source of disagreement when Julia Gillard made her only visit to the United States as prime minister in March. She and U.S. President Barack Obama visited a high school in Virginia where an Grade 11 student asked what Vegemite was. “It’s horrible,” Obama exclaimed. “I love Vegemite,” Gillard said, noting that their opinions of the spread serves as a “little bit of division” between the two of them. It sparked international curiosity when “a Vegemite sandwich” was mentioned in the lyrics of Australian band Men at Work’s hit song Down Under that topped the U.S. and British charts in 1983. Former Prime Minister John Howard claims that more Australians know the lyrics of a Vegemite advertising jingle written in 1954 than know the Australian national anthem. Defence and trade dominated her talks with Mr. Obama but it was Vegemite that dominated discussion with a group of high school students who received a surprise visit from the two leaders. Mr. Obama told a group of schoolchildren that the iconic Aussie spread was “horrible” and that Australia played an odd code of football. Otherwise, the nations were firm friends with close and unique bonds.

Queen Victoria reportedly traveled with her own bed. President Bush had his own pillow. But such needs almost caused a diplomatic incident this week. Australia’s foreign minister, Kevin Rudd, wanted to bring his beloved breakfast treat to New York with him this week. But according to Mr. Rudd’s Twitter feed, the airport authorities in New York tried to confiscate it. The culprit - vegemite, yes the spread that most Aussies love and the world hates. Vegemite has scored itself another bout of international infamy after foreign minister Kevin Rudd was forced to bring out the might of “ministerial intervention” to get his breakfast through US Customs on Sunday. The suspect little jar of brown stuff that saw Rudd questioned en route from Mexico to New York was actually his breakfast, a supply of emergency Vegemite he’d stashed in his carry-on bag. “Only problem travelling to NY is that they tried to confiscate our Vegemite at the airport. Needed Foreign Ministerial intervention,” Rudd tweeted following the incident. Luckily, Mexico’s Foreign Service came to the rescue, and the jar was eventually allowed to accompany him on the plane. Meanwhile, the BBC also sought to explain the substance to its UK-based readers: “Vegemite, a savoury paste made from yeast extract, is popular in Australia,” read its report. “It is similar to Marmite, which is widely eaten in the UK.” No, it’s nothing like Marmite.

The Australian invention, launched in 1923, has a high Vitamin B content and is marketed heavily on its health benefits for children. Australians abroad commonly bemoan how difficult Vegemite is to find outside Australia.

Vegemite Nearly Causes International Incident Fareed Zakaria, CNN

We all like our comforts of home, even world leaders. Colonel Gadhafi always traveled with his tents.

66

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


LOCATE is a new service from the Foreign Office that lets you register your whereabouts while you’re abroad. So, if there’s an emergency and you need to be contacted, we can find you more quickly.

Register with LOCATE by visiting www.fco.gov.uk/travel and clicking on

LOCATE.

67


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Kuwait Shell and Kuwait Oil Company Launched ‘Seat Belts Save Lives’ Campaign in Kuwait

K

uwait Shell, in partnership with Kuwait Oil Company (KOC), hosted a new road safety campaign entitled ‘Seat Belts Save Lives,’ which seeks to improve driving habits, encourage and educate the public in the use of seat belts and child restraints. The campaign was held in Souk Shark from 26th May until 27th May, where it showcased the importance of seat belts and how they can help to save an adult or child from serious injury or death if they are in a car accident. The campaign featured a Seatbelt Convincer workshop in which members of the public experienced what it is like to ‘crash’ at speeds of up to 12 miles an hour. Kuwait Shell’s Chairman, Ahmed Mouti said: “People have many excuses for not wearing seat belts while driving, Shell Kuwait and KOC have taken the initiative in this campaign to demonstrate the value of seat belts and how they can actually save lives in case of a car accident. Our priority is to benefit the community we live in and this campaign successfully demonstrated the importance of wearing a seatbelt.” The ‘Seat Belts Save Lives’ campaign is part of Kuwait Shell’s ongoing regional ‘Road Safety’ initiative which began in 2008. Research has shown that one of the

68

best ways to stay safe during a car accident is by wearing a seat belt. Mr Saeed Al-Shaheen KOC’s Well surveillance group manager commented: “When adults buckle up, their children learn to buckle up too, reducing the chance of injuries or death. At KOC we believe in the importance of road safety, hence our partnership with Kuwait Shell where we hope our message comes across to the public. The safety of every individual on the road is our utmost priority and concern.” At the ‘Seatbelt’s Save Lives’ stand, attendees were given the opportunity to observe hourly performed demonstrations by Dr. Ibrahim El-Mahdy Kuwait Oil Company HSE & Road Safety consultant and Noor Al-Assar, Kuwait Shell HSE Lead. The stand welcomed over 800 visitors over the course of the two day campaign where they had the chance to experience the importance of wearing their seat belt while driving on the roads.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


WE REALLY SHOULD BE NAMED UK ELECTRIC. Made in the UK, MK products have been serving reliably since 1919. More than 6 million 2 Gang Socket Outlets — just a part of the MK product line — are produced, tested and distributed by UK employees each year.

Kuwait’s favourite wiring accessory brand for more than 50 years. For more information visit www.me.mkelectric.com or www.keckuwait.com


Car Care

(for Those Who Really Don’t Care) Susan Day

M

y friend Gene Pepper had to rescue me the other day as my 19 month old battery died. I parked at Starbucks to run in for a coffee, left the car parked in the sun and when I came out . . . nothing. I have to confess I wasn’t completely surprised as several times in the preceding weeks I’d made quick stops and then had to wait while my car struggled back to life when I turned the ignition key. Kuwait is a great place for cars. For people who are really into them, everything is available – from an old Nissan Sunny to a shiny new Maybach. For the rest of us, it’s still above average. The lack of taxes make cars cheaper than elsewhere; labour costs are less here so maintenance is affordable; and the roads are pretty good. However, and we’re getting to the point of this article, car care takes on a whole new meaning in Kuwait. Forget everything you’ve learned or experienced elsewhere; trust me, it doesn’t apply. My introduction to the unique aspects of car care in Kuwait came early one morning about two months after I bought my (used) car. I tried to start it and it was dead. Luckily I had a mechanic across the street and he came over to see what was wrong. After about two minutes he kindly chewed me out for not putting water in the battery like I was supposed to. Now, I started driving in the US in 1976. I bought my first car in 1977. I’ve had several cars in the thirty years that followed and not once did I have a battery that I had to put water in. I do remember hearing about those batteries, but it wasn’t part of my automotive history. So, tip number one: Don’t assume you have a closed cell battery. Check it out. That’s just first on the list, there is more. Car batteries last an average of about 22 months. If yours is older, you might want to have it evaluated or you could be in for a surprise one morning.

70

Tyres last about the same period. In the summer the asphalt gets so hot it literally cooks the rubber, making it brittle. Forget about 5 years/50,000 miles, you want to inspect them monthly after about 20 months. Tyre pressure is a bigger deal here than most places, as the temperature variations are so extreme. In perfect tires, the rule of thumb is for every 12 Celsius change in air temperature, your tire’s inflation pressure will change by about 1 psi (up with higher temperatures and down with lower). Brake pads seem to react similarly. After about 8 months (or six months if summer’s there), have them checked and be prepared to replace them. Given the heat and the dust, you want to check and probably change your oil filter every 3,500 km or 12 to 15 weeks. It won’t hurt to have the cooling system checked out while the oil is dripping out – water evaporates faster here. And, touch wood, I haven’t had a problem with belts and hoses, but have the mechanic also look at those during the oil change. Finally, because you don’t want to be driving around even for one day without AC, have your AC checked at the beginning of the summer (personally, for me that’s late April!). It worked hard last season and deserves a little pampering. If you’ve got a new car, check the battery and follow the recommendations of the service centre. If you’ve got a previously owned gem like me, take heed. Happy driving.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Carla in Kuwait Why? • Dad asked Mum if she wanted a summer job out here. I jumped in saying ‘Me! I do!’, and not really expecting anything to happen. Here for 5 weeks. • Work experience. Just finished my NVQ Level 2 City and Guilds qualification in Hairdressing. Starting level 3 in September. Girls at college are all very envious of the opportunity. • Visiting dad. First visit to Kuwait, although not to the Middle East. Picked the best time to come out! If I can stand this heat then I should be able to survive here the rest of the year.

What I’m doing here: • Working. Work experience in a western salon run by Rachael Gibson. Newly opened salon called Top To Toe in Egaila, like ‘a little sanctuary in the madness of Kuwait’. • Also work experience at Oxford Learning with a class of 11 young Kuwaiti children ranging from 3-7 years old who are learning English. Having lots of fun there. • Working with dad, some admin work in the office. • Was invited to play piano at Movenpick, Shuwaikh and have been re-invited, think the customers enjoyed my playing. It makes me happy to find and be able to play a piano here, as at home I’m used to playing every day. Piano withdrawal symptoms; not good.

