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TM

Issue 7

Discover Sligo

â‚Ź3.99

Discover Sligo

and the best of the North West Issue 7

www.discoversligo.com

www.discoversligo.com Glencar Worldwide Water Company Tel: 071 913 5553 www.glencarwater.ie


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Editorial In recent months a number of Sligo's tourism and recreation operators have begun to work together to explore what needs to happen for County Sligo to be promoted as one of Ireland's leading activity hubs.

Angling has been a backbone sport in the county for many years, which is hardly surprising as Sligo abounds with lakes and rivers, quite apart from its 110 miles of Atlantic coast. This is a popular place for coarse or game fishing, and for those who fancy landing a shark there are opportunities for deep sea angling at several of the county’s seaside resorts. Hillwalkers are spoilt for choice with the Dartry Mountains, the Ox range, the Curlews and the Bricklieves, and for any who enjoy walking but don’t have a head for heights, there are fabulous sandy beaches all along Sligo’s coast – many almost deserted – as well as headlands and small peninsulas, while inland there are many lake and woodland walks. There are sailing clubs at Rosses Point and Mullaghmore; there are cycling trails (Sligo forms part of the North West Trail), swimming, rowing, diving – the list goes on. The county is one big outdoor arena, but there is plenty of sports infra-structure as well. There are clubs with coaches, instructors, equipment and guides for hire, information outlets – everything you could want to help you get started or back you up if you are an experienced player already. And the extra bonus is that all of this is set against Sligo’s fabulous scenery, and with all the ‘off piste’ opportunities for relaxation and refreshment you could want, either in the county or Sligo Town itself, which is a vibrant, cultural city with lots going on – shops, cafes, restaurants, bars, theatres and galleries. Our sister business, Discovery Tours (www.discoverytours.ws), provides a tour planning and ground-handling service for groups that come from across the globe to visit Ireland. Often we find that these groups fall so in love with Sligo, that on subsequent visits to Ireland they elect to spend a greater prropotion of their time here than elsewhere in the country.

looking for information on the northwest?

This year Discover Sligo celebrates its 10th year in business. The magazine has been going since 2003 and today it is Sligo’s number one magazine, catering for both visitors to the county and those who live here alll year round. In each edition we provide a variety of articles, not just on tourism and recreation, but also on some contemporary issues. Enjoy the read – Do please tell us what you think, and above all, contact us if we can help in any way as you or your friends Discover Sligo.

Useful Services

Those of us fortunate enough to live in Sligo know full well that the county and surrounding region has a wealth of excellent outdoor activity resources. Indeed many are of world class standard. Just check through the pages of this magazine and you will see what we mean. Better still, use this magazine, log on to our portal website – Discover Sligo.com - or visit our Info-Shop on Markievicz Road in Sligo town centre (along the river from the Yeats Statue) to get the information and help you need to get out and about and enjoy the region's activities and pursuits.

In fact one of our longest standing customers, who has been with us for close on ten years, has now dropped London and Paris from their itinerary so they can spend more time in Sligo!

share the experience Editor PA Assistant Technical Support Graphics Managing Director Sales Staff DS Shop Discovery Tours

Lorely Forrester Hanneke van den Eertwegh Lorna Kirrane Simon Malcolm Daragh Stewart Keith McNair Patrick Stewart Hannah Maguire Donal Doherty Debbie McNair

Discoversligo.com

Discover Sligo – share the experience ISSN: 1649 – 8534 Where possible images have been credited. Other photographs: © Brierton Forrester design, Donal Doherty, Itchy Feet Promotions, James Connolly, Joe McGowan, Michael McCormick, Patrick Stewart, Sligo Champion, Steve Rogers, Tobergal Lane, Ulrike Schwier, Zoe Lally and contributors.

Discover Sligo Loughanelton Calry Co Sligo Ireland Tel: 071 914 7488 Email: info@discoversligo.com www.DiscoverSligo.com

This publication is copyright to Discover Sligo Ltd, 409458 Directors K McNair D McNair Loughanelton, Sligo, Ireland. www.discoversligo.com ISSN 1649-8534

daraghstewartdesign Graphic Designer

[e] daraghdesign@gmail.com [t] 087 125 7100

sligo’s portal website


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Lough Gill Sligo Email:info@iiccc.info www.iiccc.info Tel: 071 911 9911 Fax: 071 914 6130

Set in the heart of Yeats Country, on the idyllic and peaceful shores of Lough Gill in Sligo, Innisfree International College & Convention Centre (IIC&CC), is an ideal environment in which visitors can reflect, study, learn or simply be inspired. Benefiting from a location that is both unspoiled and convenient, IIC&CC is only a matter of minutes away from Sligo City.

An integral part of the vision of IIC&CC is to provide visitors with a quiet, reflective space for contemplation and meditation. Along with the wonderful and picturesque grounds, the residences too provide guests with a peaceful retreat. Each comfortable and spacious apartment is furnished to the highest standard and equipped with modern conveniences that afford guests absolute privacy.

Surrounded by nature, IIC&CC enjoys one of the most scenic campus locations in Ireland. Overlooking the inspirational Lake Isle of Innisfree, the college and its residences offer visitors a unique opportunity to break from the busyness of everyday life. There are plenty of opportunities for guests to immerse themselves in the natural surroundings, as well as soak up the wealth of literary, historical and spiritual sites in the environs.

IIC&CC is the ideal location for those wanting to take time out; to seek creative inspiration; to study; or to experience a time of rest and reflection.

To find out more about IIC&CC visit www.iiccc.info, email info@iiccc.info, or call us on Tel: 071 911 9911.

www.iiccc.info 3


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Enda McCarrick Motors appointed SAAB Service Dealer for the North West

4


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Contents INFO & CRAFT SHOP

Introduction and Maps

2-9

Events & Entertainment

10-19

Learning

20-22

Environment

23-24

State of The Art Investment

24

Sligo Life

26-28

Lisbon Leaves Me Confused, Bewildered & Perplexed 26 Letter to the Minister of Finance 27

In Sligo town centre, Markievicz Rd Along the river from the Yeats Statue • Information for Visitors & Locals • Souvenirs & Local Arts & Crafts • Books on Sligo • Internet Service & Refreshments • Tour planning service

Tel: 071 914 7488 Email: info@discoversligo.com www.discoversligo.com

Every care is taken in producing this magazine to give a faithful impression and accurate details, and the publishers and editorial staff are in no way liable for incorrect information, but apologise unreservedly for any errors.Views/opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of Discover Sligo staff. Where contributors or their representatives have signed off proofs, no liability is accepted by Discover Sligo for incorrect details contained in ads. The publishers of Discover Sligo Magazine wish to inform it’s readers that the views and opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors thereof and as such the publishers do not accept any responsibility or liability for those views and or opinions. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or made otherwise available on a retrieval system or submitted in any form without the express written permission of the Editor and Managing Director of Discover Sligo.

Outdoors & Activities

29-49

A Good Walk Spoiled

38

Young Sligo

50-51

Shopping

52-61

Sligo Shopping - Difficult Times Streetwise Use it or Lose it Waiting for Godot.Waiting for Who?

52 54 57 60

Arts & Crafts

62-64

Demise of the Craftsman

63

Towns & Villages

66-73

Touring Sligo

74-85

Heritage

86-91

Coney Island

91

Good Food

92-104

Green Fingers

97

Good Health

105-106

Where to Stay

107-116

A Wild,Wet Weekend

114

Getting Here

116-118

Useful Services

119-121

My Sligo Childhood

122

5


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County Sligo

6


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Map Reference Member

Page

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 9 9 24 25 26 27 28 27 29 30 31 32 33 34 11 35 36 37 38 39 11 40 41 42 43 44 25 45 46 47 48 49 50

7th Wave Surf School Ard Nua Village Ardtarmon House Arigna Mining Experience Atlantic Caravan Park Austies Bar & Restaurant Ballisodare Pharmacy Bella Vista Bar & Restaurant Castle Dargan Golf Club Castle Dargan Hotel Cawley’s Guest House Classiebawn Restaurant Clevery Mill Clifford Electrical Cois Re Apartments Coleman Irish Music Centre Coleman School of Music Crafter’s Basket,The Davis’s @ Yeat’s Tavern Dmac-Media Drumcliffe Tea House & Craft Shop Eagles Flying Fisheries Board, NW Regional Glencar Worldwide Water Company Greenlands Caravan & Camping Park Hall Door Restaurant,The Icon Spa @ Castle Dargan IIC&CC Island View Riding Stables ISPCA / SSPCA Joe Mc Gowan Lough Key Forest Park M V Excalibur Mc Carrick Motors Mc Dermott’s Bar & Restaurant Mill Falls Mullaghmore Sailing Club NW Surf School O’Donnell’s Pub Radisson BLU Hotel Riverbank Restaurant Sealview Photography Sligo Airport Sligo Park Hotel Sligo Yacht Club Solas Spa Sports Centre, Regional Strandhill Business Park Strandhill Caravan & Camping Park Strandhill Golf Club Strandhill Surf School Swingle Tree Carriage Tours Taylor’s Art Gallery Texaco Service Station (Grange) Tracey’s Surf Shop Venue,The Voya Seaweed Baths Waterfront,The

46 112 111 89 115 94 66 72, 94 39, 40 39, 40, 98, 108 71, 108 96 95 35 111 19, 51, 69, 89 51 62 68, 96 2 80 51, 86 42, 44 104, 124 115 98 106 3 37 23 70 51 70 4 83, 98 67 49 46, 69 14 95, 106, 110 101 62 117 111 49 106 29 117 115 41 47 37 63 68 46 14, 103 106 70, 103

7

Introduction and Maps

Map Ref.


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SLIGO CITY MAP

8


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Map Reference Member

Page

Map Ref.

Member

Page

1

Academic Enrichment Workshops

21

29

King’s Chinese Restaurant

98

2

Adams Childrens Wear

61

20

Kitchen Restaurant,The

98

3

Albanne Property Management

113

30

Lynda Gault Ceramics

63

4

Allure

58

2

Lyons Cafè

61, 100

5

Artisan

63

31

M.V Spirit

45

6

Barton Smith Lock & Safe

91, 118

32

Mc Canns Menswear

60

7

Barton Smith Sports

32

33

Melody Maker

16

8

Bistro Bianconi

95

34

Milligan Place Self Catering

112

9

Cafè Fleur

54

35

Model Arts & Niland Gallery

18

10

Cafè Society

95

36

Mortgage Centre Sligo,The

28

11

Cat and the Moon,The

64

37

Mullaney Bros. Drapers

55

12

Centra Supermarket (Cosgroves)

30

38

Osta Cafè & Wine Bar

102

13

Chez Philippe-Creporie Bretonne

57

39

Outerpoint

47

14

Clarence Hotel

12

40

Poppadoms Restaurant

93, 100

15

Clarion Hotel - Sligo

48, 102, 109

41

Quay’s Bar & Restaurant,The

94

16

County Sligo Heritage & Genealogy Ctr

90

42

Quayside Shopping Centre

58, 59

17

Cummins & Co Accountant

118

43

Rula Bula

50

Daragh Design

2

44

Sakura Oriental Restaurant

101

1

Discover Sligo

62, 116,121, 123 45

Shafin Developments

67

1

Discover Sligo Bus Hire

116

46

Shenanigans Bar & Restaurant

102

1

Discover Sligo Shop

62, 121

2

Shoes & Sports

61

1

Discovery Tours

20

47

Silver Apple,The

101

2

Dorothy Perkins

61

15

Sinergie Restaurant

102

18

Firefly (Foot Orthoses)

76

41

Sligo City Hotel

94, 109

19

Gaiety Cinema

11

48

Sligo County Council

24

20

Glasshouse Hotel,The

98, 110

49

Sligo International Tourist Hostel

116

21

Gourmet Parlour

96

50

Sligo Tea Room,The

88

22

Happy Days Adventure Play Centre

51

51

Stables,The

14

23

Hargadons (Bar-Food-Wine)

15

52

Tobergal Lane Cafè & Restaurant

12, 102

24

Harp Tavern,The

14

53

Tom Yam,Thai Restaurant

101

25

Hawkswell Theatre

19

15

Turf ‘n’ Surf @ Clarion Hotel

48

2

Henry Lyons & Co

61

54

Walking Clinic

74

26

IT Sligo

22

1

www.DiscoverSligo.com

123

27

Johnston Court Shopping Centre

53

50

Yeat’s Society

86, 88

28

Kate’s Kitchen

57

1

Yeat’s Suppers @ Broc House

99

2

Ken Hunter Menswear

61

9

Introduction and Maps

Map Ref.


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2009 Festivals and Events (Sligo & Bordering Towns & Villages)

July

August

4

Strandhill Gymkhana

1

Tubbercurry Literary Festival

5

Sligo Races - Cleveragh

1-2

Ballymote Annual Heritage Weekend

5-12

Dr. Douglas Hyde Summer School of Traditional Music www.douglashyde.com

1-2

The Goat Festival - Curry

1-7

Mermaid Nationals – Rosses Point

6-12

Cairde Summer Festival- Sligo taramcgowan@cairdefestival.com

3-7

Carmel Gunning International Summer School - Sligo www.carmelgunning.com

12

Connaught Motor Rally (Sligo Stages)

4-9

Carrick Water Music Festival – Co Leitrim

12

Dromahair Craft Fair

5-6

Sligo Races - Cleveragh

12

All-Ireland Metal Man Triathlon Rosses Point

6-9

Black Pig Festival - Enniscrone Tel: 087 635 1812.

12

RNLI Open Day – Rosses Point

9

Dromahair Craft Fair

12-18

South Sligo Summer School,Tubbercurry Tel: 071 918 2151 www.sssschool.org

8-12

Tubbercurry Old Fair Day

17-19

Sligo Jazz Festival 2009- Sligo Town

19

Orchid Walk - Mullaghmore

23-1 Aug

Boyle Arts Festival www.boylearts.com

25-7 Aug

50th Yeats International Summer School www.yeatssligo.com

25

Town Centre 1st Anniversary – Ballisodare

30

Grange Agricultural Show

30-2 Aug

Grange Music Festival paulwills@eircom.net

31-2 Aug

The James Morrison Festival- Riverstown www.morrison.ie

23

10

All-Ireland Donkey Derby - Mullaghmore

25

Sligo Races, Cleveragh

29

25th Annual Warrior’s Run Festival – Strandhill

29-30

Music Festival - Mullaghmore

29-31

Coleman Traditional Music Festival - Gurteen

29-31

GP14- National Sailing Championships Rosses Point

30

Gurteen Agricultural and Horse Show


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13

Dromahair Craft Fair

26

Strandhill Guitar Festival www.strandhillguitarfestival.com

30

Sligo Races – Cleveragh

SLIGO 12 SCREEN MULTIPLEX

October

Wine Street Sligo Town

1

Sligo Races – Cleveragh

1-4

Sligo Baroque Festival

2-4

Sligo Traditional Singing Weekend www.sligotradsingers.com

11

Dromahair Craft Fair

14

Cohmaltas Tour of Ireland info@colemanirishmusic.com

22-26

Sligo Live Festival www.sligolive.ie

29-1 Nov

Ballintogher Traditional Music Festival

30-2 Nov

John Egan Traditional Festival ballintoghercommunity@eircom.net

Other/On-Going Events: Office Tel: 071 916 2651 Fax: 071 917 4000 24 Hour Programme Information & 24 Hour Credit Card Booking 1520 927 011 Email: gaietycinema@eircom.net Book On-Line @ www.gaietysligo.com

Sligo Art Gallery - Sligo Town Hawkswell Theatre - Sligo Clarence Hotel- Sligo. Coleman Irish Music Centre - Gurteen Tobergal Lane Cafe (Music) - Sligo The Cat and the Moon Galleries - Sligo The Model - Sligo Agricultural /Equestrian Shows/Horse racing - page 37 Sailing - page 49, Surfing - pages 46,47 & 48. Soccer - page 30, GAA - page 34

Photos: ©Itchy Feet Promotions

11

Events & Entertainment

September


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SLIGO TOWN TEL: 071 914 6599 Wine Street Sligo www.clarencesligo.com

z z a J

every ht g i n y a Frid

and with Sunday Brunch 1-3pm

LIVE MUSIC every evening Wed-Sat

The Clarence Hotel, located in the centre of Sligo town dates from the 1800's. Although it retains its original facade, the interior is anything but dated. With the original hotel, four bars, a restaurant and a performance space, The Clarence caters for any event, big or small.

Bistro and ‘Tapas’ style menus Fresh coffee & French patisserie Irish Craft Beers Wines by the Glass Full Bar Licence

Nestled in the major shopping area of Sligo town, it is a perfect place to stop for a coffee or a quick snack, however it is after hours that The Clarence really comes alive. The club has three tiers for optimum viewing and acoustics. The space is tailored for performance and has housed international talent while still keeping its ear to the ground in its continuing support of local musicians.

The Café at the heart of Sligo living www.tobergallanecafe.ie 12


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www.tobergallanecafe.ie

Sligo Jazz Festival 2009 17-19 July www.sligojazz.ie

13

Events & Entertainment

Tobergal Lane Sligo Town Tel: 071 914 6599


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STABLES

O’Donnell’s Pub

Wine Street Sligo Town Tel: 071 914 2280

Cliffoney Tel: 071 916 6421 Email: bgeoghegan@opex.ie

O Donnells Bar, also known as the Guinness House was built in 1802 for Lord Palmerston and later extended by Nimmo whose cut stone staircase remains to this day. The bar maintains its original format in shape and decor and is a comfortable, warm welcoming venue for a drink or some music. Home of the North Sligo Comhaltas Father Flanagan Group, it features a live session on the last Saturday of each month (all musicians welcome) and a mix of music most weekends. In the summer an early evening session with an Irish theme is a regular feature with the locals breaking into song. Whatever your taste, a warm welcome is guaranteed in this beautiful old family-run Public House.

In the heart of Sligo Town, The Stables Bar is a popular place for music lovers as there is traditional music every Sunday evening, a live band on Fridays and Saturdays and popular Karaoke evenings on Tuesdays.The pub is also a great place to eat at any time of day, as food is available from 12noon-5.30pm every day except Sunday, with the daily specials and lunch menu being posted on each table.The pub, much bigger inside than it looks from the street, has an open stone wall, stained glass motifs on doors, windows and table partitions and a friendly, relaxed atmosphere. This is also a good place for sports fans as major events are shown on the large plasma TV.

The Harp Tavern

THE VENUE

Quay Street Sligo Town Tel: 071 914 2473 Email: harptavern@eircom.net

RESTAURANT & BAR Strandhill Tel: 071 916 8167

One of Sligo’s most popular music pubs, this is the place to find ‘The Jazz Lads’ every Sunday at 1pm, playing their own particular style of jazz and blues. On Monday evenings you can enjoy traditional Irish music with some of Sligo’s best known players, and visiting musicians are welcome to join in. Situated on the corner of Quay Street, the pub overlooks the Garavogue River, and there is parking opposite. Inside The Harp, natural stone floors, open brickwork and a cheerful log fire make this a cosy place for a drink, a chat or a session. At lunchtime (not Sundays) the pub offers a selection of sandwiches, while tea, coffee and snacks are available all day. The pub is open 7 days all year, from 11am (12.30 Sunday).

Located on the main R292 in Strandhill, overlooking Sligo Bay, The Venue first opened in 1880 and still manages to capture the mood of times gone by in its cosy pub. With its warm interior, open fire and friendly locals, it’s a great place to sit and chat or enjoy a quiet pint. Thursday-Sunday are music nights, with traditional sessions as well as folk evenings. The welcoming atmosphere extends to the spacious restaurant behind the bar which is open from 12.30-9.30pm 7 days, all year and offers an à la carte menu as well as the house specials of seafood and steak. Sunday lunch is from 12.30-4pm. 14


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Hargadon’s O’Connell Street Sligo Tel: 071 915 3709 www.hargadons.com

The shop stocks a wide range of Bordeaux wines, including all appellations and communes that fall within a reasonable price range. It also has a comprehensive stock of classified growths to cater for the higher end of the market. Hargadon’s is currently establishing relationships with producers in the Rhone and Burgundy. The shop also stocks a range of wine from the owner’s vineyards in the Languedoc, and will import more of these when they come to maturity. Their vineyards in this area of the South of France have introduced them to some exciting new wines in the region which they hope to stock very soon.

In the heart of Sligo Town, on the recently pedestrianised O’Connell Street sits Hargadon’s Pub. It is just what an Irish pub should be – like stepping back in time, full of snugs and quirky memorabilia that seem not to have changed since the pub opened in 1864. But there is nothing old fashioned about the food and comfort. Hargadon’s, recommended by Georgina Campbell’s 2009 Ireland Guide, has a menu that can be described as ‘Irish with a modern and sophisticated touch’ and offers lunch and evening ‘tapas’.

Hargadon’s intends to develop a truly comprehensive list that includes something to suit everyone’s taste and pocket, on a par with anything being offered elsewhere in the country, as well as wines that are exclusive to Hargadon’s Wine Shop. Bernard Colleary would be very happy. Hargadon’s Wine Shop Johnston Court Sligo Opening: Mon - Sat 10.30am - 6pm Sun 2-6pm

The evening menu is served Tuesday-Saturday, 4-9pm and includes dishes such as sun dried tomato & spring onion frittata with red onion marmalade and spinach sauce, prawns in garlic and chilli oil, and local mussels in a creamy wine sauce.There are also Hargadon’s Specials, all under €10, which may include some favourites like duck egg omelette, homemade chicken spring roll served on a herb polenta cake or the perennially popular oysters and black velvet.

Sligo boasts several historic pubs, all with their own unique traditions. Thomas Connolly’s on Markievicz Road not only serves a great pint of Guinness but is the perfect place to relax and step back in time for an hour or two. Flagstone floors and generous snugs with timber and glass partitions ensure that it cannot fail to lure anyone with its Victorian charm. Miscellaneous pages from original ledger books,The Chronicle and The Sligo Champion are framed to hang alongside glass mirrors, tattered calendars and browning photographs. Once known as Nicholson’s it is a true taste of Sligo’s past.

Lunch time options are simple, delicious and suited to the time of day, and include chicken pesto parmesan, Hargadon’s fish pie, and tasty and satisfying steak sandwiches. A selection of paninis and open sandwiches is always Desserts include available. homemade apple sponge, banoffi pie and warm chocolate brownies with chocolate sauce and cream.

For those looking for something livelier, McLynns on Old Market Street is renowned for its traditional music sessions. Owned by Donal McLynn, the pub has been in the family for a long time and offers a perfect mix of musical entertainment and Sligo culture.

The food is cooked on the premises and the service is friendly and helpful under the expert management of Joe Grogan and Miriam. Hargadon’s extensive wine list is supplied by Hargadon’s Wine Shop next door.

Hargadon’s Wine Shop Johnston Court Mon-Sat 10.30am-6pm Sunday 2-6pm

Owned by Ronan (Uisce) Waters, Shoot the Crows on Market Cross squeezes loads of interesting and odd artefacts into its tiny space. Painted murals on the glass of the front window and inside the pub change with the seasons, and there is a strange collection of skulls at the bar. Offering a good pint and a great variety of music , the pub is beloved of musicians throughout Sligo, many of whom drink here even if they are not playing. All are welcome to join in on session nights.

Sligo

In December 2008 Hargadon’s opened its own wine shop in a property adjacent to the pub, which opens into Johnston Court Shopping Mall. This would have pleased the man who originally built the pub in 1864, Bernard Colleary, who as well as being a Member of Parliament representing Sligo North, was a Grocer and a Wine & Spirit Merchant. The business was only acquired by the Hargadon brothers, Patrick and Thomas, in 1909 when Bernard Colleary died.

A good selection of vintage pubs for anyone looking for a relaxing pint, a lively music session or an evening out in a setting that smacks of time past. 15

Events & Entertainment

The wine shop contains over 250 wines from around the world, with an emphasis on Old World Wines. While they have been chosen to suit all tastes and pockets (ranging in price from €7.99 up), they also have to meet Hargadon’s high criteria: quality wines that represent good value. Most are imported directly from the producers themselves, or from the negociants in France, which enables Hargadon’s to sell good quality wines at a competitive price.


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Irish Music – Alive and Kicking? Irish music is known and loved all over the world, and is still at the heart of Irish society. Although its roots probably go much further back, traditional music – in the form that we still know it – began in the first half of the 20th century when it was common for friends and neighbours to gather in one another’s homes. In those days of general hardship, few could afford musical instruments, although some talented craftsmen might venture to make their own. The lack of instruments in no way deterred the Irish from making music, instead there was just a good deal of unaccompanied singing or lilting which was known as ‘SeanNos’. Traditional tunes were handed down from generation to generation, from townland to townland, and of course the boys and girls would dance to the music. year, with preliminary ‘heats’ taking place around the country from May-July.These competitions have a serious following, and help to ensure that our traditions are not lost.

In more modern times, the local pub has been one of the great arenas for Irish music, because it is a place where people regularly go to relax and meet each other. Inevitably, being a focal point in most communities, the pub is often at the heart of our culture, because that is where all important aspects of life – faith, politics, sport, language, music and dance are discussed, enjoyed or put into practice. Our finest musicians gather for a few tunes at the nightly sessions, often over a pint or two. It has always been a huge part of what Ireland is all about, something enjoyed by visitors and locals alike. It has also ensured that our music has remained sacrosanct – an integral part and parcel of who we are.

Irish Folk music has sprung from a different source and like folk music all over the world is basically the raw music of the people or a particular country or region. It is simple music that hasn’t been ‘dressed up’ and is usually story orientated. Ireland has a great store of folk songs, or ballads, recounting the country’s history and lore and – more recently – its troubles, and many of the songs we know best were first sung on the streets of Dublin. If you are interested in Irish music, an excellent monthly publication, ‘The Irish Music Magazine’ is a fascinating and informative read. There are many, many musical instruments used in playing traditional music, and many different styles. If you hear something you like in a pub, remember to ask one of the musicians what the piece was called. Most musicians are only too happy to talk to an appreciative audience which is why the pub is such a good forum – very different from a concert stage! Some musicians may also have CDs of their work for sale.

Unfortunately times have changed. Modern political correctness and certain legislation have seen fit to ban children from pubs after 9pm. Of course, in one respect this is right and proper – children should be protected. However, Irish music will, in my belief, pay the price in the long term.We are no longer handing down our age old concept of ‘ceol agus craic’ to our children. Young traditional players can now no longer take part in sessions. Children, including visitors, cannot witness accomplished players performing – and the late night session in the pub is sometimes the only opportunity of doing this. Of course there are always lessons, concerts and specific opportunities for children to see and hear this music, but they have to seek such occasions out, which is a far cry from absorbing it as a natural part of their day-to-day cultural upbringing. The place that our own music held in our lives is being taken by other things that are more readily available – TV for one! Happily the Fleadh Cheoil, which started in 1951, does a huge amount to keep traditional music alive and well amongst all age groups. It began as an attempt to establish standards in Irish traditional music through competition at an annual national festival, and takes place in a different Irish town in August each

Another way to learn more is to go into a good record store and talk to the people who run it – never be afraid of saying you are new to the genre! In Sligo Town, Melody Maker stocks a huge array of Irish music, both traditional and folk, including CDs by local musicians like Dave Sheridan, a talented flute player from neighbouring Leitrim. One of his recent albums ‘Sheridan’s Guesthouse’ features guitar accompaniment by the great Sligo musician Seamie O’Dowd. Melody Maker also stocks albums by Sligo’s highly acclaimed traditional band, Dervish, as well as many other well known groups and individuals. Folksy Gerry, who plays in pubs and works in the Donegal Shop, is an encyclopedia of knowledge in Irish Music.

Melody Maker Promenade Quayside Shopping Centre Sligo Tel: 071 916 1070 The Diamond Donegal www.donegalmusicshop.com STOCKISTS OF IRISH TRADITIONAL AND FOLK AND AMERICAN COUNTRY MUSIC 16


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Events & Entertainment

Live Music Guide Mondays: Trad Sessions DJ or Band

Harp Tavern The Clarence

Tuesdays: Karaoke DJ or Band

Stables Bar 9.30pm The Clarence

Wednesdays: Trad Music, Song & Dance Live Music DJ or Band

Coleman Heritage Centre (July and August) Tobergal Lane The Clarence

Thursdays: Live Music Background Music DJ or Band

The Venue, Strandhill Tobergal Lane (Classical Guitar) The Clarence

Fridays: Live Band Live Music Jazz Live Music DJ or Band

Stables Bar The Venue, Strandhill Tobergal Lane Harp Tavern The Clarence

Saturdays: Live Band Live Music Trad Music, Song & Dance Live Music DJ or Band Trad Session (last Sat of month) Live music (most Sats)

Stables Bar The Venue, Strandhill Coleman Heritage Centre (July and August) Harp Tavern The Clarence O’Donnell’s Pub O’Donnell’s Pub

Sundays:

Photo:©Itchy Feet Promotions

Trad Session Jazz Jazz Trad Session DJ or Band 17

Hargadons 2.30pm Tobergal Lane 1-3pm Harp Tavern Stables Bar 6pm The Clarence


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Ceoláras Coleman Gurteen Co. Sligo

summer 09 Coolera Dramatic Society presents THE BUTTERFLY OF KILLYBEGS Wed 1 to Sat 4 July, 8pm Cho-In Theatre Company (Korea) presents THE ANGEL AND THE WOODCUTTER Mon 6 July, 8pm HAWK’S WELL SINGING SUMMER CAMP Mon 20 – Sat 25 July SINGING SUMMER CAMP CONCERT Sat 25 July, 7.30pm

Concerts/Seisiún

THE WOLFE TONES IN CONCERT Sun 26 July, 8pm

Traditional music, song & dance

Hawk’s Well Lunchtime Theatre presents IRISH WRITERS ENTERTAIN Mon 27 July to Sat 1 August, 1.05pm (50 mins)

July & August Wednesdays & Saturdays at 9pm Other Concerts with Ceoltóirí Coleman on July 10th, August 4th & 22nd September 22nd October 11th & 21st

50TH YEATS INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL Sun 26 to Fri 7 August Poetry Reading by SEAMUS HEANEY Mon 27 July, 8.30pm

Coleman Traditional Festival August 29th - 31st

THE BROCK MCGUIRE BAND Mon 3 August, 8.30pm

Comhaltas Tour of Ireland October 14th

Yeats International Summer School Drama Workshop presents WORDS ON THE WINDOWPANE AND PURGATORY Fri 7 August, 8.30pm

PJ Murrihy October 24th Visit the new exhibition area with interactive audio display Coffee Shop/Music & Gift Shop

HAWK’S WELL DRAMA SUMMER CAMP Mon 10 to Fri 14 August, 10am to 3pm

For details of other concerts and events check our website www.colemanirishmusic.com Tel: 071 918 2599

Beezneez presents A WAKE IN THE WEST Wed 19 to Sat 22 August, 8pm

Hawk’s Well Theatre, Temple Street, Sligo Box Office: 071 916 1518 or book online at

Open all year round Mon-Sat 10am-6pm

www.hawkswell.com 19

Events & Entertainment

Traditional Music Visitor Centre


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Tailor Made School Trips For the last three years, teenage students from Palos Verdes School in Los Angeles, California have made a spring-time trip to Ireland to learn about Irish life, culture and very specifically cross community links and reconciliation issues. The groups have been facilitated by Keith and Debbie McNair of Discovery Tours, who organise everything from transport and activities to entertainment and homestays with local families. On this particular 10-day trip the young people visit Dublin, Belfast and Sligo, learning something in each location of the historical, religious and political background that has made Ireland what it is today. Very few of the teenagers – and their leaders – who make the trip, return home unchanged in some way, and many of them say that meeting people of their own age from all walks of life and all sides of the political divide opens their eyes as nothing else can. Discover Sligo asked Dan Fichtner, Palos Verdes group leader, to share some reflections from this year’s tour.We were struck by the fact that all the participants, including the chaperones and guide, felt it had been ‘life changing’. Their own summary of other comments makes interesting reading too.

On the practical side:

On the activities side:

• The food was delicious and quality was always guaranteed. • Sitting by the fire in the restaurant near Glendalough made for a cozy comfortable meal. • Using a combination of nature and history showed Ireland to be one of the most beautiful countries in the world. • There are lots of cemeteries in Ireland. • Communities are bustling with people in the main parts of towns. • Home stays helped create a safe and inclusive feel in Sligo, • Having host families taking in students helped them to “feel the feel of Ireland.”

• Face-to-face interactions with someone involved in the Troubles opened up a new world, an important moment in the trip. • One of the Belfast students who joined in had never been on the other side of the Peace Wall. • Reading about the IRA and terrorists, and then viewing the film The Wind that Shakes the Barley was a good combination of information gathering. • Bus touring the murals with a guide helped to truly understand the historical meaning. • The inclusion of music, dance, etc helped in the realization that such study should be continued. • The physical exertion, even the slipping and sliding in the rain on the megalithic Carrowkeel Tombs Trek, all made for a greater appreciation of this important site. • All activities went by quickly – competitions made the learning more enjoyable.

On the thoughtful side: • Religion, racial or other differences are no reason to hate. • Attempts to answer our questions were sometimes difficult because the situation is complex and hard to explain. • Discussions (student to student) helped because adults do not think like students. • Jerry of the Fellons Club – ‘The first casualty in conflict is the truth.’ and ‘One man’s terrorist is another’s freedom fighter.’ • Not so much that we are such and such, but that we are different, • There is division in America – • There is a ‘PV Bubble’ enclosing us. • Family relationships are extremely important to the Irish, perhaps more so than in the States. • No one side is entirely to blame for any conflict, all sides share some blame.They need to acknowledge their culpability. • Humor was often an important part of the learning process. • College education should focus on learning, not getting good grades to please parents.

On the funny side: • Sophia’s use of half a roll of toilet paper to explain who she is to the Monkstown youth. • Being locked on the bus because one fell asleep when we left it for the Fellons’ Club. • On the sheep farm where one orphan lamb bonded with John. • Hiding in a Carrowkeel tomb and scaring those who entered. • Counting off in the bus after seeing sheep and Number Nine going ‘na-a-a-a-a-a-ine’. • Dracula’s grandmother living in Sligo. • Yeats’ remains might not be in his grave at Drumcliffe. • Sheep are not as white and fluffy as one might think. • Donkeys bite. • Kissing couple on a bridge in Derry were both guys.

And the last word goes to Dan Fichtner, the group leader. ‘Our sincere thanks go to Keith McNair and Discovery Tours for affording us the opportunity to learn and grow. Learning through a mixture of experience and study produced some great results that will continue to affect the lives of all participants in this trip.Travel indeed broadens one’s perspective.’

For details of this and the other trips that Discovery Tours can organise for your group, Tel Keith McNair on 086 830 6060 or see Discoverytours.ws 20


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Irish Cultural Studies Institute 9 – 17 July 2010 Daniel S Burt PhD Academic Director Now in its sixth year the Academic and Professional Development Summer Workshops in Ireland will be sponsoring an 8-day Irish Cultural Studies Institute based in Sligo, with workshops in Irish literature, history, music, dance, creative writing, photography, and painting. Taught by master artists, writers, scholars, and teachers, the Irish Cultural Studies Institute will offer an exceptional opportunity for anyone interested in exploring the best of Irish writing, art, history, and performance in the incomparable setting of Sligo, on Ireland’s magnificent northwest coast. Participants will have the ability to concentrate in a single topic area or ‘mix and match’ among several. The Institute will be open for day and residential bookings.

Modern Irish Literature - Based in the landscape that inspired Yeats, the workshop will feature contemporary Irish writers and experts guiding participants to a greater understanding of the legacy of Yeats, Joyce, Synge, O’Casey, Beckett and Friel, as well as the achievement of Heaney, Boland, Doyle and others.

its prehistory through its Monastic and Medieval traditions, the years of English rule, the Great Famine, the War of Independence and Civil War to the Troubles and current peace process. Sessions will be held at many of the sites where history was made, led by distinguished Irish historians and experts.

Learning

Irish History - The workshop will examine the extraordinarily rich history of Ireland from

Irish Music & Dance - Enjoy a cultural immersion in Irish traditional music and/or dance, instructed by Irish master performers, while taking advantage of the resources of the Michael Coleman Irish Music Centre, one of Ireland’s premier venues for the cultivation and preservation of traditional Irish music, dance, and heritage. Creative Writing - Poets, fiction, and nonfiction writers can perfect their skills under the guidance of master Irish writers during a week of small group discussions, instruction, and critiques, all taking place alongside excursions around Yeats Country.

Photography & Painting - Irish artists and photographers will instruct small groups of painters and photographers (at all levels) in workshops taking advantage of Sligo’s remarkable scenery which includes mountains, lakes, rivers and miles of stunning coastline. Each workshop will take full advantage of one of the world’s great classrooms: Ireland itself, with frequent excursions to sites that made history, stimulated great art and culture, and continue to inspire.

Book on-line at www.discoverytours.ws

Some highlights of past summers’ workshops include: • a performance by world renowned traditional musician Martin Hayes and Dennis Cahill • private meetings at Stormont in Belfast with representatives of the four major political parties in Northern Ireland • a music and dance performance aboard the Rose of Inisfree cruising Lough Gill • an afternoon spent with a Shanachie, a traditional Irish storyteller • literature and creative writing sessions in a 150-year-old thatched cottage • searching for a Mass rock near the Gleniff Horseshoe • a sea voyage to Inismurray Island and its monastic ruins

Email your enquiry to info@discoverytours.ws

What past participants have said about the workshops: ‘Discovery Tours provided me with a phenomenal Ireland experience in its Arts Workshop! We packed in an amazing amount of activities. In my individually tailored schedule, I studied set dancing and sean-nos with the area`s foremost teachers. As a group, the places we visited, activities in which we participated, and the people we met gave us historical, artistic, political, and sociological insights into the unique Irish culture.’ Linda Luca, Philips Exeter, Byfield, MA ‘I have been doing European tours and creative workshops since 1996 and my trip to Sligo with Discovery Tours topped every experience to date.We had a small group which allowed us to venture off the beaten track of most tours to private homes, inaccessible islands, and dance festivals. Poets and writers described to us the legendary 40 shades of green that comprise the Irish landscape. As a painter I was awed by the amazing geological forms in the Sligo area and the skies that were the source of striking changes in light and color from dawn until dusk.This trip fulfilled my treasured dream of touching and being touched by the Irish landscape and will serve as inspiration for many paintings!’ Betsy Hubner, Burr & Burton Academy, Manchester,VT ‘Discovery Tours provides participants with an experience that gratifies the senses and the intellect. Spoiled with fine dining, expertly guided tours, enchanting scenery, and thoughtful workshop programming, you will leave promising that you will return.This is by far the best workshop I have ever attended.’ Photo: © Ulrike Schwier Michelle Chartrand, Pere Rene de Galinee School, Ontario, Canada 21


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About IT Sligo The Institute of Technology Sligo is one of Ireland’s most successful third level educational institutions. In the North West of Ireland, we are one of the regional leaders in education, innovation and economic and social development.