Where I’ve visited; • Been to the embassy on several occasions. Very lucky to have been so often in such a short space of time. • BBF meetings and events. The AGM, Armed Forces Day, F1 Day.

74

• Have seen lots of malls, always enjoyable. Been to a few souks, really enjoy visiting places like this. • Have attempted a few times to go go-karting but it’s not really the best time to go, either too hot or too dusty.

Would I come back? • Definitely. • I plan on coming back at some point, possibly come back for much longer when I’ve finished my college education. • There are better job opportunities here than there are in the UK. e.g. In the UK; after 18 months of job hunting I’m still trying to get a job, right now it almost seems impossible but I’ve got to keep trying… In Kuwait; before I came out I had several job opportunities and after 1 week of being here I had 3 work experience opportunities, with an invite to come back after my visit if I wanted. • No major complaints, actually no complaints really at all. I was told a lot of things about Kuwait that might put me off staying here again. It hasn’t really fazed me; I’m a very understanding and patient person. The crazy driving I was told about, to be honest doesn’t feel that crazy, it’s quite laid back in a sense. Yes they swap lanes like it’s some sort of game of weaving through the traffic to get to the finish line first but there’s no real ‘road rage’ like there would be in the UK if the same thing was going on there. • Been kept busy most days I’ve been here, working or out visiting places, no time to rest here, this is definitely not a holiday. • Strangely I only met one Kuwaiti to speak to – a lovely lady.

Since leaving Kuwait I have enrolled in a TEFL English (for non native speakers) teachers course and will soon be back to seek a “proper” job.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


Cost per 4 insertions, paid in advance, attracts a discount of 10%


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

British Business Forum 2011-2012 Membership and Membership Renewals The time of year is with us again: Time to join or renew your membership in the British Business Forum (BBF). For current members: We hope you will have found value, not only in your business activities, but also in the social activities that have been arranged by the Forum and that you have been able to broaden the scope of your operations as a result. If there is any change in previously submitted form (20102011), please take a moment to complete/update the attached 2011-2012 application, which along with your 45KD membership fee can be given either to any Board Members or dropped in at BBF office (attached map). The coming year promises to be an exciting one and we believe that your continuing support will cause us to grow and become stronger. If you are a member who has reached the end of their tenure in Kuwait we

wish you well, wherever you go and would thank you for all your support during your time here. Please let me know if you wish to be removed from the mailing list. For potential members: As you’ve surely discover just from flipping through this magazine, the BBF is an active group of professionals working – directly or indirectly with British businesses here in Kuwait, in the region, and beyond. Please join us for a meeting to see for yourself how the BBF can enhance both your professional life and your social life. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any queries or require any information regarding the BBF and its activities.

Rose William BBF Administration Manager P: +965 2232 2038 F: +965 2232 2040 Email: business@bbfkuwait.com


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

Membership Benefits 2011-2012 with Valid BBF Membership Card

Valid through end of June 2012 (unless otherwise stated)

A

s a member of the BBF you enjoy discounts on many exciting goods and services. We encourage you to patronise these friends of the BBF who are going that extra step to serve you. 10G Technologies

Avanti Palace Restaurant

10% on all IBM servers, storage, tape libraries

15% discount

5% on all Microsoft licences

Valid to 15th March 2012

10% on all Cisco switches, routers, firewall/IT

Tel 2575 1081/2

10% on all VM ware licencing 10% on all Sonic wall UTM devices

Gulf Union Solar Solutions

25% on all professional services

10% discount on all products

Valid to 1st May 2012

Valid until 25th February 2012

Tel 2495 4155

Tel 2491 5044

A One Car Rental

Holiday Inn Kuwait Salmiya

Individual members 10%

25% discount at the following restaurants:

Corporate members 15%

L’Aroma Café, Sakura Japanese Restaurant

Tel 2227 3900

Tang Chao Chinese Restaurant

Ayman Zaman Lebanese Restaurant ,

Alghanim Travel

Rib Eye Steak House &

Dar Al Awadi Office Only - personal visit

Al Diwan International Buffet

Exclusive offers for BBF members & families

10% discount on outside catering

travel@alghanim.com

20% discount on banqueting

Current offer on BBF website

Tel : 1847 777 x 5302

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

77


BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM

Ibis Salmiya & Sharq

London Limo

Discount offer (to members & friends, family,

Individual members 10%

colleagues & clients when booked the member)

Corporate members 15%

10% discount on rooms on published rates

Tel 6000 5466

15% discount on food & beverage in all outlets

Movenpick Hotel - Shuwaikh

Tel 2573 4247

20% in all restaurants

Inchcape Shipping Services Worldwide Movers

Tel 2461 0033

10% on domestic packing & removals

Napket Restaurant - Avenues

Tel 2243 4993

15% discount Valid until 14th January 2012

Kei Japanese Restaurant

Tel 2571 5084

J W Marriott 15% in all restaurants

Spalon - Spa & Salon for Men

Valid to 17 May 2012

15% discount

J W Marriott

Tel: 2242 2650

Valid until 14th January 2012

Tel 2242 2244/ 9900 1717

Kuwait Medical Center

Top to Toe Hair & Beauty Salon

Salmiya Branch

Taiba Mall, Egails Commercial Complex

15% on all treatments by Dr Linda Asfour

10% discount on all beauty services

Surgical & cosmetic dentistry

(excluding hair)

Root canal treatment

Offer cannot be used in conjunction with any

Peridontal treatment & surgery

other seasonal promotion

Crowns & bridges

Tel 9938 9358

Ceramic crowns & veneers

Implants (Branemark, ITI System)

Wisdom teeth operations

Childrens dentistry

Tel 2575 9044/45/46

78

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

From The Tower to the Towers

Y

ou may have noticed, in downtown Shuwaikh and around the malls, that Oxford Street icon, the “black cab”, recently arrived and here to stay. Not just in black, but bright hues of white, silver and bronze which seem somehow appropriate in the Kuwaiti sunshine. These are not taxis that can be hailed with a whistle; there is no meter, no garrulous font of information and opinion on any subject that you can think of, posing as a driver. “The Knowledge” is provided by Satnav, guiding a uniformed chauffeur, proficient in Arabic and English.

This altogether more comfortable concept is the brainchild of London Limo, in partnership with Al Zayani and the London Taxi Company. Utilising the vehicle’s spacious design, luxury enhanced to include flat TV screens, DVD, internet connection, laptop rests, client to driver intercom, and the service also includes newspapers and such essential reading as the latest copy of Dispatches in each limo! London Limo also caters for clients with special needs including easy wheelchair access ramps and anchoring facilities, for comfortable travel The “style and comfort” epithet has been successfully adopted by Avenues visitors, where London Limo is now the official provider of choice, and further introductions to the fleet will support London Limo’s ambitious plans to provide the “experience” to a much wider market.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

79


80


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

‘For Hire’ Takes On a Whole New Meaning

T

hese days when a taxi is ‘for hire’ you can’t assume that that means it’s empty and ready to transport you to the destination of your choice. It could also mean that the contract for the top to tyres advertising is about to run out and the entire surface of the taxi is for hire. The London taxi has caught the eye of many advertising agencies because of their unique body style. The practice dates back more than a decade and today it is is common to see the vehicle wrapped with advertising and used for marketing events in the UK.

81


THE BRITISH EMBASSY

Consular Section (For a full update on the consular section see page 88. ) Since 1 June 2010, applications for full validity passports for British Nationals are no longer processed at the British Embassy, Kuwait. All passport applications from Kuwait are processed and printed centrally in the Passport Processing Centre in Dusseldorf, where you need to send your application. These changes have been implemented throughout the Gulf and are part of a global initiative to streamline and modernise the UK’s overseas passport operation. The UK remains one of the few countries printing passports in Embassies and Consulates abroad. This is expensive to do and is less secure as we have to transport blank passports around the world. Our aim is to reduce the cost of running the operation, while improving security and maintaining a high standard of customer service. How long does this service take? You should allow up to 4 weeks to submit your application before travelling. Dusseldorf aim to process straightforward applications within 10 working days upon receipt of the correct documentation and payment. Applications for first time applicants may take longer. Please ensure you allow extra time for delivery at both ends of the process. If you need to travel for urgent reasons, please contact the Consular Section here at the British Embassy, Kuwait on 22594358. Full details are on the British Embassy website: www.ukinkuwait. fco.gov.uk The Consular Section Public Counter hours are 08:30 – 10:30, Sunday – Thursday.