One of Ireland’s most successful educational institutions. We deliver flexible contemporary programmes from higher certificate and degree level courses to taught postgraduate and research awards using both traditional and online delivery. IT Sligo is a focus for local business innovation and development and we have an excellent track record in collaborating with businesses, the community and the creative industries across our core disciplines of Business and Humanities, Engineering and Science. At IT Sligo we are recognised for our integrity and openness; for providing a supportive and flexible learning environment for our students to achieve their potential; for our innovation and research; and for being proactive, encouraging and entrepreneurial in our dealings with the business community. Our philosophy is indeed the embodiment of what Yeats described as the ‘Pilgrim soul.’

Professor Terri Scott President

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Sligo SPCA

@ The Annie Finnegan Animal Shelter Rathosey Coolaney Tel: 071 916 7737 Mob: 087 216 6216 Email sligospca@gmail.com

www.sspca.ie

Registered Charity Number: CHY 12485

Homes

The SSPCA exists to help animals in distress in Sligo.We get calls all the time, and we always try to help. Sometimes that means referring the case to someone who is better able to assist than we are, which is where our many members, outside experts and the other agencies with whom we are in regular contact come in. Being available at all times to help animals takes time and costs alot of money – and that is where you come in, because we receive only limited Government funding, and as a registered charity are staffed entirely by volunteers. Without the ongoing help of our supporters we couldn’t carry on.

We never refuse an animal that is surrendered to us, and thanks to Horkans Pet World, who donate what can only be described as monstrous amounts of pet food, we can feed these poor animals. But that is only the first part of the rescue process. One of our greatest needs is for kind homes. Would you consider offering a home to a rescued animal? If not now, perhaps at some future date? Please contact us – we are building a data base of potential homes and will work with you when the time is right. All homes receive a visit from our team to ensure that everyone’s needs are met.

What you do

Fundraising

Thankfully people give generously. And not just kind individuals, though we are grateful to everyone who puts their hand in their pocket. Sometimes people get together and organise donations from others, like the staff at Tiscali in Sligo who raised a fantastic €1000. Another recent donation that is making a real difference to needy animals in Sligo came from Saorise O’Donoghue who competed in the 20km Connemara International Half Marathon last spring to raise money for us. She and partner Freddie Symmons raised a staggering €2406 – every cent of which is being used to build a vitally needed new kennel block at our Animal Shelter in Coolaney. This will house 16 dogs, and will sit alongside a shop, grooming facilities, a laundry, a kitchen and isolation rooms. The cattery is also undergoing renovations and will house up to 12 cats plus kittens when completed. Without Saoirse and Freddie’s help, this wouldn’t be possible. And thanks to The National Lighting Showroom too, who have donated the light fittings for the new kennels.

Are you good at raising money? We needs funds all the time, and welcome supporters who will organise events on our behalf. See our web site for ideas! We can help with banners,T-shirts and promotional material and, thanks to Orbicon Print Ltd, we have sponsorship cards and preprinted stationery.

Neutering One of the biggest ways in which the public can help animal welfare is by neutering their pets, males as well as females. A tom cat or a dog can sire hundreds of offspring, many of which may end up as hungry, sick, unwanted strays who continue to breed, creating a bigger problem for tomorrow.

What you can do Neuter your animals Give a home to a rescued cat or dog Fundraise Volunteer Donate Raise awareness Become a member of the SSPCA

Gifts in kind are just as welcome as money. We need plumbers, electricians, and project managers.We also need people who will exercise dogs, clean pens and feed animals on a regular basis. We need foster homes and are always glad to add to our data base of those willing to help with specific services. Gifts that help us keep going day-to-day are invaluable. Two such fantastic gifts are the van donated to the Society by Enda McCarrick of Sligo Renault, which keeps us on the road, helping animals in crisis. The other is the diesel voucher given by Sligo Fuels Ltd. Both of these are life-savers - literally. Thank you!

To find out more about the Society, log on to our website, kindly designed and hosted by Dmac Media Ltd – www.sspca.ie

Help us to help them Saoirse O'Donoghue and Freddie Symmons presenting the cheque to Jarlath Gantly (PRO) which was used to buy building materials for the new shelter. Every cent goes towards the animals and their best welfare. 23

Environment

What we do


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STATE OF THE ART

TREATMENT PLANT OPENED The largest infrastructural project in Sligo in recent years has been officially opened by Minister of State Michael Finneran, TD. The new Sligo Main Drainage Wastewater Treatment facility will mean the elimination of untreated discharges into Sligo Bay and will enable Sligo County Council to fulfil its obligations under EU Directives. It will also accommodate demand from tourism, housing, commercial, industrial and recreational developments in the capital City of the North West Region, together with the provision of sludge reception facility for the treatment of all sewage sludge within the county. The scheme will ensure the protection of a quality environment in Sligo Bay and will clear the way for the integration of sewerage facilities from the surrounding areas of Cummeen, Carraroe, Ballincar, Teesan/Lisnalurg, Rosses Point and all areas designated for development in the Sligo & Environs Development Plan. Referring to the benefits of the scheme to Sligo, Minister Finneran said “it reflects the Government’s ongoing commitment to preserving and protecting our water resources as a key element of environmental policy, to meeting EU standards for drinking water and wastewater treatment and to putting critical infrastructure in place that will ensure ongoing support for industrial, commercial and other development.”

To place the facility in context, Sligo County Council has one of the most efficient and progressive water services investment programmes in the country. This is testament to the vision and commitment of the elected members and staff, including those dedicated people now retired, who also gave valuable service in the delivery of this programme. Value for money has always been a core objective in the delivery of the capital programme, and great credit is due to the various members of the project team for delivering this facility on time and within budget. From Sligo County Council’s perspective, it was also a key consideration that the scheme was developed without compromising our local environment, and the facility is perfectly integrated and greatly enhances the environmental quality of its catchment area. The story of the scheme involves many strands. There is a special sense of history to this location, as the name ‘Sligo’ is derived from the ‘slig or ‘shells’ which were once plentiful in the estuary beside the plant. There is also a sense of pride in our local landscape, and a sense of achievement in our ability to deliver a project of this scale while protecting our natural heritage and habitats. The people of Sligo will welcome the delivery of this plant as an important investment in our future.

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D

Environment

L/R – Mark Driver, Project Director-Anglian Water International, Tom Brennan S.E.- SCC, Paddy Coffey, Coffey Construction, Gary Coone, Projects Manager-Coffey Group, David James, Process Design Project Manager-Anglian Water International & Enpure Ltd., David Kiely, Jennings O Donovan & Partners, Seamus Concannon, retired Director of Services, Kevin Larkin, retired Senior Engineer, SCC, Louise Dwyer, Projects Manager-Jennings O Donovan & Partners, Donal Harrison, S.E.-SCC, Tadhg Buckley, Director-EPS Ltd., Tom Kilfeather, DOS-SCC, James Melvin, Senior Resident Engineer-SCC, Pat Doyle, Project Engineer-SCC, Hubert Kearns County Manager-SCC.

L/R – Cllrs John Sherlock & Albert Higgins, Pat Doyle, Sligo County Council & Project Engineer, Cllrs Rosaleen O’Grady & Seamus Kilgannon, Director of Services, Tom Kilfeather, Mayor Cllr. Veronica Cawley, Minister Michael Finneran, Cathaoirleach Cllr Jude Devins, County Manager, Hubert Kearns, Mark Driver, Anglian International Water, Deputy Jimmy Devins, Senator Geraldine Feeney & Deputy Eamon Scanlon at the opening of Sligo Main Drainage

For further information call the Sligo Main Drainage Project Office at 071 911 1388 or

visit www.sligococo.ie 25


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Gone - Straight Bananas! Celebrating EU Regulation 1677/88 which rules that bent bananas can now co-habit Europe's shop shelves alongside their straight fellows! The following letter was received at Discover Sligo’s offices from a concerned citizen and government employee. Name and address supplied but withheld upon request.

Letter to the Minister for Finance A Chara, Under Euro Zone rules individual states cannot devalue the euro currency for understandable reasons. It is central to the European movement and the Euro Monetary Fund that ‘one economy, one currency’ is a large part of the model that Europe adheres to.Those few countries that have not joined (notably Britain, the world's largest financial centre) seem to be regarded, rightly or wrongly by Euro-Zone members as somehow less committed to the spirit of the Union. Meanwhile the drive to expand the Euro Zone continues, even if it is perceived as pressure on non-members to accede this almost final frontier of national interest in favour of the federal model. In recent turbulent times economists, Europeans and the Irish themselves are largely agreed that this unity has been the saving of the Irish economy.Were Ireland still an independent financial force (!) the economy would have long since gone the way of Iceland and, pardon the pun, melted away in gross devaluation. However another form of devaluation is presently in process and, were it extended to its natural conclusion, could be a major boost towards the recovery of the domestic Irish economy. Current proposals plan that the National Asset Management Agency (NAMA), when established mid2009, will take over the toxic developer debt of the 6 guaranteed national banking operations. This is currently seen as essential to the reinvigoration of the national banking system, isolating the “bad” and allowing good to start flourishing again. However when NAMA absorbs this toxic pile, running into many billions of impaired assets, it will effectively have devalued those holdings by at least 50% from day one. This new reality (and valuation) is at the heart of the proposal and axiomatic to its implementation. Thereafter, the national banks may well be nationalised and their viable corporate debt and remaining toxic exposure be factually devalued by a similar percentage. So devaluation by any other name is well in process and by that model only benefitting those who have orchestrated the disaster that is the post Celtic Tiger reality.

Meanwhile the regular man in the street is paying a very high and direct price for this national ruination. Pay As You Earn (PAYE) workers are undergoing savage levies and pay cuts to support government and employment. In reality take home pay has fallen by 10-12 % and the upcoming autumn Budget can only presage more of the same.The only relief is that current European Monetary Fund interest rates are at an all-time low giving mortgage repayment relief to those not on fixed rates. It’s worth noting, however, that one in five mortgage holders, are fixed and the banks are showing no sympathy as they try to renegotiate the new reality. Also domestic property values have fallen through the floor with a national drop of perhaps as much as 30% and a stagnant market promising further decline. So many, fortunate to still have jobs, are now in a definite negative equity trap that they are obliged to retain and maintain. There is however one real solution that might assuage the general public and bring parity to their situation vis-a-vis NAMA secured property and banking echelons. In mitigation the government should unilaterally decree a reduction in value of ALL mortgages of property (commercial, speculative and domestic) in the Republic on a given day and date with no caveats and by not less than 30%. This would show some parity of concern for the private sector in real terms, recognise the current value of the Irish Homes market and undoubtedly regenerate activity in home sales across every section and locality. It would also release much disposable cash into the retail sector. Most especially it would compensate the regular tax payer who is being obliged to carry the burden of profligacy for generations to come, and mirror the place to which they have been brought by the aforesaid developers and bankers. If it can be achieved quite openly for certain sectors through the NAMA route, then surely it can be applied across the board, especially when the inevitable outcome would be massive, fresh stimulation of the retail and property sector. What say you, Minister? Mise le meas The (Broke) Hurler on the Ditch

If you think the author's gone straight bananas let us know. Even better, if you have an idea or observation about an issue that you think affects us locally in Sligo and the Northwest - then please write to us at: Gone - Straight Bananas! Discover Sligo Magazine, Markievicz Road, Sligo. We might publish your views, even if others think you've gone straight bananas! 26


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Lisbon Leaves Me Confused Bewildered & Perplexed when we elect our TDs who legislate in our national parliament. However the people we elect to the European parliament [MEPs] do not make EU laws. This legislative power rests solely with the 27 citizens, the Commissioners, who are not elected but, under Lisbon, would be chosen by the EU President.

Dear Bananas, No politician has yet spelled out to me what the core issue is with the Lisbon Treaty. I know it is complex and the issues are many, but is there one main, underlying ‘foundation stone’ to the Treaty that – if I knew what it was – would help me decide how to vote? My husband is equally vague – we both feel completely ‘at sea’ and WE ARE NOT ALONE! I truly think many people are too embarrassed to admit they don’t know what it’s all about, as that makes one sound stupid. I am not very political, but I have strong views and believe we should all exercise our right to vote. But where do we start? What is at stake here? I remain Confused Bewildered & Perplexed

Interestingly, it seems many people think an EU Commissioner represents his/her country, when in fact he or she is only responsible for a portfolio, such as agriculture. Under Lisbon, Ireland will no longer be able to nominate its Commissioner, instead the commissioner will be chosen by the Commission President. Most of us agree that the EU has greatly aided the building of peace and prosperity in Europe, a sharp contrast to the horrendous conflict the whole world was propelled into by the denial of democracy in one part of Europe a few decades ago. This historic perspective shows that respect for democracy is essential.Without it countries are destined for trouble.

Dear C, B & P Recently an Irish Times columnist referred to ‘Lisbon 2 as Europe for slow Irish learners’. I don’t like that statement. Lisbon is long and complicated and we are the only people in Europe to vote on the Treaty. Lisbon addresses important issues like democracy, EU’s effectiveness, its citizen’s fundamental rights, and matters such as the environment and military capability. These are valid issues which will affect Europe and, by definition, Ireland. There are many emotive notions circulating which undermine one’s thinking; so to gain a sound understanding we ought first address some of these. 1 ‘If we vote Yes, Lisbon will sort out our finances.’ Voting No did not cause our financial mess. Voting Yes will not solve it. Interestingly, the Sunday Times remarked: ‘Lisbon 2 is identical to the first treaty, but the government hopes recession-hit voters will say yes this time’.

Finally, for now, one last question: Has the Treaty changed since last time?

2 ‘We will be chucked out of the EU if we vote No again.’ Lisbon is not a referendum on Ireland’s membership of the EU and we can’t be “chucked out”.

Pro-Lisbon Czech Prime Minister said:‘Not a dot nor comma … has been changed.’ The reason, according to pro-Lisbon Czech Europe Minister, is that the governments of the member states do not want to have to ratify the treaty again.

3 ‘No Voters are simply ‘Looney Left’ or ‘Fascist Right’ & Yes Voters are the only pro-Europeans.’ There are plenty of ‘normal’ people on both sides. Nor is this debate about personalities.We will vote on a legally binding treaty that affects the future of Ireland – and Europe. And yes, people on both sides can be pro-EU.

So how exactly has our government responded? According to the recent Dept Foreign Affairs postcard, the Irish government had ‘discussions with all EU Member States’ to ensure we have ‘legal guarantees and assurances’. However, these guarantees will not form part of the Lisbon Treaty, they will be attached to a later treaty as a protocol. And what does that mean? Well, according to Professor Steve Peers of University of Essex: ‘The 2009 Decision is legally binding but is subordinate to the Treaties in the event of conflict’ between the treaty and the protocol.

Be encouraged to think for yourself. That’s the joy of democracy! And democracy is the ‘key issue’ you ask about. Both sides of the debate see a problem with the EU’s democracy under Lisbon. The pro-Lisbon ‘Ireland’s Future.ie advises that ‘there is no democratic deficit in the EU’. Yet German Courts, who sided with the Yes camp, recently concluded: ‘[we] see the oft-cited “democratic deficit” in the EU as an inherent, structural problem… the problem is inherent, too, in the Lisbon Treaty.’ Pat Cox, pro-Lisbon former President of the European Parliament, advised on RTE that Lisbon created concerns for European democracy in the long-term. Closer to home, Eamonn Dunphy acknowledged: ‘My fundamental objections to the treaty remain: … the lack of democracy’. On the No side, Declan Ganley’s warning sounds stark: ‘Democracy is approaching an end in Brussels. The Lisbon Treaty would end it. And I simply don’t know how we would get democracy restored …’

So if the actual Treaty hasn’t been changed in response to the real concerns raised by the people of Ireland, and the protocols would be subordinate to the Treaty, what’s the point of voting again? Maybe you even feel annoyed that we are being asked to vote again. Admittedly it does make one feel like we live somewhere like Zimbabwe where they had to vote again 'til they ‘got it right’! Is our government right when it urges us to vote Yes? Or is Vincent Brown right when he says that Ireland owes it to the people of Europe to vote No? Please don’t give up! Over the coming months we should engage in a thoroughly healthy debate that might help clarify what Lisbon really means for all of us! And what it means for democracy. There’s more to explore and discuss….

It’s quite reasonable to conclude both sides recognize that there is a problem with democracy in the EU. How central is this issue? In democracies, the citizens elect politicians who legislate and are accountable to the people.That’s how it works in Ireland, and elsewhere,

Log on to the debate

we

Yours Bananas

www.Lisbon2.info The Heart of Europe

Europe – a democratic Europe 27

Sligo Life

As we collectively wrestle with the development of the EU, the people of Ireland – even Sligo – can draw on our own experience. We have contributed significantly to the development of democracy. For example, Proportional Representation was first used in Sligo. Markievicz was the first woman Westminster MP and the world’s first woman cabinet member. More recently, the Irish Peace Process has demonstrated the transformative power of a democracy that purposefully accommodates minorities. It was no easy task for our elected representatives to secure the overwhelming support of the diverse people on this island for the Good Friday agreement. It demanded determination, stamina, goodwill and the ability to keep on negotiating for a better deal, for all, against nearly impossible odds. This democratic backbone has shown its strength in keeping Ireland focused on peace. Notably, many commentators, including France’s President Sarkozy, reckon that if the citizens of France, Germany, Britain and the Netherlands were allowed to vote on Lisbon they would probably say no.Why haven’t they been asked? It makes us wonder that maybe not enough ground work has been done to harness the support of the people of Europe.


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Mortgage Centre Sligo Markeivicz Road, Sligo Freephone: 1800 44 28 28 Tel: 071 914 2828 Fax: 071 914 2899 Email: sligomortgage@eircom.net

We can Help! John O'Connor T/A Mortgage Centre Sligo is regulated by the Financial Regulator as a mortgage intermediary.

Are You Financially Fit? Your income is your most important asset. Are you protecting it? Your income pays for everything. Have you ever thought what would happen if you were unable to work through accident or illness and your income ceased?

You can have a Guaranteed Premium – which won’t change during the term of the plan A Reviewable Premium – premiums stay constant for first 5 years and are reviewed every 5 years thereafter.

Take a few minutes to think about your financial commitments and how much you actually spend every month: mortgage, insurances, bills, loans, pension, household, social etc.

You can Index your income benefit by 3% per year – as your salary increases so will your replacement income and, of course, your premiums.

If you had no income, due to unforeseen illness or injury, how would you pay for this lifestyle?

Or you can opt for them to stay level – neither premiums or benefit will change during duration of the policy.

Think how you would answer the following questions:

What benefits will you get?

Or you can select Escalation – income benefit will increase by either 3% or 5% while your premiums remain level.

What arrangements does your employer have if you are on long term sick leave?

Guaranteed Increase Option: You can increase your benefit by 20% without having to provide new evidence of health.This offer will be made to you every 3 years.

How long would your savings last if you had to live off them?

Occupation Change: You can change jobs and your plan can continue between jobs if you are made redundant.

How would you pay for your outgoings if you had no savings or income?

Hospital Cash Benefit: You can receive an income if you are in hospital for over 7 days. Automatic Premium Protection: You won’t pay your premiums while receiving income benefit, but your plan continues. When you return to work your plan continues unchanged.

Social welfare disability allowance is around €200 a week, and there is NO such allowance if you are self-employed. Almost 11% of the population are classified as having a disability, yet only around 10% of working people in Ireland have any form of salary protection.

Rehabilitation: When you get back to work, we will restart your benefit payments if you suffer a relapse within 6 months. If you have returned to a job that pays less than your previous earnings, you may be eligible for partial benefit.

Income protection is a form of disability or sickness insurance that can help prevent financial worries. You can choose how much you pay, what type of plan you have and when you would like it to end.

Overseas Benefit: If you claim income benefit while you are outside the EU, we will pay your income for 13 weeks in a year, or 39 weeks in total.

Find out more about Friends First Income Protection at The Mortgage Centre 28


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Sligo Regional Sports Centre Cleveragh Sligo 25m heated swimming pool, Jacuzzi, Steam Room, children’s pool, gymnasium, Sports Hall Tel: 071 916 0539 Fax: 071 915 0941 Email: regsport@gmail.com

Camp 1 June 29 – July 3 Camp 2 July 6 – July 10 Camp 3 July 13 – July 17 Camp 4 July 20 – July24 Camp 5 July 27 – July 31 No camp August 3 (Bank Holiday) Camp 6 August 10 – August 14 Camp 7 August 17 – August 21 Register now for an action-packed week!

Learn to swim this summer! Children’s Intensive Swimming Class June 30, July 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9 (6.30pm – 7pm) Adult Intensive Swimming Class June 30, July 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9 (7pm – 8pm) Regular swimming lessons for adults & children recommencing September 2009 Regular Beginner/Improver Swimming Lessons every Tues or Wed 7pm or 10pm SRSC Monthly Membership available for as little as €1 per day

www.sosport.ie 29

Outdoors & Activities

Childrens’ Summer Camps 2009


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Here we go, here we go, here we go! Ryan Casey It’s that time of year when we see the start of the ever popular FAI SUMMER SOCCER CAMPS. There are 9 camps in total this year, spread throughout the county to cater for boys and girls between the ages of 7-15.The camps are extremely well organised, so the kids have nothing to do except enjoy themselves, make new friends and learn some new skills. Who knows - we might find the next Robbie Keane! All camp coaches are vastly experienced and are all qualified UEFA standard coaches. Many of them have worked the camps for several years and have professional playing experience. On arrival at the first day of camp each participant will be registered on the role call and issued with their top-of-the-range Umbro FAI SUMMER CAMP KIT. Each child will receive a jersey, pair of shorts, socks, football and back pack, all made to the highest standards by official FAI kit sponsor Umbro. Once all the kids have arrived, groups will be made up according to age and size, a dedicated coach will be appointed to each group and then the fun begins!

Yeats Utd, Carney 6-10 July Arrow Harps FC, Riverstown Community Park 13-17 July Coolaney Utd FC, Coolaney Community Park 13-17 July Sligo Showgrounds Astro Pitch 27-31 July and 3-7 August Killglass/Eniscrone Utd FC, Micheal McGowan Park, Enniscrone 10-14 August Boyle Celtic FC, Celtic Park, Sligo Road, Boyle 17-21 August Goal Keeper Camp, Sligo Showgrounds Astro Pitch 22-23 August

Each day sees different fun activities based around the fundamental basics of soccer. The morning sessions are mostly fun drills to learn the skills of dribbling, heading, passing and shooting. The afternoons are all small-sided games and world cup blitzes where the kids get the opportunity to show off the skills they have learnt that morning. All camps will be supervised by a head coach and FAI DEVELOPMENT OFFICER Ryan Casey. The following is list of venues and dates for this year’s camps.

If you are interested in sending your child to any of these highly enjoyable camps, you can book online to secure your place at www.fai.ie and click on Summer Camps, or you can call 1890 653 653

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Romauld Boco, Sligo Rovers Photo: ©James Connelly

Outdoors & Activities

Cosgrove’s CENTRA

Cosgrove’s

MAUGHERABOY SLIGO TEL 071 913 8731 MAUGHERABOY 31


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Making a Splash! Eavan McLoughlin

BARTON SMITH SPORTS

Fishing & Shooting Specialists For the largest selection of rods and tackle in the North West! Trout and Salmon flies a speciality Local and state fishing licences Clothing and life jackets Live and frozen bait available Shot guns & rifles Shooting accessories Large selection of walking & camping gear Portable stoves & gas stocked

For value, quality & friendly advice call David or Gerry Tel: 071 914 2356 HYDE BRIDGE SLIGO Email:info@bartonsmith.ie

Photo: © M.McLoughlin Sligo Swimming Club started in the 1920’s and has been growing ever since. Today it has 240 active members, and welcomes anyone between the ages of 7-18 who can swim a length. Some join just for the fun of swimming, but the Club’s aim is to train swimmers for competitions and many members compete at the BC&A Grades Division & National Championships. And this is the time of year when they are being put to the test, as the summer months see many of the finals, including the Community Games in August. If you are not a member of the swimming fraternity, these national competitions can seem very complicated, but for many young people, it’s the reason they get out of bed every morning – quite literally. Serious competitors are training in the pool while the rest of us are still pressing the snooze button. Sligo has lots of talented young swimmers, who perform together as a team, and are involved in a broad range of activities.They are all very committed, despite the hard work. One of the team, 14 year old Eavan McLoughlin explained that they are all expected to log an hour a week per year of their age, mostly in the pool, but also in the gym.This requires commitment from the swimmer’s family too, providing lifts to the pool and gym at all hours, as well as to competition venues. Swimming at this level requires Olympic length pools (50m) such as the ones in Limerick and Dublin, so for the Sligo team, championships necessitate long journeys. The team receive every encouragement from Coaches, Cathryn Brady and Trevor Collins, who are there to help hone raw talent into medal winning ability. It is one thing to be a good swimmer, another to be fast, but to achieve national trophy standards in the required strokes requires a balance of talent, fitness, technique and speed which these coaches can help achieve.They do a great job, as witnessed by the success as well as camaderie that prevails at Sligo Swimming Club. Successful young swimmers may need to be dedicated but they do enjoy other aspects of life too. Eavan, for example, loves GAA, and plays for both her local club and the U14 County Team. She is also keen to learn to fly and had her first flying lesson when she was only 12. But swimming is her first love, and in this she is joined by younger sister Rachel, another team member. In fact there are several families with brothers and/or sisters competing at different age levels, like Joseph, Peter and Niamh Mooney, Ciaran and Daire McCloskey and brothers Gareth and Keith Mullen. Like all dedicated athletes, these youngsters and their other team mates eat sensibly, stocking up on slow release, carb-rich meals and snacks, especially around competitions. Just as important, they always have a bottle or glass of water to hand.Their coach’s dictum: ‘keep those muscles liquid!’ is rightly taken in a very literal sense. They need their muscles, and strength - both mental and physical. Competing in any sport is tough and swimming is no exception. Once any of them steps onto that starting block there’s no going back, and even when they’ve given their best, there may yet be disappointment to cope with. At least one thing is always easy- hunger hits all the swimmers as soon as a competition ends, and they and their families usually head straight for somewhere to eat, a first essential ‘unwind’ while the adrenalin is still buzzing. It’s a good moment, a real high if someone has won. Let’s hope they’re all as high as kites this summer! Good luck to all of you - Hayley,Aoife, Katie, Niamh, Laura, Gareth, Keith, Matthew, Eavan, Shona, Joseph, Peter, Ronan, Robert, Ciaran, Daire, Ruth, Daragh, Sadbh, Mark and Rachel! Sligo Swimming Club trains at Regional Sports Centre, Cleveragh, Sligo. New members always welcome. Contact: David Tel: 087 221 2504 Email: ramcloughlin@eircom.net or ver.kelly@hotmail.com 32


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All Ireland Metal Man Triathlon 12 July in Rosses Point This year’s event will be Olympic distance, will start at 10am in Rosses Point and is expected to be a fast and exciting race.The finish will be outside Harry’s Bar on the promenade. The event will comprise: • 1500m Swim in the sheltered Rosses Point Bay • 40k cycle through the ‘Land of Heart’s Desire’ • 10km run along Rosses Point promenade and Yeats Country

Sports Clubs Sligo Mountaineering Club

Sligo Warriors Basketball Club

Meet Tubs&Tiles car park, Sligo, Sun 10.30am. Club disperses summer months, meets 1st Sun of Sept. Fee €35, new members can only join on first Sun of the month. Contact: Michael Mulligan Tel: 071 914 1267. Email: fgallagh@iol.ie

Meet in Sligo IT multi-purpose centre Sept-April. Age range 6-Adults. Specific training times on website. Contact: Breedge Scanlon/ Gorana Leahy Tel: 071 914 4417/ 071 914 7872 E-mail: info@sligowarriors.ie www.sligowarriors.ie

Sligo Walking Club Members meet Sligo IT car park 2nd & 4th Sat of each month 10.30am. Fee €35 pa. New walkers can walk once for free, thereafter must pay fee. 19 July Orchid Walk around Mullaghmore Headland after a talk on orchids at Organic Centre, Rossinver 10am.Walk only, meet Lomax Boat Yard, Mullaghmore 3pm.Tel Trudie Lomax: 071 916 6124 Autumn Walking Festival October 24-25. Contact: Ox Mountain Development Co www.oxmountain.com for details.

Karate Higashi Karate Club Lessons in The Crib Youth Centre, Rockwood Parade. Mon and Wed Adults 8-10pm Sat am Junior (6-10 yrs) 10.30-11.30am Senior (10-13 yrs) 11.30am-1pm Kids per class: €7 Adults ¤ €50 / 8 (2-hour) classes. Centre is fully matted + CCTV cameras for added safety. Irish Sports Council Approved. Contact: Micky Downs Tel: 087 629 6933

Sligo Rowing Club Sligo Kayak Club

Meet Sat and Sun am in Doorly Park clubhouse, Sligo. To join and for events contact: Rory Clarke Tel: 087 618 9156 Email: roryclar@gmail.com

Members meet once a week in Iascai River, Doorly Park from 6.30-8.30pm. Fee €50 /pa, only over 16’s Contact: Alan Moore Tel: 085 120 2556

Innisfree Wheelers Cycling Club Diving/ Sub-Aqua Club

Group rides leave Sligo IT 6.30pm Tues & Thur (summer only). Sunday spins 9am (summer), 10am (winter) Short rides Tues, long Thurs, very long Sun Contact: John Greene Tel: 071 916 9840/ 086 100 5219 www.inisfreewheelers.com

Meet Thurs Oct-Dec.Theory lectures 8.30pm Sligo IT then 10pm Sports Complex for pool training sessions. Generally dive on Sat & Sun am Mullaghmore.Trips during college holidays. Open to all IT students and staff over 16 (fee). See website for details of entry criteria Contact: Enda Gibney Tel: 071 915 5243 Email: gibney.enda@itsligo.ie www.itsligo.ie

Sligo Aikido Club Meets Mon, Tues, Wed & Fri at Dojo on Quay Street (Custom House Quay). Mon is beginner’s night 7.15-8.15pm. Yearly insurance fee: €40 pa / adults, €30 / U-15’s. This is reduced to €25 & €20 respectively after 1st March. Adults: €50 pm, €100 /10 classes U-15’s: €90 / 3 months 2+ kids same family €74 per 3 months Contact: Simone Chierchini Tel: 087 948 9853 Email: sligo@aikikai.ie

Sligo Rugby Club Seniors meet in clubhouse Tues & Fri 7.30pm. Juniors meet Sun 10.30am Sligo IT. Fee €60 pa. Clubhouse: Hamilton Park, Strandhill. Contact: Brendan Leahy Tel: 087 799 5020 Email: rbleahy@eircom.net www.sligorfc.ie

St Joseph’s Amateur Boxing Club

Lough Bo Shooting Club

Meet in Ballinacarrow Community Centre Tues & Fri. Junior Classes (U-14) 6.30-7.30pm, Senior Classes 7.30-8.30pm. Girls only classes are Weds at 7.30-8.30pm. €3 / class, no membership fee. Pay as you go. Contact: Stephen Reynolds Tel: 087 858 9369 E-mail: stephenreynolds@oceanfree.net

Meet Weds 7pm, Clubhouse Lough Bo. Usually go clay pigeon shooting after a brief meeting. Clay pigeon membership free. Rifle and pistol club fee €350 pa. Contact: John Conlon Tel: 071 916 5141

Sligo Tennis Club Clubhouse on the old Bundoran road,open 7/7. New members welcome. Check website for fees & events. Contact: Martin Tel: 071 916 2580 Email: sligotennisclub@eircom.net www.sligotennisclub.ie

Sligo Petanque Club (French Boules) Meet Tues & Thurs 6.30pm. All welcome.Training from All-Ireland gold medal champion Bridie Nicholson. No fee. Brand new pitch in Kevinsfort. Contact: Killian Kiernan Tel: 087 267 0530 33

Outdoors & Activities

There will also be an Olympic distance relay team event - ideal for those who would like to participate, but who haven’t yet completed a full triathlon. The legendary Ger Hartman will present the trophy. Over 150 entries are registered, including some international competitors. The organisers are planning a fun-filled family day out, so there will be lots of entertainment. www.sligotriathlon.com.


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GAA in Sligo GAA Summer Camps This year there are 12 venues for the VHI GAA Cul Camps in Sligo.There is one new camp this year in Geevagh, which we hope will be a great success. On each camp there are both Football and Hurling and this year, on a number of the camps there will also be Handball.The Camps are jam-packed with fun games, skill stations, conditioned games and go games activities in which everyone is involved. Every day is different with loads of fun and enjoyable stuff to take part in. If you want to improve your skills, meet new friends, meet loads of County Footballers, Hurlers and Ladies Footballers then the Sligo VHI GAA Cul Camps is the place to be this summer. A typical day at the Camp consists of: Tues 10th

Time 10.00am – 10.45am 10.50am – 11.30am 11.40am –12.10pm 12.10pm- 12.40pm 12.40pm – 1.20pm 1.20pm – 2pm 2pm – 2.20pm

Activity Fun Games Punt Pass/Hook pass Conditioned games Lunch Attacking play SAQ 11 a side games

GAA in a Fun Way! How would you like to enjoy Gaelic Games Football/Hurling this Summer? • Play loads of Fun Games • Be involved in every game and session • Work with professional GAA coaches • Improve your skills in an enjoyable learning environment • Pick up an active and healthy sport and meet new friends in the process If interested please contact your RAPID Community Rep or the RAPID Office Tel: 071 911 1805 for a form.

This year’s coaches include a number of County players including Noelle Gormley. Noelle has been working at the camps for the past 4 years. She says ‘The Cul Camps are a great way for children to learn new skills, meet new people and have a fun and enjoyable time. Seeing players develop and improve their skills is the most enjoyable aspect of being a coach on the VHI Cul Camps’.

Week 1 - Venue Tourlestrane Geevagh Calry

When? How much? What age? Where?

Sessions will take place on Wednesdays 5pm-6pm or 6pm-7pm in July and August €20 for the whole course 5-8 years at 5pm-6pm 8-12 years at 6pm-7pm local Sligo Town venue (TBC)

Dates 6 July – 10 July 6 July – 10 July 6 July – 10 July

Camp Type Football/Hurling Football/Hurling Football/Hurling

Club Co-ordinator Martin Walsh Teresa O’Rourke Deirdre Quinn

Mobile Number 087 240 2315 087 136 9259 086 322 1351

13 – 17 July 13 – 17 July 13 – 17 July

Football/Hurling Football/Hurling Football/Hurling

Martin Giblin/Declan Keaveney Paul Dwyer Des Henry

086 173 3572 086 255 4914 087 647 3556

20 – 24 July 20 – 24 July 20 – 24 July

Football/Hurling Football/Hurling Football/Hurling

Pat Mc Grath Joe Campbell Pat Kilcoyne

087 670 2792 086 838 1270 087 638 4032

27 – 31 July 27 – 31 July 27 – 31 July

Football/Hurling Football/Hurling Football/Hurling

Paddy Tuffy Jimmy Mc Loughlin Mary Quinn

087 914 2154 087 748 7553 086 375 7626

Week 2 -Venue Dromard Keash Oxfield

Week 3 -- Venue Ballymote Kent Park Tubbercurry

Week 4 - Venue Enniscrone St Molaise Gaels Coola

Camp Co-ordinator: Liam Og Gormley Humbert St Tubbercurry

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Ross Donovan Photo: ŠSean Carleton

Outdoors & Activities

CLIFFORD ELECTRICAL Carraroe Sligo Tel: 071 914 3766 www.cliffords.ie 35


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Racing Horse racing is an old sport in Sligo, with the first recorded meeting (run under the newly formed Turf Club rules) taking place in Rosses Point in 1791. The track later moved to land on the Hazelwood estate owned by the Wynne family, and eventually came to the present site at Cleveragh, just 1km outside the city centre, over 50 years ago. The Cleveragh course is described as a right handed track of 1600m with a steady climb from 4 furlongs out. There are meetings throughout the season, but by far the most glamorous and popular must be Ladies’Day, which this year will be on the 6 August. Photos: ©Sligo Races

The horses are the most important part of any meeting, but on Ladies’ Day it is perhaps not surprising if some peoples’ attention strays from the race track, even during the finishing moments. If recent years are anything to go by, the ladies this August will certainly offer the finest horses a run for their money in the eye-catching stakes. Meetings last year were likened to ‘Derby or Oaks Day’ at Sligo, and it’s great to see such an enthusiastic crowd who like dressing up. People often choose to arrive early and relax over drinks or dinner at the race course, perhaps while they decide which horses to have a flutter on, or just while they view the competition. Because competition it certainly is! Prizes are not just awarded to the winning horses, they also go to the lady who is not only the best, but also the most appropriately dressed. Photo: ©Sligo Champion

Of course the fine details have yet to be decided – it is too early to say which horses might be running, or even how many races will take place, but two things are already certain. One is that the ladies of Sligo have set themselves an increasingly high standard in recent years, and the other is that it is going to be a great day out.