82

LOCATE:

If we can’t find you ---- We can’t help you Register with us If you are a British national, and travelling or living abroad, or planning to do so, use our LOCATE service to tell us. Our embassy and crisis staff can then give you better assistance in an emergency such as a tsunami or terrorist attack. We are encouraging all British nationals travelling and living abroad to register with us on LOCATE at: https://www.locate.fco.gov.uk/ locateportal/ …. even for short trips. From 3rd February, more than 50 improvements have been introduced to enhance the performance of LOCATE – the FCO registration and crisis management system. These improvements include: • • •

Being able to register on LOCATE without needing to input your passport details. Clearer labelling to make the public site easier for customers to use and understand. LOCATE will now send auto email reminders to the email address provided by the registrant in the trip details as well as to the email address used to create the registration account. If you don’t receive the account verification email after first registering you can return to the main LOCATE page and click on a link “Never Received Your Confirmation Message?”. Once you’ve entered your user ID, you will be faced with a simple logic puzzle. This meets FCO I&TD concerns about automatic spam bombarding the website and allows visually impaired people to complete the puzzle (Facebook and Google style logic puzzles do not meet FCO standards).

These changes should make LOCATE easier to use. These improvements were introduced as a direct result of feedback from LOCATE users and customers across the network. FCO has heard your concerns about the reliability and functionality of LOCATE and have been working hard to introduce the changes you want to see.

How to contact British Embassy Kuwait - Consular Section: Tel: 22594355/57/58 Fax: 22594359 Kuwait.generalenquiries@fco.gov.uk

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


THE BRITISH EMBASSY THE BRITISH EMBASSY

Visa Visa Section: Section: UKBA Kuwait:

During the last financial year (1 April 2010 – 31 March 2011), UKBA Kuwait processed Since57,000 September 2007 over Numbers 120,000 over visa applications. applicantsto rise, have their visa continue year lodged on year, proving that the United Kingdom is theKingdom destination of application for the United at our choice for tourism, business higher Visa Application Centre (VAC) inand downtown education for those living intoKuwait. Kuwait. Numbers continue rise and with

UK Trade and Investment Section: Head of Trade & Investment: Duncan Hoyland – (+965) 22594362

Senior Trade & Investment Advisers:

McKay – (+965) 22594363 We Paul would like to draw your attention Irene Ronald – (+965) 22594365 to changes in our contact details: Trade & Investment Advisers: Romeo Rosario – (+965) 22594364 Embassy – Switchboard: Gula Al-Sharafi (+965) 22594366

Tel.: 2259 4320 Fax: 2259 4368

Head of Trade and Investment:

Duncan Hoyland – 2259 4362 Defence & Security

Alec Gribble – (+965) 22594336 Deputy Head of Trade and Investment:

Irene Ronald – 2259 4365 General Enquiries:

Fax: (+965) 22594368 or 22594339 Trade and Investment Ofcers:

ukti.kuwait@fco.gov.uk

Josephine Muhyedden – 2259 4363 Elvis Noronha – 2259 4367 British Gula AlEmbassy Shara Switchboard: – 2259 4366 AnjuTel: Verghese - 2259 4364 (+965) 22594320 Fax: (+965) 22594339

DISPATCHES DISPATCHES A

Winter 10/11 utumn 2011

over 50,000 applications lodged in this UKBA Kuwait continues to process visa nancial year it proves that the UK is the applications very effectively with around destination of choice forprocessed trade, education 95% of all applications within and tourism for those living in Kuwait. 2 working days. Paul Dryden, the Entry Clearance Manager says, ‘Our staff UKBA to process in the Kuwait sectioncontinues consistently meet visa the Customer Agreementwith set around by the applicationsService very effectively UK where over 90% within of all 95%government of all applications processed straightforward applications are processed 2 working days. Paul Dryden, the Entry within 24 hours of receipt within the Clearance Manager says, “Our staff Embassy, this is a phenomenal achievement in the section consistently meet the considering the numbers that are lodged Customer Service Agreement set by the during the busy summer season’. UK government where over 90% of all straightforward processed As an ongoingapplications process toare improve the overall service, UKBAwithin Kuwait and VFS within 24hrs of receipt the Embassy, Global, mandatory online this is introduced a phenomenal achievement appointments 10 April 2011. Paul considering thefrom numbers lodged especially explains ‘During the summer season we during the busy summer season”. become the victim of our own success and the visa application centre (VAC) sometimes Since Mayovercrowded 2008 anyonewith who delays has made becomes for an application UK visa at this the does VAC our customers. forToa ensure that has happen been able track their application not againto this summer or in the future, we receive have updates introduced mandatory online and by SMS on the online for all applicants. progressappointments of their application. This ensures that all applicants are given a specific appointment time during the day The online tracking system is available free which will reduce bottlenecks at certain via the VAC website at www.vfs-uk-kw.com times. If an applicant does arrive at the and needs an application reference VAC withoutjust an appointment they will be numberan and date of birth. Alternatively you offered appointment slot at a later date may wish to use call our the Premium VAC on lounge 2297 1170 or they may but will be required to check pay an the additional or 2247 7490 to status charge. of your Between 14 May and 23 July the VAC will application. open 6 days a week (Friday closed) to ensure customers can lodge their application The VAC also provides additional services at their convenience; the opening hours such as the sale of Travel Insurance by are 09:30 till 16:30 (Sunday to Thursday) AIG and Visit such as Please Oyster and 10:00 tillBritain 16:00 goods (Saturdays). cards that and you overapply 75 attourist attractions ensure least 10 working throughout UK. journey If you are to days prior the to your totravelling avoid any disappointment. more details please the UK shortly youFor may wish to purchase access the VFS Global website value at www. these goods which are excellent for vfs-uk-kw.com money. VFS Global Kuwait also has a number of Visit The VAC is open between 09:30 and 16:00; Britain products on sale at their VAC. These Sunday items to Thursday or ifHeathrow you wish to make include such as Express an appointment you (multi may do so till 16:30. tickets, Oyster cards transport ticket To make an and appointment or receive more for London) various tickets for major tourist attractions theaUK. They information aboutthroughout applying for visa for are priced and1170 are available the competitively UK please phone 2297 or 2247 to visa applicants and non visa applicants 7490. during opening hours.

87 83


COMMUNITY GROUPS

LEARN AND LOVE IT . . .

Making Its Mark: DAI Cultural Season 17

Magic happens when people and art connect. When, all of a sudden, a child can see specific motifs of Islamic art in a favourite carpet; when the absence of sapphires in the Mughal jewellery stops being a mystery; when the links between culture, history and art seem obvious. That “when” moment is magic. This season the DAI is offering everyone 6 and older the chance to feel the magic. For more information on any of these programmes, email susanday@darmuseum.org.kw or a.alhazzaa@darmuseum.org.kw Children’s Art Workshops: In the 4th series, children between the ages of 6 and 12 will explore some old favourites and a few new subjects. In all cases, they’ll be having so much fun they won’t even realize how much they’re learning. The first session is 1 October, when the participants will talk about Islamic art motifs in preparation for a visit to the Arab Fund Building. DAI Classroom: Schools are invited to send classes to the Amricani Cultural Centre for 90 minute, age-appropriate programmes that are fun and educational. Students will explore one or both of the exhibitions and have the chance to demonstrate what they learned in the process. Visits are being scheduled now for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, starting in November. Docents: Volunteers who are truly Part of Art, DAI Docents are well trained, enthusiastic leaders who share their knowledge of and affinity for the treasures held in the Amricani Cultural Centre. We will begin training the next group of docents in October, sign up now. Junior Docents: This is a new programme for young people between the ages of 13 and 16. Junior Docents will learn about the two exhibitions in Amricani, art history and be introduced to the various aspects of running a successful museum. Sign up now for more information.

O

MAKING A JOYFUL NOISE . . .

MAKING ITS MARK: DAI

CULTURAL SEASON 17

DAI MUSIC CIRCLE

n 17 October 1995, the curator of the Tareq Rajab Museum Professor WORKING THEATRE Géza Fehérvári launched the Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah’s MONDAY year NIGHT first cultural season. There were 10 lectures that and a trip LECTURES ARE BACK : CS17 GETS UNDERWAY TUESDAYS WITH THE DAI WORDS AND ON 26 SEPTEMBER to the Arab Fund building. Quickly, having a representative of the ACTION Tareq Rajab Museum open the season became a tradition – one that continues this season with Ziad Rajab giving the opening lecture. That, however, is one of a very few things that hasn’t changed. The success of the DAI Music Circle (DMC) continues to grow well beyond expectations. Bringing music to the al-Maidan Cultural Centre virtually every Wednesday, the DMC committee has produced a programme that will have a world of music echoing through the theatre during CS17. Throughout the season, which starts with a piano recital commemorating the bicentennial of Franz Liszt on 28 September and ends on 30 May with a celebration of Kuwaiti music, the audience will enjoy everything from Baroque organ to acoustic rock. A cine-concert and a marionette performance mix visual and musical arts. Yemeni performers share their traditional music, as do a classical Flamenco guitarist and the Vienna Boys Choir. Jazz from Uzbekistan, Raga from India and Maghrebian music from North Africa; the offerings this season are as diverse as the countries from which the performers are drawn.