Beach Racing This is a popular sport in the county and, in some areas, dates back for a long time. In Enniscrone they were racing horses on the beach over a hundred years ago, and Rev James Greer records attending such events in his book ‘The Windings of the Moy’, written in 1914. The races are generally held in the early summer, and have – of course – to be timed to fit in with the tides. There is a great feeling of excitement and anticipation as cars stream onto the impromptu car park on the beach and line up in ranks behind the track. Horses are being walked, the bookies have set up under colourful umbrellas, there is a beer tent with a few musicians, and ice cream vans. The race track is marked out on the sands of the estuary, the sun glinting on the sheen of water still lying in its hollows. Eager race goers – some in wellies and many bare-footed in the wet sand – mill about, greet friends and check the odds on the runners in the first race. One of the features of these races is that the jockeys are all youngsters, and many of them can be seen preparing their horses behind the scenes, a slight nervous tension evident in their faces.The commentary box is rigged up well above the race track – in what looks like a cherry picker brought onto the beach for the occasion! Then the first race begins, the horses come thundering down the track, tiny jockeys perched up aloft, sea water and sand spraying up behind them, and excitement mounts in the crowd as everyone watches their favourite fly past… This year’s races at Culleenamore beach were held on 14 June, the date is dependant on the tide. The Enniscrone Races were held on 27 June – another blazing summer’s day. There are also beach races at Lacken Strand in neighbouring County Mayo, which are usually held in May. All of these informal races make a great day out, and deserve to be put in your diary for next season. 36

Photos: ©Lorely Forrester


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Mullaghmore

Donkey Derby

Outdoors & Activities

Photo: ©Joe McGowan

The All Ireland Donkey Derby is in Mullaghmore on 23 August. Donkeys come from all over the country to compete and there are numerous heats and then the hotly contested, nail-biting final. Recently, donkeys from Tyrone have walked away with most of the prizes - maybe this year the Sligo donkeys will run off with the honours!

• Day rides • Riding lessons

Most of the riders are children or young adults. There are also childrens’ entertainments, craft stalls, live music, a cowboy riding display and the ‘Queen of Mullaghmore’ contest.The day raises lots of money for charity each year and is a great summer event for your diary.

Open all year 9am – 7pm AIRE approved

Horse Shows

We offer the only Centred Riding (REG TRADE MARK) (Sally Swift) Instructor in Ireland

Agricultural Shows of particular interest to equestrian enthusiasts are the North Sligo Agricultural Show in Grange on 1 August, the Enniscrone Show on 22 August and the Gurteen Agricultural & Horse Show on 30 August. These shows feature show jumping for young riders, horse classes, puissance and other related equine activities alongside the other attractions common to Agricultural Shows. There are also two Gymkhanas: Strandhill on 4 July and Dromore West on 9 August.

Sligo Race Dates 2009 Sunday 5 July Wednesday 5 August (E) Tuesday 25 August (E) Thursday 6 August (E) Ladies Day (E) Evenings Adults €15, OAPs/Students €10, Children Free

Coachman driven tours of Yeats country. State of the art handcrafted wagonette, drawn by a pair of traditional Irish cobs. Carriage seats up to 8 adults. • 1hour Drumfad drive • 2hour pub stop drive • Mullaghmore headland drive • Themed drives (e.g. nature, heritage) and special parties (hens, anniversaries, family get-togethers etc.) on application

Agricultural Show Dates 2009 Sunday 5 July Ballymote Ballina, Mayo Fri-Sun 10-12 July Branchfield (Riverstown) Sat 18 July Saturday 25 July Manorhamilton, Leitrim North Sligo (Grange) Saturday 1 August Bonniconlon Monday 3 August Saturday 22 August Enniscrone Mullaghmore 23 Aug or 6 Sept (TBC) Gurteen 30 August Saturday 5 September Beltra

As well as being an equestrian center, Island View is also a family run farm. On a visit here you will find mares and their foals, bantham hens and their chicks, ducks, rabbits, dogs and kittens. Meet Rossi the miniature stallion. Location: on the N 15, 16km north of Sligo, 13 km south of Bundoran. approved

Booking and Contact details: Island View Riding Stables, Grange, Co. Sligo Tel: 071-9166156 Mobile: 086-1956615 Email: islandviewridingstables@gmail.com www: islandviewridingstables.com

Equestrian Shows 2009 Strandhill Gymkhana & Craft Fair Sat 4 July Dromore West Gymkhana Sun 9 August Sun 23 Aug Mullaghmore Donkey Derby 37


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A Good Walk Spoiled? Mark Twain referred to golf as,‘A good walk spoiled’. Clearly,Twain was alluding to the challenges and frustrations that accompany this game which requires such precision and skill.Well, I can safely say that given Sligo's magnificent landscape which combines a rugged coastline, beautiful mountains, and peaceful lakes, it is virtually impossible not to have a glorious day on one of Sligo's beautiful golf courses.

While I was attending the Yeats International Summer School back in the early 1990’s, I had the good fortune to stumble upon County Sligo Golf Club at Rosses Point. Although participants in the program were encouraged to stay in town, I opted for a small B&B named The Rock House out near the point where Myra Curley welcomed me, and this was the genesis of my attachment to Rosses Point. I played the golf course numerous times, and I imagined what it would be like to share this magical corner of the world with a group of junior golfers. As a faculty member at The Lawrenceville School and the Director of Nike Junior Golf Camps in New Jersey, I believe in the benefits of international travel and study, and know the value of cultural exchange and the personal growth that can be achieved. Although it took a few years, 15 to be exact, I finally organized a trip, and it turned out to be an incredibly enjoyable and rewarding experience. In June 2007, 10 boys and 4 Coaches boarded a plane @ JFK, New York - destination Rosses Point! It was the journey of a lifetime, and it was as much about the people we met as it was about the birdies, pars and bogies. During the planning stages, my first order of business was to secure a hotel. The Yeats Country Hotel fitted the bill as it was adjacent to the golf links and had a massive practice putting green just steps from the front door. My next challenge was to identify an Irish travel company that could provide all the ground handling for our group when we landed on Irish soil. I spoke with a number of companies, but none more professional and courteous than Discovery Tours of Sligo. The McNair's, Keith and Debbie, could not have been more gracious and helpful. I immediately sensed that I and my group would be in good hands. Boy, was I right! Not only was the bus service timely and comfortable, but the McNair's and their competent staff went beyond the call of duty to see to it that we had a memorable experience from start to finish!

Ronald Kane Rosses Point was our ‘home’ course and we tackled the challenging links four times out of the six days. Jim Robinson, the veteran Head Professional, welcomed our group with open arms. His knowledge, affability, and genuine personality left a lasting impression on us all. We loved the golf course.We viewed it as challenging, yet fair, and the unpredictable wind made it such that we would have been happy playing it every day. Nevertheless, other courses beckoned and we had the great pleasure of playing Enniscrone one morning. We encountered heavy rain, as if the #1 par four wasn't challenging enough! All the same, we loved every minute of it and the closing stretch of holes with the village in the distance is an image for the memory bank. On another morning, we skipped to Donegal Golf Club.That winding road to the clubhouse and first tee added to the mystique. The openness, the mounds, the sea, and the land of Murvaugh made this jaunt another special excursion out of town. Although it was the passion for golf that brought this group together and was the main reason for visiting Sligo, we made the most of our time off the course, too.The Sligo Races! What a great time! We enjoyed every moment on the racecourse. It seemed like the whole town closed down @ 6.00pm. I'm glad I didn’t need a tube of toothpaste, because all the stores were locked as people stormed for the races! The boys chatted with some lassies while their Coaches made some wagers. In my life, I've never enjoyed losing money more! On another evening, we dined with the McNair's at The Waterfront Restaurant. Oh the rainbows on the point! The boys and I witnessed a distinctive double rainbow over Oyster Island. The meal was outstanding, and the company even better. Keith filled us in on how Discover Sligo Magazine comes together, and Debbie made certain that we ordered the Killybeg Crabs as an appetizer! What a team! I could go on and on. The views of Coney Island and the Metal Man from the 3rd tee at Rosses Point, the traditional Irish music at Sean O'Dwyer’s Harp Tavern on Quay Street, the village road in Mullaghmore, the potato leek soup and a pint in the Rosses Point bar are all small pieces of the mosaic that make Sligo a special place. Yes, it's the land of heart's desire, and yes, I'll be back. June 26, 2009, to be exact.This time with my family and another group of young, aspiring golfers. I look forward to seeing some familiar faces starting with the McNair’s. I look forward to spending some time with the folks at Rosses Point Golf Club. And, best of all, I look forward to taking a stroll on the strand with my wife, Maureen; daughter, Bridget; and son, Aidan. It's a chance for them to see and feel what their Da's been raving about all these years. With a little luck, there just might be another rainbow in the sky on which my children can make a wish. Groups of adult or junior golfers interested in travelling to America should contact: Ronald Kane, The Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 rkane@lawrenceville.org Tel: + 609 620 6320

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Calling all Junior Golfers! The participation and competition level of juniors in golf has increased dramatically in the last few years, with more and more youngsters enjoying the excitement of a day at the golf course. Increasingly, golf clubs welcome and integrate juniors, giving them a chance to discover and play the game of golf. At the same time, the knowledge and expertise built over the years of PGA professionals and bodies such as Junior Golf Ireland have given a boost to the quality of the instruction available.

Xavier Médas

As parents or family members, you may wonder if there is a better way for you to introduce your children to golf. Here are a few tips for parents who would like to attract their youngsters to play this ‘game for life’. Firstly, your timing couldn’t be better now that the summer holidays are here. You may already have tried to cultivate an interest in learning golf with your son or daughter. The qualities that golf embodies will make you want to have your children share those experiences.You, the parent, are the person who will provide the greatest access and offer the most encouragement to your children.

Children learn by imitation, so encourage them to watch a PGA or LPGA event on TV. In County Sligo, the West of Ireland Championship played at Easter is a must-watch. Players such as Padraig Harringhton, Rory McIlroy and Shane Lawry competed and won in ‘the West’ before they turned professional. Also, coming up at Castle Dargan in the last week of July is the 2009 Connaght Boys Under 18 Amateur Open Championship. We are looking forward to following new upcoming talents. The crowds and the excitement of such competitions are both great magnets for a young person's imagination.

There are group classes and individual tuition available for children from the age of 6 or 7. One of the keys to getting your child interested in golf is finding an inviting programme that they enjoy participating in.The fun factor should be the main incentive for a young candidate to get interested in the game. As a PGA professional, it is one of my duties to give my time and knowledge of the game and to provide education in golf. As Castle Dargan Golf Club is a progressive club, we welcome juniors, as we believe (and never forget) that they are our future.

Yours in golf Xavier Médas

Castle Dargan Estate Ballygawley Tel: 071 911 8080 Fax: 071 911 8090 Email: golfpro@castledargan.com Web: www.castledargan.com

Junior Girls Golf GUI and Coola School

For all enquiries please contact the Golf Services Team at

Castle Dargan Golf Club Telephone: 0719118080 E-Mail: golf@castledargan.com www.castledargan.com 39

Outdoors & Activities

During the year, regular group classes and camps are run to maintain a continuous interest in and education of the game. Some of the local schools also have golf programmes and these are a great way for junior golfers to develop their sport. My latest sessions were in conjunction with Girls in Golf (part of the Junior Golf Ireland programme) which totalled 21 teenagers aged from 13 to 15 of different abilities.The feedback I got was that they greatly enjoyed the programme. Some have joined as members and can now develop the skills they learned anytime they come to the club. For my part, I always get great satisfaction from witnessing and sharing enjoyment and from good results achieved in every class. Furthermore, the social interaction that the pupils experience with the other participating children does benefit their ability to integrate better.They learn that golf is a social game played by rules of conduct and proper etiquette.


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Golf courses

Castle Dargan Golf Course Ballygawley Tel: 071 911 8080 Fax: 071 911 8090

within

30 minutes:

Email: golf@castledargan.com www.castledargan.com

Ballymote Golf Club Ballymote Co Sligo Tel: 071 918 9059

Parkland

Bertie’s Pitch & Putt Lisnalurg Co Sligo Tel: 071 914 6383

Pitch & Putt

Castle Dargan Golf Club Ballygawley Co Sligo Tel: 071 911 8080

Parkland

County Sligo Golf Club Rosses Point Co Sligo Tel: 071 917 7186 Links

Strandhill Golf Club Strandhill Co Sligo Tel: 071 916 8188

Links

Tubbercurry Golf Club

The Golf Resort at Castle Dargan is more then just a memorable golf Course, it is the North West’s finest Golfing Resort experience, a golfers paradise – an accomplished and stunning course designed by Ryder Cup Hero Darren Clarke and the centre piece to this fabulous resort.

Tubbercurry Co Sligo Tel: 071 918 5849

Parkland

Tubbertelly Pitch & Putt Tubbertelly Tubbercurry Co Sligo Tel: 071 918 5916

Ideal for a golfing break, society outing, corporate event or simply to improve your game. Lessons are provided on site by the PGA qualified resident Professional. Castle Dargan’s Golf Team offers a refreshing approach to service.

Pitch & Putt

60 minutes: Ballaghadereen Golf Club Ballaghadereen Co Roscommon Tel: 094 986 0295

Castle Dargan Golf Club Facts Length of course No of holes Additional holes Par Type of course Visitors daily Club shop Hire service Tuition Dressing Rooms Club Bar/Restaurant Basic Green Fee

Parkland

Ballina Golf Club Ballina Mayo Tel: 096 21050

Parkland

Ballyhaunis Golf Club Ballyhaunis Co Mayo Tel: 094 963 0014

Parkland

Blacklion Golf Club

6,200m 18 Golf Academy 71 Parkland Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes €70 Mon-Thurs €80 Weekends

Blacklion Co Cavan Tel: 071 985 3024

Parkland

Boyle Golf Club Boyle Co Roscommon Tel: 071 966 2594 Parkland

Bundoran Golf Club Bundoran Co Sligo Tel: 071 984 1382

Links

Carrick on Shannon Golf Club Carrick on Shannon Co Leitrim Tel: 071 966 7015 40

Parkland

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Outdoors & Activities

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Photo: © Castle Dargan

90 minutes driving distance of Sligo

Strandhill Golf Club

60 minutes continued:

Strandhill Tel: 071 916 8188 | Fax: 071 916 8811

Claremorris Golf Club Claremorris Co Mayo Tel: 094 937 1527

strandhillgc@eircom.net | www.strandhillgc.com

Parkland

The picturesque village of Strandhill is just 5k from Sligo Town. It is home to one of the best kept secrets in golf – Strandhill Golf Club – described as ‘the jewel of the West’ by Christy O’Connor. The challenging links nestles at the foot of Knocknarea Mountain, with Ballysadare Bay to the south and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. It is a very fine example of a links course.

Enniscrone Golf Club Enniscrone Co Sligo Tel: 096 36297

Links

Enniscrone Pitch & Putt Enniscrone Co Sligo Tel: 096 36788

Pitch & Putt

Swinford Golf Club Swinford Co Mayo Tel: 094 925 1378

Parkland

90 minutes:

Par for the course is 70 but with some long par 4’s you can be assured your game will be tested. As you start into our back nine and feel you are coming to terms with things, you then move on to Amen Corner (13,14,15) three of the most interesting holes you will enjoy in golf. Be ready for a truly great finish, two par 4’s and a 185m par 3.

Ballinamore Golf Club Ballinamore Co Leitrim Tel: 071 964 4346

Parkland

Castlebar Golf Club Castlebar Co Mayo Tel: 094 902 1649

Parkland

After your game, enjoy the Clubhouse bar and restaurant, where our motto is Friendship in Sport. On Mondays we offer a round of golf and lunch for just €30. Contact the Club for details. We welcome golf societies (group rate €30 weekday, €40 weekend)

Castle Hume Golf Club Enniskillen Co Fermanagh Tel: 048 6632 7077

Parkland

Castlerea Golf Club Castlerea Co Roscommon Tel: 094 962 0068

Parkland

Donegal Golf Club Co Donegal Tel: 074 973 4054

Strandhill Golf Club Facts

Links

Enniskillen Golf Club Enniskillen Co Fermanagh Tel: 048 6632 5250

Parkland

Length of course No of holes Additional holes Par Type of course Visitors by arrangement Club Shop Hire service Tuition Dressing rooms Club Bar/Restaurant Basic Green fee

Lough Erne Golf Resort Enniskillen Co Fermanagh Tel: 048 6632 3230

Parkland

Roscommon Golf Course Co Roscommon Tel: 090 662 6382

Parkland

Strokestown Golf Course Strokestown Co Roscommon Tel: 071 963 3660

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5,675m 18 70 links Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes €40 weekdays €50 weekends


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Angling - Get hooked in Sligo With breathtaking scenery, unspoilt countryside, a vast selection of rivers and lakes, not to mention the ocean, Sligo is simply an angler’s paradise. There are fantastic facilities for coarse fishing in the numerous lakes aorund Ballymote and in Lough Gill, as well as game fishing in the various other loughs and rivers around the county, including Lough Bo and Glencar Lough. Add to this deep sea angling from Mullaghmore or Enniscrone, and Sligo’s attractions for the angling enthusiast, whether beginner or experienced, are boundless. Outdoors & Activities

In fact, the serene setting of the lakes in their beautiful surroundings, and the amenities available in Sligo, may even encourage those who have never considered taking up angling before to have a go. It won’t take long for anyone to understand why – despite many other competitors for the title – fishing remains the most popular sport in the world! All you will have to decide is whether you prefer game, coarse or sea fishing. All three can be pursued within the county. The Ballysadare Fishery is known far and wide for its salmon and Lough Arrow is famous for its brown trout. There are remote lakes in the Ox Mountains, and Glenade Lough and Lough Gill hold abundant pike, perch and bream. With over a hundred miles of coast, there is no shortage of sea fishing.

The County Sligo and District Game Angling Guide is free from the NWRFB or from local tourist outlets. The North Western Regional Fisheries Board Ardnaree House Abbey Street Ballina Co Mayo Tel: 096 22788 Fax: 096 70543 Email: info@nwrfb.com www.northwestfisheries.ie

On the Ballysadare Fishery, angling was traditionally concentrated downstream of the falls, though many salmon are now caught on the upstream stretch. Anglers should note that a quota system applies on this fishery and that booking is essential. On scenic Glencar Lough and the outflowing Drumcliffe River the salmon fishing season starts on 1 February, but fishing is most productive from April on, while the best months for sea trout are JulySeptember. The beautiful Easkey River gets a good run of both salmon and sea trout, especially from June-September. County Sligo is partly bounded by the magnificent River Moy, Ireland’s most prolific salmon river, and Lough Arrow, on the Roscommon border has traditionally been rated amongst the top brown trout fisheries in the country. Brown trout are also found in Lough Gill, Lough Talt which nestles in the Ox Mountains, Lough Bo and Lough Doon which is just over the border into Co Leitrim. Most salmon and sea trout fisheries are privately owned and permission of the fishery owner is required in addition to a State Licence. Further information can be obtained from local tackle shops or from The North Western Regional Fisheries Board. The main centre for coarse fishing is Ballymote, from where anglers can make their own way to the Owenmore River, Templehouse Lake and several other lakes which hold stocks of pike, perch, bream and rudd. Lough Gill has an excellent stock of bream, while Belhavel, Corrigeencor and Glenade Loughs also hold stocks of pike, perch and bream. For the sea angler, the Sligo coastline offers a wide variety of fishing, extending over a vast area from Mullaghmore in the north of the county to Killala Bay with beautiful Enniscrone beach and the Moy estuary in the far south west. The Moy estuary is noted for its excellent sea trout fishing and surf fishing is quite popular of many of the region’s superb beaches. Deep sea fishing is available at a number of locations, the principal centres being Mullaghmore, Rosses Point and Enniscrone. A detailed Sea Angling Guide including maps showing the best shore angling locations, and contact details of all licensed charter boat operators is available from the The North Western Regional Fisheries Board.

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Photo: ŠGranville Nesbitt


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Deep Sea Fishing

Francis Maye

Sligo Bay is a wonderful place to fish, the journey to the fishing grounds itself is worth the trip. Passing Ballincar, Rosses Point, Oyster Island, the Metal Man and Coney Island is something you will remember for a long time.

Catch and release is now widely practised not only with the sharks but with most species that don’t go straight to the table. But don’t worry though - there is time to get a photo or two. Most skippers even release mackerel and pollack when enough have been caught for the day’s and evening’s use.

Fishing often starts around Coney where some good mackerel can be found, these can be added to the ruby dubby if blue Shark is the target for the day. Otherwise, cut into strips to bait hooks for the other species that wait to be caught farther out. It’s a poor couple of hours if you don’t hook 3 or 4 different species; it’s a good few hours if you get 8 or more. Shark fishing is often a case of ‘hurry up and wait!’ - everyone is in a hurry to get a slick going and to get the baited hooks into the water then it’s a case of hoping that a shark picks up the trail. However, some days the bay appears to be full of life. You can’t get the smaller hooks to the bottom as the mackerel just want to get caught.The dolphins want to play and come round for a nosey, then if you are lucky, you’ll hear a blow, and see the majestic arch of a minke whale breaking the surface. Sometimes you only see them in the distance, but there are times when they come in close to the boat, so close you can nearly touch them. On days like that I feel ‘if only I spoke their language, we could have a chat’, that’s how close they are. Then everyone forgets about the fishing for a few minutes and gathers to watch these magnificent creatures. In these waters they should have a distinctive white mark across the flipper and occasionally you will see the smaller whales leap right out of the water and go back in nose first, like a dolphin. They are the only whales that do this. But whether they dive or not, it is incredible to be so close to a whale, and even after all these years, it is still a tremendously exciting moment.

Go Deep Sea Fishing or Visit Coney Island on M V Spirit Now leaving from Hughes Bridge, Sligo Town, morning & evening Daily tours of Sligo Bay, including Coney Island, Strandhill, Culleenamore. (Innishmurray Island by special arrangement.) Sligo Bay has a wide variety of wildlife: seabirds, seals, dolphins, porpoises, basking sharks and sometimes whales.

Sea Angling • Charter / Hire • Safety Boat • Whale / Dolphin Watch • Birthday Treats • Corporate Events • Film / TV • Team Building • Offshore Surfing

All weather

All year

Mob: 086 067 5833 skipper@spiritadventure.net www.spiritadventure.net MV Spirit carries a full list of safety equipment on board, as you would expect with an ex-lifeboat.

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Outdoors & Activities

But this is only the starters, the ‘interval entertainment’. The real fun starts when you see a fin break the surface, especially if it’s in the area of your line. Holding your breath as you feel the first tug, trying not to be too hasty or too slow, knowing you’ll only get one chance… Then snap back and you have him.When I say you have him I mean you have him hooked, it may be an hour or more before you have him tired enough to bring alongside.


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071 916 8483 | 087 287 0817

• • • •

Daily surf lessons for adults and kids Kid’s Summer Camps Lessons for large or small groups ISA approved instructors

www.strandhillsurfschool.com | strandhillsurfschool@eircom.net

Strandhill Summer Surf Camps Strandhill Surf School (see ad) Weekly Camps from 9 June Mon-Fri 9am-noon €100

Perfect Day Surf School Weekly Camps July-Aug Mon-Fri 2-5pm Also group lessons daily Adults €30 U18 €20 Contact Elisha Tel: 087 202 9399 or 087 289 7462 Surf & Turf Camps Surf (Sea Camp) Mon-Fri 9.30am-12.30pm €90 per week Turf (Land & Sea) Mon-Fri 10-4.30pm €180 per week. Tel: 071 984 1091 or 087 987 4455 www.turfnsurf.ie/kidscamps

A National and International Sport Surfing becomes more popular every year, and many surfers take their sport a step further by entering competitions at different levels. Local competitions are held all over the country and this year’s County Sligo Open Championship will be at Strandhill over the August Bank Holiday weekend, 1-2 August. This is a great chance to find out whether you are good enough to take your sport on to the next level. If you are less eager to compete, you can still see some great surfing, so head down to Strandhill anyway and watch all age groups take part.

SURF, SKATE & SAIL Clothes & Equipment Rockwood Parade Sligo Tel: 071 9146950 Photo: ©Zoe Lally 46


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Surfing - Give it a go!

7

th

If you have never tried surfing before, you are in for a really fantastic experience. But beware! Life may never be the same again – you will probably get well and truly hooked into this terrific sport and find that you want to spend all your spare time in the water!

Learn to Surf with

Wave Surf School Enniscrone Beach

• Adults & Kids Surf Lessons (daily) • Kids Summer Surf Camp (July-Aug) • Hen & Stag Parties • Women's Surf Weekends • Level 2 Coaching using your own equipment. Tel: 087 971 6389 / 085 738 5399 Email: 7thwavesurf@eircom.net www.seventhwavesurfschool.com

Signing up for a few surfing lessons is really the best way to be introduced to the sport. A qualified surf instructor will have all the equipment that you need, including wet suits (all sizes), foamies (the special boards that you learn on), leads etc. Also, you can relax and know that you are in safe hands. A few warm up exercises on the beach and a full talk through gets you ready to start, then the instructor will take you into the shallows and show you how to handle the board. Each person naturally leads with either their right or their left foot – either way is fine, and you will soon find out whether you are a ‘goofie’ or a ‘natural’!

Enniscrone Summer Surf Camps North West Surf School (see ad) Weekly camps from 8 June – 28 August 11am – 1pm €100 8 years +

7th Wave Surf School (see ad) Weekly camps July & Aug 10am-12.30pm 8-16 years €125 Discount 2 kids or more Surf with Ione Byrne, National Junior Surf Champion

And that is just the start! Wait until you feel the exhilharation of standing up for the first time, riding your first wave! This exciting sport is enjoyed by all ages, from small kids to grannies. Maybe it’s time to give it a go! Come on down to Enniscrone and start a love affair with the waves.

At North West Surf School we offer a variety of surf programmes for all ages and skill levels. We offer surfing lessons to individuals or groups, to adults and to kids. We also run youth surf camps.

Find out more If you discover that surfing really is your thing, you never know, you could win a place on the Irish Surf Team which already includes several Sligo members and managers.There are certainly plenty of ideal beaches and breaks in the county to practise.

Enniscrone beach, where we are based, provides ideal conditions for novice or intermediate surfers as it is 5km long, and very safe.

If you are new to surfing, check out the ISA website for local clubs, events and other information, including ISA approved instructors, safety guidelines and all-important tips on surfing etiquette. www.isasurf.ie

North West Surf School Enniscrone Shane Lavelle

All our instructors are certified by the Irish Surfing Association and also have Beach Lifeguard qualifications. Surfing is one of today’s most popular sports, and once you have tried it, you will understand why! Book in with North West Surf School and we’ll help you experience ‘the ride of your life’! Shane Lavelle

North West Surf School Main Street Enniscrone Tel: 087 959 5556 northwestsurf@gmail.com www.northwestsurfschool.com IRISH SURFING ASSOCIATION

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Outdoors & Activities

One of the best places in Sligo to experience the pleasures of surfing, especially if you are a beginner, is Enniscrone. This fabulous beach at the south-western end of the county is 5km long, and truly one of Sligo’s special places. From a surfing point of view it is ideal, because it is flat and very safe.


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Turf & Surf at the Sligo Clarion Sligo is being fêted as Ireland’s new outdoor recreation hub, and quite frankly it’s not surprising when you stop to take a look at the sports and other outdoor activities on offer within the county. Take surfing. Along with world class waves in Easkey, Enniscrone and Strandhill, there are lots of other beaches and reef breaks for the experienced surfer to find and enjoy, and many ISA qualified instructors and Surf Schools to introduce newcomers to the sport. There are championship links golf courses at Rosses Point, Enniscrone and Strandhill as well as fabulous parkland courses elsewhere in the county, most notably at Castle Dargan. Sailing clubs at Mullaghmore and Rosses Point provide a great calender of events, and you can go horse riding in any number of places – either beach riding or trekking with Island View Stables, or cross country hacking or trekking with a wide choice of stables. Sligo is a paradise for hill walkers, and there are many clubs within the county offering organised walks on a regular basis. If angling is your sport, then look no further! Sligo is full of lakes and rivers, quite apart from the 110 miles of coastline, and there is every kind of angling available throughout the season. Or perhaps you enjoy diving, or cycling, motor sport, swimming, rowing – the list just goes on.

At Sligo’s Clarion Hotel, you don’t need to leave the kids behind in order to have a bit of time together. In fact, they can have their own little break too – on us.We offer Summer Turf n Surf Breaks specifically with the kids in mind. From now until the end of October you can book two nights for all the family that will include our Turf n Surf special. You will have a wonderfully spacious hotel suite with a buffet breakfast each morning, unlimited access to The Clarion’s SanoVitae Leisure Club, and while you are relaxing, unwinding and deciding how to spend your day together, the children will be having the time of their lives – our treat. Because when you book a two-night break, your under 17’s stay free of charge and enjoy an action-packed, fun-filled day at our Turf n Surf Summer Activity Camp! This includes a free packed lunch and transport to and from the Camp. The Camps are open to kids aged 7+, and are run from Lissadell House and Strandhill. The bus leaves at 9.15am and returns to the hotel at 5pm, leaving you with all day to relax and do whatever you want. We do recommend that the children wear suitable outdoor clothes, and bring a spare set and a towel. The activities they will enjoy include surfing, the Crystal Maze, orienteering, kayaking, a History Mystery, Bush Craft, caving and lots more… After all, if you’re going to check out some of Sligo’s fantastic indoor and outdoor activities, it seems only fair that they should too!

For more information Tel: 071 911 9000 or log onto www.clarionhotelsligo.com The Clarion Hotel Clarion Road Ballinode Sligo

And it’s not just that Sligo’s scenery forms such a spectacular backdrop to all these activities which makes them something out of the ordinary, the county also has fantastic facilities, a high level of coaching and instructors and lots of experience as providers of these and many related services. The county really is in a bracket of its own. Add to this the fact that Sligo Town is a vibrant, cultural city with lots going on – shops galore, cafés and restaurants of every description, plenty of bars and night clubs to chill in, theatres, cinemas, galleries – and you won’t have a spare moment. And if it’s deep relaxation you’re after, there are the famous seaweed baths at Strandhill, there’s yoga, massage and detox.Then there are scenic drives to take in the hills, lakes, rivers and miles of Atlantic coastline; there are megalithic sites, modern literary figures, ancient tales, folklore and traditions to explore. In fact, you may already be wondering how soon you can head to Sligo for a break, just the two of you (if you can persuade Grandma to have the kids). But that’s where we come in.

Turf n Surf Summer Camp Breaks From €200 pps Midweek From €220 pps Weekend

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Outdoors & Activities

Sligo Yacht Club

Mullaghmore Sailing Club

Rosses Point Tel: 071 917 7168 www.sligoyachtclub.org

Mullaghmore Barry Kilmartin Tel: 087 980 3215 kilmartinbarry@hotmail.com

19 July Family Day 1-7 August Mermaid National Championships 14-16 August Cruiser: Sligo Park Ladies Cup 16 August Family Day 29-31 August GP-14 National Championships

4 July 11 July 18 July 24-26 July 2 August 7-9 August 16 August 22 August

Fancy Dress Race Fish Night Ladies’ Helm Race MSC Regatta Killybegs Regatta Ladies’ Cup Rosses Point (SYC) Junior Regatta Race Photo: ©Brian Farrell

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Young Sligo Activities in Sligo

JFK Parade Sligo Town Tel: 071 914 7528 Email: fun@rulabula.ie www.rulabula.ie Opening Times: Monday – Friday

11am – 6pm*

*Open late Thursday & Friday, by reservation only.

Sundays

Build a Bear Build a Bear is exactly as the name suggests, you can create your own special teddy bear, give him or her a name and they'll be your special friend for life! You can choose from a range of animals, from cats to giraffes. Hand stuff your teddy with fluffy stuffing, make a wish on a star, place it in your teddy's tummy, close him or her up and we will issue a birth certificate to commerate the day. If you like we can also record a special message on your teddy's voice box that will play when you squeeze him/her.

1pm – 5pm

Rulabula launched its pottery painting studio in November 2007. Since that time Rulabula has expanded its range of services to include Décopatch, Glass Fusing and Slumping, Tie-dye and Build-a-Bear, not to mention the most calorieladen hot chocolate for miles around! Décopatch Décopatch is Rulabula’s version of découpage - a creative, crazy and fun way to decorate any kind of surface (flat or uneven) with all types of patterns, styles and designs - the choice is yours. You can stick onto virtually any surface, including metal, plastic and wood. With our selection of paper you can even create paper patch animals and if you use some of our Aquapro varnish, you can completely seal your creation with a waterproof seal and it will last a lifetime. And remember, your creations are only limited by your imagination. Glass Fusing & Slumping Glass Fusing is a new and exciting idea. Come on in to Rulabula and we'll show you how to create your own ‘Glass Art’. It’s very easy and great fun! You can create your own jewellery or bigger custom pieces. Choose from a variety of background colours and then decorate with an array of colours, shapes, sizes and textures of glass – the choice is yours. Then score, snap away and leave your creation in the studio to be fused. All prices include materials and firing. If you'd like to slump (turn your piece into a bowl or other shape) there is an additional 15 euro charge for the second firing. You'll love the fun of creating glass art and the look of your fused glass piece! This activity is for ages 10 and up.

Since opening, Rulabula’s environmental policy hasn’t changed, and remains as stringent as ever. Stephanie is committed to making the small changes that will help make her business environmentally and socially responsible. From supplying fairtrade clothing for staff uniform to printing all promotional materials using vegetable based inks on recycled paper, Rulabula ensures that all its products and services are ethical, eco, organic and, as an added bonus, really quite lovely! Stephanie also believes in offering employment for people whose needs have not been met by mainstream education. The creative and relaxed atmosphere in Rulabula is an ideal environment for those who might not previously have had the opportunity of responsibility to work in a business, developing their social and job skills. If you are visiting Sligo, and don't know what to get Granny as a souvenir, or if it’s too wet to be outside, pop down to Rulabula. We are open 7days a week from 11am to 6pm Monday to Sat and 1pm to 5pm on Sundays. You don't need to book, but it’s better to call ahead during our busy times - school holidays and Saturdays. Summer Camps 2009 After the highly successful Summer Camps of 2008, Rulabula is delighted to offer a wide range of camps for Summer 2009. Local artist Wayne O'Connor will be back to help get your creative juices flowing for a week-long camp of cartoon workshops. Chris Millar, who is just back from living and working in Argentina, will be holding fun Spanish & Art workshops during the summer - not to be missed! PS: both Wayne & Chris are pretty nifty guitarists, so get ready to sing! What are you waiting for? Book your place today!


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Happy Days Adventure Play Centre Cleveragh Business Park Sligo Tel: 071 913 5115 Mob: 086 609 8448 Supervised Play Dance Mats Children’s Parties

Young Sligo

Photo: ©Ulrike Schwier

Lough Key has for many centuries drawn people from near and far to its spectacular views, abundant wildlife, historic buildings and islands. This legendary backdrop of water, parkland and forest now encompasses a landmark cluster of unique attractions offering gentle leisurely pursuits or energetic activities. Whatever you choose it’s the perfect place to do as much or as little as you like!! The Lough Key Experience takes you on an engaging audio journey of nature and history through the 19th century underground servant tunnels, up the Moylurg Viewing Tower and along Ireland’s first Tree Canopy Trail.

• Boda Borg • Gift Shop • Tree Canopy Walk • Old Servant Tunnels

• Adventure Play Kingdom • Restaurant • Forest & Parkland Trails • Caravan & Camping Park

The innovative and weather independent Boda Borg is a unique and challenging Swedish concept for adults and children alike containing numerous challenges with fun-filled activities and imaginative puzzles but no instructions. Once you enter the twostorey Boda Borg only teamwork, ingenuity, trial and error will allow you to progress through the quests. Our outdoor Adventure Play Kingdom provides stimulating and entertaining activities and equipment for children of all ages and abilities in a colourful and safe environment. For opening times, admissions and further information please visit:

www.loughkey.ie or Tel 071 9673122 Boyle Co.Roscommon 51

Email: info@loughkey.ie


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Sligo Shopping – Difficult Times? Discover Sligo talked to Ann Clinton, former President of Sligo Chamber of Commerce, about how Sligo is being affected by the global recession.

but shoppers today also want high-street names, and Quayside and Johnston Court house many big multi-national brands. It adds to Sligo’s pulling power to be able to offer more, not less. The new shopping malls are well placed too, as adjacent and interconnecting streets are jam-packed with a wide selection of shops offering a choice of everything and anything. The out of town retail parks further increase the diversity of Sligo’s choice. Cleveragh Retail Park on the Riverside to the east of the city and the Warehousing Park at Carraroe contain a generous mix of easily recognised multi-national outlets and big-name brands catering for all needs and tastes in today’s world.

Ann, what is your view of Sligo as a shopping centre? Sligo city is a thriving administrative, commercial and educational centre which has seen unprecedented growth over the past ten years and fared well. It has retained its title of ‘Shopping Capital of the North-West’ despite the upsurge in retail development in many neighbouring towns and cities.

Sadly, many shops, both in town and out, are being hard hit by the current global Recession. Many have already closed. How do you think this will affect Sligo in the long term?

How do you think this change has impacted on Sligo’s development? Fortunately, most of the new retail development has taken place within the city centre itself or on the periphery. Sligo Borough Council Planners have consistently adhered to ‘best practice’ planning guidelines over the past decade and have therefore continued to ensure the viable and sustainable future of the city and its core retail centre.

I do think that the retail sector, both multi-national stores and the home grown local shops here in Sligo are responding to the global down turn in business. Everyone is seeing a reduction in prices on a day to day basis and it is evident that ‘Sales’ are no longer just an end of season event as before. Sligo’s cohesive shopping base within its core centre is once again an advantage, as the big-name multinationals are mixed in with indigenous stores, which is rare nowadays. Many towns neglected their central shopping bases when the ubiquitous out of town shopping mall phenomena took hold 20 years ago, and as a result have suffered from the doughnut effect – lots of activity on the outskirts of town and nothing in the middle. They are now trying to regenerate their centres and attract business back in.

Do you think the outlying retail parks at Carraroe and Cleveragh have damaged trade in Sligo itself by causing the ‘doughnut’ effect, as it’s called, where out of town development causes inner city social and commercial life to die? This has happened all over Ireland, and in England too, but I don’t think it’s been allowed to take hold in Sligo. I think we have retained our city centre’s cohesive character, with its easy access, interconnecting streets and side lanes - ideal for wandering and meandering. Also, Rockwood Parade has re-focused the city onto the beautiful Garavogue River, mixing cafes and bistros with shopping to make it a delightful walkway for visitors or locals.