Under the direction of celebrated Kuwaiti writer/director Sulayman Al-Bassam, this season the Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah expands its performing arts programme to include the theatre arts. Over the course of the season, five international theatre workshops will be held at the al-Maidan Cultural Centre. The three-day seminars will be led by Al-Bassam and an internationally respected visiting artist, selected to present his/her speciality to Kuwait’s young theatre professional. Dramatic writing, directing, scenography and various technical skills will feature in the workshops. In addition, on the Tuesday evening following the workshops, the visiting artist will give a 60 minute seminar open to the public. Targeting all those interested in learning more about different aspects of the theatre arts, the conversations are sure to be revealing and informative. Al-Bassam is the founder and creative mind behind SABAB, an independent, international touring theatre company based in Kuwait. The company is working internationally across national and cultural boundaries and uses theatre to engage with issues of identity, history, language and culture. SABAB has achieved worldwide acclaim and recognition for its productions, performing to audiences across four continents. Recent works written/adapted and directed by Al-Bassam include: The Speaker’s Progress, Richard III: An Arab Tragedy, commissioned by the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) for the Complete Works Festival; The Mirror for Princes / Kalila wa Dimna co-produced by the Tokyo International Arts Festival, Barbican bite06 and Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah, Kuwait; and The Al-Hamlet Summit, co-produced by the Tokyo International Arts Festival.

Recognising the wealth of talent in Kuwait, two seasons ago the Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah launched the DAI Forum. The Forum is a community-based programme designed to provide an opportunity for local experts to share their knowledge with people here at home. This season the expanded Forum becomes part of Tuesdays with the DAI. In CS 17, the Forum features lectures, the book club and films. The lectures get underway on 27 September, with a discussion on the accessibility of art and continue, covering Arabic poetry, feelings and movement, the cultural impact of urban renewal, and architecture and the environment. 12 Angry Lebanese, on 11 October, starts the film programme. It will be followed by Deema Al-Ghunaim’s film/lecture Sensations of A Moving Machine on 15 November and Amreeka, directed by Cherien Dabis and co-produced by Al-Zain al-Sabah, on 20 March. In one of the few anomalies in the programme, the book club actually kicks off on Sunday, 9 October. The Blair/Bloom book Islamic Arts (Art and Ideas) is expected to spark a discussion of what is and isn’t “Islamic art”. Other books being read this season include Jerusalem by Karen Armstrong, The Edge of War by Alex Darwin, The Rumi Collection, and Bill Moyers’ Genesis. Previously the bailiwick of those ages 6 – 12, this season the workshop opens up to adults. This season, you have the opportunity to learn about and experiment with different aspects of Islamic art. Starting in October, with an Introduction to Glass Painting, continuing in November with ceramics, January with creative writing, and finally, a four session calligraphy course in April/May; the workshops give participants the chance to discover both a bit about the art of Islamic world and about their own creativity. A short brief about the subject as it relates to Islamic art and an explanation of any necessary art techniques will be followed by the opportunity to apply what you’ve learned. At the conclusion of the workshop, you’ll have a work of art all your own. Finally, we have our first series of conservation-oriented workshops this season. Over three weeks in March and April, DAI consultant curator Sophie Budden will provide practical advice for caring for your collectibles, including metals, wood, textiles, paintings ceramics, glass, stone and plaster. Conservation workshops, art workshops, lectures, movies, and books: Tuesdays with the DAI brings new life to mid-week.

During Cultural Season 17, the DAI will be providing more than 10 times 10 activities. This season is about more: more lectures, more music, more workshops for adults, more opportunities for young people, more chances to interact with parts of the collection, and more. The Monday Night speakers at the al-Maidan Cultural Centre are drawn from a broad geographic expanse and represented the widest array of talent that the DAI has ever presented. And the subjects . . . they’re even more diverse than the lectures. The DAI Forum events, held Tuesday nights at Amricani Cultural Centre, will feature documentaries, book club meetings, lectures, and adult art workshops. Highlighting the skills and knowledge found in Kuwait, these interactive activities offer something for almost everyone. Those looking for music with have to wait until Wednesday. Starting this season, there will be a musical performance virtually every week. From the Vienna Boys Choir to the Emerald Dust rock band, the al-Maidan Cultural Centre will truly present a comprehensive mix of music genres.

84

www.darmuseum.org.kw

On 17 October 1995, the curator of the Tareq Rajab Museum Professor Géza Fehérvári launched the Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah’s first cultural season with a lecture on “The Art of Lacquer in the Islamic World.” There were 10 lectures that year and a trip to the Arab Fund building. Quickly, having a representative of the Tareq Rajab Museum open the season became a tradition – one that continues this season with Ziad Rajab giving the opening lecture. That, however, is one of a very few things that hasn’t changed. This season, Cultural Season 17, the DAI will be providing more than 10 times 10 activities. This season is about more: more lectures, more music, more workshops for adults, more opportunities for young people, more chances to interact with parts of the collection, and more. Like the signet rings and seals that are the visual representation of this season, the DAI plans to make its mark this season on more people in many more ways. Seals and signet rings, like those chosen, had two functions. First, they indicated ownership and certified the authority of the person using the seal. Second, and more important, they stated boldly that an individual had made his mark on paper, property or a process. That is what we intend to do – to make our mark on the community. Unlike a seal or signet ring, our mark won’t be evidenced in a brand or insignia but in the increased awareness of and appreciation for Islamic art and culture in all its many forms.

The 17th Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah Cultural Season will be launched on 26 September, with a lecture on kiswas, the holy covers on the Ka’aba in Makkah. And with this lecture, an amazing journey will begin. This season the speakers are drawn from a broad geographic expanse and represent the widest array of talent that the DAI has ever presented. Lecturers will be coming from the around our region, Europe, Asia, and North America. There will be professors from such prestigious institutions as Harvard, SOAS, and the Islamic Studies faculty at the University of Sarajevo. Two museum directors will participate, including the 1st woman museum director in Iran. The VP of the European Union of Arabists and Islamists, and a former UK MP and head of the country’s National Heritage organization will both speak during the season, as will a musicologist, a field anthropologist, an artist/sculptor, an archaeologist, and several research specialists associated with leading institutions and foundations. And the subjects . . . they’re even more diverse than the lectures. From Makkah, subsequent speakers will take us to al-Andalus, Yemen, Bosnia-Herzegovina, India, Iran, Europe in the Romance period, and, closer to home, the Gulf shores and Hijaz. Speakers will talk about Islamic objects in Western hands; Western classical music in the Islamic world; the connection between the Latin and Islamic worlds, and architecture around the world. Islamic heritage in Saba and central Europe will be discussed, as will the music of western Saudi Arabia and pearls from the Gulf. The scents and sensibilities of Islamic gardens will be presented along with lectures on the sense and sensibilities of the Holy Qur’an and aspects of Islamic law. Safavid textiles and Abbasid and Fatimid textiles will be explored, as will Persian painting and sculpting. The Silsilename of three artistic Ottoman families will be explained and Ottoman talismanic protections will also be discussed. The journey starts at 7 PM on 26 September. You don’t want to miss it.