No one person can stop the Recession, but how can the people of Sligo make a difference to the welfare of their own city? The ‘Shop Local’ campaign has, I think, made people more aware of the need to support local shops and businesses.These businesses give employment locally.We have to help ourselves out of this recession. By supporting our local shops and stores we are helping to keep people in employment.The more people we keep in work the better off we all are. It’s fine availing of the cheaper goods out of state, but as citizens of this state we are the ones who will pay higher taxes and lose important services if unemployment keeps rising. Short term gain will eventually end with long term pain in our pockets. Also it is up to us to maintain Sligo’s character and diversity which is greatly increased by having a large number of small, local shops. If these stores are forced to close through lack of business, many of them will never return and we will have lost a great deal of choice and individuality. At the end of the day it’s not just the planners and developers and big names who determine what the city has to offer – you and I, as shoppers and users play an instrumental role.

Many people feel that Rockwood Parade would be an ideal location for the Saturday Farmer’s Market – a beautiful as well as central, pedestrian location where there is far more footfall than in its current situation. Would you agree? I haven’t really given much thought to this. I believe there are certain bye-laws pertaining to ‘occasional trading’. For instance, the Market Yard is a designated area and has worked well as a market place for quite a long time now. If there is a move to have a Saturday Farmer’s Market on Rockwood Parade, it would be imperative that much needed and – I might add – long promised additional parking facilities were put in place in that area. This would ensure such a move didn’t add further to Sligo’s traffic flow problems. Do you think that the new in-town shopping malls have struck at the heart of Sligo’s individuality on the retail front? Are small shops losing out as a result of them?

What do you think of inner city pedestrianisation? It’s common all over Europe, but is it the kind of city enhancement that Sligo needs, and does it work for everyone – shoppers, townsfolk and drivers?

Absolutely not! ‘One for all and all for one’ is what makes for vibrant and sustainable trade in any town. Of course we want to hold on to all the individual shops that give Sligo so much character, 52


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In view of all that we’ve discussed - the current economic climate and towns in Northern Ireland exerting such a draw - do you think Sligo will be able to hold on to its ‘Shopping Capital of the North-West’ tag?

I presume you mean the pedestrianisation of O’Connell Street. Certainly, it is a bonus for shoppers and I think most locals and visitors alike have enjoyed the feeling of being in a designated shopping arena. Both the local authority and the traders in O’Connell Street have done great work in creating an ‘al fresco’ environment in the street since its closure. I live on the outskirts of Sligo and drive through the centre many times every week. Unfortunately, at peak times the town centre does become very clogged with traffic, but in a place the size of Sligo that’s only to be expected during rush hours. There is certainly a perception out there that ‘snarl up’ has been exaccerbated by the pedestrianisation of O’Connell Street. Personally, I don’t think it will make any difference to the congestion levels if traffic continues to flow out onto the Inner Relief road via John Street, or whether it gains access down O’Connell Street to exit the city. Because of its geographic location, all traffic must touch either the edges or the centre of Sligo, and the River Garavogue running east-west through the town centre means that all through-traffic has to cross one of its bridges, and this inevitably slows the flow. The supply of adequate and easily accessible parking facilities in the city centre and the provision of the Eastern Bridge are core requirements if we are to ease the traffic flow problems of this Gateway City once and for all. Without these two vital infrastructural necessities, we can mess around with any or all aspects of traffic flow in Sligo and still gain only minimal relief unless the core problem is resolved.

continued on page 59.

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Shopping

Certainly we will. There have always been swings one way and then the other with regard to cross-border shopping. Obviously, the down turn in the value of sterling versus the euro has a huge impact on exchange rates for people going north to do their shopping. With the recession hitting people’s pockets so hard, everyone wants to get better value for their money.You can’t blame anyone for that. But as I said earlier, I think that shops and businesses here in Sligo are respondng to the best of their ability with lower prices and more ‘Sales’ than ever before in order to hold onto their local consumer base. I do think that this is having an affect and to re-iterate my other point – it is up to Sligo’s inhabitants as well.This is our city.We live and work, shop and play here. Do we want Sligo to wind down around us, or to grow and thrive? It is up to us to keep it vibrant and healthy by using it. Then Sligo will definitely retain its title ‘Shopping Capital of the North-West’ - not just because it is competitively priced but also because of the choice and diversity on offer, the café and bistro culture within the City centre itself, and not least because of the friendly, helpful and welcoming reception Sligo people have always given to both locals and visitors.


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businesses, especially with current economic challenges, might feel deterred from such an initiative due to the fees that have to be paid to the local authority, when such low cost facilities would greatly boost life in the town centre all day and evening!

O’Connell Street

A covered band-stand near the junction with Tobergal Lane would be a treat. Let’s encourage buskers to play all day – they make everyone feel better. Let’s also use it as an open-air performance space, allowing room for emergency vehicles to pass, of course. Some pavements need repairing.We don’t need to cobble the entire street – if we wait ‘til we can afford that, the heart might have stopped beating in our retail trade! The sections that need to be relaid can be concrete and set into the concrete could be bronze plaques celebrating notable and famous Sligonians – say, those of Westlife fame, WB of course, even Ray McSharry, what about Spike? Maybe our fellow Sligonian, Michael Fingleton, might sponsor a plaque or two, when he retires! About 10 covered stalls could run off-centre down the street (leaving emergency vehicle access). Ideal for a market, and yes, traders can pay a modest rent. Why not have a series of markets through the week? The farmer’s market one day; a craft market another; the French Market some other day; a book fair, what about a charity fair day? Why not five or six days a week, attracting people and activity into the town centre.

Streetwise Keith McNair I used to be indecisive, but now I’m not so sure. To be honest, it’s lack of funds that holds me up with decisions. I guess it’s the same with the proposed pedestrianisation of Sligo’s O’Connell Street. Did I read recently that it might cost €4.5 million? Even if some QS can stand over such an estimate, we all know the chances of securing even €1 million to move O’Connell Street’s development beyond the current impasse are remote. Surely our town centre deserves better?

Discover Sligo would be delighted to provide a town centre information kiosk – and help get tourism and recreation information into the hands of locals and visitors. This would be a great addition to our new info-shop on Markievicz Road, located opposite the tour coach parking. Finally, let’s erect something at either end of O’Connell Street to create the impression of entering a special area, with floral decorations and attractive information boards that tell the street’s history and publicise up coming events.

There’s plenty of debate. Should traffic be allowed back up the street? In both lanes, or just one? Perhaps only in the evenings? Shouldn’t it be kept as a pedestrian area? One senses a growing frustration among traders and residents as this indecision drags on, hindering Sligo’s main shopping area from realizing its potential in the process.

The above 6 suggestions won’t cost anywhere near € 4.5 million, but they’d do wonders for O’Connell Street. A little over €100k would pay for the lot. In fact, each one could be sponsored and not cost the local authority a cent!

Sligo’s layout is quite different to many traditional Irish towns, in that it doesn’t have a market square or a diamond at its centre. In fact it’s hard to say exactly where the town’s centre is. On the other hand Sligo has inter-connecting streets, fine buildings (old and new), river front walkways and distinct shopping zones, which all add up to create huge potential, especially when compared to other towns and cities. Sligo has its ‘Templebar’, its ‘Grafton Street’, its ‘Quays’, and its ‘Christchurch’ within a few minutes walk of each other, and it’s good to see some formerly busy locations being redeveloped, redecorated and re-opened – ensuring variety and diversity which can only bode well for the future.

But now I awaken from my dream! Let’s not be hasty, let’s not do anything that instantly gives a stronger heart to the town and makes it a delightful place to spend time (and money). Let’s decide not to decide! Let’s wring our hands that we don’t have €4.5 million to spend. On what?

However, O’Connell Street remains stuck fast in indecision. Here are a few dreamy suggestions that could transform its present rather confused identity. They could be in place within a month, if a decision was made, and none of them would break the bank – if one could get a bank to lend the money in the first place! Wonderful to see restaurants, café’s and pubs providing continental style outdoor seating areas. If they were allowed to erect simple covered gazebos then we could enjoy sitting out to wine, dine and listen to music even on dull or damp days. It’s a pity that some 54


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Shopping

MULLANEY BRO.

S

O’Connell Street SligoTown Tel: 071 914 0718 Fax: 071 914 4388 Email: info@mullaneytravel.ie Fashions change, style changes, but quality remains constant. And in seeking to describe Mullaney Brothers, it would be hard to better that statement. The beautiful, listed traditional shopfront, with its Connemara marble, Burmese teak and mahogany, and Roman fan-set mosaics is a fitting metaphor for the business that has flourished behind the façade since the 19th century. A combination of local character and distinctiveness combined with international materials – a reflection of this local Sligo business trading as far afield as Los Angeles and Linz, Melbourne and Spitzbergen. Mullaneys do, of course, also sell to customers all over Ireland, who return again and again to enjoy the choice and diversity available; as does their local trade, who form a mainstay of the business. Mullaney Brothers derives its character from the fact that the shop is still owned and run by two generations of Mullaneys. John Snr and his nephew, also John, carry on a tradition established by Michael Mullaney in 1895 when he came to manage the woollen department for White Bros., acquiring the business with his brother Thomas when John White retired in 1909. With the tailoring departments they also acquired a shipping agency, representing Cunard,White Star, P&O and other lines. Now alongside the travel agency the shop stocks all kinds of fine clothes, household linens and woollen rugs, a wide range of curtain materials and luggage. It supplies uniforms to 14 different schools, exports the best of Irish design to customers in America, and offers first class tailoring - clients come from all over the world to be measured up for bespoke suits. So next time you want to travel, or give yourself a new look, come into Mullaneys and enjoy the whole experience. Maybe it’s a byproduct of the travel agency, the way they always make you feel first class, make you feel posh. Mind you, posh would have been a familiar term here, after all it originally meant Port Out, Starboard Home – the only way to travel by sea! Or maybe it’s just 150 years of knowledge, experience and care that have gone into creating that certain sort of something they have in Mullaneys. In today’s terms it’s a real ‘two for the price of one’ experience – travel agent with drapers, old-world charm with up-to-the-minute designs, historic pedigree with forward-thinking modernity. Not to mention two John Mullaneys! 55


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Photos: Š BFdesign 56


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Erin Quarter

organic shop and delicatessens with yummy bits and bobs from all over – comestibles you might despair of finding anywhere else in the county; a shop that sells alcoholic beverages that you also won’t find anywhere else; it has bookshops and artist’s materials; kitcheny shops; a shop where you can buy Persian rugs alongside pure, delicous soaps from France! It has music shops and clothes shops specialising in individual collections. It even has a little antique shop full of interesting treasures.

Market Street Castle Street

Use It or Lose It Lorely Forrester Whether I am shopping in London, Paris, a provincial market town like Galway or good old home grown Sligo, I always head for the small streets, the little laneways, the individual shops.Yes, of course there is appeal in the big names, there’s cachet attached to brandleader purchases, and – let’s face it – most of the high street names tempt us all through their doors more often that we’d like to admit. But there’s nothing so appealing as the one-off shop, the small, bijou store where everything in stock has been chosen for a valid reason by a real person, not by some distant buyer making unilateral decisions on our behalf, deciding what we’ll wear or use.The owner – often the person behind the till – has chosen stock because they like it, or they know the maker, or they visited a particular country and chose things to bring back. I’m not saying that items for sale aren’t mass produced – maybe some of them are – but at least it doesn’t feel that way! It feels personal, individual, like someone presenting a collection just for you to choose from, that you might not find anywhere else.

None of us want Sligo to lose a vital part of its unique character and personality, so let’s celebrate it instead! Next time you are in town, pass through the Erin Quarter. Give yourself a treat and pause to enjoy it. Stop, browse and shop! You will be surprised and delighted and even better, by using it, you’ll be helping to ensure we don’t lose it.

The Erin Quarter is just such a place in Sligo. It has art and craft shops with one-off ceramic pieces, paintings and jewellery; it has an

Kate’s Kitchen 3 Castle Street, Sligo Proprietor: Philippe Huel

A WAVE A DAY

KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY

Tel: 071 914 3022 Fax: 071 914 3022 kateskitchensligo@gmail.com www.kateskitchen.ie Speciality fine food and wine shop with adjoining toiletry department Gifts and hampers available for any occasion 57

Chez Philippe

CREPERIE BRETONNE

Sweet & Savoury Crepes Tea/Coffee Minerals Etc

Court Yard opposite Sligo Court House Teeling St Sligo Tel: 087 419 7216

Shopping

It’s not very big, the Erin Quarter, but it’s a great place, with its French Creperie, its unusual pubs and – thanks to the Model Satellite’s temporary descent into the town – not one but two picture galleries.There used to be another picture gallery at the end of the street, one that ran exhibitions by a group of local artists, but sadly it disappeared some years ago.And therein lies a core truth.The parts of a town, any town, that hold all the little, interesting, individual shops are vulnerable in ways that the big stores aren’t. It can be hard, especially in an economic downturn, for small businesses, like shops or galleries, to stay afloat - even in the best of times many operate hand to mouth. It’s great that Sligo has the Erin Quarter, so let’s do our bit to keep it alive through the bad times. The people of Ireland are saving more money today than during the Government-incentivised SSIA savings period. Understandable, given the economic climate, but counter-productive if it slows spending too much. If we get too cautious, the recession will drag on and have greater impact. Unlikely as it seems, we collectively need to spend our way out of this recession. Now is the time to make sure we support businesses, keep the economy turning. Small shops aren’t necessarily more expensive, but they are likely to be hardest hit in any downturn and if they close, they may never return.

Grattan Street


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Quayside

Hopefully, Sligo’s planners will continue their current policies, ensuring that this beautiful City never falls prey to the out of control retail sprawl witnessed elsewhere. Sligo has a thriving business and residential community at its centre. With a carefully planned development strategy we will continue to attract inward investment, retain and grow jobs and see this Gateway City reach its true potential as the ‘Shopping and Tourist Capital of the North-West’.

21 Quay Street Mall, Quayside Shopping Centre, Sligo. (through NEXT)

Tel: 071 915 3353 Open 7 days Also at Letterkenny Forte Shopping Centre, Neil T. Blaney Rd, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal. (opposite New Dunnes) Email: alluredesigneraccessories@gmail.com www.alluredesigneraccessories.com

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Photos: © BFdesign

Shopping

Alluring, Not just by Name!

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The inner relief road and several car parks have made access to this area of town even easier, just as the bus and train station have been doing for years.

Wine Street & Hyde Bridge

All in all, this should indeed be a bustling hub. It has the provenance, it has the experience and it has always attracted both traders and public. It is an area of town with limitless potential. However, over more recent years something, somewhere hasn’t quite clicked into place. A master plan was conceived, to bring in a major developer who would realise this potential, rejuvenate the area and give it a strong central core. Unfortunately the drive to achieve this seems to have been diluted so much by controversy and indecision over the last few years, that anyone would be hard pressed now to say what might or might not be in the offing, and one fear’s that the people of Sligo are on the verge of giving up waiting for a ‘new look’ for this area. Of course it is always difficult to manage change - with inevitable stand-offs between residents, businesses, developers and local politics. No one could claim to know a fast track through the decisions and agreements that have to be reached. But we seem to be no further on than we were seven years ago, and Wine Street is paying the price for the fact that everything seems to have gone on ‘hold’. After such a length of time, it is impossible to prevent a street from reflecting the fact that it is an area ‘in waiting’. It smacks of times we have all been happy to leave behind, and now with the added burden of the recession upon us with all its gloom and doom, we need to be all the more actively pushing ahead to a better future by giving Wine Street the new life it deserves.

Waiting for Godot. Waiting For Who? Patrick Stewart Wine Street has been a bustling hub of Sligo since time immemorial. Apart from anything else, it is one of Sligo’s oldest streets, having existed since way back in the 12th century, although for many years it had the rather down-at-heel name of ‘Back Lane’. The area was then dominated by the Stone Fort for two hundred years, but its future was dawning! Wine was becoming an important commodity, widely drunk before tea became available in Ireland, and was being imported into Sligo as early as 1400. In 1622 a local merchant, John Braxton was licensed to sell wine in the town, and Wine Street rapidly became the centre. The name ‘Winetavern Street’ was sometimes applied and wine storage vaults were established in the 17th century where Toher’s the Chemist now stands.

And it wouldn’t be difficult, because this part of town has so much going for it. Lovely shops, a natural flow of both pedestrian and other traffic, the river at one end of the street, and a ready-made history of development and transition to build on. There are still family-run businesses here, the locals are friendly and welcoming and still offer that special, particular customer care which is so often associated with Ireland. And there is already a great infrastructure to form the backbone to any future plan, including some lovely architecture that current owners are tastefully renovating and redecorating to their former glory. We already have big high street names, restaurants, pubs, the cinema and lots of great shops, and at this time of year with hanging baskets, summer flowers and sunshine, everyone is upbeat.

At the beginning of the 19th century, Wine Street began to be a business and residential centre, and in the wake of that increasing commerce came into the area.The Clarence was originally the home of one Dr Bartholomew Carter; William Middleton probably lived in what is now known as ‘Shell House’; and the Pollexfens owned the building on the corner of Adelaide Street. But all of these soon became places of business, especially after the railway station opened in the 1860’s. Henry Lyons’s warehouse – still a thriving store – and the Fish Market (where the Post Office now stands) were just two of many commercial enterprises that burgeoned here in the late 1800’s. In those days, Wine Street also contained tailors, doctors, general merchants, seed coal and salt merchants, emigration agents, estate agents, a rope maker, butter merchants, ships chandlers, a registrar of marriages and a boarding Academy for Ladies!

So let’s find the momentum to get moving, to make a decision at long last. Those who have the power also have the responsibility not to waste even more time. Excuses are easily found, but unfortunately action on the ground seems scarce! Why are we waiting?

MCCANNS MENSWEAR

Throughout its history, Wine Street has been developing, growing, serving the population of the town, and in our own times it has seen many newcomers including individual traders, a modern 12 screen cinema replacing the rather charming old Gaiety building, the Quayside shopping mall, which has brought a whole cluster of big name shops to Sligo, and the Johnston Court mall which has done the same on a smaller scale.

Sligo Shopping Centre Wine St Sligo Tel: 071 916 0041 Email: joemccann2@eircom.net

Everything for the distinguished man about town! 60


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Shopping

HENRY LYONS & C L O

TD

Wine Street Tel: 071 914 2616

Ken Hunter Tel: 071 914 3896

This is a shop that will appeal as much to fashion-conscious young men as to the more conservative mature gentleman. The shop stocks formal jackets and suits from Baumler and Magee, as well as a full range of shirts, jackets and suits by Remus, trousers by Mayer, and a great choice of casual wear by Camel & McGregor, Ben Sherman, Kickers, Levi, Wrangler and Diesel. The shop sells Gift Vouchers.

Dorothy Perkins Tel: 071 914 1270 Dorothy Perkins delivers high street fashion that is guaranteed to be feminine, good quality and affordable catering for the fashion needs of a wide variety of women from sizes 6-20. In the Sligo store we also stock a maternity range. Dorothy Perkins provides a relaxed hassle-free shopping experience, with friendly and helpful staff.

Adams Tel: 071 914 9877 This is Adams Children’s wear at Lyons of Sligo. Our new collections include all the latest fashion looks, complete with cool accessories and footwear for the season. You’ll be spoilt for choice! Call in soon to check-out our latest offers.

Shoes & Sports Tel: 071 914 3724 Email: shoesandsports@eircom.net Stocking leading brands in Ladies and Gents footwear, including Clarks, Ecco, Lotus, Catepillar, Ben Sherman, Wendel, Wortmann, Dubarry and Merrell. We have trained fitters for children and brands include Clarks, Ecco, Lelli Kelly, Pablosky and Dubarry. Our comprehensive sports and outdoors wear department stocks Regatta, Dare 2 B, Adidas, Reebok, Ellesse and O'Neills and has something to suit everyone's needs. Sports bags and other goods are also available and we have great deals for skiers, with a wide selection of ski-wear for ages 3 and up.

Lyons Café Tel: 071 914 2969 Email: info@garystafford.com With entrances on both Wine Street and Quay Street, this café has been a popular rendezvous in Sligo Town since 1923. If you love home-made goodies, this is the place for you! Everything is made on the premises, and the café serves a selection of Fair Trade Coffees. Open from Monday – Saturday, serving breakfast (until noon), lunch (12.30pm – 2.30pm), and soup, sandwiches, tarts, scones and other cakes all day long. 61


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Photo: ©Rob Forrester

More than just information We also sell arts and crafts by Sligo Artists

Discover Sligo Markievicz Rd Sligo 071 914 7488 • • • •

Local Books, Stationery & CDs Pictures and Photographs of Sligo Town & County Pottery Hand Crafts & Handmade Jewellery

The place to find a unique Sligo gift

For all your craft & wedding supplies !! Fabric, Knitting Wool, Beads, Card & Papers, Embellishments, Dressmaking Patterns, Ribbons, Buttons, Feathers, Haberdashery, Rug Wool, Embroidery & Crochet Threads, Cake Decorations , Pfaff Sewing Machines, etc etc...

Wedding Invitations, Favour Boxes and more...

The Crafter’s Basket Cliffoney Tel 071 916 6515 www.craftersbasket.com Open Monday to Saturday 10.00am to 6.00pm

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Arts & Crafts

Artisan

Demise of the Craftsman Rachel Quinn

Crafts & Fine Art

The small artisan business is in danger of disappearing here in Sligo, which will be a significant loss to the county’s tourism industry, as from my experience almost all visitors love seeking out things that are made locally.

Whether you are looking for Carpets, Fine Art Prints, Hand-made Garments, Jewellery or unusual craft objects visit Artisan at Market Cross. We stock a variety of crafts from Ireland and abroad.

I have been a craft designer and maker for over a decade – in fact I have been making things for as long as I can remember. And I have come to realise that studios such as mine are an important part of the visitor’s experience of the county – I think this would be true anywhere, as it seems to me that seeing, understanding and possibly buying locally made arts and crafts is something we all want to do, where ever we go. It adds to one’s holiday experience. I know that visitors enjoy coming to my studio, watching what I do and gaining some insight into why I do it and why I do it here. It all helps to make their experience of the county unique, and that is what they want – it’s what we all want when we travel.

Open Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm Market Street Sligo Tel: 071 914 4772

studio shop

Lower Quay Street Sligo 10am–6pm Tues-Sat Tel: 071 911 4155 Email: lyndagault@hotmail.com

At the same time, I am not in business to make a lot of money, I am in business to make.Yet I, along with other crafts people, are bound by the same regulations as larger enterprises, and the costs of doing business here are prohibitive and threaten to close many of us down. Yet as I see it, we are providing an important amenity in a county that aspires to be a tourist destination.

Located off Lower Quay Street behind Quayside shopping centre › Pottery studio and shop

› Browse in the shop and watch work in progress

› Throwing, glazing and decorating all done in situ

Surely businesses such as mine should be nurtured and helped to grow and thrive? Surely we are part of an essential intrastructure to offer visitors? And in recessionary times, we are people who are creating jobs for ourselves and just trying to stay in employment – on minimal profit and with no derogation of liability. Some of the ways in which we could be helped are neither difficult nor costly, like relaxing the strict rules on signage which would benefit both artisan and visitor.West Cork has been very successful in this area – colourful signs proliferate making it easier for studios to do business and easier for tourists to find them. Adopting this user-friendly approach only makes sense. Better signage would also help visitors with the navigation of Sligo, which is not adequately addressed at present. Sligo has so much to offer, but it’s not always easy to locate its attractions on the ground. Another aspect of the problem is advertising. Small businesses, artisans and craftspeople often earn so little that advertising – the one thing that might help their business to grow – is beyond reach financially. Plentiful signage provides inexpensive and long-lasting advertising. In the current economic climate, when staple industries like tourism are even more important, it is vital to support micro businesses who are not only creating jobs but also providing diversity within the county for tourists. A group marketing plan backed by the county could provide much needed support to encourage these small producers and help keep them in business. After all, we aren’t multinationals who come in when there are high profits to be made and vanish when these disappear. We are local producers who want to work, want to make the county work and who will still be here in the morning.

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Arts & Crafts

lynda gault ceramics


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The Cat and The Moon The Cat & The Moon Craft emporium stocks the best in quality Irish handmade crafts, along with fine art in the upstairs gallery. Its dynamic in-house jewellery studio remains at the nucleus of innovatory design, offering customers three unique jewellery collections, all of which are designed and handcrafted on the premises using precious metals and gemstones. Best known for their floral series, which features as part of the original The Cat & The Moon brand, this range offers individual designs, from the classic to the contemporary. Spirit of Ireland is the name of their latest collection, recently launched with an inspired series of reproduction crosses from Innismurray. Not least, the Martina Hamilton Collection offers signature pieces in ranges like the awardwinning “Nebula”. Launched in 2008, these exquisitely-crafted creations won “Best Jewellery Product” at this year’s Showcase of Irish Craft in the RDS. www.martinahamilton.ie

The Cat & The Moon

Spirit Wild Goose Studio

Ana Faye

Malcolm Johns

Suzanne Woods

of Ireland

The Cat & The Moon craft shop offers a wealth of exceptional products, all made with skill by the cream of Irish craft workers. Celtic history, tradition and mythology are encapsulated in carved and moulded bronze and iron works from the Wild Goose Studio. Indulge that handbag fetish with award-winning leather bags by Ana Faye. Utility meets beauty in Malcolm Johns’ unique boxes, each lovingly carved from Irish hardwood by the craftsman’s skillful hand, and imbued with the fun and imagination of its maker. Alternately, experience the sense of time slipping through your fingers, as you trace the indelible legacy of centuries inherent in every majestic bog oak sculpture realized by Celtic Roots Studio. Martina Hamilton

Allow yourself time to step into The Cat & The Moon. Enjoy browsing through unique in-house jewellery collections, select art and handcrafts from the cream of Ireland’s designers and craftworkers, as well as a broad spectrum of fine art and limited edition prints and photography in the Gallery.

COLLECTION

Calendar of Gallery Events A summer season of exhibitions featuring artists from Sligo and environs. Annie Harrison

The Cat and The Moon Art Gallery, Castle Street July 18 - Aug 12 Cormac, Caitriona O’Leary: Aug15 - Sept 9 Declan Bray: Patricia Curran-Mulligan, Myriam Leyden: Sept 12 - Oct 7 The Atrium, Nazareth Nursing Home, Church Hill in association with The Cat and The Moon Olive Bodeker and Anne Osbourne: June 20 - July 15 July 18 - Aug 12 Cormac and Caitriona O’Leary: Annie Harrison: Aug 15 - Sept 9

The Cat & The Moon 4 Castle Street Sligo Tel: 071 914 3686 www.thecatandthemoon.com

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Lough Arrow

Towns & Villages Photo: Š Lorely Forrester 65


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Ballysadare The name Ballysadare (also spelt Ballisodare) literally means ‘the townland of the waterfall of the oak’.Whether the oak still stands or not is open to question, but the river still rushes down the falls here into Ballysadare Bay, and has played an important role throughout the town’s history. St Fechin had a salmon fishery here in the 7th century, and in 1857 Ireland’s first fish farm was created here, which brought many other business interests in its wake. While the fish farm is long gone, angling remains a key sport in the area, and salmon fishing continues in the town today under the aegis of the Ballysadare Fishing Club.

Today Ballysadare is very much a 21st century outpost of Sligo, with a growing population and a number of shops including a supermarket, a large pharmacy, a butcher and a post office.There are also schools and there is now the Avena Leisure Centre which has a 20m swimming pool, a children’s pool as well as a hydrotherapy spa, jacuzzi, sauna, steam room, techno-gym, spin cycle studio and the option to take part in various classes from aerobics to yoga. To find out more visit www.avenaleisure.com Fishing remains a major hobby in the town, and the Ballysadare Fishing Club even run a Young Angler’s Competition during the summer months, usually in July. The river itself is 5 miles long and drains a catchment area of 252 miles. There is a small run of salmon in the spring, but the peak season is June-July. There is also the option of sea trout fishing in the estuary during rising tides and this season generally runs from March to September. It is advisable to contact the Ballysadare Fishing Club (Tel: 071 913 0513) as they control fishing rights and are part of the larger North Western Regional Fisheries Board (www.northwesternfisheries.ie).

In 1833 the great Avena Mills that straddled the river were opened, once again bringing employment and business to the town. The mills were destroyed by a massive gas explosion in 1856, killing 9 people, but prosperity returned with the coming of the poet Yeats’s grandfather and great uncle, Messrs Pollexfen and Middleton, and the mills continued to be a vital part of Ballysadare’s livelihood until they were closed in 1989. Today the original site of the mills has been redeveloped into apartments. The river played yet another part in the development of Ballysadare, as in the days when Dublin still relied on gas for its lighting, this village on the outskirts of Sligo was ablaze with locally produced electricity, thanks to its river.

There are also plenty of outside activities to take advantage of the beautiful surrounds including numerous walks in the Ox Mountains or for something a little less testing there are trails (some starting from the Avena Leisure Centre) through Union Woods, as well as mountain bike routes. After so much exertion visitors can enjoy a quiet pint or two in one of the village’s pubs including the traditional and picturesque Thatch Pub just outside the town on the Dublin road.

This was a busy junction on the main road into Sligo, especially after 1808 when the Mail Coach was able to take advantage of the new road from Sligo to Boyle. From 1854 Charles Bianconi was running a daily coach service to Ballina, so Ballysadare saw even more traffic passing through the town, and the coming of the railway only increased that. By 1875 this was an important stop on the line from Collooney to Enniskillen.

This year marks the first anniversary of the development of the new shopping core in the town's centre. To mark the occasion, there will be a fun day for all on 25 July, with lots of childrens' and street entertainment. Make sure you come along to help celebrate, and raise a toast to the year to come, when hopefully Ballysadare will go from strength to strength!

Photo: © BFdesign

BALLISODARE PHARMACY

Enda Lannon MPSI Colin Lannon MPSI

Dispensing chemist. Cosmetics and all your medical needs

Tel: 071 913 3033 Fax: 071 913 3442 66


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Collooney

Dromahaire

Collooney is a pretty little town just 10 minutes drive from Sligo Town. It is perched on a hill, and from a distance it is possible to see the spire of the Catholic church long before you come to the town itself. The church was built in 1847 by Sir John Benson, a native of Collooney, who also enlarged the Protestant Church which had been built in 1720. The town has shops, a post office, schools and all the services you could require.

Dromahaire – the name in Gaelic means ‘the ridge of the two demons’ – is a pretty little village nestled snugly in the curve of the Bonet River at the head of Lough Gill, between Killery Mountain, Slieve Dhean and O’Rourke’s Table, which is no doubt how the Gaelic name originated. Quiet, peaceful and surrounded by beautiful countryside, it is nonetheless only 10km from Sligo Town, so is very popular with families who live and work in Sligo’s county town. Dromahaire has everything a rural village could want, with two well stocked grocery stores, a specialist cheese shop, butcher, a hair salon, beauty parlour, doctor’s surgery, school, pubs, hotel and also The Riverbank Restaurant in which to relax and dine. It also has plenty to offer in the way of outdoor activities. Lough Gill is only a short distance away, with cruises on the Rose of Innisfree, angling and lots of islands to explore. One of these is the Lake Isle of Innisfree, made famous by the poet WB Yeats, who wrote movingly about the tiny island when he was far away in London. On the shores of the lake lies Parkes Castle which in recent years was beautifully restored both inside and out, and is now open to the public until October each year. It is well worth a visit to see the displays inside, walk along the battlements and have a cup of tea. The castle was built as a 3 storey, fortified manor by Roger Parke in 1610, although there was an earlier castle on the site which belonged to the O’Rourkes, Celtic High Kings of the ancient kingdom of Breifne.

Close to Collooney lies Markree Castle, standing in 1000 acres of rolling parkland filled with splendid trees. The castle has been home to the Cooper family since Cromwellian times, and today is run as an hotel. The façade dates from 1802 and the castle contains other interesting features such as the flight of stone steps up to the main hall, the wonderful oak staircase that leads to the upper floors, a large stained glass window depicting the family tree and a beautiful neogothic chapel. The Castle’s Restaurant, with its rococo plasterwork, ornate mirrors and gilded cherubs is a romantic place to dine, and it is also possible to have Sunday Lunch and afternoon tea there.This year the hotel celebrates its 20th Anniversary with a Charity Ball on 4 July.

On the southern side of Dromahaire you can visit the remains of Creevelea Abbey, once a beautiful monastery. Built in 1508 it was the last Franciscan Friary to be built before the supression of the monasteries by King Henry VIII in the mid 16th century.A carving of St Francis still remains, and there are many fine examples of traditional Celtic crosses.

Situated as it is in the centre of the county, and with Markree Riding Stables located within its parkland, the Castle makes a great base from which to explore the county and enjoy the many outdoor activities on offer. Union Woods lie just a short distance away – a wonderful place to walk, cycle or ride.There is golf at nearby Castle Dargan and angling on the rivers that abound in the area. The megalithic burial ground at Carrowmore is well worth visiting, it is the largest of its kind in Ireland and of the tombs that date back six and a half thousand years, one is thought to be the oldest building in the world.

This is an area populated by many artists and craftspeople, and during the summer and early autumn months there several Craft Fairs to attend, at which there is also music and children’s entertainment. The Craft Fairs are held on 9 August, 13 September and 11 October. From 29 October – 2 November the Ballintogher Music Festival and concurrent John Egan Traditional Festival will run in the nearby village. This is an annual event which attracts many from far and wide to its concerts, sessions, dancing and music schools.The festival features workshops in many instruments, traditional dancing like Sean Nos and singing. There are nightly sessions in all the local pubs in the area, so if you like traditional music, it’s one for the diary.

1 O'Connell St. Sligo Ireland Tel: 071 9135125 Email: info@kevinsfort.ie 67

Towns & Villages

Collooney also has a railway station linking the town with Sligo and Dublin, in fact in years gone by this was a busy hub – the junction for 3 railways. Today many people live here who work in Sligo, as the town offers a quiet haven, surrounded by countryside. Where the old mills stand, on the river behind Innisfree Crystal there is a lovely waterfront walk, part of a tasteful development of houses and apartments, all of which benefit from the peaceful location and the pleasant sound of the falls.The mills on the opposite side of the river functioned until the 1950’s, their longevity attributable to the fact that they had been converted to produce woollen goods, notably blankets.They have now been largely dismantled and are derelict.


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Drumcliffe & Rathcormac

Grange Grange is a bustling village in north Sligo which has pubs, restaurants and shops. It is close to lovely beaches and there is always plenty going on. During the summer months, this is a great place to find somewhere to eat, relax with a drink in one of the lively pubs such as Langs, Mickey’s, Moran’s or Barry’s, and hear a bit of music. Tuesday is Irish Night in Barry’s and everyone is welcome to join in.

As you drive north along the N15 from Sligo towards Donegal, you gradually approach one of the county’s most distinctive and instantly recognisable landmarks, Benbulben. Like the prow of a great ship, the mountain towers above the flat coastal plain all around, its gladier-gouged sides catching every change of the light. As you pass through Rathcormac, pause to admire the militant statue of local patriot and icon of the Irish revolution, Countess Markievicz. Born in London on 4 February 1868, Constance Georgina Gore-Booth grew up in her family home, Lissadell House which lies not far from Rathcormac. She married Count Casimir Dunin-Markievicz in Paris, but when she later moved to Dublin she soon gave up her frivolous lifestyle and became involved in politics and revolution. She was the leader of the rebellions of 1916 and was condemned to death – a sentence she only commuted because of her sex. Later in life she became the first woman ever elected to the House of Commons in Westminster, and went on to become Ireland’s first female Cabinet Minister.

Grange Music Festival The Grange Music Festival in the Park is back for its 8th year! Friday 30 July- Sunday 2 August will see an exciting mix of local talent and festival headline acts.There will be street busking around Grange on Saturday afternoon, the Festival UpFront Club and various acts in the marquee on Saturday night, with the main festival taking place on Sunday from 3pm until late. You can expect trad, jazz, barbershop choir to country, rock and blues and the famous ‘Big Party’ finish. There will be the usual range of family entertainments all day Sunday alongside the music, and bar facilities in the marquee. North Sligo Agricultural Show The other big event taking place is the annual North Sligo Agricultural Show. This takes place on Saturday 31 July in the centre of Grange. The morning is filled with animal classes, when cattle, sheep, horses and donkeys are judged and prizes awarded.The judges will also award certificates for home produce, arts, crafts and flower arranging.Young children will be taking part in dressage and showing their ponies off in the ring.

Beyond the Markievicz statue stands the 19th century Roman Catholic Church dedicated to St Colmcille, and a mile or two further along the road you come to Drumcliffe where this same saint founded a monastery in the 6th century. Today only the round tower and high cross still stand as memorials to this ancient foundation. Drumcliffe is internationally famous as the last resting place of the Nobel Prize winning poet William Butler Yeats. His last poem asked that he be buried here in the Church of Ireland graveyard, ‘under bare Benbulben’s head’. In fact Yeats moved to the South of France in later life, for health reasons, and it was in France that he died, but many years later, his remains were brought to Sligo, the county that had inspired so much of his work, and interred at Drumcliffe.

The afternoon show is when the general fun begins. There will be a Dog Agility display and also a Dog Show involving all the usual classes, including old favourites like ‘The Dog You’d Most Like To Take Home’ so if you think your pet is a show-stealer, then bring it along. All dogs are welcome, but please bring them on a lead and don’t leave animals shut in hot cars.

The church itself, St Columba’s, hosts music recitals and concerts throughout the year. In the church precincts you will find an art gallery,Teach Ban Nua and also the Drumcliffe Tea House and Craft Shop. This makes a welcome place to stop for refreshments, with lots of delicious home made treats on offer. The craft shop is stuffed with lovely things to take home or give away as presents. The art gallery is holding an exhibition right through the summer until 15 September.

There will be basket weaving exhibitions, lots of trade stands to browse through, arts and crafts to purchase, flower arrangements and displays of vegetables, cakes and other home produce to admire. There will also be a hand sheep-shearing display and a parade of vintage cars. Children will enjoy the bouncy castles, face painting and all sorts of novelty races. There is also a Bonnie Baby competition, so don’t forget to enter your latest-born.