Theatre hasn’t been overlooked. For the first time, celebrated Kuwaiti writer/director/producer/ actor Sulayman al-Bassam, with specially selected international guests, will host five workshops for those working in the performing arts and five lectures for those just curious about the theatre arts. In addition, he will present a new production in February. Participation is also an important part of this season’s cultural education programmes. In addition to the art workshops, the DAI has a docent programme for adults and will be launching a junior docent programme for children between the ages of 13 and 16. The Children’s Art Workshops are back for the 4th season, with activities for kids between 6 years old and 12 years old. Later in the year two additional programmes will be added to the CS17 calendar. Family Day at Amricani will offer activities that encourage parents and children to explore the museum together. DAI Classroom will provide a similar opportunity for schools eager to expose their students to the collection. All these activities are open to the public and everyone is welcome. For more information on any of these programmes, email info@darmuseum.org.kw.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


‫ﺳﺒﺘﻤﺒﺮ‬

‫أﻛﺘﻮﺑﺮ‬

September 2011

ÚæKE’G

26

AÉKÓãdG

27

AÉ©HQC’G

28 Fazliddin

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

‫ﻧﻮﻓﻤﺒﺮ‬

‫دﻳﺴﻤﺒﺮ‬

November 2011

October 2011

5

‫ﻓﺒﺮاﻳﺮ‬

February 2012

January 2012

5 Annie Montigny

Ziad Rajab Lecture

Lecture

1

4

Glass Painting Workshop

º°SôdG á°TQh êÉLõdG £–Y

øjódG —°†a 5 Vienna ¿É«àa ábƒL 2 Kuwaiti Talent ±ƒæ°ùM Boys Choir É«æ«a øe øjó°ûæe £«°Sƒe Concert Concert £«°Sƒe

á«àjƒc ÖgGƒe £«°Sƒe

Jassim al-Sadah Lecture

Husanov Piano Recital

‫ﻳﻨﺎﻳﺮ‬

December 2011

6

É°TÉH OGDƒa óªMCG Iô°VÉ £–Y ±õY ƒfÉ«ÑdG £«°Sƒe

7 Recital for Two Pianos Concert

4 Amiri Sea

…Òª©dG ábôa

Band ôëÑdG £«°SƒŸ Kuwaiti Music á«àjƒc £«°Sƒe Concert

1 Voice and

Clarinet through the Ages Concert

øeõd

âÑ°ùdG

Saturday Book Club Islamic Arts (Art & Ideas)

óMC’G

9

ÚæKE’G

10 Guillem R. Bordoy

AÉKÓãdG

11

13

Sunday

Lecture

Monday

Tuesday

AÉ©HQC’G

á«Fɪ櫰S á«°ùeCG Film Night ÉæKG :»FÉKh º–«a 12 Angry Lebanese ÉÑ°VÉZ É«fÉæÑd Iô°ûY

14 Trudy Kawami

12 Lisa Urkevich

15 Deema al-Ghunaim

13

Lecture

Lecture

Book Club Jerusalem

Kuwait øjODƒe ábôa 16

12 Young

Camerata Concert

Kuwaiti Ú«àjƒc ÜÉÑ°T Performers £«°Sƒe Concert

Wednesday

Lecture

9 Kenan Musić

6

10 Book Club

7 Farah al-Nakib

Lecture

Jarno Peltonen Lecture

Lecture

The Rumi Collection

Book Club The Long Way Back

GΰùcQhCG 14 Polish Music zâjƒ“dG ÉJGÒeÉc{ Night £«°Sƒe Concert

£«°Sƒe ájóædƒH

£«°Sƒe á«é«–N

11 GCC Music Concert

8 The Gryphon Trio Concert

âÑ°ùdG

Saturday

óMC’G

Sunday óÑ©dG É°S ˜OÉY 21 Anna Contadini QOÉ÷G Lecture

ÚæKE’G

17

AÉKÓãdG

18 Ray Farrin

AÉ©HQC’G

19 Dreams and

19 Souad Ali Lecture

16 ¿GójR Ž°Sƒj

13 D. Fairchild Ruggles

17 Christiane Gruber

14

Lecture

Monday 22

Lecture

Ceramics Workshop

±õN á°TQh 20 Futha Al-Abdulrazzaq Lecture

Lecture Creative Writing Workshop

Tuesday

Passion Flamenco Concert

Wednesday

›ÓMCG{ 23 Trio Ensemble zŽWGƒYh Concert £«°Sƒe ƒ“æeÓØdG

»KÓãdG ábôa 21 An Evening of ᫐«°SƒŸG Acoustic Rock Concert £«°Sƒe

•hôdG £«°Sƒe

Book Club The Edge of War

áHÉà“dG á°TQh á«YGóHE’G

18 Ali Akbar and ¬bÉaQh ÈcCG »–Y Friends £«°Sƒe

15 Amin “Mr. FaRi”

18

Abdal Lecture

Concert

âÑ°ùdG

22

21

óMC’G

23

22

ÚæKE’G

24

Saturday

Sunday 28 Iris Gerlach

AÉKÓãdG

25 Glass Painting º°SôdG á°TQh 29 Ceramics Workshop Workshop êÉLõdG £–Y

±õN á°TQh

24 Theatre Seminar 1 Visiting Artist

Tuesday

AÉ©HQC’G

Wednesday

ÚæKE’G

Monday

26 Augsburger

ôZÒÑ°ùZhCG 30 Folk Music

Puppenkists ¢ùà°ù“æÑH Marionette ¢ùFGô©dG ìô°ùe Theatre

Concert

19

á«Ñ©°T £«°Sƒe

28 Egyptian

Music Night Concert

ájô°üe £«°Sƒe

21

25 Yemeni

á«æÁ £«°Sƒe

31 Creative

áHÉà“dG á°TQh á«YGóHE’G

Music Concert

22 Ramzi Yassa

Piano Recital

31 Juan Souto Lecture

AÉKÓãdG

Writing Workshop

29 Samy Ibrahim

AÉ©HQC’G

and Friends Concert

Wednesday

‘É``````ãdG ¿Gó``````«ŸG õ``````côe

86

»M z

áHÉà“dG á°TQh Creative Writing Workshop á«YGóHE’G

Tuesday

Al-Maidan Cultural Centre

Theatrical Production SABAB Theatre

20

23

Lecture

Monday

International Theatre Workshop 1

Amricani Cultural Centre

‘É```ãdG ÊÉ```“jôeC’G õ```côe

Theatre: note days

*

At Amricani Cultural Centre

‘É```ãdG ÊÉ```“jôeC’G õ```côe

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

º


‫ﻳﻨﺎﻳﺮ‬

‫ﻓﺒﺮاﻳﺮ‬

‫ﻣﺎرس‬

February 2012

January 2012

‫إﺑﺮﻳﻞ‬

March 5 2012

April 2 2012

5 David

2

Mellor Lecture

6 Caring for YOUR Collection Workshop

4 Amiri Sea

…Òª©dG ábôa

Band ôëÑdG £«°SƒŸ Kuwaiti Music á«àjƒc £«°Sƒe Concert

1 Voice and

Clarinet through the Ages Concert

£–Y ±õYh AÉæZ øeõdG ÈY â«æjQӓdG £«°Sƒe

7 North African Music Concert

3 Caring for YOUR ájÉæ©dG á°TQh ”àYƒªéà Collection ŽëàdG øe Workshop

øe £«°Sƒe É«jôaEG ˜Éª°T £«°Sƒe

4 Jazz from

ìô°ùŸG á°TQh »ŸÉ©dG

Theatre Workshop 2

—ª÷G »eGQ Iô°VÉ

6

10 Book Club

7 Farah al-Nakib

12

13

Lecture

The Rumi Collection

øe RÉL ¿Éà°ù“HRhCG £«°Sƒe

Uzbekistan Concert

åëH ᐖM ìô°ùŸG ˜ƒM ôFGR ¿Éæa §ÿG á°TQh »Hô©dG

1 Theatre

Seminar 4 Visiting Artist

Calligraphy Workshop

2 Music for

Violin and Piano Concert

¿Éª“–d á«°ùeCG ƒfÉ«ÑdGh £«°Sƒe

7

11 International

Lecture

Elisa Gagliardi-Mangilli Lecture

ájÉæ©dG á°TQh ”àYƒªéà ŽëàdG øe

10

9 Kenan Musić

‫ﻣﺎﻳﻮ‬

May 2012

8 International Theatre Workshop 3

ìô°ùŸG á°TQh »ŸÉ©dG

7

9

˜ƒM åëH ᐖM Theatre ìô°ùŸG 10 Seminar 3 Visiting Artist ôFGR ¿Éæa

Theatre Seminar 2 Visiting Artist

˜ƒM åëH ᐖM ìô°ùŸG ôFGR ¿Éæa

Book Club Genesis

Book Club From Rags to Riches

£«°Sƒe á«é«–N

11 GCC Music Concert

8 The Gryphon Trio Concert

¿ƒØjôZ »KÓK £«°Sƒe

14 Music of the Baroque Era Concert

Book Club The World is Flat ô°ü©dG øe £«°Sƒe 11 Quator Cello ɪ«æjRƒe ƒ––°ûJ QƒJÉc Musinema - »«°Sƒe ¢VôY »chQÉÑdG Cine-Concert »Fɪ櫰S £«°Sƒe