Texaco Filling Station Grange Tel: 071 917 3900 Email: garlowfuel@eircom.net Fax: 071 917 3906 68


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Gurteen

Enniscrone This little seaside town is famous for several different reasons: a wonderful 3km sandy beach, the links golf course rated one of the best in Britain and Ireland, and seaweed baths that are the last word in relaxation. Kilcullen’s Baths have stood on the sea front for over a hundred years, and although they are now housed in a different building, they retain all their special features: huge roll top baths, Turkish style steamboxes and piping hot seawater and freshly gathered seaweed. There’s nothing like the baths for unwinding, soothing aches and pains and restoring a sense of well being!

Gurteen, set in the very heart of the county, has a surprisingly rich past for such a small place. This is a heritage town, and justifiably so as it could be called the capital of traditional Irish music. The town has been home to more great traditional players than any other place, and it was here that the distinctive South Sligo musical style was born, a style that is recognised and imitated worldwide.

The golf course is known far and wide, but this isn’t the only outdoor activity on offer in Enniscrone. The beach is famous for surfers, and is ideal as it is long and safe. Several surf schools operate here, including North West and 7th Wave, and Summer Surf Camps run throughout the season at which anyone can try this increasingly popular sport. There is also Tracey’s Surf Shop in the town selling everything you could possibly want to be cool in the water, or even out of it! The town lies on the mouth of the fabled Moy salmon River, so this is a very popular spot with anglers too.

The musical theme continues in the town’s restaurants and pubs, with the Crossbar, the Rathmudder Inn, the Roisin Dubh and Teach Murray, which often feature traditional Seisiuns.

During the summer months there are lots of events to keep everyone entertained. This year saw the revival of the beach horse races that used to be run over 100 years ago. One of the highlights of the summer is the Black Pig Festival which this year runs from 6-9 August. Celebrating the demise of a fabled wild boar that ran amok in the town, the festival is four days of fun for everyone with a carnival, street parades, live music, go-karting and puppet shows. The main event of the festival is the Raft Race when everyone takes to the water in a variety of crafts and rafts – anything that will float (and some that don’t!) There is plenty going on for the children to enjoy, including a fun fair in the town from 6-16 August.

Beyond Gurteen visitors can connect with ancient and more recent Irish history and enjoy the distinctive local landscapes. Carrowtemple is an important early Christian site where visitors can see replicas of the original inscribed stone slabs around the boundary of the ruined medieval church. Nearby Moygara Castle is one of the finest examples of a castellated building in the county, and overlooks the beautiful Lough Gara, which features one of the largest collections of crannogs, manmade islands built for protection in Ireland’s Bronze and Iron ages.Another prehistoric site in the area is Drumanone Portal Tomb.

The Enniscrone Agricultural Show takes place on 22 August. This has all the usual animal show classes, as well as show jumping and puissance.There are displays of home baking, flower arranging, home grown fruit and veg and also a keenly contested photography class. Bring your pets along to the dog show – they might win a rosette! This year also sees a mobile pet farm and birds of prey for the children to enjoy along with other entertainment.

Lough Gara is also very popular with fishermen Flock to the Lough is an annual festival that is held in July every year in neighbouring Monasteraden, and Boyle Arts Festival (23 July –1 August) is a 10 day event that is not to be missed. 30 August is the Gurteen Agricultural and Horse Show, and 14 October is the Comhaltas Tour of Ireland.

From 8-11 October there will be the O’Dubhda Clan Gathering in the town, so if your family roots include any O’Dowds, make sure you join in! www.odubhda.com For details of all events: enniscronetourism@eircom.net or Tel: 096 36746

Coleman Centre Gurteen Tel: 071 918 2599 www.colemanirishmusic.com

North West Surf School

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Main Street Enniscrone Tel: 087 959 5556 northwestsurf@gmail.com

Towns & Villages

Probably the most famous musician to have come from Gurteen was Michael Coleman (1891-1945), who was an innovative ‘master of the fiddle’. The current international popularity of traditional Irish music is perhaps the direct result of Coleman’s influence. His life is celebrated in the Michael Coleman Heritage Centre that is the focal point of Gurteen’s main street, and there is a replica of his home in nearby Killavil that serves as a museum and an archive. 28-31 August is the Traditional Music Festival at the Coleman Centre, and from 4 July-28 August, every Wed, Thurs and Sat night the Centre holds summer music sessions at 9pm.


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Mullaghmore

Rosses Point

Mullaghmore is a seaside resort in North Sligo that is hugely popular with locals and tourists alike. There is a small, picturesque 19th century harbour in the centre of the village from which the fishing and sailing boats come and go, lovely to watch as you sit and relax over a drink or a cup of coffee. Close to the village is a sheltered bay with a long sandy beach, and as a backdrop to the whole scene the Atlantic Ocean spreads away to the west and the Dartry Mountains to the north - a beautiful vista.

Rosses Point is a friendly seaside resort close to Sligo Town. It is widely known for its long, safe, sandy beaches which are popular for walking and swimming all year round. In addition, Rosses Point is home to Sligo Yacht Club, which hosts national and international competitions.The summer months see lots of fixtures in the sailing calendar – all dates for your diary if you enjoy this great water sport. Don’t miss the GP14 National Sailing Championships on 2931 July, the Mermaid National Championships from 1-7 August, and the Family Open Days at the Yacht Club on 19 July and 16 August. 14-16 August sees the premier annual Cruiser Event, with the Sligo Park Ladies’ Cup – racing for the oldest sporting trophy in the world.

The village has pubs, hotels and shops supplying all your needs, plus whatever fresh catch the fishermen bring in! From the harbour you can also take a fishing trip or, if the weather is right, sail over to the island of Innishmurray. This is an hour’s journey away, but needs good weather as otherwise landing on the island can be difficult. St Molaise built a monastic settlement on Innishmurray in the 6th century, and it was inhabited thereafter until the 1940’s.The restored remains of the original beehive cells can still be seen there, also the derelict 19th century houses. A natural lake in the centre of the island has become a sanctuary for seabirds. Keith Clarke & Joe McGowan, and also Lomax Boats offer trips to Innishmurray or sea angling trips from the harbour.

Those interested in the sea will be pleased to know that there is a lifeboat shop in the village which sells various goods, raising money for this worthwhile cause. The RNLI Open Day will be held on 12 July this year. The village is also famous for being home to the County Sligo Golf Club. This famous links course has unparalleled views of Sligo’s iconic mountain, Benbulben and also enjoys the breeze blowing in off the Atlantic, something which can make a round of golf way out of the ordinary.

On 19 July you can join the annual orchid spotting walk around Mullaghmore headland. Trudie Lomax will be giving a talk on orchids at the Organic Centre in Rossinver at 10am that morning and the walk will start from Lomax boat yard at around 3pm

Marking the entrance to Sligo Quay, Rosses Point inevitably has a long seagoing history. This was practically the last view emigrants had of their homeland as they left Ireland for a better life in New World in the mid 19th century. A bronze statue of a girl with outstretched arms stands on the shore here, a moving testament to those who departed and those who were left behind. In the middle of the estuary stands the Metal Man, pointing to the deep water channel – the safe passage for boats passing through the sound.The 7.5 ton, 3.75m statue was placed on this specially built pillar in 1822, and three years later he was painted into his smart, nautical attire. WB Yeats christened him ‘the man who never told a lie’. The All Ireland Metal Man Triathlon takes place on the 12 July.

Close to Mullaghmore lies the fairytale castle of Classiebawn. It was built in the 19th century by Lord Palmerston, but more recently belonged to Lord Mountbatten. He visited the castle most summers with members of his family. In 1979 his boat was blown up by the IRA just off the coast here, killing him, his grandson, Lady Barbourne and a local man Paul Maxwell. The highlight of the summer in Mullaghmore is the All Ireland Donkey Derby which takes place on 23 August this year. Donkeys are brought from all over Ireland to compete and the event raises money for charity. In addition to the donkey heats and finals, there are childrens’ entertainments, craft stalls, live music, a cowboy riding display and the contest to appoint a Queen of Mullaghmore.

It is not surprising, with its seafaring history, that Rosses Point has a long tradition of hospitality, with pubs, restaurants and accommodation readily available.The Waterfront Restaurant, which also has its own bakery and tea shop lies in the middle of the village, and Austies, a popular bar and restaurant with sailors past and present, has just been re-opened under new management. The Radisson BLU hotel is nearby, and offers fine dining in its Classiebawn Restaurant and relaxation in Solas Spa. There is also Eros Spa at Yeats Country Hotel.

Local historian, Joe McGowan’s latest book A Bitter Wind is available in bookshops. His previous books include: Echoes of a Savage Land; In the Shadow of Benbulben; Inishmurray: Gale Stone and Fire; Inishmurray: Island Voices; Constance Markievicz: The People’s Countess; Sligo: Land of Destiny; and A Fairy Wind CD. See www.sligoheritage.com

Photo: © Joe McGowan 70

Waterfront Restaurant Rosses Point Tel: 071 917 7122


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Tubbercurry

and lots going on in the pubs every evening. It all culminates with Old Fair Day in August, when the town is filled with stalls, demonstrations of old crafts, a pet dog show, a busking competition and amusements for the children. Nearby in Curry, The Goat Festival held in aid of Bothar, is a three-day festival that takes place later in the summer over the August Bank Holiday weekend.

The town’s biggest asset is the great outdoor world and wilderness that lies all around it. Lough Easkey and Lough Talt are wonderfully wild areas, still remote from the busy world, and the surrounding hillsides are believed to be one of the two most important sites of blanket bog land left in the world, the other being in the Ural Mountains.This is a fabulous place to ride, walk, cycle or drive and appreciate all the native flora and fauna, two particular species to look out for being blueberries and orchids that grow especially well here. There is a Walkers Club based near Lough Talt and there are many lovely walks to be done in the area - a perfect way to enjoy the locality. Mass Hill, near Lough Easkey is the site of a penal Mass Rock where Roman Catholics went to hear mass during the time of the Penal Laws. Today you will find a peaceful place with a statue and the stations of the cross - the site laid out like a garden.

The town is famous for its Summer School of Traditional Music and Dance, which takes place 12-18 July. In celebration of this tradition the Fair Green in the middle of town has a sculpted group of musicians and dancing children created by arist Cillian Rogers. The town is also well known for its drama. The Western Drama Festival takes place in March, but there are other drama events during the year, and an active drama club, The Phoenix Players, well known for its Christmas Panto. This is a town well endowed with Clubs and activities. During the summer months there are lots of mini-clubs for kids, and special events for the holiday period and the local Pioneer Club is very active in running activities for young people. Tubbercurry Golf Course is a very popular Parkland Course just on the edge of town, with a club house to relax in after the game. There is also Tubbertelly Pitch and Putt for those who enjoy chipping and putting.This is also a fabulous area for coarse angling, popular with fishermen from Ireland and beyond.

Within easy reach of Tubbercurry is Knocknashee, the legendary hill of the fairies, a spectacular plateau with fabulous views over the north Connaught plain. Gillighan’s World is on one side of the hill, an open park full of fairy creations, as well as a pet zoo – an ideal place to take children. Close by are the ruins of Court Abbey, a 15th Century Franciscan Friary. The 30m high tower still stands at the junction of the east and west chapels, and remains of wall paintings are still just visible in damp conditions. Near Tubbercurry is Achonry Cathedral, the smallest cathedral in Ireland, which is still used occassionally and due for more restoration. A great summer event that takes place every year is the Old Fair Day, which is the highlight of the week-long Tubbercurry Fair in August. There are arts and crafts events for children, street entertainments, a Parade of Vintage Cars, a family Treasure Hunt

Cawley’s GUESTHOUSE

EMMET STREET TUBBERCURRY Tel: 071 918 5025 Fax: 071 918 5963 Email: cawleysguesthouse@eircom.net

Cawley’s Guesthouse in Emmet Street is the perfect holiday base for visitors to Tubbercurry, with 12 bedrooms, private parking and terraced garden. Cawley’s Restaurant is open Tues-Sat, serving lunch daily from noon-3pm and dinner from 6.30pm-9pm. Cawley’s will cater for functions of up to 150 people.

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Photo: ©Trudie Lomax

Tubbercurry is Sligo’s second largest town, located in the south of the county. It is wonderfully central for visitors who want to make the most of the area around the Ox Mountains, within easy reach of Knock and Sligo Airports, Enniscrone and the sea, the Moy river and Foxford, Ballina and Westport in Co Mayo, as well as the rest of County Sligo and Sligo Town. Cawley’s Guesthouse in the centre of town makes an ideal base for anyone visiting the area, offering a warm welcome and a home-from-home atmosphere.


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Strandhill

Bella Vista

Strandhill is a pretty seaside resort lying at the foot of Knocknarea, just a few kilometres from Sligo Town. It has many attractions including a long, sandy beach popular with families and surfers, a links golf course,Voya’s renowned seaweed baths – the perfect place to relax after lots of outdoor activities - and some great pubs and restaurants.Visitors to Strandhill will be spoiled for choice if they want to eat out or just have a summer drink, with Bella Vista, Brees Bar, Kelly’s, The Dunnes Tavern, The Strand Bar and The Venue. There is also Jade Garden Restaurant, Shell’s Café and Trá Bán to choose from. The little town provides all the services you would expect, with a pharmacy, shops and two hairdressers, Hair Duo and Koppertopz. Sligo Airport, which flies to and from Dublin, is just outside the town.

Bar & Bistro Strandhill Tel: 071 912 2222 www.bellavista.ie

‘It’s all about the family’ Bar – Restaurant – Takeaway Suitated beside the rugged Atlantic Ocean, in the scenic surfing village of Strandhill, Bella Vista Bar & Bistro is fast becoming a popular meeting place for locals and tourists. Food is served from 10am – 10pm daily, including breakfast, lunch, pizzas, pastas, à la carte menu, a kid’s menu and Coeliac friendly dishes, so there is bound to be something to satisfy any appetite.

Photo: ©BFdesign Strandhill is famous for its summer events, including the Culleenamore Races in June, which take place on Cullenamore beach and the Strandhill Gymkhana & Craft Fair on the first Saturday of July, which is a great day out for all the family. Another great annual event is the Warrior’s Run, this year celebrating its 25th anniversary on 29 August at 3pm. This is a gruelling race of 15km from Strandhill beachfront to Queen Maeve’s cairn at the top of Knocknarea and back again. Runners must be registered in advance for this daunting 2.5 hour race, in which the male and female winners each receive €1000. Every year about 400 competitors from far and wide take part, and a separate title, King of the Mountain, goes to the person fastest up and down the 233m mountain-section of the race. Open to running clubs, teams and individuals – but unless you are able for this challenging run, plan to just watch instead! See www.warriorsfestival.com

• Different Catch of the Day everyday for all our fish lovers. • Child-friendly restaurant with colouring books, toys and fish tanks to entertain the little ones. • Caters for parties, communions, confirmations. Post and pre-wedding parties, christenings. • Suitable venue for business meetings with free wi-fi available. • Sports Bar which shows all major sporting events.

Our pizzas are crafted with fresh dough and oven baked for perfection. We blend our dough fresh everyday with high quality flour and olive oil then proof at the correct temperature for a smooth and satisfying flavour. We top these creations with our signature sauce, a select cheese blend and fresh ingredients to give you a pizza masterpiece carefully balanced in both taste and portion. Our biggest motivaton is our customer’s excitement. For us there is no better feeling in the world than seeing a satisfied smile on someone's face.

Remember Bella Vista Bar & Bistro is all about the family. Come in and join us!

Photo: ©James Connelly

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Summer Camps Although swimming is not allowed from the beach, surfers enjoy the waves here all year round and during the summer months this is a great place to join a summer surf camp and take to the water. Join a Perfect Day Junior Surf Camp this summer, and learn to surf or improve your existing skills, learn ocean awareness, surf history and – exclusive to Perfect Day – do a Rookie Lifeguard introduction course. The camps run weekly in July & Aug, Mon-Fri, 2-5pm Max 12 students per camp, so early booking is essential. Also small group lessons daily – Instructor/surfer ratio 5/1, Adults €30, U18 €20 Contact Elisha Tel: 087 202 9399 or 087 289 7462 Photo: ©James Connelly

Kid’s Summer Camps run by Strandhill Surf School offer weekly camps starting from 9 June, Mon-Fri, 9am-noon, €100 For details of all Soccer and GAA Summer Camps, see pgs 31 and 34 Strandhill Rugby Club - Summer Kids Club Contact Connacht Rugby Club summercamps@cbirfu.com Dynamo Gym Club dynamogymclub@gmail.com 20 – 22 July, 10am – 12.30pm and 19 - 21 August, 10am – 12.30pm. Contact Diane Middleton by e-mail for all details. Siobhan Monaghan Irish Dance Summer Club Contact Strandhill School.

Photo: ©Ulrike Schwier 73

Towns & Villages

Enjoy Surf & Turf Camps! Surf is a sea camp, Mon-Fri, 9.30am-12.30pm, €90 per week, Turf is a land & sea camp, Mon-Fri, 10-4.30pm, €180 per week. Tel: 071 984 1091 or 087 987 4455, www.turfnsurf.ie/kidscamps


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Sore Feet? Flat arches? High arches?

Walking Tour

of Sligo Town

Commentary Lorely Forrester R= Turn Right. L=Turn Left Use in conjunction with map on page 8 Although Sligo is a city, having a charter and two cathedrals, it is locally, and affectionately, known as Sligo Town.The name Sligo is thought to mean ‘shelly place’, although some say that it might derive from ‘Sli’ meaning route, as from earliest times Sligo was strategically placed. This was always an area abounding in shellfish of all kinds, and bucket-loads of shells were removed when foundations for the town’s buildings were laid. Equally, from earliest times, Sligo was a strategic point in the North West, and remains so today, so either root would be valid.

Markievicz Road & Hyde Bridge Our tour starts in Markievicz Road named in memory of Sligo’s heroine, Constance Gore-Booth, later Countess Markievicz. Raised at Lissadell House, she was a leading figure in the Easter Risings of 1916, escaped execution, was later elected to the English Parliament and became Ireland’s first female Cabinet Minister. Leaving the shop, L to Hyde Bridge, formerly Victoria Bridge but renamed for the first President of Ireland, Douglas Hyde.The Glasshouse Hotel perched by the bridge, Sligo’s most avant garde building, stands on the site of mills dating back to pre-1558 which were later owned by William Pollexfen,Yeats’ grandfather. Biomechanical Gait Analysis: Comprehensive, professional assessment of feet, legs & gait, including RS Scan technology to record your footstep at 500 frames/sec. Sports and Orthopaedic consultations Common conditions: • Aching legs • Ankle/knee/hip/back pain • Heel pain • Bunions • Shin splints • Ball of foot pain • Tendonitis Plus many more…

Yeats Building The Yeats Building, red-bricked with a timbered upper storey stands opposite, on the corner of the bridge. Once the Royal Bank, it was presented to the Yeats Society by the AIB in 1973. Today it is the headquarters of the Yeats International Summer School and houses the Yeats Society Library, The Sligo Art Gallery and a photographic collection of Yeats and his family. Across the river from the Yeats Building is Barton Smith’s, originally founded in 1788 and still selling everything for the ‘hunting, shooting, fishing’ enthusiast. Continue on and R just before the red brick Post Office, into Fish Quay. This used to be Fish Corner, home to Sligo’s fishmongers even before the 1885 Fish Market was built but the name disappeared after the Post Office was built in 1901. Follow the lane round to the car park in Quay Street, beside the river.

Famine Memorial, Quay Street Car Park The Garavogue River, once known as the Sligo River, is always full of swans, often with their young in tow, still wearing their juvenile fawn plumage. In this riverside car park stands a memorial commemorating those who died during the famine, and those who emigrated to escape. Sligo was devastated first by cholera and then the Great Famine of 1845. Many left from these Quays, including one ill-fated ship which sank just outside Sligo Bay with the loss of all lives. Conditions were so bad on board these ‘coffin ships’ that many didn’t survive the journey to a new life.

Treatment programmes: • Muscle strengthening/ stretching programme • Footwear/Sportswear advice • Orthotics: simple/custom made insoles • Padding and strapping Chiropody services: All foot treatments including verruca and nail surgery

WALKING CLINIC Chiropody/Podiatry 4 Stephen Street Court Stephen Street Sligo Tel: 071 911 0010 www.walkingclinic.ie Colm J Regan

Tobergal Lane Mosaic

BSc (Hons), MChS, SRCh

State registered Chiropodist/Podiatrist

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Quay Street L up Quay St past the entrance to Quayside Shopping Mall, opposite which is The City Hall. Described by many as Italian Renaissance in style, the foundation stone was laid by Sligo’s Mayor, William Abbott Woods in 1865 before a large crowd and with the band of the Sligo Rifles playing. It stands on the site of the old Castle of Sligo, later the Stone Fort built in Cromwellian times. During the English conflicts of 1689 Patrick Sarsfied incorporated this and other areas of the town into the Green Fort, captured for the deposed King James II, making it so strong that it was the last western garrison to surrender when William and Mary finally defeated the Jacobites in 1690.

Touring Sligo

The Assembly Rooms in the City Hall were once the theatre in which the Yeats brothers would have seen plays performed. Also in City Hall is the register of those on whom Sligo has conferred its greatest honour – the Freedom of the City. Amongst others it includes cardinals, bishops, professors, and also Countess Markievicz, honoured in 1917. At the top of Quay St is Henry Lyons department store dating from 1845, one of the best traditional Irish shop fronts in Sligo.

Wine Street R into Wine St (named for the wine vaults once maintained close to this corner) with its shops and Gaiety cinema complex. Opposite this is the Methodist Chuch built c1830, replacing the earlier Wesleyan Chapel on Bridge St dating from 1775 (around which time John Wesley himself visited Sligo regularly). At the end of Wine St, where doctors, dentists and lawyers have their practices in what were once elegant town houses, on the corner with Adelaide St stands a large house, premises of McCanny & Co Solicitors. This was the headquarters of Sligo’s largest shipping enterprise in the late 1800’s, where Yeats’ Grandfather Pollexfen trained his telescope on his ships entering and leaving Sligo Harbour from the glassed-in crow’s nest atop the building.

humorously described it as ‘Hiberno-Romanesque’ - its particular style being typical of so many churches built in the years following Catholic Emancipation. Over the road from the RC Cathedral is the Gillooley Memorial Hall which has a stage, a gallery and a large auditorium. On the hill opposite is the splendid former Bishop’s Palace.

John Street,The Two Cathedrals

Hawkswell Theatre & Tourist Office

L into Adelaide St, L into Dunnes Car Park, through to the main car park and R into the alley leading down beside Johnston’s Court Shopping Mall to John St. Opposite is the Church of Ireland Cathedral of St John the Baptist, designed in 1730 by the German architect Cassels who also designed Leinster House. It was refurbished in 1812 and 1883. Here Yeats’s mother married John Yeats, a young barrister, in September 1863. A brass memorial to her is on the wall near the pulpit. Yeats’ grandfather Pollexfen supervised the building of his own tomb in the churchyard. The Cathedral has other literary associations, notably with Bram Stoker whose mother, born Charlotte Townley in Sligo Town, witnessed the horrors of the terrible cholera epidemic in 1832 perhaps the tales in her memoirs sparked her son’s imagination and led to the birth of ‘Dracula’! Ireland suffered more during this pandemic than even England, losing 25,000 people to the disease. Sligo was the worst hit town, an estimated 700-1500 people dying, including several doctors and William Middleton, Yeats’s other grandfather.The town almost came to a standstill, and it was said some, carried away on cholera carts, were buried still barely alive.

L out of the RC Cathedral onto Temple St, to the Hawkswell Theatre, which is open all year offering all kinds of cultural entertainment. The Theatre was named after a play by Yeats, the name coming originally from Tubber Scanavin, the Hawk’s Well near Coolaney. Beside the theatre is the North West Tourist Office. The Genealogy & Heritage Centre, where you can trace your family roots, is also based here.

Presbyterian Church,The Friary L down The Lungy and R into Church St. Here is the Presbyterian Church, built in 1828.At the junction with Harmony Hill pause for a moment to admire the view down to O’Connell St and Benbulben beyond. R into Dominic St, at the top of which stands a small courtyard on the left containing the apse and stained glass of the old Holy Cross Dominican Church. Walk through here to the new church known locally as The Friary, and the High St. R then L into Old Market St. where lived Peter O’Connor who advertised ships sailing from Sligo to America in 1846, the start of the Big Exodus. On into Teeling St, named for the 24 year old hero of Carricknagat Battle at Collooney in 1798. Aide-de-camp to General Humbert, after the French surrender, Bartholomew Teeling was handed over to the English during an exchange of officers, after which he was court-martialled and publicly hanged like a criminal outside Arbour Hill Prison, wearing his French uniform.

Next to St John’s is the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, built in 1874 when Laurence Gillooley was Bishop. Sligo is part of the Diocese of Elphin whose first Bishop, Saint Asicus, was consecrated by St Patrick himself, and the Cathedral has a replica of the Saint discovered in a London brica-brac shop! Officially Renaissance Romanesque, Sean O’Faolain 75


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The Courthouse

the commentary at the County Museum and Library on Stephen Street, or for a fuller tour, continue to the end of Rockwood Parade.

Designed by Rawson Carroll who also built Classiebawn Castle at Mullaghmore, this striking building was erected in 1878, and has been recently renovated. Opposite is the brass plaque of ‘Argue and Phibbs’, a remarkably named firm of lawyers who once practiced there!

JFK Parade Cross over onto a second riverside street, renamed after the assassination of President John Kennedy. Originally Linenhall Street and then Corcoran’s Mall, named for the developer Thomas Corcoran who, around 1800, built extensively here and in Thomas St, demolishing the north and west sides of Sligo Abbey to utilize the stone – a scandalous concept today. His relative, General Corcoran, a hero of the American Civil War, and another free thinker, was court-martialled for refusing to parade his troops before the Prince of Wales.At the end of the Parade the Riverside Hotel was the site of the former Martin Distillery, once managed by Andrew Jameson, son of the famous Dublin distilling family. Sligo Distillery’s ‘water of life’ was a favourite with many, but most notably King George III.

Sligo Abbey Carry on down this street then R into Abbey St. The Dominican Abbey, the only medieval building left standing in Sligo, was founded by the Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, Maurice Fitzgerald in 1253, who already had a castle in Castle St., no trace of which remains. Accidentally destroyed by fire in 1414, it was rebuilt in its present form.When Sir Frederick Hamilton’s soldiers sacked Sligo in 1642, killing, pillaging and burning, the Abbey was also torched and everything valuable in it destroyed, including ornaments, vestments and items which the townspeople had brought to the friars for safekeeping. (5 of his cavalry, on their way back to Manorhamilton after this raid, galloped to their deaths over the cliffs above Glencar.) Stonework from the buildings started being removed in the 1700’s and in 1760 the community of friars moved elsewhere. Still intact amongst the ruins of the Abbey are the High Altar, and the pulpit projecting from one of the cloister walls. Take time to visit the Abbey, and see the remains of this beautiful building in detail.

Castle Street – O’Connell Street Returning along Abbey St, cross into Castle St (once the site of Sligo Castle) towards the heart of the town. Here on the left is Mary’s of Sligo, once home of Edward Doherty, who led the chase after John Wilkes Booth, President Lincoln’s assassin. Almost next door is ‘Morgan’, birth place of Shane Filan from the band Westlife. Further on Lady Erin, the memorial to the Uprisings of 1798, stands in the middle of the road at Market Cross where formerly stood the Bishop’s Stone erected in 1570 at the site of this once busy market place. Straight along Grattan St past EJ’s on the R where in 1914 Angelo Di Lucia and his lover murdered his wife while she slept. The building was redesigned by Ralph Byrne in1918 as the Bank of Ireland. At the end, R into O’Connell St, once called Knox St and recently pedestrianised. On the left, Hargadon’s pub interior was once used as the model for a set at The Abbey Theatre, Dublin, as the archetypal Irish pub. Beyond, also on the left, with another beautiful traditional shop front is Mullaney’s Drapers, which started as shipping agents and became one of the first travel agents in Ireland. R into Tobergal Lane opposite Mullaney’s and continue to end of lane.

The Mall Cross The Garavogue River on the loop footbridge by the hotel. On the far bank lies the lovely old Georgian Rectory of Calry Church and to the right, Sligo Grammar School, a leading school (now co-educational) which has occupied these grounds since 1752, although the establishment itself is much older, and the current buildings much newer. Up onto The Mall and L beside Calry Anglican Church, which serves the School as well as its own Parish. In 1885 a hydraulic engine replaced manual labour to work the organ! Opposite is the old Masonic Lodge, and next door The Model Arts & Niland Gallery {Temp closed). Built in 1859 as a ‘model school’ and dynamically reworked in 2000, the gallery houses works by Jack Yeats (who professed that he never

Rockwood Parade R onto this river-side walk with its shops and cafés, where the swans drift on the river. Either cross the footbridge to Stephen Street car park where there is a monument to a former Governor of Chile and Viceroy of Peru, Ambrose O’Higgins, a native of Sligo (which also commemorates his son Bernardo, the first President of Chile), and rejoin

Institute of Technology Campus Sligo tel.: 071 91 49494 fax: 071 91 44500 76


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painted a picture without ‘putting a thought of Sligo in it’), and 70 other Irish painters, alongside exhibitions by contemporary artists. It is well worth a visit and a coffee.At the end of The Mall, cross into Stephen St.

The County Museum and Library The banks and business quarter, Stephen St is also home to the Museum and Library, housed in the old Congregational Church and its Manse, built in 1851. The Yeats Memorial Museum, containing different editions of the poet’s works and other letters and written material concerning him, opened here in1958, its inspiration coming from Nora Niland, Librarian at the time. The Lending Library is also here, with the reference library on nearby Bridge St. Touring Sligo

Yeats Statue The next R turn is Holborn St which was once home to Spike Milligan, beyond which, ouside the Ulster Bank stands a memorial to poet WB Yeats. This building was ‘bombed to ruins’ during the Civil War but was rebuilt. When receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature from the King of Sweden in 1924,Yeats commented that the Stockholm Royal Palace reminded him of the Ulster Bank in Sligo. In 1989, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of his death, the townspeople erected this statue, by artist Rowan Gillespie, of the poet ‘wrapt in his words’, in this, the obvious place. R Down Markievicz Road is Connolly’s Pub, a pub which feels as if time has passed it by, a drop of old Ireland. Further down is Discover Sligo’s Shop, where you will find more tourist information, local arts, crafts, music and gifts.

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Driving Tour of Yeats’ Country

Damien Brennan

Use in conjunction with a road map

Glencar Lake Photo: ©Ulrike Schwier

William Butler Yeats called Sligo ‘The Land of Heart’s Desire’ and its beauty, archaeology and folklore filled his early poetry. Throughout his youth he returned from London for holidays with his maternal grandparents, the Pollexfens, and his Middleton cousins, from whose homes at Ballysadare, Rosses Point and Sligo town itself he was free to roam and dream.

The panoramic views from the top of Dooney are worth the stiff flight of steps, and show the magnificent prow of Benbulben straight ahead, and to the left, Knocknarea. "The wind has bundled up the clouds high over Knocknarea, And thrown the thunder on the stones for all that Maeve can say."

Today, much of what inspired him remains and a day trip around Yeats’ Country illuminates the poet’s words while you discover just how powerfully those same words celebrate his beloved Sligo.

Further on the circuit of Lough Gill meander down country lanes to view the Lake Isle of Innisfree. Lonely in London and hearing water tinkling in a fountain, the poet vowed "I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree, And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made:" When you hear "lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore" in this quiet place, you appreciate just how powerfully Yeats used language.

Lough Gill and Innisfree

Approach to Lough Gill Leaving Sligo Town by Pearse Rd, turn left through the traffic lights at the Sports Ground, then just beyond suburbia left again onto the Green Road ‘Scenic Drive’. From the brow of the hill feast on the beauty of Lough Gill. From here you clearly see "Where dips the rocky highland Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,There lies a leafy island Where flapping herons wake The drowsy water-rats". This landscape was planted by the Wynne family of Hazlewood in the 1700’s, and became popular with Sligo folk. "I went out to the hazel wood, Because a fire was in my head," wrote Yeats and here you can understand the lure of Lough Gill for the dreamy young writer. Turn right for Tobernalt Holy Well, sacred from generations of prayer.

Dromahaire and Parkes Castle "He stood among a crowd at Dromahaire; His heart hung all upon a silken dress." This pretty village was home to the hospitable O’Rourkes of Breffini, the remains of their Banqueting Hall is still there. Stop for coffee here or at nearby Parkes Castle. The beautifully restored Castle has an interesting audio visual presentation on the heritage of the region and is well worth a visit.

Glencar Continuing to the outskirts of Sligo Town, turn right onto the N16 towards Enniskillen. Towering landscapes gouged by glaciers 12,000 years ago epitomise Glencar Valley, and after rainfall you may see Sruth in Aighd an Ghaoth (Stream in the face of the wind) - a thundering waterfall driven back into the air by the prevailing westerly winds…children often think the mountain on fire!

Dooney Keeping the lake on your left you soon reach Dooney Rock, a favourite spot for dancing and romancing and Yeats would have seen a blind fiddler who regularly played here. "When I play on my fiddle in Dooney, Folk dance like a wave of the sea." 78


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The Metal Man Light points incoming ships away from Sruth na Mile (the thousand streams) and into the channel to Sligo. Oyster Island is parallel to the village and the larger Coney Island (which gave its name to the more famous one off New York) can be accessed by causeway from Strandhill road at low tide.Yeats first experimented with the paranormal at Rosses Pt, encouraged by his cousin’s housekeeper who had ‘second sight’.

Lissadell

Sligo Town

With the lake on your left, keep right under the mountain and travel on to Drumcliffe and Lissadell House, once home to generations of Gore-Booths. Yeats, an emerging, successful poet, met Eva and Constance, daughters of the house and was delighted to stay here in 1894. Eva was a poetess herself while Constance (later Countess Markievicz) was a leader in the Rebellion of 1916 and became an icon of revolutionary Ireland. Many years later Yeats recollected his time there: "The light of evening, Lissadell, Great windows, open to the south,Two girls in silk kimonos, both Beautiful, one a gazelle." Continue on to Raghly Harbour for a lovely walk around this unspoiled peninsula with its picturesque fishing boats.

Ships no longer ply to Liverpool, Glasgow and the Americas, but some still unload at the docks here. The great mansion in which Grandfather Pollexfen lived at the height of his career still overlooks the quays, while Merville, to which he retired, is now Nazareth Home for the elderly. He even built his own tomb which can be seen just inside the gates of St John’s Cathedral. On the corner of Wine Street and Adelaide Street the severe stone headquarters of the Pollexfen companies still stands, with its turreted watch tower from which incoming shipping could be viewed. On Hyde Bridge, the Yeats Society’s headquarters houses the offices of the International Summer School, the Sligo Art Gallery and a photographic exhibition on the Yeats family and Sligo - all worth a visit. Just over the bridge, outside the Ulster Bank stands a sculpture by artist Rowan Gillespie of the poet ‘wrapt in his words’ erected by the people of the town to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yeats’s death in 1989.

Drumcliffe At nearby Drumcliffe, St Columba founded a monastery in the 6th century. Today a magnificent 11th Century High Cross and the remains of a Round Tower still stand.Yeats’ great-grandfather was Rector here and a memorial beside the altar in the restored church commemorates him. In one of his best known poems,Yeats made his final wishes known. "Under bare Ben Bulben’s head In Drumcliff churchyard Yeats is laid. An ancestor was rector there Long years ago, a church stands near, By the road an ancient cross. No marble, no conventional phrase; On limestone quarried near the spot. By his command these words are cut: Cast a cold eye On life, on death. Horseman, pass by!”Yeats, after a lengthy and celebrated infatuation with Maud Gonne, later married Georgina Hyde Lees, ‘George’ who revitalised his life and poetry, gave him a son and daughter, and is also buried at Drumcliffe.

Accepting the Nobel Prize for Literature from the Swedish King in 1924, Yeats remarked that the Italianate style Royal Palace in Stockholm reminded him of the Ulster Bank in Sligo! Yeats’s novel John Sherman tells of a lovesick young Sligo man living in a tall house on the Mall. Just opposite these houses stands The Model Arts and Niland Gallery, home to a collection of paintings by Jack Yeats.

Strandhill and Ballysadare Driving south from Sligo a trip around Knocknarea via Strandhill and Culleenamore is rewarding. "The old brown thorn-trees break in two high over Cummen strand, Under a bitter black wind that blows from the left hand."

Rosses Point Drive through Rathcormac, on to Rosses Point. The Middletons owned this peninsula and had holiday homes here. Grandfather Pollexfen owned a shipping company and so the seas, fisher folk and water lore were part of every visit to Sligo. Remembering his cousin,Yeats wrote: "My name is Henry Middleton, I have a small demesne, a small house set on a storm bitten green".The remains of Elsinore Lodge (where the family claimed the ghosts of smugglers came tapping on the window panes at night!) can still be seen, also the Pilots Watch House, painted by the poet’s brother, Jack Yeats.

If you are fit, a walk to the top of Knocknarea and the mythological burial cairn of Queen Maeve is comparatively easy and the whole of the Land of Heart’s Desire is displayed below you. At nearby Ballysadare the Pollexfen Company had extensive milling interests and the poet often stayed at Avena House, off the main street. Salley rods were grown here, for basket making, and Yeats once heard a tinker woman sing the ballad he later reworded so delicately: "Down by the salley gardens my love and I did meet; She passed the salley gardens with little snow white feet. She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree: But I, being young and foolish, with her would not agree." As you leave Yeats Country take with you the beauty of the place immortalised by the Yeats family.

@ Drumcliffe Tel: 071 916 3117 www.yeatstavernrestaurant.com 79

Touring Sligo

Picnicking at Glencar Waterfall with aunts,Yeats wrote "Where the wandering water gushes From the hills above Glen-Car, In pools among the rushes That scarce could bathe a star,We seek for slumbering trout And whispering in their ears Give them unquiet dreams". Keep to the upper main road (N16) and just when you think you have gone too far, turn left down to the lakeshore and the Waterfall. Reached by a paved walk, it’s easy for young and old.