8

¿ÉYóL »ª¡a Iô°VÉ

or de

Quatu

16 ¿GójR Ž°Sƒj

13 D. Fairchild Ruggles Lecture

Layla Diba 19 Lecture

17 Christiane Gruber

14

Book Club The Edge of War

20 Film Night

Lecture Creative Writing Workshop

18 Ali Akbar and ¬bÉaQh ÈcCG »–Y Friends £«°Sƒe

15 Amin “Mr. FaRi”

21

18

International Theatre Workshop 1

21

Abdal Lecture

Concert

22

Amreeka

áHÉà“dG á°TQh á«YGóHE’G

19

24 Theatre Seminar 1

Theatrical Production SABAB Theatre

Music Concert

á«æÁ £«°Sƒe

14 Tamer el

17 Sandra

15 Calligraphy

Leithy Lecture

al-Saleh Lecture

Organ Recital

É«æ«a çGôJ øe »«°SƒŸG £«°Sƒe

Writing Workshop

á«àjƒc ÖgGƒe áHÉ°T £«°Sƒe

16 Kuwait’s Young Talent Concert

20

27 Caring for YOUR Collection Workshop

22 Ramzi Yassa

Piano Recital

£°SÉj …õeQ £«°Sƒe

28 Emerald Rock Dust Concert

Lecture

ǠƵƆƯŽȚ ȸȢƾƷŽȚ NjƃŸ ȜǍǤƾƇž*

ájÉæ©dG á°TQh ”àYƒªéà ŽëàdG øe

24 Calligraphy

ódGÒeG ábôa â°SO •hQ £«°Sƒe

25 Sounds of India

Workshop

§ÿG á°TQh 22 »Hô©dG

Concert

óæ¡dG äGƒ°UCG £«°Sƒe

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

º«gGôHEG »eÉ°S ¬aÉaQh £«°Sƒe

30 Monday

Iraq Concert

§ÿG á°TQh »Hô©dG £«°SƒŸG á«bGô©dG

Cappozzo Lecture

Workshop 4

and Friends Concert

23 The Music of

˜ƒM åëH ᐖM ìô°ùŸG ôFGR ¿Éæa

28 Valerio

International á°TQh

29 Samy Ibrahim

Theatre Seminar 5 Visiting Artist Calligraphy Workshop

29 Sunday Theatre

áHÉà“dG á°TQh á«YGóHE’G

ìô°ùŸG á°TQh 5 »ŸÉ©dG

International Theatre Workshop 5

21

23 Jochen Sokoly

Tanavoli Lecture

28 Saturday

31 Creative

§ÿG á°TQh »Hô©dG

Workshop

£«°SƒŸ ᖫ°ùŸG 18 Vienna’s áaô¨dG Musical Heritage £«°Sƒe

26 Parviz

áHÉà“dG á°TQh Creative Writing Workshop á«YGóHE’G

25 Yemeni

celles

violon

16 May Farhat Lecture

»Mô°ùe êGôNEG zÖÑ°S{ ìô°ùe

21

Visiting Artist

and More Friends Concert

19

20

23

Messilah Chamber Ensemble Concert

á«°ùeCG á«Fɪ櫰S ɓjôeCG :º–«a

º«gGôHEG »eÉ°S ¿hôNBG ¥ÉaQh £«°Sƒe

9 Samy Ibrahim

ìô°ùŸG »ŸÉ©dG

29 Exhibition of

Workshop Artwork Through 7 June

30 A Celebration of Kuwaiti Music

¢Vô©e ˜ÉªYC’G ¢TQƒ–d á«æØdG ˜ÉØàM’G á«àjƒ“dG £«°SƒŸÉH º°SƒŸG ›ÉàN

87


COMMUNITY GROUPS

British Ladies Society

2

011 has turned out to be one of the busiest years for this friendly and active society of some 250 ladies from the British Community together with around 60 friends who hold Associate Membership from a host of other nationalities. The launch of the new season has already started

announce that our Telecoms partner, Wataniya, has

benefit from the chance to make new friends, join in

wi-fi access in our premises as well as ensuring our

with a rush to renew memberships or sign up to the 23-plus monthly activities, and get discounts from over 60 businesses in Kuwait. In our calendar year beginning September 2011 we have already planned for 6 Dinners, 2 Bazaars, 4 large-scale fundraising

events plus the additional excursions and events that somehow slip into the schedule along the way.

As well as all this socialising, we have a thriving lending library with over 3,000 titles and two active reading groups.

88

This year we are delighted to

become a major sponsor enabling us to provide free website and telephones are up to scratch!

Since its inception in 1993, the BLS has raised over KD 215,000 for a number of charities both home

and abroad. This year we are supporting Ruqayah Alqatami

Breast

Cancer

Foundation

(formerly

Hayat4Cancer) in Kuwait and Help for Heroes in the UK, thereby forging stronger links between

our communities through working together on our fundraising efforts.

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


COMMUNITY GROUPS

We also have close ties with other groups and societies in Kuwait, the British Business Forum being first among equals and enjoyed another successful Introduction to Kuwait event on 7th October 2011 at the Hilton in Mangaf. The BLS has a printed handbook which is famous for providing invaluable information on how to get the most out of your life in Kuwait which is provided within the membership fee (which has remained the same for 5 years). However, even if you cannot join us as a member, you can still purchase this great guide and gripping read. Our website at w w w. t h e b l s k u w a i t . com has additional tips and info to help you on your way. Here are a few dates for your diaries and we very much hope to be able to welcome you either into our Society or as a guest at one of our many activities and events in the very near future!

Tuesday 1st November Dinner at the Movenpick Hotel al Bida’a First week in November tbc Firework Party at Green Island Saturday 26th November Christmas Bazaar at BSK

Tuesday 6th December Christmas Dinner at the Crowne Plaza Hotel Tuesday 10th January Dinner at the Movenpick Hotel al Bida’a Friday 17th February Valentines Ball at the British Embassy

www.theblskuwait.com tel: 6665 0381

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

email: info@theblskuwait.com

89


COMMUNITY GROUPS

Community Groups Kuwait Scorpions

one in December and the other in May. A wide variety

Welcome to the Kuwait Scorpions,

group, which has a very professional approach to

the oldest rugby football club in the Gulf. We were established in the late 1940’s after the Kuwait Oil Company and the British Army played the region’s first ever recorded rugby fixture. For 2010 the club has reverted to its original name of ‘Scorpions’ and will no longer use ‘Nomads’ as its name.

of nationalities have been attracted to sing with the singing, but makes sure that being part of the choir is fun for everybody. If you have an interest in choral singing and would like to find out more about the group, and what it does, please visit our website where you will find up to date contacts and information.

Email : info@ahmadimusicgroup.com Today the Scorpions have over 200 playing

Web : www.ahmadimusicgroup.com

members of all ages from more than 18 different countries including Kuwait, Iran, Lebanon and Egypt.

Kuwait Saracens

In addition there are many hundreds of supporting members in Kuwait and throughout the world. The Scorpions is now the biggest expatriate organization

It is our mission to continue

in the country and association with the Club provides

to preserve the spirit of rugby and

wide-spread exposure both here and throughout the

to promote and develop the game of rugby at

Gulf region.

all levels in Kuwait society.

Jon Law Chairman

We ensure that:

jon@bd-wm.com

by coaches that are qualified for the age groups

Qais AlDoub Vice Chairman casealdoub@yahoo.com Steve Allan Club Captain

Training is structured, progressive, and presented they coach.

Our players have access to the best possible training equipment and the most up to date

s_allan@yahoo.co.uk

coaching methods. •

Ahmadi Music Group

environment. •

Jabriya. The Group sings a wide variety of music and encourages small group and solo performances as well. AMG usually performs two concerts a year;

90

All our teams have the opportunity to travel and play enough competitive matches to enable them

The Ahmadi Music Group is a choral group which rehearses and performs at the New English School,

All players can learn, practice and play in a safe

to continue to develop their skills. •

We provide training for age groups from 5 – 19 years old. All coaches are IRB certified.

Info@q8saracens.com

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


2011 / 2188 / ``g - ä ´ / 2011 / 401 / Ω - ä

Restore your balance Refreshing weekend room offers with flexible check-in and check-out including private beach access. Stay one night for only KWD 59* and treat yourself with breakfast and dinner for two at our international buffet restaurant. Stay one night for only KWD 45* and get free Privilege Club Card (valid for 3 months). Stay one night for only KWD 39* and enjoy a 20% discount on all restaurants. For room reservations, call 1848111 or visit www.kuwait.crowneplaza.com *Terms & conditions apply ©2010 InterContinental Hotels Group. All Rights Reserved.