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Driving Tour of North Sligo

Joe McGowan

Use in conjunction with a road map Finian claimed the copy as well as the book, but Colmcille refused. The dispute was brought to the High King of Ireland whose edict was: 'To every cow its calf and to every book its copy'. As a result the High King and Colmcille did battle on Benbulben’s slopes in 561AD.Thousands were slain and the King was forced to concede the copy of the psalter to Colmcille, the victor.

Grange Next we come to Grange… a literal translation from the Gaelic ‘An Grainseach’ indicating that this was once the site of a granary. Laid out in a triangle it has attractive streetscapes. The little park on your right has a statue of St Molaise, founder of the monastery on Inishmurray which can be seen about 6kms out in Sligo Bay.The island can be visited on calm days by boat from nearby Mullaghmore and is well worth a visit in favourable weather. Grange has a number of pubs where the best of Irish music is assured and an Irish welcome can be found.

Inishmurray Heading northwards once again, rocky cliffs defy the Atlantic gales. Here, the restless ocean tumbles onto miles of rugged shoreline. Nestled within these waves - just a few miles offshore - lies the mystical island of Inishmurray. St Molaise founded a Christian Monastery here in the 6th century, the remains of which have been restored. On this island of gale, stone and fire we enter a shadow-land where holy man meets pagan, where Holy Wells calm the sea, where cursing stones and mystic fires consume the heretic. One of its most remarkable features is Leac na Teine, the Stone of the Fire located in Teac na Teine (House of the Fire). Tradition holds that if all fires were extinguished on the island, a sod placed on Leac na Teine would ignite spontaneously. Stricken by remorse after the Battle of the Books, it was to St Molaise that Colmcille confessed. As a result, Colmcille was banished to Iona, Scotland, in 563 AD, his penance to convert more people to Christ than had fallen at Culdreimhne.

Photo: ©Ulrike Schwier

North Sligo is full of history and heritage. Here we can trace the dramatic tendrils of our nation from prehistoric mythology to modern times, in a setting both pristine and majestic. In its lofty mountains, winding rivers and jagged coastline, God has created a land largely unspoiled by time or man. Leaving Sligo town on the N15 we crest Tully Hill. Suddenly we see the Dartry mountain range in all its grandeur.The mighty prow of 'bare Benbulben’s head,' made famous by the poet WB Yeats, defines the landscape. In the shadow of this mountain stretch the rolling hills and valleys of an enchanted land, a panorama rich in history, folklore and mythology.

Streedagh & Grange Streedagh beach is ideal for a long walk in bracing Atlantic air. It was here that three ships of the Spanish Armada were dashed to death in 1588. An English official, Geoffrey Fenton, reported: ‘I numbered in one strand eleven hundred corpses.’ Captain Francesco de Cuellar was the sole survivor who miraculously, with the aid the Gaelic O’Rourkes of Breffini, made his way back to Spain.At times the timbers of his ship are revealed still upright in the sand. His diary discovered in 1885 in the archives of the Academia del Historia in Madrid, tells us much of conditions prevailing in Ireland at that time. Also to be seen here and at nearby Raughley are fossil remains, remnants of prehistoric times. Continuing north, Benbulben and the Dartry mountains dominate the landscape. Precipitous limestone slopes plunge to pleasant valleys, farming country, where grazing sheep dot the heights and cattle graze the lowland pastures. Hill walking in unspoiled countryside and hang-gliding with the hawks on capricious updraughts are popular sports here.

Rathcormac In Rathcormac village stands a magnificent bronze memorial to Countess Markievicz, born Constance Gore- Booth at nearby Lissadell where she spent her early years.An active suffragette, she gave her first speech to promote womens’ rights at nearby Drumcliffe. She is best known for her part in the 1916 Easter Rising, for which she was sentenced to death, a sentence commuted to life imprisonment because of her gender. Constance became the first woman ever elected to the English House of Commons in 1918. On the formation of the Irish Dail she was appointed Minister for Labour thus becoming the first woman Cabinet Minister in the world!

Drumcliffe Mullaghmore & Classiebawn

We continue north to Drumcliffe Visitor Centre. Here lies WB Yeats, at peace in the Sligo soil that inspired much of his work. Drumcliffe was an early Christian site of major significance founded by St Colmcille in 575 AD - the round tower and high cross still remain. St Colmcille is remembered too for his part in the 'Battle of the Books': Colmcille copied a book while a guest of St. Finian’s.

Our next stop is Mullaghmore, with its picture postcard 19th century harbour, wild sweep of ocean and expanse of golden sand. Pause to watch the fishermen at work and feast your eyes on the scenic Dartry mountains delight your eyes.A cruise to the ancient monastic island of Inishmurray, only an hour's sail away, is available

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from here. Another time, another world! Do stop here and explore, and take the scenic drive around the headland.

married to Fionn at Tara in County Meath. At the wedding feast the fickle Grainne fell in love with the younger warrior Diarmuid, and persuaded him to elope with her. Next day, the vengeful Fionn set out in pursuit of his former comrade in arms and his faithless bride. Fionn's pursuit was relentless but the hunted couple eluded their pursuers for many years, hiding in caves such as this. The ruins of an old schoolhouse along the ring road stand as testament to this once populous valley. Turf is still cut here, but compared with times when this was the only fuel used for heating and cooking, very little is saved today.

Nearby, the fairytale Classiebawn Castle dominates the landscape, built in the mid- 19th century by Lord Palmerston. In recent times Lord Louis Mountbatten, great grandson of Queen Victoria, Earl of Burma, last Viceroy of India and Supreme Allied Commander in SE Asia during WW2 inherited the castle and estate. In August 1979 his boat was blown up by the IRA in the bay. Lord Mountbatten,his grandson Nicholas, Lady Brabourne and Paul Maxwell died. Hard under Classiebawn, by an outcrop of rock called Dostann na Briona, the fairies, remnant of the dispossessed race of Tuatha de Dannan, reside.At the door of the fort the 'Daoine Mhaith' come and go in their revelries and travels. The worldly wise may mock such foolish beliefs but Edwina, Lady Mountbatten, did not. She often visited and left messages at this enchanted place.Within living memory offerings of poteen have been left here in thanksgiving or supplication. Old people know the door where the Sidhe come and go, but the 'Fairy Rock' is silent and enigmatic, guarding its secrets.

Derelehan plateau

Mullaghmore's rugged seacoast supported a lifestyle now gone. In less prosperous times these rocks and inlets were seaside gardens, where sea foods, edible seaweeds and fish could be found in abundance.

Creevykeel ‘The purple heather is the cloak, God gave the bogland brown But man has made a pall of smoke To hide the distant town.’ Let us head for those peat bogs and heather-cloaked mountains, stopping first to marvel at Creevykeel Court Tomb. Dating from the late Stone Age it was the focal point for early settlers here, a place of ceremony and worship fulfilling most of the functions of the Christian churches of today. Excavated ashes and bone fragments indicate burials and cremations - ceremonial rites of passage we still perform today.

Our brief tour of North Sligo is over. Let us hope that this sweep of beautiful countryside may long remain unspoiled, and that the words of one English visitor a hundred years ago will be as valid tomorrow as they were then: ‘The charm of the place lies in its simplicity and the tranquil delight of doing nothing if one so chooses.’

Gleniff Horseshoe Entering the Gleniff Horseshoe, we see on our left the remains of an old barytes mill. Used in the manufacture of glass, paints, china, wallpaper and pre-Xray barium meals, barytes was mined here until the middle of the 20th century. In 1928 a railroad ran from here to Mullaghmore, built to ship the product out through the harbour there. Gleniff's industrial past is long gone and now the hills are a haven of peace and quiet. Driving around the horseshoe look at the arched cave 1,200 feet up the mountain, said to be the last hiding place of Diarmuid and Grainne in their perpetual flight from Fionn mac Cumhaill, leader of the Fianna. Grainne, daughter of the High King Cormac Mac Airt, was

Drumcliffe Co. Sligo This charming Tea House and Craft Shop offers good wholesome food together with mouth-watering home-made cakes and desserts. There is a selection of Yeats and Irish Interest Books to browse through, complimented by a distinctive selection of original quality Crafts. Enjoy the relaxed atmosphere and cheerful service with hassle free parking. Open daily all year round. Accessible to all. Licensed to sell wine.

Tel: 071-914 4956 Fax 071-914 8971 Email: drumcliffeteahouse@eircom.net Beside WB Yeats’ Grave 81

Touring Sligo

Now we turn left along the mountain road towards Sligo, into the Derelehan hinterland where the views of Ben Wiskin and Benbulben are spectacular at close range. It was here, on the slopes of Benbulben that Diarmuid met his end. While sleeping in the Gleniff cave, the couple were awakened by the baying of hounds hunting boar on the slopes of Benbulben.Word came that the boar was slaughtering Fionn and the Fianna. Grainne begged Diarmuid not to go, reminding him of the prophecy that he would meet his death by the great boar of Benbulben. Despite her entreaties, Diarmuid’s warrior instinct prevailed and he went out to meet his fate, killing the animal but being mortally wounded. Fionn, coming on Diarmuid in the pangs of death, felt sorry for him but would not save his unfaithful comrade, and thus ended his fabled pursuit of the lovers.


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Driving Tour of South Sligo

Lorely forrester

Use in conjunction with a road map people were left alive to bury the dead. Recovery was helped by the building of mills in 1833, which later thrived under the ownership of Middleton and Pollexfen, the poet Yeats’s relatives, whose ‘Avena’ flour became well known. It is said that while Dublin was still lit by gas, Ballysadare was ablaze with water-driven electricity.

Collooney Turn left over the bridge and we soon arrive in Collooney, passing the monument to Teeling, aide-de-camp to General Humbert. During the Year of the French, the decisive battle of Carricknagat took place here, in which Teeling fought with great valour.After the French surrender, which brought the revolution to an end, officers were exchanged, but this romantic hero of the 1798 Rising was treated like a common criminal and ignominiously hanged outside Arbour Hill Prison, still wearing his French uniform. He was 24. Collooney Station, once the junction for 3 railways, services only the Dublin train now.The castle, erected in 1225, was the first stone and mortar stronghold built in Connaught, and this leafy town was the scene of many battles between the King of Connaught and his rivals.The place was sold to Joshua Cooper in 1727 for £16,945 5s 6d.The Protestant Church was built in 1720, and later enlarged by Sir John Benson, a native of Collooney, who also built the Catholic Church in 1847. The mills, overlooking lovely falls behind Innisfree Crystal, were built in 1838 and provided a living for many. Later converted to produce woollen goods, they worked until the 1950’s. Markree Castle, now a hotel, lies nearby, still home to the Cooper family who have lived there since Cromwellian times when the land was given to Edward Cooper in lieu of pay. In 1832 another Edward Cooper founded an Observatory there which received worldwide acclaim.

Photo: ©BFdesign

South Sligo is a glorious patchwork - of pasture land rolling from the Ox to the Bricklieve and Curlew mountains, of lakes and rivers, of townlands and forts, of ruined castles and abbeys; a patchwork peopled with present inhabitants, but also with the figures of those who lived, loved and fought here long ago. And it is full of fable, that dream-like dimension where history and legend intertwine inextricably and forever. A day tour will reveal some of its secrets.

Ballymote Leaving Collooney we head south for Ballymote, passing near Annaghmore and Templehouse, ancestral homes of two of Sligo’s

Strandhill, Coney Island and Carrowmore We start at Strandhill, winding through pretty roads under the shadow of Knocknarea, an ever-present reminder of ancient times, whose 24m cairn, believed to be that of Queen Maeve of Connaught, is visible for miles. Also on top of the hill are the remains of a cashel or fort. In clear weather a walk to the top of the hill is rewarded with fabulous views across the whole of Sligo and its beautiful coastline. Beneath lies Coney Island, accessible at low tide across the sand. St Patrick is said to have visited the island, dug a well and installed his wishing chair on the western side. Drink at the well for 9 days and you may sit on the rock chair and make a wish - but only once a year! One of only 3 silver mines in Ireland was worked here. Resuming our journey, we come to Carrowmore and find the largest Megalithic burial ground in Ireland, where one of the tombs is possibly the oldest building in the world, thousands of years older than the Egyptian pyramids.

Ballysadare The Ballysadare River, famous for its salmon fishing - enters the sea in this bay. The Cooper family of Markree constructed the lift on the falls to introduce salmon to these rivers in the 18th century. Nothing in the village now hints at the devastation caused here by the cholera pandemic in 1832 when scarcely enough 82


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oldest families, the O’Haras and Percevals. Ballymote is a traditional market town which once had more pubs per capita than any place in Ireland. Granted the right to hold Fair Days twice a year in 1604, prosperity really came to the town in the mid 1700’s when the Earl of Shelbourne introduced linen production into the area.The Castle was built in 1300 by Richard de Burgo, Red Earl of Ulster. Its 3m thick walls contain 1m passages leading to 6 great towers.The marked walk beside the castle tells more of its history.The Book of Ballymote, a 502 page manuscript about Sligo’s history and families, compiled by monks in the castle in 1391 was sold in 1522 for 140 milk cows.The original is now in Dublin, but one of only 6 replicas ever made can be seen in The Coach House Hotel in the town.The Courthouse, built in 1813 was originally a Bridewell, or house of correction. Nearby is Eagles Flying, the raptor sanctuary where you can see many birds of prey and watch wonderful flying demonstrations.

Gurteen & Lough Gara

Kesh The name Kesh Corann comes from the legendary harper, Corann, who, they say, was rewarded for his musical skill with this land. There is a cairn on the summit, and caves can be seen 150m up the cliffs from the road beneath. Diarmuid and Grainne, eloping together on the night of her marriage to Fionn Mac Cumhaill are said to have sheltered here during their desperate flight from her husband and the Fianna. Cormac Mac Art, King of Ireland, born at the foot of Kesh Corann, was stolen (while his mother was drawing water from a nearby well) by a wolf who mothered the infant for a year in the caves, until he was finally found - a story made more plausible by the fact that some of the caves penetrate for miles. Each year the Lughnasa Festival to honour the Celtic god Lugh was held here, on Garland Sunday, the last Sunday in July. In nearby Toomore Churchyard lie the Kings and Princes of Connaught who fell at the Battle of Kesh.Their grave, known locally as The Altar, is close to the church. Excavations revealed 1,000 year-old bones here.

Castlebaldwin Tel: 071 916 5132

Ceol, Caint agus

Craic’

Open every day for BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER WELCOMES FAMILIES CHILDREN’S MENU

Ballinafad, Lough Arrow and Carrowkeel By small backroads we come to Ballinafad, the ‘entrance to the long ford’. A strategic point between the Curlew and Bricklieve mountains,The Castle of the Curlews with a round tower at each corner was built here in 1610 by Captain St John Barbe who received the land from James 1. Lough Arrow, a famous trout fishing lake is a picturesque and beautiful stretch of water, best seen from Carrowkeel above Castlebaldwin. Here, atop windswept hills is a cemetery with 14 cairns and passage tombs, some with classic cruciform chambers, 2 ruined dolmens and many circular stone foundations believed to be the remains of dwellings dating from 3,800 BC. McDermott’s Bar makes a good refreshment break here.

• TRADITIONAL MUSIC NIGHT ON FRIDAY • GAMES ROOM • WIDE SCREEN SPORTS • FUNCTION ROOM

Coopershill & Riverstown Turning right off the Sligo Road we come to Coopershill, where the Unshin and Douglas Rivers meet. The elegant house, built in 1774, was by local tradition paid for with ‘a tub of gold guineas’, but the last guinea was spent before the house had risen above ground level, so many foundations had to be laid in the soft ground for the access bridge. So bad was the situation that land had to be sold the pay the debts incurred. Riverstown lies between the two rivers.Visit Sligo Folk Park & Heritage Museum to see a collection of old agricultural machinery and artifacts. Disaster occurred in this village on Christmas Day, 1841 when the Catholic Chapel gallery collapsed, injuring over 40 people, but there were good times too - in November 1858 the town was illuminated by tar barrels and bonfires as 200 tenants gathered on horseback to escort Charles Cooper and his bride to Coopershill.A successful creamery was opened in 1898 whose butter (costing 9p per pound) won 1st prize at the London Butter Show in 1900!

WITH FULL DINING FACILITIES

Sooey, Ballygawley, Sligo Next we head to Coola Crossroads and turn left onto the R284 towards Sligo Town, passing the old forge at Sooey which has been restored and re-thatched.At Ballygawley we drive through Union Wood past the Lough. There is a walk along the lakeside. This is an area rich in wildlife, with otters, deer, falcons, mute swans, goldeneye, wigeon and teal. Nearby lies Castle Dargan, loved by Yeats for its 2 castles facing each other across a small lake. He described the ruins, seen at dead of night, mysteriously lit and filled with people from a by-gone age dancing to ghostly music, wrapped in another time. Here, fittingly, we leave South Sligo, its stories and fables, like Castle Dargan’s ghosts, fading back into the hills and townlands as quietly as its rivers slip down to the sea. 83

Proprietor Glen McDermot

Touring Sligo

We pass near Killavil and Mount Irwin where the old Abbey, founded by Edmund O’Gara in 1320, flourished until the monks were slaughtered at their prayers by Cromwell’s troops.They say the pure in heart can still hear monks chanting the unfinished office amidst the ruins. So we come to Gurteen where Michael Coleman’s life is celebrated. ‘Master of the fiddle’, Coleman had a lasting influence on traditional music in South Sligo, and the Coleman Centre ensures that his legacy endures. Further on, by Lough Gara, the massive 6 towered Moygara Castle, burned in 1581, was one of Sligo’s finest castellated buildings. More that 300 crannog sites (man-made platforms for dwellings) were found in the lake 50 years ago, some small islands, some just mounds – many occupied as early as 1000 BC.

BAR & RESTAURANT


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Driving Tour of West Sligo

Lorely Forrester

Use in conjunction with a road map

Knockalongy Photo: ©Naomi McBride

West Sligo, encompassing the ridge of the Ox Mountains and the stretch of lowland coastline running beneath them, is magnificent country with wild and rugged stretches of shoreline, fabulous beaches, lonely hill top lakes, renowned rivers, and some of the best blanket peat bog in Europe. Its views can be breathtaking, its scenery inspiring, and its history, as always, recounts man’s struggle with man, God and the elements. Let us take a day tour that will reveal some of the secrets of this landscape.

for Gillighan’s World at Knocknashee, or Mullinabreena, the Hill of the Fairy Palace which stands alone.A large Bronze Age fort once covered the hilltop. Children especially will enjoy stopping to visit the fairies who now inhabit the hill, and the views from the top are beautiful. Below lie the ruins of Court Abbey, built by the O’Haras in the 14th century. Nearby is the source of the famous salmon river, the Moy.

Tubbercurry & Banada Abbey Ballysadare We start our tour at the top of Ballysadare Bay where the river cascades into the sea. Overlooking the waterfall are the remains of a church built to St Fechin in the 7th century.Apparently he also had a salmon fishery and a watermill here even in those distant days.The river is still full of salmon, but many caught on a rod and line these days are returned. Ballysadare has often been a place of explosions, with the mills destroyed that way in 1856, and the bridge much later, after which the river had to be crossed by planks. Happily both were restored in due season, although the mills later fell into disuse and have now, sadly, been pulled down to build apartments. Now we cross the bridge and turn right onto the N59.

Coolaney & Knocknashee Taking the Coolaney turn, we climb into the Ox Moutains to this quiet little village.A local tale relates that a long-dead MacDonagh Chief gave two neighbouring areas as dowries to his daughters, Oonagh and Annie, hence the confusing names Collooney and Coolaney. Approaching the village we pass the strangely shaped Hawk’s Rock close to the Hawk’s Well - Tubber Scanavin. Yeats named a play after the well, and the theatre in Sligo Town has very fittingly taken the same name. Leaving the village we follow signs 84

Sligo’s second largest town lies at the foot of the Ox Mountains, and every April hosts the Western Drama Festival, and every July the South Sligo Summer School for Traditional Irish Music. The earliest historical reference to the town is 1397 when the O’Connors built a fortress here. For centuries Tubbercurry thrived, and in 1853 was further enhanced by its inclusion on Charles Bianconi’s route. Based in Sligo Town his wonderful horsedrawn open conveyances held up to 14 passengers seated back to back and facing outwards. These cars allowed regular travel to Ballina. In 1895 the railway line opened, but was closed in 1975. No hint remains today that the town was all but destroyed during a reprisal raid by the Black & Tans in September 1920. The main street burnt for days and it is said the gutters ran with petrol, porter, whiskey, melted soap and candle grease. 3km north-east of the town lies Achonry and the smallest Cathedral in Ireland, built in 1820 to hold 250 people, but there was a monastery on this site as early as 530 AD. Turning back towards the Ox Mountains, we soon come to quiet Banada. Hard to believe that in the 1850’s the main coach road passed through here and the thriving community had a pub,


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2 butchers, 2 coopers, 2 weavers, a shoemaker, a blacksmith, a corn mill, a pound and a kiln! The 5-arch bridge was built around 1800, but the Abbey dates from 1423 when it was home of the Jones family, but as 2 sons and 3 daughters embraced the church they gave the Abbey and its contents, including a silver chalice made in 1641, to the Sisters of Charity.

Leaving Enniscrone with a ruined O’Dowd castle and the sea on your left, come to Kilglass Protestant Church behind which is the old Abbey, believed to be the burial site of Duald MacFirbis of Lecan Castle. Historians of the O’Dowds, the MacFirbis family were scholars for 4 centuries, their home a centre of learing and culture. They compiled 3 major manuscripts on the history of Sligo.

Lough Talt & Lough Easkey Easkey This small village lies on the river of the same name, meaning ‘full of fish’, and is indeed famous for its salmon and trout.These days Easkey is even more famous for its surf, and has a Surf and Information Centre in the village. The Protestant Church of St Anne, burnt (along with many others along this coast) during the uprising of 1798, was rebuilt in 1820 at a cost of £1,238 15s 4d with a grant from the Board of First Fruits, and was restored in 2005. Down by the sea are the remains of Rosslea Castle and the old pier, a popular spot for fishermen. On the way out of the village lies the Split Rock. It is said that Fionn Mac Cumhaill, idling in the Ox Mountains, challenged a comrade to throw a stone to the sea, which he did. Fionn’s stone fell short, and in rage he split it with his sword. It is also said that if someone walks through the split 3 times, the rock will close on them! 5kms on, the road follows a sharp right-hand bend, near a distinctive modern water tower. We turn left instead, down Ballykillcash Hill to the coast road. At the top of this hill, on clear days, the view is spectacular, with the Sligo coast and much of Donegal laid out below.

Enniscrone or Inishcrone Reaching the N59 just past Dromore West we turn left, passing the remains of the old workhouse (now privately owned) where many were forced as a last resort to seek food and shelter during the famine. Continue on, turning right to Enniscrone, a little seaside holiday town famous for its sunsets. The 4km beach, including the ‘valley of the diamonds’ stretches invitingly into the distance, its great sand dunes forming part of the widely acclaimed golf course. Also renowned are Kilcullen’s Seaweed Baths, as popular now as they were when they opened in 1912!

Aughris Head Behind this beautiful stretch of coastline sits another controversial wind farm in the Ox Mountains. This area is a paradise for twitchers, with many species of seabird - gulls, shags, curlews, storm petrels, kittiwakes, fulmars and guillemots.Aughris Head can offer a wild and rugged cliff walk, a lovely beach with stunning views, and a pub close to the water. Round the corner, Dunmoran Strand is yet another lovely beach. Dolphins are often to be seen leaping and tossing all along this coast, and seals can also be spotted, their heads sticking up like little periscopes.

In the main street a large black pig (the huge creature made by local sculptor Cillian Rogers) recalls a tale - a huge boar ran amok in Donegal, devouring women and children. Pursued, it fled south, disappearing into the sea in Sligo and later emerging on Enniscrone beach. It was finally slain at nearby Mackduff, and being too big to bury was covered with a pile of stones which remain to this day.

Skreen and Ladies Brae Turning inland we come to Skreen, its name probably deriving from the latin for shrine. Adamnan, the saint who was biographer to St Columba, founded the church here in the 7th century, and his well is at the base of a pillar to the right of the road. The Protestant Church, founded in 1704, is particularly noted for its graveyard monuments, most of which were made by the local Diamond family, monumental masons for seven generations. The famous 19th century scientist, Stokes was born in the Rectory here. Close by, near the remains of Ardnaglas castle, the last wolf in Ireland was killed by a wolfhound, a beautifully carved stone marks the event! We turn towards Knockalongy, the highest peak in the Ox range, to take the scenic drive over the mountains known as Ladies Brae. The road winds along the side of the hill and suddenly offers panoramic views over the Sligo coastline - on a clear day a truly wonderful sight, revealing all the magic of this county, beloved by the poet Yeats and many others, before and since. The next left turn after this viewing point brings us to Beltra, a short distance from Ballysadare, which ends our tour. 85

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At the foot of Crummus peak lies beautiful Lough Talt, and on calm days when the water reflects the surrounding mountain, it is truly magical. A favourite spot for trout fishermen, and equally popular amongst walkers for the 6.5km circuit winding around the shore. Retracing the road for 3km to Mullaney’s Cross, turn left, then left again signed to Lough Easkey. A few miles up this winding road is Mass Hill where mass was said during the time of the Penal Laws. Here the Shaking Rock is to be found, a massive boulder high above the road which can be rocked by a touch of the hand, but which, miraculously, has never fallen. Sharing the road with mountain sheep we come to Lough Easkey, a solitary place with wide open skies, peat bog and a spare beauty. This lake is also popular with anglers who fish for trout and salmon. Leaving the Lough, and passing the remains of an old hunting lodge, we descend towards the coastal plain, fabulous views of the sea stretching before us.


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A Tour of Sligo’s Castles

Arthur Livingstone

Sligo has over 30 sites with names which include the word ‘castle’, 8 of which are in private hands and are well preserved and documented. Of the rest, although they lie in ruins, about a dozen are worth searching out, as they have either substantial remains or interesting associations. Sadly the rest have long since decayed to rubble, their valuable stone having been taken long ago to construct bridges or other buildings. I say ‘search out’ because unless you know where to look, some are hard to find, which is a shame. Just a few more signposts (and information boards at the sites themselves), would enable many people to enjoy this part of Sligo’s heritage.

This fortification was built in 1610 by Capt St John Barbe with grants received from James 1. Despite its romantic name, the castle has nothing to do with birds – curlew comes from the words meaning ‘rough mountains’ and the castle was indeed built to command the pass over the Curlew Mountains. Location: N 54° 01·566’W 008° 20·139’.

A good starting point is Ballymote Castle, right in the heart of the county, one of the easiest to find as it is situated in a public park next to the railway station. Here are the imposing remains of a fortified and originally moated castle built by Richard de Burgo, the ‘Red’ Earl of Ulster, in 1300. Its walls are 3m thick with 1m passages inside, and it had 6 towers, a 46m square courtyard and large accommodation areas on the north side. The castle changed hands many times – the English, Rory O’Connor, Sir Richard Bingham and the O’Rourkes all holding it at different times, but it came back into the possession of the McDonaghs time and again and it was they who sold it to the O’Donnell clan in1598 for the sum of £400 and 300 cows. It was from this spot that Hugh Roe O’Donnell set out on his ill-fated march to Kinsale in 1601. An information board is displayed at the ruined gateway to the castle. Location: N 54° 01·566’W 008° 20·139’.

Rejoining the N4, continue towards Sligo, and travel about 7km to the village of Castlebaldwin, and turn right onto a minor road. At the first junction, take a lane to the right, which encircles the site of Castle Baldwin and eventually rejoins the N4. The castle here was an L-shaped fortified house built in 1650 which subsequently belonged to Edward Nicholson, High Sherriff of Sligo. It was constructed after the traditional ‘castle’ had gone out of fashion and fortified houses were the style, but along with its high gables, chimney stacks and basement it had gun loops flanking the fireplace and a walkway at roof level – so defence still very much in mind! An information board has been erected by Duchas about 300 metres from the front of the castle ruin. Location: N 54° 04·746’ W 008° 21·980’. Our next stop is Moymlough Castle (pronounced ‘Meemlagh). To reach this site, continue on the N4 to Collooney, turn left at the second roundabout, and almost immediately right to bypass the town. Cross the river and then take the first left, signposted ‘Coolaney 8’. 1km on, the road crosses the disused railway line and after another 2km turn left, re-cross the railway line and traverse an S-shaped bridge over the river. After 1.5km the ivy-covered ruin of Moymlough Castle comes into view. Another tower house, it replaced the ancient castle of the O’Hara’s built in the 15th century. Although only 3 storeys remain, it was probably higher and measured 9.4m by 5.5m. Features which can clearly be seen from the road are the intramural staircase and the distinct ‘batter’ to the lower two metres of the outer walls. Part of a garderobe is also visible. Moymlough continued to be one of the strongholds of the O’Hara Buidhe, the lords of Leyney. Sadly its sister castle at Coolaney has entirely disappeared, having been recycled to build the new bridge in 1833. Location: N 54° 10·334’ W 008° 33·806’.

From here, drive south to Gurteen, and join the R294 Ballina–Boyle road for 5km (towards Boyle) to Mullaghroe. 50m before the sign ‘Monastarden 6’, turn left onto a minor, unmarked road, and after about 1km, on rising ground ahead lie the extensive ruins of Moygara Castle, which is in a relatively good state of preservation. It was an ancient stronghold of the O’Garas, princess of Coolavin, and in its time was one of the best examples of a castellated building in Sligo. About 57m square, with a battlemented 12m high tower at each corner and 1 in the centre of both east and west walls, it must have been impressive. The walls were loopholed for firearms, and there was extensive accommodation on the western side, although the portcullis sadly no longer remains on this wall. In 1581 it was burned by the Governor of Connacht. A sycamore tree in the south eastern corner of the castle is said to be the shoot of one on which O’Gara hanged miscreants. The castle is surrounded by pasture land, but farm lanes extend almost around all four sides. Location: N 53° 58·821’W 008° 27·850’. From here, continue towards Boyle, 10km away, and take the N4 Sligo road in the direction of Sligo, which crosses the Curlew Mountains. At the foot of the descending slope, turn right into the village of Ballinafad, and park in the castle grounds.The four towers of Ballinafad Castle are clearly visible on a mound overlooking the village and the main road.

Proceed for 0.5km and turn right to Coolaney village, cross the aforementioned bridge, and continue over the Hungry Rock pass to join the Sligo–Ballina N59 near Beltra, then turn left to Skreen.

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Take right turn signposted ‘Dunmoran’ for 1.5km, then right over a small bridge and uphill, passing a sign for Dunmoran Strand. At the first junction over the hill, turn right.The ruin of Ardnaglass Castle stand about 200 metres along this road, in a field on the left. Ardnaglass was one of the many castles of the O’Dowds, lords of Tireragh. It is said that the last wild wolf in Ireland was killed by a wolfhound belonging to the O’Dowds. A stone carving commemorating this event was inserted into the castle wall, but is now in the museum of the Royal Academy of Ireland. Location: N 54° 15·322’W 008° 42·436’. The McFirbis family, historians and bards to generations of the O’Dowds, lived at Kilglass near Enniscrone and wrote The Yellow Book of Lecan there. A plaque there commemorates them and their manuscript, which is in the care of the Royal Irish Academy – a nice memorial, and one which all Sligo’s heritage sites deserve!

Carrowkeel 14 cairns remain on the hilltops here in the Bricklieve Mountains, with 6 more extending towards Keshcorran. Nearby circular stone foundations are believed to be the remains of dwellings from around five and a half thousand years ago. Cremated human remains and Bronze Age artefacts have also been found.

Carrowkeel 14 cairns remain on the hilltops here in the Bricklieve Mountains, with 6 more extending towards Keshcorran. Nearby circular stone foundations are believed to be the remains of dwellings from around five and a half thousand years ago. Cremated human remains and Bronze Age artefacts have also been found.

Supposedly the cairn of the Queen of Connaught, this passage tomb dates from c.3000BC and remains unexcavated. Close by the remains of dwellings, pottery and stone axes have been discovered.

Caves and Cairns at Keash There is a cairn at the summit of this 365m hill. The caves below, which apparently delve many km into the hillside, allegedly sheltered Cormac MacArt, King of Ireland, and Diarmuid and Grainne. In nearby Toomore churchyard lie the kings and princes of Connaught.

Other Places of Interest

Irish Raptor Charity Ltd.

Parkes Castle

Ballymote, Co. Sligo Tel/Fax: 071 918 9310

This restored castle built by Roger Parke in 1610 sits on the shore of Lough Gill. The courtyard grounds contain evidence of an earlier 16th century Tower House once owned by Sir Brian O’Rourke who was later hanged at Tyburn in London in 1591.The castle has been beautifully restored using Irish oak and traditional craftsmanship.

www.eaglesflying.com Scientifically managed sanctuary for birds of prey and owls

A visit to Eagles Flying is fun for all the family. The highly entertaining and interactive shows at Ireland's largest Bird of Prey Centre mean excitement, photo opportunities and the chance to get close-up with birds of prey. Experience Eagles, Hawks and Vultures flying right over your head or landing beside you.You have never been that close to such a bird.There are more than 100 birds of prey - some with a wingspan of more than 3 metres. If you are lucky, you can fly or touch one of them during the show. If you like more cuddly creatures, you can stroke the animals in our large Pet-Zoo.

Sligo Abbey This was originally a Dominican Friary, founded in the mid 13th century by Maurice Fitzgerald. It is the only medieval building left standing in Sligo.The site contains a great wealth of carvings including Gothic and Renaissance tomb sculpture, a well preserved cloister and the only sculpted 15th century High Altar to survive in any Irish monastic church.

FLYING DEMONSTRATIONS

daily at 11am & 3pm (60 min. each approximately)

Boyle Abbey

Open: 10.30 –12.30 & 2.30–4.30 1st April – 7th November inc.

This well preserved Cistercian Monastery was founded in the 12th century under the patronage of the local ruling family, the MacDermotts. It was used to accommodate a garrison in the 17th and 18th centuries which resulted in mutilation, but it stil retains much to interest the visitor, including an exhibition in the restored gatehouse which dates from the 16th century.

Pet Zoo

We have rabbits, guinea-pigs, geese, ducks, hens, lambs, goats, donkeys and more,

so a visit is fun for all the familiy.

FREE PARKING FOR CARS AND COACHES To Find Us:

Drive from Ballymote towards Temple House / Ballinacarrow or from the N17 towards Temple House / Ballymote. Our GPS co-ordinates: N54°06.133´ W8°34.094´

Carrowmore Megalithic Cemetary The largest megalithic cemetary in Ireland, it contains over 60 tombs, although only half are visible. Some date back six and a half thousand years, making them older than the Egyptian pyramids. A restored cottage houses an exhibition relating to the site.

Beat the rain - Now with indoor display area 87

Heritage

Knocknarea Tomb


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The Yeats Society Yeats Memorial Building Hyde Bridge Sligo Tel: 071 914 2693 Email: info@yeats-sligo.com www.yeats-sligo.com

Yeats International Summer School – 50 Years! Welcome to the Yeats International Summer School, Sligo, which this year celebrates its 50th anniversary! It is certainly not a moment that we shall let pass without celebrations. As usual, we offer a full academic programme of lectures and seminars by many well-known scholars and a great gathering of Irish poets who will be reading their work in the evenings. Some of the most exciting names in modern poetry are here, including Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, Eavan Boland, Dennis O’Driscoll, Gerald Dawe, Julie O’Callaghan, Bernard O’Donoghue, Leontia Flynn, Moya Cannon, Peter Fallon, and others.

The famous Drama Workshop, run by Sam and Joan McCready, will run throughout the two weeks and culminate in the production of a Yeats play. Award-winning poet Sinead Morrissey will conduct the Poetry Workshop which takes place over the central weekend. There will be an unusually exciting round of music sessions, concerts, and afternoon excursions to the surrounding Yeats country. Our lecturers include Denis Donoghue, who directed the first Yeats summer school here 50 years ago, and other former directors of the school, including John

Kelly, Ron Schuchard, Bernard O’Donoghue and Elizabeth Butler Cullingford. One of the key factors in shaping the success of the summer school has been the commitment and dedication of the people of Sligo, particularly members of the Yeats Society, who have kept the torch burning all these years. All of the teachers and students at the school owe a great debt of gratitude to those people in Sligo who have voluntarily worked to make things happen in the summer months. The school’s programme is simple: lectures in the morning, seminars in the afternoon and plenty of opportunities to visit those legendary places which have drawn people to this part of the country over many years: Drumcliffe, Ben Bulben, Knocknarea, Glencar, Lissadell, Carrowmore, Ballylee and Coole Park. The Yeats country has always been an inspiring place to visit and we fully anticipate that students will be coming here for another 50 years. We are delighted that you have made the journey to Sligo and we hope that you will have a most fulfilling fortnight here in the place that most influenced the poet. Jonathan Allison, Director of the 2009 Summer School

Highlights of 2009 Summer School, 25th July - 7th August 2009 Patrons: Mrs Grainne Yeats and Miss Caitriona Yeats Denis Donoghue (New York University) directed the first school and now returns to deliver a lecture entitled ‘Three Presences: Yeats, Eliot and Pound’. Helen Vendler (Harvard University) officially opens the school on 25 July. She will give seminars on Yeats’s middle and later poems and present a lecture: ‘Vacillation: the Yeatsian Contraries’. John Kelly (a former director of the school) will lecture on the relationship between the poet and his father, John Butler Yeats. Seamus Heaney, Vona Groarke, Michael Longley, David Fitzpatrick (Trinity College, Dublin) will discuss the relationship Julie O’Callaghan, Helen Vendler, Denis Donoghue, between the Yeats and Pollexfen families and Sligo. Liz Cullingford, Roy Foster For a full list of other speakers, lectures, seminars and readings see our website. Lectures: 9.30am and 11.15am (weekdays) in the Hawk's Well Theatre Seminars: Groups meet daily from 4.30-6pm. Evenings: Special presentations by writers, musicians, dancers and storytellers. Plays, concerts and other events are normally run as part of a Sligo festival at this time. Student members of the drama workshop will produce a play on the final Friday evening. Tours: See our website for list of optional tours Social Centre: The Yeats Memorial Building is open daily for study, relaxation, networking with lecturers and fellow students etc.