DISPATCHES A crowneplaza.com

utumn 2011


COMMUNITY GROUPS

Kuwait Caledonians Kuwait Caledonian Society is a charitable society for the promotion of Scottish culture in Kuwait, Membership is open to those who are Scottish by birth, married to a Scot or have at least one Scottish parent. Associate membership is available to those demonstrating a genuine regard for Scottish culture. Our gatherings are amongst the most colourful and popular in the expatriate social calendar and each year raise substantial amounts for Scottish and Kuwaiti charities. Details for all events will be publicised in the local press. Specific enquiries may be addressed to:

Nanette McCulloch Tel : 9983 0865 Sam McCulloch Tel : 9971 6840 Email : caledonians_kw@yahoo.com

Kuwait Irish Society The Kuwait Irish Society is a non profit organisation whose aim is to promote and celebrate Irish culture, craic and sport in Kuwait. We seek a multicultural membership from all walks of life and of any nationality. The society organises and runs several events throughout the year culminating in the celebration of St Patrick’s Day in March. Through all of our activities the Irish Society tries to raise as much money as possible for charitable causes in Ireland and here in Kuwait. Becoming a member of the society is free and easy and we give our members priority notice of any of our activities. For more information about any of our upcoming events, cultural experiences and membership please contact us at:

irish_society_kwt@yahoo.com

92

Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah’s 17th Cultural Season, organized in conjunction with the National Council for Culture, Arts and Letters, got underway on 26 September 2011. Virtually every Monday night at 1900, the Maidan Cultural Centre opens its doors to gifted lecturers and talented performers. The Friends of the Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah (DAI) plays an important role in the growth of the DAI. As a “Friend”, you will be part of a success story that you help maintain – a success story that is recognised internationally and appreciated locally.

Zeinab Tel : 2563 6528 Email : membership@darmuseum.org.kw

DAI Music Circle For the third season, people interested in music should take note of the DAI music programme. This season, every Wednesday night is set aside for the DAI Music Circle. The concerts are held at the alMaidan Cultural Centre in Maidan-Hawalli and are open to everyone.

Helena D’Souza Tel : 2240 0992, ext 19 Email : information@darmuseum.org.kw

Anzik Are you an Australian or New Zealand woman in Kuwait? ANZIK is an information group of women here that started on a small scale last year. If you would like to hear about our monthly get-togethers (no committees!), please email: us at

ANZIK@hotmail.com

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


COMMUNITY GROUPS

The BLS Kuwait (British Ladies Society) The BLS is one of the busiest and most popular societies in Kuwait, run by women for women and families. We meet for friendship and support, and run fund raising activities for charities in UK and Kuwait. We organise over 20 events or activities each month: coffee mornings, library sessions, mothers and toddlers club, children’s music group, evening events, book clubs, and excursions to places of interest. We’re also a network for women seeking work: members find employment or voluntary work through connections made at the BLS. Membership is KD 30 including free Kuwait Information Guide, free Christmas dinner and free diary. Members get discounts at over 60 organisations, restaurants, coffee shops, retail outlets, health clubs, beauty salons, and more. The BLS Kuwait Information Guide (fully sponsored by the Avenues) is for sale at KD 5. Sale profits go to our two charities, chosen annually by our members: in 2009/2010 we are supporting Operation Hope (Kuwait) and Breakthrough Breast Cancer (UK).

Contact details: info@theblskuwait.com +965 6665 0381 www.theblskuwait.com

Girl Guiding Kuwait Singers

British Guides in Foreign Countries (BGIFC) is part of the Guide Association, Girlguiding UK, offering girls Theopportunity Kuwait Singers is a part mixed voice (SATB) choir of the of taking in the Guide programme over fifty singers madeWhilst up of people from all walksa whilst living abroad. our units maintain of life who share love of singing. Wegirls, are always membership of ata least 50% British we do willing to all welcome Whatever your welcome girls whonew wishmembers. to join, subject to places. previous experience you are guaranteed a very warm reception! We perform all kinds of music from classical and opera to light pop and songs from the shows, with the aim of producing as professional

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

a performance as possible, whilst still ensuring it is fun for singers and audience. The Kuwait Singers All our uniformed leaders are trained volunteers. present two performances a year; a seasonal concert BGIFC Kuwait District currently comprises 5 units: in December and a more varied one in May. We also 1 Rainbow Unit (5-7yrs) 2 Brownie Units (7-10 yrs) 1 perform at several other venues on a less formal Guide Unit (10-14 yrs) and 1 Senior Section Unit (14 basis. Rehearsals are held at Atakamul International and over). Girlguiding is a registered charity. If you School, Sabah Al-Salem on Sundays from 7.30are interested in finding out more about Guiding in 9.30pm. For more information: Kuwait, or wish to help as a leader or parent, please Mike Kempster, Musical Director contact :

Tel : 66683770 Amanda Wheldon Email : kuwaitsingers@yahoo.com District Commissioner Tel : 66405350 e-mail: ajwmjk@yahoo.co.uk

PAWS - Protecting Animal Welfare Society We are an active group of local and international volunteers committed to protecting animal welfare in Kuwait. PAWS runs Kuwait’s first officially licensed animal shelter. The educational mission of our society is to promote responsible pet ownership and to advance the humane treatment of all animals. Our work is supported entirely through the donations of our members and supporters. Through the generous hearts and hands of people here in Kuwait, we can ensure that animals who come into our care will receive veterinary treatment, care and shelter, while we seek to place pets in caring homes. Join us online as a member and support our work at the shelter. Visitors and prospective pet parents are very welcome! For further information about the organization, please contact:

Tel : 99440089 Email : pawsq8@yahoo.com Web : www.paws-kuwait.org

93


COMMUNITY GROUPS

Kuwait Mantas The Kuwait Mantas is an overseas branch of the British Sub-Aqua Club (BS-AC). Divers trained by any organisation are welcome to join the club and enjoy the corals and fish found in the warm waters of the Gulf. Dives are organized on our own boat every weekend and occasionally we camp out on one of the islands. We organise socials during the week. There are training courses for beginners. For more information contact:

Mike Dalton Tel : 9960 4865 Web : www.kuwaitmantas.com

KBFSA KBFSA has started life as a website initially to connect ex-pat Brits with a passion for the beautiful game! The site will be maintaining a register of Brit football supporters so that they can arrange to meet up to watch live TV matches especially World Cup Qualifiers etc and share their mutual enthusiasm together. We are hoping to set up a regular meeting night and then hope to set up a calendar of events such as quiz nights, video evenings and of course live match nights! Please register with the website so that we can contact you as soon as possible and get KBFSA off the ground.

Contact : www.kbfsa.co.uk

Kuwait Writers Workshop The Kuwait Writers workshop meets most Saturday evenings in the working year, taking turns to host in each others homes. Members who are native or virtually nativespeakers of English, critique each others’ writing in progress. We concentrate only on creative writing eg poetry, short story, drama plays, travelogue etc. Group has met since 1993. Several members have published over the years.

Contact : 6632 7130 E-mail : tonerssq8@hotmail.com

94

KTAA - Kuwait Textile Arts Association Kuwait Textile Arts Association is a multi cultural, not for profit organization based at Sadu House. The Association aims to nurture and promote the art and craft of textiles and fibre arts and to facilitate sharing and exchanging of ideas, knowledge and skills in Kuwait and the Gulf region. Membership is open and meetings are held at 19:00 at Sadu House, on the Arabian Gulf Street. Members also enjoy a programme of demonstrations, workshops, stitch and quilting groups, a textile library and international cultural tours. KTAA sponsor an annual exhibition of members textile work and a children’s textile arts day. For further information, please contact:

Kathy Hendrickson Tel : 9715 2637 email : wovenpieces@yahoo.com or presidentktaa@yahoo.com

Kuwait Offshore Sailing Association The Kuwait Offshore Sailing Association (KOSA) meets on the first sunday of each month from October to June - 7:30 PM at the BLS Library in Rumaithiya for social gatherings and sailing talks on specific topics. KOSA offers social sailings and fortnightly races as well as the opportunity to sail further afield at Bahrain and Dubai Regattas. KOSA also offer tuition and training course for beginners and experienced sailors alike. KOSA welcomes visitors and anyone with an interest in sailing in a friendly relaxed club atmosphere.

Website : www.kosaq8.com E-Mail : sail-kosa@live.com Yahoo Group : http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/kosa-group/ Commodore Ross Ferguson - 9732 3359

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


COMMUNITY GROUPS

Expat Mums Kuwait Expat Mums of Kuwait is a group of English speaking

expat mums from more than 25 countries who gather regularly for weekly coffee catch ups, mums only dinners, playgroups and more. For more information visit the Website: www.expatmumskwi.com

Bright Horizons Toastmasters Club Toastmaster’s International helps you develop your

public speaking skills, giving you more confidence professionally and personally.

Bright Horizons

Toastmaster ‘s sessions are held at Better Books in Salmiya.

For more information

Email : brighthorizonstmi@yahoo.co.in

Kuwait Little League Baseball Kuwait Little League Baseball is a volunteer organization that fields 25 teams for children between the ages of 5 and 17 – no experience required. The season runs from October to April and volunteer

coaches, scorekeepers and umpires are always needed.

For more information or to volunteer or sign up your child visit

www.q8ll.org E-mail : q8llbaseball@gmail.com

Website :

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011

Children’s Art Workshop The Amricani Cultural Centre is hosting the Children’s Art Workshop programme designed to introduce children between the ages of 6 and 12 to the art and culture of the Islamic world. Classes are held in the Workshop at the Amricani Cultural Centre on Saturday mornings, from 9:30. The classes for 8 – 12 year olds last 2 hours; the classes for 6 – 8 year olds last 90 minutes; and the combined classes for 6 – 12 year olds last 2 hours. OCTOBER 1 Islamic Art Motifs (ages 8 – 12) 8 Visit to the Arab Fund Building (ages 6 – 12) 15 Archaeology Explained (ages 6 – 8) 22 Archaeology Explained (ages 8 – 12) 29 Creating Artefacts (ages 6 – 12) NOVEMBER 19 Archaeological Dig (ages 6 – 12) Finding artefacts the kids created and we buried in the sand DECEMBER 3 Intro to Textiles in Islamic Art (ages 8 – 12) Visit to Sadu House 10 Textile Project (ages 8 – 12) 17 Textiles in Islamic Art (ages 6 – 8) Visit to Sadu House For more information or to sign up your children, Email: americanikids@darmuseum.org.kw

Q8 Bridge Club We are constantly on the lookout for people who enjoy a good game of Bridge. We meet Sundays and Tuesdays at 8 PM at the Sea Club in Ras Salmiya. We are a small and very friendly club of English speakers and will make you feel most welcome. For more information:

http://q8bc.blogspot.com Email : boukhrissamia@gmail.com

Website :

95


Surname

!!!!!!!!!!! BRITISH BUSINESS FORUM Forename !!!!!!!!!"#$%$&'!"(&$)*&&!+,#(-! !!!!!!!!!!! ! !!The Voice of British Business Passport !!!!!!!!!"#$%$&'!"(&$)*&&!+,#(-! Nationality number/ Company

in Kuwait

2011/2012 ! !!The Voice of2011/2012 British Business Civil ID No. in Kuwait Membership Application Form Position in

Surname

2011/2012

company

Membership Application Form

Nature of business Surname Forename

Years in Kuwait

Telephone Forename Nationality home

Telephone Passport number/ office

Fax Nationality Company home

Civil ID No. Passport Fax Position in number/ office company Civil ID No.

Nature of Company Mobile business number

Position Years in in Pager company Kuwait

Telephone personal Fax

Telephone company Fax

home

office

Company Fax Mobile address home number

Post code Fax Pager and district office number

Mobile Email Proposer’s number personal name

Pager Email Proposer’s number company signature

Email Company

Email Post code company and district Seconder’s

Nature of Telephone business home Email

personal address Seconder’s name Company Proposer’s address name

Applicant’s Proposer’s Seconder’s signature name Seconder’s Applicant’s

number

Years in Telephone Kuwait office Email

signature Post code Proposer’s and district signature

Date Proposer’s Seconder’s signature Seconder’s

Date Iname am willing for my contact details to be circulated to other members signature signature IApplicant’s am willing for my contact details to appear on the BBF website Date members Isignature am willing for my contact details to be circulated to other II wish to joinfor one the BBFdetails Business SectoronGroups (check boxes below) am willing myofcontact to appear the BBF website

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No

I wish to & join one the BBF Business Sector Groups (check boxes below) Yes & Training No am willing for myofcontact details to be circulated to members Banking Finance Construction & other Eng. Education & Finance Construction Eng. Education IBanking am willing for my contact details to appear on the & BBF website Yes & Training No Healthcare Oil & Gas Information Tech’ & GasGroups (check boxes below) Information IHealthcare wish to join one of the BBF BusinessOil Sector Yes Tech’ No Aviation, Travel and Hosp. Arts & Culture Fashion Aviation, Travel and Hosp. Arts & Culture Fashion Banking & Finance Construction & Eng. Education & Training Healthcare Oil & Gas Associate Member: Please indicate your business Associate Member: British business interests interests Aviation, Travel and Please Hosp. indicate your ArtsBritish & Culture

Information Tech’

Fashion

Associate Member: Please indicate your British business interests For Office Use Only Date paid For Office Use Only

Email sent

For Office Use Only Receipt Date paidnumber

Membership Email sent no. Email sent Previous member Membership Membership no. no.

Date paid Date approved Receipt Receipt number number Date approved approved Date

96

Email: rose.william@bbfkuwait.com Enquiries: 66841114 Previous member

Previous member

Email: rose.william@bbfkuwait.com Enquiries: 66841114

Email: rose.william@bbfkuwait.com Enquiries: 66841114

DISPATCHES A

utumn 2011


Kuwait Energy&Infrast 2011 LOGO.pdf

17/5/11

Exclusive 15% discount off for BBF Kuwait

16:50:40

members

STRATEGIC PARTNER C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

SUPPORTING PARTNER

Energy and Infrastructure

2011

Courtyard Marriott, Kuwait City, Kuwait 31 October - 3 November 2011

Energy Days

Infrastructure Day

Thursday, 3 November 2011

Tuesday and Wednesday, 1-2 November 2011

Pre-conference masterclass: Procurement and development strategies for new entrants Monday, 31 October 2011 to win work in Kuwait’s mega projects market EXPERT SPEAKER LINE-UP INCLUDES:

Key benefits of attending:

Farouk Al Zanki Chief Executive Officer Kuwait Petroleum Corporation (KPC)

Exclusive personal access to over 200 industry leaders ESJWJOHUIFEFWFMPQNFOUPG,VXBJUPWFSUIF Shaikha Al Bahar DPVSTFPGGPVSEBZTEFTJHOFEUPGPDVTPOFOFSHZBOE Chief Executive Officer JOGSBTUSVDUVSF XIPDBOTJHOJŝDBOUMZJOşVFODFZPVS National Bank of Kuwait (NBK) PSHBOJTBUJPOśTGVUVSFQSPŝUBCJMJUZ Nezar Al Sayegh Ţ Gain strategic intelligence and insights JOUPUIF Assistant Manager for Transport Master MBUFTUNFHBQSPKFDUTBOEJOWFTUNFOUPQQPSUVOJUJFT Plan Department Kuwait Municipality JOTFDUPSTTVDIBTPJMHBT QPXFSXBUFS  9 9 JOGSBTUSVDUVSFBOECBOLJOHXJUINFHBQSPKFDUT 6 0 90 Eng. Suhaila Marafi +971 4 3 ister JODMVEJOH$MFBO'VFMTQSPKFDU OFXBJSQPSUUFSNJOBM  Director – Department of Studies and Research to reg OFXIPTQJUBMT FUD Ministry of Electricity and Water y a Ţ Unique networking and invaluable opportunities GPS tod Dr. Hashem Al Tabtabaei ZPVUPNFFUXJUINBKPSDMJFOUT EFWFMPQFST DPOUSBDUPST  Technical Team Leader Partnership Technical Bureau (PTB) DPOTVMUBOUTBOEJOWFTUPSTJOBOEPVUTJEFPG,VXBJUUP Ministry of Finance, Kuwait JNQSPWFZPVSCVTJOFTTGPPUQSJOUJOUIFNBSLFU Eng. Mahdy Al Dakheel Ţ (PWFSONFOUJOWPMWFNFOUBMMPXJOHZPVUPCVJME Director of Projects Department – Kuwait International Airport BOENBJOUBJOSFMBUJPOTIJQTXJUIQFPQMFEJSFDUJOH Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) UIFGVUVSFPG,VXBJU JODMVEJOH,VXBJU1FUSPMFVN Jeff de Lange $PSQPSBUJPO ,VXBJU.VOJDJQBMJUZ 1BSUOFSTIJQ Deputy Managing Director Gulf Consult Kuwait 5FDIOJDBM#VSFBV 15# .JOJTUSZPG&MFDUSJDJUZBOE 8BUFSBOENBOZNPSF Ţ

Call

Dr. Dalal Al Wadaani Director of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Hospital Ministry of Health, Kuwait

Please quote BBFK_Ad1 upon booking

Tel: +971 (0)4 390 0699

Ţ

-FBSONPSFBCPVUFOUFSJOHOFXNBSLFUT CZ BUUFOEJOHUIFPOFEBZDFSUJĹťFEXPSLTIPQ  Ĺ?1SPDVSFNFOUBOEEFWFMPQNFOUTUSBUFHJFTGPSOFX FOUSBOUTUPXJOXPSLJO,VXBJUĹ›TNFHBQSPKFDUT NBSLFUĹž

www.meedkuwaitprojects.com


We helped her start a new business That’s our client, and together we’re growing At Gulf Bank, we are with our clients every step of the way. We continue to evolve, grow and succeed to help them achieve their goals and aspirations.

e-gulfbank.coms1 805 805 G R O W I N G

W I T H

Y O U


Dispatches Magazine October 2011