The Sligo Tea Room Yeats Memorial Building Douglas Hyde Bridge Sligo 087 620 6931

Open: 9am – 5pm Monday - Saturday 88


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New Facilities in Ceoláras Coleman The Traditional Music & Visitor Centre Gurteen

Arigna Co Roscommon

Heritage

The most exciting and innovative news on the Irish music scene is the availability of the brand new exhibition and information unit at Ceoláras Coleman in Gurteen. In this purpose built facility there is a stunning audio visual presentation. In the beautifully laid out exhibition area, there are no less than ten touch screens. Three of these are devoted to the music and musical styles of Sligo, Mayo, Roscommon, Leitrim, Fermanagh and the USA. This is a wide but fascinating spectrum. Two touch screens provide a comprehensive display of photographs, spanning a period of half a century. Music structure and styles are comprehensively covered in further touch screens and there is also one dealing with archive material. The final touch screen deals with dancing and dancing instruction.

Discover and experience the life of a coal miner through a unique underground tour in what was Ireland's last working coal mine which closed in 1990. The mines operated for 400 years and the work of a miner was exhausting and often hazardous with working conditions that were very harsh and cramped.

The 2009 programme has commenced with two very successful traditional music concerts. The summer programme is about to get under way. There will be twice weekly sessions, commencing on the first week of July on Wednesday and Saturday nights until the end of August, music by local and visiting musicians. There will also be singing and step dancing. The shows start each night at 9pm. Admission is €10 and group bookings will be catered for.

This mine opened as a tourist attraction in 2003 and has proved very popular with visitors. The tour guides are all exminers who deliver a very interesting and informative tour.

The annual Coleman Traditional Festival takes place from August 28-30 and the musical variety is wide. There will be an old style ‘Ramblin House’, a Céilí, fiddle playing competitions and great traditional music sessions. Into the autumn, further concerts and events are planned.

Come and take a journey underground through a part of our natural history which you have only ever been able to read about until now. Relax after your tour and have a cup of coffee in our coffee shop and enjoy the breathtaking views over Lough Allen and the Arigna Valley.

The Music/Gift Shop in Ceoláras is renowned for its variety and quality of stock. Music books, instruments, a full range of CDs and a lovely selection of pottery and craftware are to be had at competitive prices. All events take place in the comfortable 140 seat theatre at Ceoláras Coleman.

The Arigna Mining experience is open all year, seven days a week from 10am-6pm daily.

The Coleman website, www.colemanirishmusic.com is a well designed and informative source for all current information and also a valuable shopping experience for the best in traditional and general music CDs and books at keenest prices.

For further information, please contact us at: 071 964 6466 Email: info@arignaminingexperience.ie

Tel: 071 918 2599 Fax: 071 918 2602 Email: info@colemanirishmusic.com www.colemanirishmusic.com

www.arignaminingexperience.ie 89


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County Sligo Heritage & Genealogy Centre County Sligo Heritage & Genealogy Centre Aras Reddan Temple Street Sligo Tel: 071 914 3728 Email: info@sligoroots.com Website: www.sligoroots.com

In fact, the total number of records on the computer database now exceeds 450,000 - a figure which is still growing, with the staff at the Centre currently in the process of computerising the 1911 census for County Sligo.

Most popular Sligo Surnames….. According to this database, the most popular surnames for Co Sligo are as follows: Brennan Conlon Connor Beirne Donnell Feeney Flynn Gallagher Gillan Gilmartin Hart Healy Higgins Kelly Loughlin MacDonagh MacGowan Mullaney O'Hara Scanlon Walsh Generally speaking the vast majority of the records held on this database relate to people who were baptized or married, or lived or died in Co Sligo over the past 250 years.

Genealogy and Family History…. Genealogical Research or Family History Research seems to be ‘all the rage’ at the moment… The curious challenge of plotting the descent of a person, family, or group from an ancestor or ancestors is proving a somewhat addictive hobby for many – even developing into an obsession for some. In fact, many observers say, it is becoming one of the world's most popular pastimes, with millions of people around the globe currently investigating their origins. The local Genealogical Research Centre for County Sligo, based in the North West Tourism Centre in Temple Street reports a significant surge in interest over the past couple of years, with the Centre’s staff now dealing with an average of over 2000 enquiries annually.

‘Though leaves are many – the root is one’ Other scientific advances too have huge potential to offer. In fact, DNA testing, one of the most amazing scientific discoveries of the past 50 years has a direct application in the field of Genealogical Research. Put simply, a Y-chromosome is passed from father to son with only a slight change every 500 years or so. This means that it should be possible to test the extended members of a family group to see if they really do come from the same genetic root.

A ‘high tech’ pursuit……. Genealogical research itself is increasingly becoming a ‘high tech’ pursuit and is considered one of the most popular uses for Information Technology and the modern home computer. It’s not surprising then to learn that Genealogy is rated amongst the five most searched for items on the internet, with the local Genealogy Centre for County Sligo’s website www.sligoroots.com receiving upwards of 20,000 visits each year. This Information Technology also affords us the opportunity of researching from the comfort of our own homes taking advantage of The Irish Family History Foundation Online Research System (ORS). As an accredited IFHF centre, Co Sligo Heritage and Genealogy Society forms part of this online research system. The site contains the largest collection of Parish records for County Sligo.The indexes, listing surname, first name, year and county of all records online are available to search freely, but for further information there is also the option to view a detailed record by purchasing credit online for instant access at a cost of €5.00 per record. You can start researching your Sligo roots by visiting www.sligo.brsgenealogy.com

Old meets new…. Traditionally, Family History Research involved visiting Libraries, Churches and Record Repositories and sifting through old books, documents and microfilms. This type of research was often painstakingly slow, time consuming and physically draining mainly because many of the old handwritten records and registers were notoriously difficult to decipher, or had become faded or damaged with the passing of time. Also, as names and addresses were not standardized and were usually entered on a chronological basis, it often took a considerable length of time to search through Registers or Microfilm reels to trace members of a particular family. This became even more complex and difficult if the Family moved to another Parish or County. Thankfully, things are a little different nowadays and help is at hand with County Sligo Heritage & Genealogy Centre offering a comprehensive genealogical research service to those wishing to trace their County Sligo ancestry. The Centre’s staff have successfully utilised computer technologies since their emergence in the mid 1980’s and now have a wealth of source records computerized. This comprehensive database is used by staff to carry out research on behalf of those wishing to trace their County Sligo ancestry.

Genealogy – the new gardening? Some say ‘genealogy is the new gardening’, which may sound surprising at first, but on analysis, you may find the two have more in common than you might think. Both require large amounts of patience, time and dedication. It takes time to weed out the irrelevant records from the ones you are interested in. Both disciplines can take months of work to bear fruit – but when they do, that ‘fruit’ is enjoyed by many and for a long time.

The main Church records computerized include: Roman Catholic Church of Ireland Presbyterian Methodist

Additional Information regarding the service: Co. Sligo Heritage & Genealogy Centre receives its main support under the Community Services Programme, which is managed by Pobal, an agency of the Department of Community, Gaeltacht & Rural affairs. County Sligo Heritage & Genealogy Society also gratefully acknowledges the assistance of FAS, Sligo County Council, Failte Ireland and Co. Sligo Leader Partnership Co. Ltd

Other major sources computerized include: The 1901 Census for County Sligo Griffith's Valuation records 1856 Tithe Applotment Books 1823 The Elphin Diocesan Census of 1749 Gravestone inscriptions 90


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Barton Smith Lock & Safe Est 1788

Our Business is your Security

Locksmith Service Safe Engineers Master Keying Biometrics

Keycutting Architectural Ironmongery High Security Locks & Padlocks

Millennium House, Stephen Street, Sligo O71 914 4344 www.barton-smith.ie E-mail info@barton-smith.ie

Unlocking the past - Coney Island

Lorely Forrester

St Patrick is said to have lived here in 450AD and is the hero of many tales. A well sprang up where he planted his staff, and his Wishing Chair stands to the north, an erratic boulder, on which you can sit and make a wish once a year, but only if you have drunk at the well for 9 days! But the main tale relates that Patrick, busy building a causeway to Strandhill, sent a message to the Widow Mulclohy that he fancied rabbit for his dinner. Alas and alack, instead - when he sat down to say grace - the cover flew off the platter and a spitting, hissing cat leaped out. Patrick was so disgusted he abandoned his work and left the island, the tiny cone-shaped isle of Doonanpatrick the only remnant of his efforts. They say the Saint, far from blessing the old crone, prayed that 4 Mulclohy sons would never live together to carry a parent to the grave. More likely, he wished a plague of rabbits on her, which would explain how Inishmulclohy came to be called Coney Island!

Although popular for summer breaks, by 1749 there was still only one established house on the island, that of Bryan McGowan, his wife and 2 children. Things improved, and nearly a century later there were 24 houses and a thriving community but the cholera and famine took their toll and caused a sharp decline in the population. By 1901 it was reduced to just 62 and the 1940’s sealed the island’s fate. A dwindling few still thatched their houses, made hay in the tiny fields, manned the drinking-water pump, dug potatoes, milked cows and fed poultry.The post boat brought mail from Rosses Point, men fished and set their lobster pots. And with neither telephones nor electricity, at night islanders tuned a crackling wireless or swapped yarns over a turf fire before going to bed by candlelight to listen to the age old swell of the Atlantic under their windows. The island’s two roads became overgrown – one passing the row of cottages where Owen Tweedy lived next to the pub, the other skirting north to White Strand, home to generations of Cartys. The school closed – no more McGowans, Higgins, Feeneys, Harans or Cartys to answer the roll-call. Fine Spanish ornaments, passed down since the wreck of the Armada galleon, were packed away from mantelpieces and dressers in Pollnamaddow and Shanbally. Cottages were deserted, old people died, the young emirated.

The rabbits thrived.The earliest record of the island is a letter John Baxter wrote to the Earl of Ormond in 1599, recommending it as a possible safe garrison for 5000 troops who, he said, could camp amongst the bushes and ‘gather a great store of oysters, cockles, mussels and coneys’; and by 1616 a Chancery Inquisition refers to the island as ‘Inishmulclohy, alias the Cony Island’. Owen Tweedy, whose family owned the island for many years, recounts that in the mid 1700’s the good ship Arethusa plied between Sligo Port and North America, and that it was her captain who named the island off New York for his own native Coney Island because it, too, was swarming with rabbits. The saint’s ‘causeway’ finally came about in 1845 when 14 markers were built across Cummeen Strand. Lined up between the old Scarden Mills and Blackrock lighthouse, the idea was that on dark nights travellers would be guided by the flashing lights.They were constructed to prevent further deaths, as 28 people had drowned in the preceding century. Many were saved – some by clinging to rings specially embedded in the pillars, but others like Martin McGowan and Roger Moffit, crossing the causeway one January

The wheel had turned full circle and the island was eventually abandoned, its small walled fields and central bogland once again just a haven for curlew, plover, snipe and the countless rabbits, who might, or might not, have been put there by St Patrick.

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night in1890, were caught by the turning tide and swept away. Little is told of Coney’s silver and lead mine, one of only 3 in Ireland. It was working in the 1600’s – Boate describes it in his Natural History of Ireland (published 1652) as being ‘upon the very mouth of Sligo, in a little desert island, called Coney Island.’ But the island seems to have been better known as a holiday resort than for its silver. Not surprising considering its panoramic views, just surprising that its heyday as a holiday destination was in the early 1800’s! Inglis, recording his Irish travels in 1834 was amazed to meet so many carts laden with country people and furniture. He learned, ‘with some astonishment that they were on their way to seabathing. A few weeks passed at the seaside is looked upon to be absolutely necessary for the preservation of health.’ Many of these tourists, known at the time as ‘sea-pikes’, came to Coney Island – apparently 400 of them one summer.

Coney Island is just 2 km long and spans under 400 acres, but it lies within sight of the mainland and twice a day the sands of Cummeen Strand stretch invitingly from Strandhill, making it temptingly accessible. But beware, when the tide rushes in, the wide, smooth beach is gone and the island shuts itself off once again.

Photo: ©BFdesign

EF


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Lunch - á la Carte Name Austies Bar & Restaurant Bella Vista Bar & Restaurant Bistro Bianconi Café Fleur Café Society Castle Dargan Hotel Cawley’s Guesthouse Chez Phillippe City Hotel Clarence Hotel Classiebawn Restaurant Clevery Mill Davis’s@Yeats Tavern Hall Door Restaurant Hazelwood Restaurant Kings Chinese Restaurant Kitchen Restaurant,The McDermott’s Bar&Restaurant Poppadom Restaurant Riverbank Restaurant Sakura Restaurant Shenanigans Bar&Restaurant Silver Apple,The Stables,The Sinergie Restaurant Quays Bar&Restaurant Venue,The Tobergal Lane Café Tom Yam (Corner House) Waterfront Bar&Restaurant

Breakfast

Name Page No. Bella Vista Bar & Restaurant 70, 92 Café Society 93 Castle Dargan Hotel 39, 40, 96, 104, 106 Cawley’s Guesthouse 69, 106 City Hotel 92, 107 Clarence Hotel 12 Classiebawn Restaurant 95 Hall Door Restaurant 96, 106 Hazelwood Restaurant 109 Kitchen Restaurant,The 98, 108 Sligo Tea Room 86 Sinergie Restaurant 101, 107 Quay’s Bar&Restaurant 92, 107 Tom Yam (Corner House) 100

Sunday Lunch

Name Austies Bella Vista Bar & Restaurant Bistro Bianconi Castle Dargan Hotel Cawley’s Guesthouse City Hotel Clarence Hotel Classiebawn Restaurant Clevery Mill Coach Lane@Donaghy’s Davis’s@Yeats Tavern Hall Door Restaurant Hazelwood Restaurant Kitchen Restaurant,The Langs Bar&Restaurant McDermott’s Bar&Restaurant Riverbank Restaurant Shenanigans Bar&Restaurant Silver Apple,The Stables,The Sinergie Restaurant Tobergal Lane Café Tom Yam (Corner House) Quay’s Bar&Restaurant Venue,The Waterfront Bar&Restaurant

Page No. 92 70, 92 93 39, 40, 96, 104, 106 69, 106 92, 107 12 95 93 95 66, 96 96, 106 109 98, 108 98 80, 98 100 101 99 14 101, 107 12, 101 100 92, 107 14, 102 68, 102

Page No. 92 70, 92 93 54 93 39, 40, 96, 104, 106 69, 106 56 92, 107 12 95 93 66, 96 96, 106 109 97 98, 108 80, 98 91, 99 100 100 101 100 14 101, 107 92, 107 14, 102 12, 101 100 68, 102

Takeaway

Name Bistro Bianconi Café Fleur Café Society Davis’s@Yeats Tavern Gourmet Parlour Hall Door Restaurant Johnston’s Court Kate’s Kitchen King’s Chinese Restaurant McDermott’s Bar&Restaurant Poppadom Resaurant Quayside Shopping Centre Sakura Restaurant Tom Yam (Corner House)

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Brighten your day!

Poppadom 34 O’Connell Street Tel: 071 914 7171 Fax: 071 914 7474 Email: poppadomireland@hotmail.com www.poppadom.ie

Going out to eat, whether it’s for a cup of tea and a scone, a quick lunch, or a leisurely meal, is always a treat. It’s a time to relax, often to enjoy the company of a friend or loved one, and always to let someone else do all the work! In times of stress it should almost be on prescription, ‘eat out three times a day – with meals.’ The trouble is, when financial difficulties loom over the whole country, eating out is often the first thing that goes by the board.

Delight in the

journey

Given the choice, I wouldn’t particularly want boiled eggs, coffee and brandy on a regular basis, but – obviously – that’s not the point. We are all saving money, ‘growing our own’, ‘dining out at home’ and generally cutting back. But it’s not the same as going out, whether it’s for a boiled egg or a fabulous four course meal. And going out now and again isn’t going to precipitate us into financial ruin, but it is going to make us all feel alot more positive about life.

Of Asian Flavours

And there’s never been more to go out for. Sligo’s cafes and restaurants get better and better with every passing year. There’s greater choice, more of our food is produced locally (or in Ireland), and the standard of how it is cooked and presented gets higher all the time. In part, we have the ‘global village’ to thank for that. Sligo, like other places, has become home to people from every continent and all cultural backgrounds. Inevitably they have brought their ideas and cuisines with them. In Sligo we now have two shops specialising in food from the eastern side of the EU, and it is possible to buy ingredients that, not so very long ago, you’d have had to travel to Dublin or further for – Lebanese, Moroccan, Indian, Japanese to name just a few. All of these influences have enriched and enlarged the possibilities for eating out in the county, which offers a wonderfully diverse range of choices.

3 course set menu from €18.95 available 5pm - till late Sun - Thu 5pm - 7pm Fri & Sat

Which isn’t to say that Sligo has lost its Irish cuisine. Happily, there are many restaurants that specialise in making the old favourites, many with a new, modern twist that bring additional flavour and flair. And with such good, locally produced ingredients to hand, they are really doing the old traditions proud.With such variety, not just of menu, but also of price range (and to help you, Discover Sligo has added the price of each restaurant’s cheapest main course to the information bar) you can be sure of finding a restaurant or cafe that will make your experience of eating out all that it should be – something to brighten your day.

Poppadoms 93

The best of Indian Cuisine

Good Food

Which is a shame, and also short-sighted. Because the recession is probably causing more general stress than anything else at the moment, and going out for a meal now and again would make us all feel better, brighter and more able to cope. And it doesn’t need to break the bank (which, let’s face it, is looking pretty battered anyway!) It’s about doing something because you enjoy it, and because it makes your day special. I remember being in a renowned cafe in Paris once, late one evening, and watching an elderly couple come in. They were ushered to a seat by a waiter who solicitously asked if they would like their usual order. A few moments later he brought a tray and laid before them, as if it were lobster thermidor, boiled eggs, coffee and brandy.


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Bella Vista

Austies Bar & Restaurant

Bar & Bistro

Shore Road Strandhill Tel: 071 912 2222 / 071 916 8400 Email: bellavistapizzeria@eircom.net www.bellavista.ie

Rosses Point Tel: 071 917 7111

This favourite hostellery in scenic Rosses Point has just had it's restaurant re-opened by chef Padraic O’Luana who happily plans to retain all the things that made it such a popular place the lovely old bar full of nautical maps, pictures and mementos, for one. The view over the estuary to Oyster Island is a wonderful accompaniment to the food, which is served all day. Seafood specials change daily and Padraic will cook freshly caught fish ‘Catch of the day’ brought in by local fishermen. During the summer months the garden area to the front will be the scene of barbecues as well as a nice place to sit with a drink. Duck, Irish stew, pasta dishes, steak, chilli and sandwiches are amongst the options on offer.

Open All Year 7 Days Bar 12noon Y Restaurant 12noon Y 10.30pm (inc Sunday)

A choice of 34 authentic gourmet pizzas on one menu is pretty impressive, even by an Italian’s standards, but to find that choice in such a fabulous location as Strandhill in County Sligo is wonderful.

Bella Vista opened in May 2004 and moved to the current premises in late 2007 and quickly established itself as one of the most popular restaurants in the area. In addition to its comprehensive choice of pizzas, it also offers delicious pasta, meat, seafood and vegetarian dishes. For those on gluten-free diets, glutenfree pizza bases are available at a small extra cost, and there are Coeliac friendly options as well. Guests can watch their pizzas being made in the open-plan kitchen off the dining room upstairs, or they can gaze out over the Atlantic Ocean as they enjoy – ‘bella vista’ indeed! There is a further dining area downstairs which is cosily wrapped around the central wooden bar and the elegant, curved staircase.

Full Licence Main Course from €9

Proprietors: Gerry & Louise Kilgallon Easy parking

Quays Bar & Restaurant Sligo City Hotel Quay Street Sligo Tel: 071 914 4000 Email: info@sligocityhotel.com www.sligocityhotel.com

Sligo City Hotel is a great place to stay or just to dine.The spacious Quays Bar and Restaurant are popular with both residents and locals who enjoy the welcoming atmosphere. We pride ourselves on consistent quality and good service, which is reflected in our award-winning chef’s menus. We serve a 3 Course carvery lunch daily from 12.30-2.30pm for just €10, perfect for a quick bite or a leisurely meal. A delicious evening menu is available every day, and also an extensive Bar Food menu.

The centrally located hotel caters for groups and special occasions for up to 200 people. Private car and coach parking is available, or there is a taxi rank opposite the hotel.

Open All Year 7 days Bar 10.30am Y

Breakfast 10am – 5pm Lunch 12noon – 5pm Pizza and Pasta 1pm – 10pm À la carte 5 - 10pm Full Licence Pizza, Pasta & Burger Takeaway Disabled access

Italian family values are very important at Bella Vista – in fact they form the basis of the restaurant’s motto: ‘It’s all about the family’. Connie and Mark Ballantine are very good at making families welcome when they go out to eat, and provide toys and even a baby gate so that parents sitting in a designated area of the restaurant can relax and enjoy their meal.

Open All Year 7 days Lunch 12.30 - 2.30pm

A sports bar at the back of the restaurant with Setanta, Sky and a large screen means that you need never miss another big game! There is also an outdoor seating area to make the most of sunny days, and other facilities include a book exchange, Wi-Fi and CyberStations internet access.

Bar Menu 2.30pm Y Dinner 6 - 9pm

Full Licence

Recommended by Georgina Campbell’s Good Food Guide 2009 and Hilary Fannin in The Irish Times as one of three recommended places to eat in Sligo.

Main Course from €10 94

Proprietor: Mark & Connie Ballantine

Baby-changing facilities Main Course from €11.95


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Bistro Bianconi

Café Society

44 O’Connell Street Sligo Town Tel: 071 914 1744 Email: dale@bistrobianconi.ie www.bistrobianconi.ie

3 Teeling Street Sligo Town Tel: 071 914 2712/3

Pizza, a particular speciality, is the mainstay of the lunchtime menu, alongside paninis and salads, and it would be hard to imagine a wider selection than the Bistro offer. From the street you can see the chefs hard at work kneading, shaping and spinning the dough at all times of day. Apart from all the usual favourites, the Bistro have some of their own specials to tempt your tastebuds, as well as a complete gourmet range, including pizzas topped with local Sligo cheese and smoked salmon, frutti di mare,Thai chilli lime dressing, and the chef’s off-the-cuff special!

Open All Year 6 days Mon - Sat Lunch Mon – Sat Noon - 2.30pm

The cheerful atmosphere and friendly service make eating in Café Society a pleasure, and best of all, it offers great value for money. We offer wholesome, healthy dishes freshly prepared each day using local and organic produce where possible. Vegetarian, vegan, low-fat and glutenfree diets readily available

Dinner 5.30pm – late Full Licence Main Course from €9.95

Offering free delivery within a 6km radius from 5pm-midnight, the Take Away offers the same extensive pizza selection as the main restaurant.They also offer gourmet salads and a world-wide selection of wines. Credit and laser card bookings are accepted by phone.

Parties, office meetings and other events catered for Main Course from €4.50

Clevery Mill Restaurant & Guest House Castlebaldwin Tel: 071 912 7424

Clevery Mill, which dates back to the 1700’s, has been lovingly restored, with an attention to detail which is reflected in everything about this restaurant and guest house. Steeped in history, the interior is adorned with old photos and perfectly placed antiques, the exterior with stone from old mills. The intimate, cosy atmosphere at Clevery doesn’t in any way detract from its simple elegance. Immaculate white linen, soft lighting and the unbeatable ambience created by an open log fire in the bar make eating here a thoroughly enjoyable experience. Add to that the fact that this is a restaurant that has won several awards, and you know you are in for a real treat.The chef uses locally sourced ingredients to create delicious menus – like fillet of Riverstown beef, breast of Thornhill duck, and fish from our own north west waters. There are also exciting vegetarian options.

The atmosphere is informal and easy, with tables in several separate areas. Plants add greenery and Moroccan style mirrors everywhere reflect the soft lighting effectively.

35 High Street Sligo Town Delivery: 071 914 7000

Mon – Sat 8.30am – 9.30pm

Proprietor: Anita Patil *Closed at Christmas

From 5.30pm an à la carte menu is also available, which has an extensive range of other Italian dishes. Chicken Boccocini with tagliatelle has become a classic in the restaurant, which is also well known for its wide selection of pasta dishes and vegetarian options. Weekly specials run throughout the year, and steak and prawns remain hot favourites.

Bistro Bianconi Take Away

*Open All Year 6 days

Good Food

Delicious aromas of Italian cooking waft out onto O’Connell Street as you approach Bistro Bianconi, making your mouth water and your tummy rumble! Give in to temptation and go in, that’s much the best solution!

Café Society is light and airy with an open plan kitchen where chefs cook everything in full view of their clientele.They cater for all palates, from gourmet diners to families, and with freshly made pizzas, tantalising curries, delicious pastas and crisp salads, the menu has something to tempt the fussiest taste buds. A selection of wines, soft drinks, hot beverages, snacks and puddings are also available all day.

Open All Year 7 days 5pm - Midnight Wine Licence

If you want to enjoy a real night out, there are six individually styled guest bedrooms, so order another bottle and forget about the drive home!

Proprietors: M Conlon, D Barber and P Grimes

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Proprietors: Brian and Pamela Conboy

Thurs – Sat (À La Carte Menu) 6.30pm – 9.30pm Sunday (Lunch Menu) 12.30pm – 3.30pm

Full Licence 6 individually styled guest rooms Caters for small functions/parties

Awards

Best Newcomer Restaurant in Connaught by Restaurant Association of Ireland, 2006 Georgina Campbell 2007/ 2008 Bridgestone’s John and Sally McKenna 2007 and 2008

Main Course from €23


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Classiebawn

Davis’s

@ Yeats Tavern

Radisson Blu Hotel & Spa Ballincar Rosses Point Rd Tel: 071 914 0008 Fax: 071 914 0005

Drumcliffe Bridge Tel: 071 916 3117 Email: info@yeatstavernrestaurant.com www.yeatstavernrestaurant.com

Email: info.sligo@radissonblu.com www.sligo.radissonblu.com

Overlooking Sligo Bay with a spectacular view of the Knocknarea Mountain, the Classiebawn Restaurant serves mouth watering cuisine in a beautiful setting. The kitchen, led by Executive Chef Joe Shannon produces exceptional food in a modern Irish style featuring fresh local ingredients.

A popular dish would be Crispy Pressed Belly of Pork with pea and bacon risotto, pork and herb sausage, and apple and shallot puree. Our delicious food is matched by genuinely friendly and expert service. The Restaurant also serves the famous Super Buffet Breakfast that the Radisson Blu group is renowned for. This sumptuous buffet will suit everyone’s taste, from full Irish to continental.

Proprietors:

Open All Year 7 Days

Bar 10.30am Y Menu 12noon – 9pm

Restaurant Breakfast Mon – Fri 7am – 10.30am Weekends 7am – 11am Dinner 6pm – 10pm

*Open All Year 7 Days Bar Mon – Sat 10.30am Y Sunday 12noon Y

Full Licence

Music Saturdays during selected months Main Course from €18

Experience Sligo’s most popular award winning restaurant. Family run, Davis’s caters for every occasion with lots of cleverly integrated eating areas. Inside it’s bright, cosy and beautifully decorated with an additional alfresco area.

The Hall Door

All our food is sourced locally, with mussels, oysters, clams, crab, and a wide selection of fish. Our local butcher supplies our perfectly aged beef, chicken, duck and lamb offering a huge selection of delicious dishes with vegetarians well catered for. To add to all that, there are daily lunch specials from 12 to 3 pm with a full sandwich/paninis and salad menu also served all day.

Castle Dargan Ballygawley Tel: 071 911 8080 Fax: 071 911 8090 Email: info@castledargan.com www.castledargan.com

Experience fine Irish Cuisine at its very best in Castle Dargan.

Sligo’s most Stylish Restaurant The Hall Door at Castle Dargan is a food lover's haven producing quality cuisine, bringing together the best local produce of Sligo’s lush farmland and extensive coast line. The Hall Door offers a relaxed ambience complemented by a stunning panoramic view of the Darren Clarke designed Golf Course and surrounding countryside.

The kids are welcome and there is a fantastic kid’s menu. The service is always welcoming with friendly staff, and a cellar of fine wine complements this busy restaurant.

Bar Food 12.30pm – 9pm Restaurant Dinner 6.30pm – 9.30pm Sunday Lunch 12.30pm – 3pm

Main Course Guests can enjoy fine dining every evening from from €18 6pm in the Hall Door, with Sunday Carvery and Daily Lunch Menus available in the Middleton Bar. Proprietor:

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Restaurant Mon – Sat 10.30am-9.30pm Sunday & Bank Holidays 12noon – 9pm Snacks served all day Alfresco area Easy Parking 7km on N15 Donegal Rd from Sligo Main Course from €10.50


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Green Fingers

Lorely Forrester Dermot Carey also grew up surrounded by fruit and veg as his parents were market gardeners and wholesalers in Dublin. After years of working in many different places, including America, he is now the head gardener at Lissadell House, where the 2.5 acres of old walled gardens have been lovingly restored alongside 8 acres of orchards and vegetable gardens.

Volkmar Klohn moved to Sligo from Germany in 1985, with the dream of living a self-sufficient lifestyle on a smallholding in the Irish countryside. He bought Crimlin Farm, a 14 hectare property near Achonry, and he and his family were soon putting their plans into action. In those days Volkmar kept goats, a cow and some sheep and, almost inevitably, started to make cheese. Hens, ducks and pigs lived in the orchard, and he planted a vegetable and herb garden, but as time went by he realised that there was too much diversity and he needed to specialise in one particular area. Finally it was the veg patch that claimed him. Volkmar’s interest in growing things had started when he was a child. His family had a garden outside Berlin and spent many happy hours there, including the long summer holidays. As a boy it was his idea of heaven, but it wasn’t until he was in his late 20’s that he returned to the soil, and only when he settled in Sligo that he realised this could be his passion. Volkmar has never had formal horticultural training, just that old and trusted method – learning by trial and error.

A year’s course in Organics on the Aran Islands, and later training with Dolores Keegan at Eden Plants set Dermot on track, and since coming to Lissadell nearly 3 years ago, he and the garden’s owners have been growing organically and moving steadily towards full IOFGA certification, to be awarded very shortly. Dermot enjoys Spring most of all, when the gardens are a blank canvas, plans drawn up over the winter are being put into operation, blossom burgeons on the trees and something new pops up each day. The vegetable garden is operated on a rotation system, as it would have been a hundred years ago, and although the original garden archives had been lost, Dermot once again keeps detailed records of each season.

Good Food

Two men in Sligo who certainly get their 5-a-day are Volkmar Klohn and Dermot Carey. What they don’t know about growing vegetables probably isn’t worth knowing, and thanks to them and others like them many of us in Sligo can eat locally grown fruit and veg even if we don’t have the time or inclination to till the soil ourselves.

He grows a wide range of greens, legumes and herbs, and a popular ‘Asian baby leaf ’ salad mix which includes Mizuna, spinach and Pak Choi. He also grows many varieties of the same vegetable, so where you and I would feel proud of 4 types of lettuce, Dermot may grow as many as 29. The gardens and orchards yield bumper crops of currants and berries (40 types of gooseberry alone), as well as pears, plums and apples, including 2 old Sligo cultivars, Irish Peach and Brown Crofton, but his favourite plant is the humble potato. Lissadell has always grown potatoes, breeding Allanah in 1910, and today it holds the largest private potato collection in Ireland, David Langford’s Heritage Collection of 180 varieties.The earliest of these – historically – is the Irish Apple established in 1768, and Dermot also holds a pretty hot horticultural early record, as he dug his first potatoes – Colleen – on 23 April this year. The first basket was bought by The Boxty House, a well-known Dublin restaurant, whose premium payment was donated to a local charity. Dermot’s own favourite variety is Arran Victory, a purple-skinned, floury white bred in 1918 in the Scottish Isles, but he says that the most universally popular spuds are still the two bred in 1850: Golden Wonder and the salad potato, Pink Fir Apple, though the modern Orla is also a contender.

Today Volkmar grows all the veg you can think of, from lettuces, scallions and peas to aubergines, peppers and tomatoes – and everything in between. He also grows a huge range of herbs, including coriander, tarragon, lemon balm, savoury and chervil alongside all the more usual varieties. He says he has no favourites, but that may be because he hasn’t time to consider such things! Almost all his crops are grown in polytunnels these days, which involves watering and dealing with specific indoor problems, but it hugely prolongs the growing season in this northern county. Certainly Volkmar has no time to wonder if he made the right decision, all those years ago – from April to October it’s full on, from dawn to dusk. There is also no time to manage a market stall, but Crimlin Farm does make up Green Boxes, put together to order for many local customers. What spare moments there are in his day,Volkmar spends looking out across his beautiful orchard, enjoying the peace and tranquility of the location. And in the early mornings, when you and I are still tucked up in bed, fast asleep,Volkmar is walking his farm with just his dogs and the birds for company in the dewy quiet.That’s when he can take stock, check the progress of his seedlings, plan the next planting and open up the tunnels to the sun and the bees. Volkmar Klohn, Tel: 071 918 6982 Crimlinfarm1@eircom.net 97

Many of the potatoes are grown to keep the varieties going, but they, and veg and fruit are supplied to hotels and restaurants in the county and are available to the public at Lissadell’s Shop in Pearse Plaza, in Sligo.Which pleases Dermot – his earliest memories are to do with growing and selling fruit and veg, and at Lissadell he is in his element, has come full circle. ‘Working here is fantastic,’ he says, ‘a fantastic opportunity.’ Lissadell Natural Food Store, Pearse Plaza, Pearse Rd, Sligo Tel:071 914 8814 Lissadellhouse.com


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The Kitchen

The Gourmet Parlour

The Glasshouse Hyde Bridge Sligo Tel: 071 9194300 Email: info@theglasshouse.ie www.theglasshouse.ie

Bridge Street Sligo Tel: 071 914 4617

The Kitchen Restaurant at The Glasshouse is set against the backdrop of the Garravogue River enjoying 140 metres of stunning river frontage.The restaurant was recently awarded an AA Rosette and specialises in using local produce to create traditional Irish and international dishes, all with a contemporary twist and served by friendly and efficent staff. The Kitchen also has an extensive wine menu, featuring a selection to suit all palates and budgets. When dining at The Kitchen, customers can enjoy pre and post drinks in one of the lively bars at The Glasshouse and can also avail of complimentary underground car parking while dining.

Visit our gourmet shop for a selection of sandwiches, salads, savoury pies, delicious pastries, sausage rolls, quiches and lasagne.We make a hot lunch daily, and also a soup filled with fresh vegetables. We also make fabulous cakes, desserts, traditional breads and preserves. The Gourmet Parlour creates wedding cakes using natural ingredients. Our cakes taste as good as they look, and are made to suit your budget.

The Kitchen is a perfect choice for an informal lunch while spending a day in downtown Sligo or for a more formal evening.

We cater for Meetings, Family get-togethers, Day-after-Wedding Receptions

Open 6 days Mon - Sat 9am – 6pm Takeaway only www.gourmetparlour.com

Open 7 days Lunch 12.00 – 3.00pm Dinner 6.30 – 10.30pm Full licence

Open all year except for Christmas Day Main Course from €15.00

Proprietor:The Glasshouse

Proprietors: Annette Burke & Catherine Farrell

Kings

McDermott’s

Chinese Restaurant Wine Street Car Park Sligo Tel: 071 915 1880 / 915 4910 Located right in the heart of Sligo Kings Chinese Restaurant offers authentic Chinese cuisine and is the perfect place to visit for a delicious, affordable meal, any day of the week. Inside the spacious restaurant the interior is stylish with dark woods, oriental art, rich reds, gold upholstery and intimate candle light. A family owned restaurant it prides itself on offering traditional Chinese dishes in a relaxed atmosphere, and with regular trips to China to sample new dishes, the menu is varied and upto-date. Aiming to give guests a sensual trip through the cuisines of Asia, the restaurant offers dishes such as YuSiang chicken, roast duck Cantonese style, beef with tofu and broccoli, scallops with cashew nuts, assorted seafood and fried rice Malaysian style, as well as generously catering for vegetarians. With an extensive wine list to compliment the food, Kings really is a great place for a romantic meal or a larger party, as it can cater for up to 120 people. Always serving your food with a smile, the staff are professional, friendly, always happy to helpful and proud of their extensive knowledge of the food they serve. Offering a takeaway and delivery service, Kings Restaurant really does cater to everyone’s needs and gives Sligo’s locals and tourists alike the opportunity to sample Asian cuisine at its best. Proprietor: Kim Yeung

Bar & Restaurant Castlebaldwin Tel: 071 916 5132

Open 7 days

‘Ceol, caint agus craic’ – music, talk and craic are the ingredients at McDermott’s, located on the N4 Dublin road just south of Sligo. A fantastic place to break a long journey, explore the area and the nearby Carrowkeel Tombs, or simply relax over some hearty, homemade, locally produced food. McDermott’s, owned by the same family since 1900, is a friendly restaurant, welcoming guests at any time of day. A local favourite, it offers an extensive evening menu with daily specials and a variety of children’s dishes. After dinner, relax and chat in the bar with locals, enjoy Friday’s traditional music session, make the most of the games room, or take in some sport on McDermott’s flat screen TV. This is a place with everything you could want – good food, entertainment, helpful, happy staff, a great atmosphere and plenty of space in which to soak it all up.

Mon - Thurs 5pm – 11pm Fri - Sat 5pm – 12pm Sundays 4pm – 11pm

Fully licensed

Caters for large parties up to 120 persons

Takeaway and Delivery Service Main Course from €11

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Proprietor: Glen McDermott Disabled access

Breakfast 10am – 12 noon Lunch 12 noon – 3pm Dinner à la carte 3pm – 9.30pm

Function Room available with full Dining Facilities Children’s Menu Baby Changing facilities

Traditional Music Friday Evenings Full Licence

Main Course from €9.50


YÜÉÅ wtãÇ àÉ wâá~? áâÅÅxÜ ÉÜ ã|ÇàxÜ? {t|Ä? Üt|Ç ÉÜ áâÇ |à xÇàÜtÇvxá‹

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Many think their view is best, but silently and certainly we know that they are wrong and our view second to none. Why else would our national Nobel Laureate have painted in everlasting words, scenes that can be seen from our table? No less than four of his poems take in our view and reference the mountains that surround our home. This is Lough Gill - seven miles long, three miles wide and a source of artistic inspiration far greater than its mere measure.

There's Dooney Rock, Dun Aodh in the Gaelic, meaning the Fort of Hugh. Here Neolithic man had a fortified height from which to defend his family. Even he must have wondered at the sweeping views of the lake, the river running to the sea and the great burial cairns on Cairns Hill and Knocknarea. By the time William Butler Yeats came to picnic and play, its Neolithic shadows were fairy wraiths that seemed to dance among the trees. Others, more substantial, now danced here, locals and Sligo town folk who came by boat, bike and horse drawn charabanc to while away romantic summer days as they listened to the fiddle music of Blind Howley from Collooney or Soldier Ward from just around the corner.Yeats caught the merriment and innocence of it all:

‘I will arise and go now, for always night and day I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey, I hear it in the deep heart's core.’ Then there was love, our poet smitten by Maud Gonne for whom he wrote some of the most beautiful love poetry of all time. He pictured himself an old fool still pining for her, long after she was gone from him forever. ‘I went out to the hazel wood, Because a fire was in my head, And cut and peeled a hazel wand, And hooked a berry to a thread’

‘For the good are always the merry, Save by an evil chance, And the merry love the fiddle, And the merry love to dance. And when the folk there spy me,They will all come up to me,With ‘Here is the fiddler of Dooney!’ And dance like the wave on the sea.’ Then there’s Slish Wood or Killery Mountain, that dips into the lake - old as any mountain in the world. It's made of gneiss, an aged limestone and has existed for over 600 million years! It has been under oceans, scorched by heat, lashed by ice and has a lovely soft, roundy shape to prove it. Beside it is Slieve Dha Ein, the mountain of the Two Birds, and sitting up there in that cleft to the left of the yellow whins is Lough Ia where the mythical Caillac Beara drowned her sorrows.Yeats' ‘Stolen Child’ tells of the fairies wooing and, for fun, stealing away a little baby. The first stanza is in Slish Wood:

Hazel Wood, the estate owned by the Wynne family who held all you can see from our window - all of Lough Gill and much more beyond. 17th century Cromwellian planters, they only sold up to the Irish Land Commission in the late 1920's. As landowners they were seldom loved, yet today the lush wooded panorama of Lough Gill owes everything to them. With Anglo Irish certainty they planned and planted the trees that we now enjoy both on shore line and island - a majestic view that might have been designed by God the landscaper! Just across the Narrows there, where the Garavogue River leaves the lake, they built a fine mansion, designed by Cassells, a German architect who transformed Georgian architecture. It's still there today and you can imagine it lit by candlelight for evening soirées in times long gone.

‘Where dips the rocky highland Of Sleuth Wood in the lake,There lies a leafy island Where flapping herons wake The drowsy water rats;There we've hid faery vats, Full of berrys And of reddest stolen cherries. Come away, O human child! To the waters and the wild With a faery, hand in hand, For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand’

Speaking of soirées, why not enjoy a Yeats Supper Evening at Broc House and see for yourself the views we have been extolling. Groups of 10 and more can be catered for, and a memorable evening promised. The finest Irish Contemporary Cooking matched with your own wines and made special by an introduction to William Butler Yeats between courses. Ideal for a special occasion, birthday, reunion or a visit to Sligo!

lxtàá fâÑÑxÜá tà UÜÉv [Éâáx ã|à{ W|ávÉäxÜ fÄ|zÉ Bookings for 10 or more For more details Tel: 071 914 7488 Email: info@discoversligo.com www.brockhouse.com 99

Good Food

Because you can't have everything, nature placed the renowned Lake Isle of Innisfree around the corner, behind Slish Wood, out of sight! I can however assure you that it's very like Rabbit Island just there on the right, so use your imagination to picture what attracted the poet to it. He himself recalled being homesick for Sligo, back in London after a holiday in the ‘Land of Heart’s Desire’ when he heard water tinkling in a flower shop window and was overcome with loneliness. He was reading the American philosopher Thoreau at the time and thought it would be a fine thing to emulate him by living alone on Lough Gill.


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Poppadom

Lyons Café Henry Lyons Department Store Wine Street Sligo Town Tel: 071 914 2969 www.garystafford.com

34 O’Connell Street Tel: 071 914 7171 Fax: 071 914 7474 Email: poppadomireland@hotmail.com www.poppadom.ie

If you stop on the corners of Wine Street and Quay Street and look up to admire the façade of Henry Lyons Shop, one feature you will immediately notice is the lovely casement window which stands out over the street below. That is Lyons Café.

Poppadom is in the very centre of Sligo Town, its front door almost opposite the Tesco arcade in O’Connell Street, and the restaurant situated upstairs on the first floor. It is nicely spacious with a stylish colour scheme of cool cream and crushed strawberry, which together with cleverly lit displays of pottery give the room a restrained elegance.

People have been meeting here since 1923 which means it is possibly the oldest café in Sligo Town. Today it is a happy blend of old and new, with polished wooden floors and tables, mirrors, ivory coloured panelling and a new abstract mural across the back wall. This is the place for homemade goodies, From cakes, pastries, bread to the Café’s famous scones; all freshly made in the kitchens – raspberry bakewell, black cherry cake, pear tart and chocolate brownies are just some of the temptations available to hungry shoppers. At lunchtime there is a new menu everyday which includes a carvery, vegetarian options and other specials. The Café is particularly famous for its slow-braised pork belly in a wild berry cider, its every changing extensive salad bar, home-made soups, salmon and home-cooked ham. There is always an option suitable for celiacs, including gluten-free soup, and there are paninis, wraps and sandwiches made from the Café’s own multi-grain bread.

Open All Year 6 days Mon-Sat Breakfast 9am -12 noon

This is an Indian restaurant that has consistently won awards, including the Bridgestone Guide 2009 Award for best Indian food. The Poppadom chefs have a stated policy of not using ‘off-the-shelf’ concoctions, additives or preservatives, or carcinogenic food colourings. They use home-ground, freshly prepared spices and condiments to produce classic Indian cuisine.

Lunch 12.30pm – 3pm Snacks 3pm - 6pm Main course from €10

Poppadom chefs are happy to prepare some of the more popular Indian dishes but their menu offers the chance to taste some of the less well known specialities of their country. Andhara Lamb is a festive dish from the kitchens of the Nizam of Hydrabad, Prawn Patiya originated in Goa, and Sorshe Bata Maach is a fish curry from Bengal. They also offer a chicken dish that hails from the Awadh empire of central India, and another fiery hot one that comes from Chettined in the south; while one of their lamb dishes, prepared with almonds, pistachios, saffron, cardammon and apricots was first prepared in the kitchens of Shah Jahan, the Moghul Emperor who built the famous Taj Mahal in memory of his beloved wife Mumtaz. There are also Poppadom restaurants in: Cornmarket, Limerick Tel: 061 446 644 Rathgar Road, Dublin 6 Tel: 01 490 2383 Newlands Cross, Dublin 22 Tel: 01 411 1144

Home & Corporate Catering Lyons Café offers outside catering, providing superb cooking for private dinner parties, office functions, weddings and family gatherings. High quality finger food buffets are particularly popular – again all home made, with not a cocktail sausage in sight! Contact Gary directly or log on to Garystafford.com for sample menus. Proprietor: Gary & Fidelma Stafford

Booking advisable at weekends

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Open All Year 7 Days Dinner Sun-Thurs 5pm – 11pm Fri & Sat 5pm - Midnight Wine Licence Music Special Occasions 3 course set menu from €18.95 available 5pm - till late Sun - Thu 5pm - 7pm Fri & Sat Main Course from €10.00

John & Sally McKenna’s Bridgestone Guide 2009 Georgina Campbell Guide 2009


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Riverbank

The Silver Apple

@ The Clubhouse

Restaurant

Dromahair Co Leitrim Tel: 071 916 4934 www.riverbank-restaurant.com

Lord Edward Street Sligo Tel: 071 914 6770 www.silverapple.ie silverapple@gmail.com

Restaurant Wed-Sat 6pm-10pm Sunday 7pm-10pm Full Licence

Large groups catered for. Children welcome

Open all year 7 Days Bar Menu 3pm-9pm

Open All Year July-Aug 7 Days Sep-June 5 Days Wed-Sat 5pm – 10pm Sun 5pm – 9pm Sunday Lunch 1pm – 4pm Full Licence Downstairs The Gateway Bar Main Course from €14

Proprietor: L Kennedy

Main Course from €17

Proprietor: John Kelly

Sakura

Tom Yam

• Chinese • Thai • Japanese

Quayside Shopping Centre Wine Street Sligo Tel: 071 915 1826 Email: tomyamsligo@gmail.com

Oriental Restaurant Calry Court, Stephen St, Sligo Tel: 071 914 9833 / 914 9828 Sakura Oriental Restaurant is centrally located in Sligo Town and is a sensual fusion of Asian Cuisine including Thai, Chinese and Japanese dishes. Inside it is light and airy, with a refreshing atmosphere which feels homely whilst at the same time a world away from Ireland. With an exciting menu ranging from Open 7 days Cooked Sushi to Noodle Soups, there is something for everyone and even a wide selection Restaurant of flower teas and coffee. 5pm – 11.30pm Sun – Thurs The menu is varied offering curries, soup, seafood, duck, and a good selection of vegetarian dishes. 5pm – 12am Focusing on Thai and Chinese cuisine there are Fri & Sat sweet and sour dishes, noodles and rice, also great appetizers such as Chinese spring roll or sesame Wine Licence prawn toast, yuk sung for 2 people, Shang Hai Caters for dumpling, sweet and sour wan ton, or Peking ribs, small parties Thai curry puff, or squid satay skewered, and Takeaway and more. The owner has introduced new cuisine to Delivery service the Sligo area. Newly refurbished the restaurant is very stylish and has a very homely feel, Takeaway emphasized by the friendly and extremely helpful staff, making dining at Sakura a memorable from €12.50 experience. Sakura is an exciting place to dine, and Main Course provides a welcome break from Ireland’s rainy from €8.50 streets bringing refreshing and authentic Asian flavour and warmth to Sligo. Proprietor: Amy Cheung

During daytime hours this restaurant operates as Cornerhouse, a welcome, good value break for shoppers in the Quayside centre, but at night this is Tom Yam, serving authentic Thai food – delicious, low in fat and very healthy. The chef, Charlie Phuakchoo is from Southern Thailand and has worked in Dubai, London, Dublin, Paris and other European capitals for the prestigious Oriental and Blue Elephant Groups, cooking for many VIP diners including Mary McAleese, Sir Bob Geldof and Sir Roger Moore. Tom Yam specialises in authentic Thai cuisine, made with fresh food cooked quickly to retain all its favours, in an open plan kitchen in view of diners. Takeaway food is also available, or food can be delivered in Sligo. 101

Disabled Access *Closed Christmas & New Year

Good Food

The Riverbank restaurant in Dromahair has re-located to the Clubhouse - still under award winning chef John Kelly, a classically trained chef who has run the restaurant very successfully for the last two and a half years. John has fifteen year’s experience under his belt, which is reflected in the enticing and varied menu. This uses local produce and professional flair to bring you a truly great culinary experience. Nestled between the old railway station and the River Bonet, the Riverbank has been tastefully decorated to comfortable, modern standards, and caters for large parties such as christenings and communions. This restaurant offers an extensive and comprehensive wine list, and provides heated smoking areas for guests’ convenience. Booking is recommended.

Conveniently located opposite bus & train station, the Silver Apple restaurant is a welcome addition to the local dining scene. Chef-owner Louise Kennedy has put her many years experience to very good use here, and has created a warm, cosy, continental feel with the help of bric a brac & posters bought at antique markets in Paris. The real star here, however, is the food. Louise creates delicious bistro inspired dishes out of the wonderful produce available locally. Expect handmade pates, breads, relishes, desserts and her own take on classics such as duck a l’orange, moules mariniere, slow cooked lamb shank, etc. A concise yet quirky wine list complements the menu and is exceptionally good value.

*Open All Year 7 Days Cornerhouse Self Service 9am – 6pm Tom Yam Sun-Thurs 5.50 – 11pm Fri-Sat 5.30 – midnight Wine Licence Main Course from €7.50


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Shenanigans Bar

Tobergal Lane

Bar & Restaurant

Café & Restaurant

Bridge Street Sligo Bar 071 914 6799 Restaurant 071 914 6795 www.shenanigans.ie

Off O’Connell Street Sligo Tel: 071 914 6599 Email: tobergallanecafe@eircom.net www.tobergallanecafe.ie

Shenanigans provides diners with everything: drinks, dinner and dancing.The restaurant oozes charm and the whole room is lit by twinkling chandeliers. The award winning chef creates imaginative dishes using locally sourced produce, and afterwards guests can dance ’til dawn, as the saying goes, when the room is transformed into a late night bar, complete with cocktails and music. Enjoy steak, seafood, pizzas, pastas and other hot favourites – and then there are the desserts! There is also a bar menu offering American style food and daily specials, including the Seanchai Burger, packed with egg, beef tomato, onion rings and cheese. Shenanigans is the home of the Frog Dog Kid’s Menu - a menu with a surprise. Shenanigans provides good, freshly made food and is the place to enjoy a great night out!

Open All Year 7 Days from 10am

Open All Year Restaurant Wed – Sat 6pm – Late Bar Menu 7 Days 12noon – 9pm Caters for Parties Full Licence (extensive wine list)

Late night bar and club DJs 7 nights

Main Course from €9.95

Proprietors: Sean & Patricia Cunningham

Sinergie Clarion Hotel Clarion Road Sligo Tel: 071 911 9000 Fax: 071 911 9001 Email: info@clarionhotelsligo.com www.clarionhotelsligo.com

Proprietor: Brid Torrades

Open All Year 7 Days

Kudos Bar The wok station supplies Asian food cooked as you order. You can also order from a selection of sandwiches, wraps, filled croissants or the more robust beef and stout pie! Sweet snacks, coffees and teas are always available. Proprietors:

Brunch at weekends 11am Y Lunch 12noon Y ‘Tapas’ style menu 5pm Y Live Music Wed-Sat night Sun from 2pm - 4pm Full Licence Wines by the Glass Dinner 5pm Y Main Course from €14.95

Ósta

Bar 12 noon Y

Sinergie Restaurant oozes contemporary style and clever design. Good food beautifully presented is the restaurant’s guiding principle, and the inspiration behind their menu is largely European with a strong Italian influence. Pre Booking is advisable.

Tobergal Lane Cafe - always offering that little bit more! A freshly prepared Bistro menu that follows the ryhthm of the seasons, plus a new ‘tapas’ style evening menu, both created from locally sourced produce on a daily basis. Fresh baked bread, pastries and desserts from in-house Patissier Julien Vial. A wide selection of drinks, from ethically produced coffee to Irish Craft Beers. A relaxing, welcoming atmosphere, perfect for chilling out, catching up on the gossip and whiling away the hours. Great live music usually every evening from Wed – Sat, and from 2-4pm on Sundays. Music varies from jazz sessions to traditional Irish dancing – but there is always jazz on Friday nights and Sunday lunchtime. The Café, at the very heart of Sligo living, is open until late (last orders 10pm or by arrangement). Having a party or family get together? Tobergal Lane Café has a large private dining area and will cater exclusively for your event. Call Fabio: 085 800 7271

Café and Wine Bar

Asian Menu 12noon–2.30pm 5.30pm – 10pm Snack Menu 12noon – 10pm Restaurant Breakfast 7am – 10am Weekends 7am – 10.30am Dinner 6pm – 10pm

Garavogue Weir Stephen Street Sligo Tel: 071 914 4639 www.osta.ie

Open All Year 6 Days Award Winning Café on the Garavogue River. A range of light savoury meals available all day made from locally sourced and seasonal produce. Outside seating available overlooking the Garavogue River. Delicious pastries baked by Julien Vial.

Full Licence

The best coffee in town – roasted by Java Republic and prepared by our trained Baristas.

Main Course from €19.95

Proprietor: Brid Torrades

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Mon – Sat Summer 8am – 8pm (later by arrangement) Main Course from €7.95


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The Venue

The Waterfront

Restaurant & Bar

Rosses Point Tel: 071 917 7122

Top Road Strandhill Tel: 071 916 8167

friends, families or corporate groups. The menu offers a wide range of dishes, including seafood, a variety of excellent chargrilled Irish steaks, the Venue’s famous homemade burgers, chicken, pasta and fajitas. Seafood extends from Lissadell mussels, crab claws and shrimp to cod in beer batter, whole sea bass and the chef’s specials: seafood mornay and lobster salad. The à la carte menu

Occupying an unrivalled location at the heart of Rosses Point overlooking Oyster Island and Coney Island, the Waterfront Bar and Restaurant offers relaxing surroundings complemented by an excellent menu and first class service.

Open All Year 7 Days Bar 12.30pm Y Restaurant 12.30pm-9.30pm Sunday Lunch 12.30pm – 4pm à la carte 4pm – 9.30pm Full Licence Seats 120 Music in Bar Thur, Fri, Sat nights

The restaurant has been recently refurbished to provide a contemporary open plan arrangement, creating a unique atmosphere throughout. Priding itself on an à la carte menu that attempts to cater for all, the restaurant has recently launched a bar menu to attract families and those whose preference is for something light. Fresh fish features highly on the extensive evening menu with two daily specials always on offer. Meat lovers can choose from a wide variety of produce cooked to order.The menu also caters for vegetarians.

Main Course from €12.95

is supplemented with a variety of daily dishes such as rack of lamb, chicken breast stuffed with mango and lobster, New Orleans Cajun

An extensive lunch/bar menu is available from 12pm until 7pm and à la carte is served thereafter until 10pm. Both menus provide a wide range of dishes and the restaurant and bar area cater for all.

catfish and Atlantic salmon – all complemented by an extensive wine list. Save room though – there’s a delicious range

The Waterfront Bakery produces brown, seeded and flavoured breads; scones, muffins and cookies as well as cakes and tarts. Advance orders are taken, and the bakery also makes cakes for any occasion.We sell a range of gluten free products. We bake all the restaurant’s bread, and you can also pop in for coffee and a scone.

of puddings to finish off with!

The Waterfront is the perfect place to enjoy a cup of coffee, a quick drink, or a leisurely meal with friends and family.

Proprietors: Peter & Yvonne Haugstrup Ample parking at rear Wheelchair access

Proprietor: Calry Leisure Ltd Ample parking Wheelchair access

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Open All Year June - Sept 7 Days Bar Open All Year 12 - 7pm à la carte restaurant 7pm - 10pm Seating for 140 Full Licence Main Course from €11.95

Bakery 10am – 5.30pm

Good Food

The Venue in Strandhill dates from around 1880 and is the second oldest building in the village. Inside, this friendly old pub happily hasn’t changed for many years, with an open fire, traditional cosy wood interior and collections of stoneware on high shelves. Off the bar is one of Sligo’s most popular restaurants, offering panoramic views of Sligo Bay – perfect on all occasions for couples,


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Drink Up - Your Very Good Health! Next to oxygen in air, water is the most essential element for our survival. It makes up over two thirds of our body weight and without it, we would die in a few days; (whereas, without food we could last nearly a month!) A human brain is 95% water, lung is 90% and blood is 82%. A decrease of just 2% of body water in the body can trigger signs of dehydration such as fuzzy short-term memory, trouble with basic arithmetic and difficulty in focusing on smaller print, like computer screens. Mild dehydration is also one of the most common causes of daytime fatigue – and many suffer from it! It is easily put right by just drinking more water. Views vary on how much water we should drink, but for most of us the answer is ‘more!’ A good guide is to halve your body weight in pounds; the result gives you the number in ounces of water that you should drink per day; (10 ounces = 300ml). More is required when exercising, pregnant or living in hot or air-conditioned environments.

The Benefits. Studies have shown that: • Water helps maintain healthy body weight by increasing metabolism and regulating appetite. Often when you think you are hungry your body is actually thirsty. • Water leads to increased energy levels and less fatigue. If you feel thirsty you are already dehydrated. • Drinking adequate amounts of water can help decrease the risk of certain types of cancers, including colon cancer (by 45%), bladder cancer (by 50%), and breast cancer. • For most sufferers, drinking water can significantly reduce joint and/or back pain. • Water leads to greater health by flushing out waste and bacteria that can cause disease. • Water can prevent and alleviate headaches – the glass of water to wash down a pill may do more good than the pill! • Water naturally moisturises skin and ensures proper cellular formation beneath to give skin a healthy, glowing appearance. • Water aids in the digestion process, helps to reduce acid reflux and helps prevents constipation. • Water is the primary mode of transportation for all nutrients in the body and is essential for good blood circulation. • Studies in the USA have shown that people who drink more than 5 glasses of water a day are 41% less likely to suffer heart attack than those who drink less than 2. The really good news in all of this is that it is so easy to make sure we are getting all those benefits. All we have to do is drink more water. And of course we want to drink the purest, best water we can find.

Glencar Water

Why do we need so much? Every cell in the body requires water for nourishment and for waste removal. If we don’t drink enough water, the body automatically tries to cut down on how much it is losing - through breathing, mucous production, urination, perspiration and bowel movements – functions we rarely think about when we feel thirsty! But when you consider that several cups of water are lost daily through breathing alone, it opens up a new perspective. This happens because the lung requires humid air to function so the body has to moisten the air before it reaches the lung and it does this through the mucous membranes of the nasal passages and bronchi. Add this water consumption to other water requirements in blood, digestion and kidney function etc - and it’s easy to see why we need so much water just to ‘keep on the road’.

How much is enough? Only 20% of our water requirement comes in food and if you think tea, coffee or juice hydrate you think again – caffeine is a known diuretic (increases urine output) and will actually heighten the symptoms of dehydration. Juice is more concentrated in sugar than cell fluid, so the body will attempt to dilute it in the gut – resulting in more water loss from your body. Plain water is the best choice, and we should drink at least a glass on waking, a glass after each meal, a glass between each meal and more when we exercise or drink alcohol, tea, coffee, canned drinks or undiluted juice.

Glencar Water comes from a natural spring, or source, located in the Dartry Mountains, in North Sligo. The water is filtered through two miles of rock, maintains a constant temperature of 4 degrees and has a stable composition providing many of the minerals and trace elements we need – magnesium, chloride, calcium, potassium and zinc. The water is in perfect balance with EU directives and requires no chemical processing. In addition, Glencar Water is bottled at the source so suffers minimal handling and no exposure to contamination – it is as pure as nature can make it, and probably the finest drinking water in Europe. Glencar Water is available in 10 litre boxes, 2 and 5 litre containers for the home or office, or handy 500ml bottles that are perfect for carrying in the car, on outings or when exercising. Delivery is free to your home or workplace, and Glencar Water is widely available in shops and retail outlets all over Sligo and Ireland. A specially designed cooler for counter or desktop use will ensure that your boxed water is always at your desired drinking temperature at all times.

Glencar Water – helping you drink up! Glencar Worldwide Water Company, Tormore, Glencar, Co Sligo. Tel: 071 913 5553 Email:sales@glencarwater.ie Web site:www.glencarwater.ie 104


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Cummeen Strand

Good Health

Photo: ŠLorely Forrester 105


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Strandhill Open: Monday to Sunday 10am-8pm www.voya.ie History be after a seaweed bath, when the body is relaxed and able to benefit more fully from the treatment. VOYA’s customers have many different reasons for coming to the baths - therapeutic, remedial, beauty and general well being. The youngest customer to use the baths so far has been a three week old child, while VOYA’s oldest customer is 97 years of age! VOYA Seaweed Baths love being able to provide a service that is natural and 100% organic, and moreover so good for their customers.

Ireland has a long tradition of seaweed bathing, which began nearly 300 years ago. Landlords who lived close to the sea would often have a bath-house on the seafront for their friends and guests to take advantage of, as even then sea bathing was considered to be very beneficial to health. It was not until the mid to late 1800’s that seaweed bathing became popular with the general public. Droves of people would flock to the seaside, especially at the end of the summer, as the baths were seen as a cure for many and various ailments. It was widely known that sea water was therapeutic, so the idea of bathing in hot seawater and freshly steamed seaweed encouraged people to come in their 1000’s to relieve conditions such as arthritis, skin problems and general aches and pains.

VOYA Products VOYA also provide the world’s only certified organic seaweed beauty and spa products. The main reason for developing these products was frustration at being unable to source certified organic seaweed facials, body moisturisers or body lotions anywhere else. In the end, VOYA simply developed an in-house range that is proving to be extremely successful.

Today’s Bathers VOYA Seaweed Baths were the first modern seaweed baths in nearly 100 years. There were set up by the current owners, the Walton Family. Neil Walton originally used the Victorian baths in Enniscrone as a method of recovery from triathlon training. He was so impressed with the speed of his recovery when using the baths that he decided to do some research into both the health and sport benefits from using seaweed baths on a weekly basis. Walton found that the baths aided in de-toxing the body, replaced lost minerals / vitamins and helped with the removal of lactic acid. He also found that the body absorbed iodine from the seaweed, which aids the function of the thyroid gland. In simple terms, the seaweed baths were a concentrated version of the sea. In addition, the baths were very good for general well being, and the oils released from the seaweed proved to be excellent for keeping the skin supple. In fact many of VOYA’s customers today use the baths regularly as a natural moisturiser for their skin. VOYA also have a range of certified organic spa treatments, ranging from body wraps, facials, hot stone massage, full and half body massages to reflexology. It is amazing how effective a massage can

VOYA Organic products are now sold all around the world. The company has won a number of design and innovation awards and, as the leading supplier of certified organic seaweed based retail and spa products, is going from strength to strength. If you need any further information please contact the VOYA team at 071 916 8686 or Email info@voyaseaweedbaths.com

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Where to Stay Keith McNair What with the economic downturn and with being in the tourist business myself, I hear reports and rumours of hotels closing - dropping like flies – or changing hands as if they are red-hot pokers!

icon spa

Icon Spa at Castle Dargan is the centrepiece for rest, relaxation and rejuvenation in Sligo. Icon Spa presents panoramic views of the Golf Course from the relaxation suite. The facilities, products and treatments are carefully selected to bring you on an exploration, which will be a complete sensory delight.

This year the grand old lady, Markree Castle, celebrates 20 years as a country castle hotel. Sligo’s Radisson Blu have launched a whole new emphasis on outdoor recreation breaks and Clarion have teamed up with Turf n Surf to provide excellent activity options for kids while Mum and Dad have time and space to enjoy their break - and each other!

The treatment suites offer therapies ranging from balneotherapy, dry floatation, massage therapies, facial therapies, and everything to treat the body from head to toe. As Sligo’s first Destination Medi Spa, Icon Spa provides a wide range of aesthetic beauty treatments collaborating with Venus Beauty Med Irelands premier medical beauty providers.

Our two town-centre hotels, The Glasshouse and the City Hotel continue to make Sligo town centre a great place for groups, conferences and coach parties.

The team at Icon Spa are committed to advancing Spa traditions by combining modern day scientific knowledge with the worlds greatest touch therapy healing rituals.

Even though its been a few years now, I still can’t get over Albanne Tourism (which manages Yeats Village and a few other properties) having 1600 beds – yes, one thousand six hundred beds - and yet each apartment or town house is as private and as intimate as your own home! This capacity, combined with the likes of Ard Nua and our hotels certainly puts Sligo on the map for conferences or summer programmes. If you are in the conference or event business, then Think Sligo – you’ll be surprised what it offers. Sligo can now so easily compete on a global stage.

Castle Dargan, Ballygawley, Co. Sligo. 071 911 8080 iconspa@castledargan.com www.castledargan.com

Add to this Castle Dargan, our premier golf hotel, also ideal for weddings and conferences, and a number of smaller, delightful, good quality family hotels and guesthouses, like Cawley’s in Tubbercurry. I know from personal experience that so often these smaller town hotels prove to be great locations to simply enjoy what’s happening locally – like a few years ago when we spent a weekend celebrating a friends 40th. Caravanning and Camping continues to grow in popularity – check out Enniscrone, Strandhill and Rosses Point. When I go camping, I like to go it alone, far from the madding crowd, but these campsites are in superb locations, each one right beside the ocean and surrounded by great facilities and activities. Sligo’s accommodation base is excellent and varied - from historic country houses like Ardtamon House and excellent 4 star hotels to good quality comfortable and homely International hostels like Harbour House. The variety is there, the choice is yours!

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Where to Stay

Here in Sligo we have an excellent array of hotels and accommodation providers. Hard-working, committed, determined, enthusiastic and visionary hoteliers and hospitality hosts who don’t give up that easily. Sligo is, beyond dispute, the Tourism Capital of the Northwest. It now has established itself as the hub for outdoor recreation, conferences or even weekend breaks.


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Castle Dargan

Cawley’s Guesthouse

Golf Hotel Wellness BALLYGAWLEY Tel: 071 911 8080 Fax: 071 911 8090 Email: info@castledargan.com www.castledargan.com

EMMET STREET TUBBERCURRY Tel: 071 918 5025 Fax: 071 918 5963 Email: cawleysguesthouse@eircom.net

The luxurious 4 Star Castle Dargan in Sligo, home to Darren Clarke’s first Championship Golf Course in Ireland, Icon Spa recently voted in the top five destination spas in Ireland and ‘The Hall Door’ fine dining restaurant, has made a big impression, since it opened its doors in 2006.

Cawley’s Guest House located in the heart of Tubbercurry, just off the N17 road, is a welcoming and friendly hotel ideal as a base for touring the north west or for a short break in Sligo. The building has operated as a hotel since 1907 and has been family owned since 1964.There are 12 spacious and comfortable en suite bedrooms.

Located just 8 minutes drive from Sligo, the Resort has also proved very popular as a business and wedding venue with unrivalled views across the golf course. Set on 170acres of rolling parkland, Castle Dargan offers an unrivalled resort experience in the heart of Yeat's Country.The estate’s 21st century restoration, has successfully balanced the charm of bygone days with the sophistication of a contemporary boutique hotel.The 1442 castle ruins, located by the 3rd hole on the grounds of the hotel attest to the property’s wonderful sense of history.

The Feile Bia approved restaurant is also open to the public and serves breakfast and lunch daily (8am-12pm and 12-3pm) as well as dinner from Tuesday to Sunday (6.30-9pm, on Mondays reservations can be made for larger parties). Our function room can cater for all your special occasions weddings, christenings etc. Tour groups can be catered for on request. Relax and enjoy a drink or cappucino on the garden terrace. The landscaped garden is available for BBQs in the summer months.

The hotel interior is classic and the atmosphere is inviting. Log fires, warm colour schemes and attention to detail, combine to ensure an unforgettable stay.The Hall Door offers fine dining in an intimate and relaxed atmosphere with an exquisite wine list and excellent service.

Fluent French is spoken in the guesthouse and the lively bar is open every night with jazz sessions throughout the winter. Traditional music sessions can be organised on request.

Directions: At Carraroe roundabout south of Sligo Town, take R284 to Ballygawley. Castle Dargan is on the Dromahair road from Ballygawley.

• • • • • • •

• 12 en-suite bedrooms • TV, tea and coffee facilities in all rooms • Hairdryers, ironing boards and electric blankets available on request • Internet access, fax and photocopying service available. • Bar Restaurant and Banqueting Facilities • A babysitting service is available • A safe is available in selected rooms. • Private parking • Meeting room • Garden Terrace

22 Bedrooms, 4 Premier, 16 Junior Suites & Golf Lodges Cable TV, Phone, Iron, Robes, Tea/Coffee Conference & Banqueting Facilities Icon Destination Medi Spa 18 hole Championship Golf Course Private Parking The Hall Door Restaurant/ Middleton Bar

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Clarion Hotel

Where to Stay

Sligo City Hotel

CLARION ROAD SLIGO TOWN TEL: 071 911 9000 FAX: 071 911 9001 Email: info@clarionhotelsligo.com www.clarionhotelsligo.com

QUAY STREET SLIGO TOWN TEL: 071 914 4000 FAX: 071 914 6888 Email: info@sligocityhotel.com www.sligocityhotel.com

Located on the outskirts of Sligo Town and overlooked by the majestic Benbulben Mountain is the Clarion Hotel Sligo.This is the largest hotel of its kind in the North West of Ireland. Dating back to 1848 and designed by William Dean Butler, the Clarion is a landmark building boasting a striking granite exterior, which has been sensitively restored and remodelled as a beautiful contemporary 4 star hotel.

Located in the heart of Sligo town, with great shopping, cultural attractions and nightlife on the doorstep, the Sligo City Hotel, with private parking facilities, couldn’t be more convenient for visitors, especially with rooms starting at only €79 subject to availability. The hotel has a large comfortable lounge on the ground floor and 58 bedrooms comprising standard rooms, luxury rooms with king size four posters and sofas, and some that are wheelchair accessible. Room rate pricing offers great value, and rooms can accommodate up to 2 adults and 3 children.

The hotel comprises of 167 rooms and guests can choose a standard double or a one or two bedroom suite which features a living room and kitchenette, ideal accommodation for families. There is a choice of two restaurants - Sinergie Restaurant offering guests a wide variety of modern European dishes and Kudos Bar, which serves Oriental cuisine and features an open kitchen, where you can watch your dish being freshly prepared in flaming woks. The SanoVitae Health & Leisure Club features a 20m swimming pool, jacuzzi, sauna, steamroom, gymnasium and aerobics room. For a real treat, there is the Essence Spa which offers guests a wide selection of face and body treatments.

The Quays Bar and Restaurant is a relaxed meeting place offering food from 7.30am - 9pm daily, with breakfast, a full carvery lunch at midday, and an extensive evening menu. Sporting events are shown Live on 42” plasma screen. The Lissadell Room and Glencar Suite are available for conferences, banqueting and weddings, and the smaller Anna Livia and Garavogue Suites are ideal for private meetings and seminars.

For the kids …. there is a games room, play room, crazy golf course, cinema and a schedule of activities during holiday periods. Truly a wonderful holiday destination.

Directions: Sligo City Hotel is in the centre of Sligo town, next to the town hall. See Town Centre map in this magazine.

Directions: Follow signs for Enniskillen N16, or watch for finger posts signs throughout Sligo town.

• 167 guest rooms and suites

• 58 bedrooms including 3 suites

• Conference & Banqueting Suites for up to 500 pax

• TV, direct dial phone, garment press, tea/coffee

• SanoVitae Health & Leisure Club

• Conference/banqueting rooms for up to 200 people • The Quays Bar & Restaurant • Wheelchair accessible rooms • Private parking

• Essence Spa

H H H

• Sinergie Restaurant and Kudos Bar • Private parking • Wheelchair accessible rooms 109

H H H H


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Radisson Blu

The Glasshouse

Hotel & Spa

HYDE BRIDGE, SLIGO TEL: 071 919 4300 Email: info@theglasshouse.ie www.theglasshouse.ie

BALLINCAR ROSSES POINT ROAD TEL: 071 914 0008 FAX: 071 914 0005 Email: info.sligo@radissonblu.com www.sligo.radissonblu.com

Towering dramatically over the banks of the Garavogue river, the Glasshouse is the first design hotel of its kind in Ireland – a glittering beacon of quirkiness and colour, in the centre of one of Ireland’s emerging vibrant and scenic cities.Through cutting-edge design and architecture, the Glasshouse has set a completely new standard of luxury accommodation, at an affordable price.

Just five minutes drive from Sligo city centre, the Radisson Blu Hotel & Spa, Sligo offers the best of both worlds, the calm and serenity of the countryside with the hustle and bustle of the city – the choice is yours! Boasting the largest wedding and conference facilities in the North West of Ireland with a capacity of up to 900 people, award winning Healthtsyles Leisure Club and the luxurious Solas Spa & Wellness Centre, the hotel has everything to offer its guests. Championship golf courses, miles of sandy beaches and stunning scenery all within easy distance.The perfect venue for business or pleasure – Radisson Blu Hotel & Spa, Sligo.

With 116 spacious bedrooms on six floors each with alternating colour schemes, guests can enjoy complimentary broadband access and flatscreen LCD TV’s. Or for a unique drinking and dining experience, the Glasshouse offers the first floor View bar - a Manhattan-style lounge overlooking the crashing weir of the Garavogue, ground floor cafe bar and the Kitchen Restaurant which enjoys 140 meters of stunning river frontage.

The hotel has 132 stylish bedrooms, including 3 Executive Suites and 7 Junior Suites.The premier suite is the Coney Island Suite, which is fully equipped with a wide plasma screen television, dining and lounge facilities and a private viewing balcony with exceptional views overlooking Sligo Bay.

Standing within metres of Sligo's main O' Connell Street,The Glasshouse is an ideal location for business or pleasure - An hour and a half from Derry and Galway Cities, Sligo has its own domestic airport, and is within easy distance of Dublin, Belfast and Ireland West Knock Airports.

Directions: N4 Sligo bypass towards Donegal, take R291 (Rosses Point turn off) to Ballincar at New Bridge over Garavogue River, Sligo Town.

Go on, Be Surprised.

• • • • • • •

• 132 bedrooms including 3 Executive Suites & 7 Junior Suites • Business Class and wheelchair accessible rooms • Cable & Pay TV, radio, in room safe, mini bar, hairdryer, tea & coffee hospitality tray, iron and trouser press in room. • Internet room available for guests. • All bedrooms offer complimentary broadband • Access to the award winning Healthstyles Leisure H Club available to all guests. H • Private parking H • Open all year H • No dogs allowed except guide dogs

Standard and superior bedrooms, junior suites Underground parking Café Bar and View Bar Kitchen Restaurant Complimentary broadband access Conference and banqueting facilities Wheelchair accessible

H H H H

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Ardtarmon House Sligo Park Hotel & Leisure Club PEARSE ROAD SLIGO TOWN Tel: 071 919 0400 Fax: 071 916 9556 Email: Sligo@leehotels.com www.leehotels.com Now a 4 star Hotel

Located in north Sligo, right beside the sea, Ardtarmon was rebuilt in the 1850’s. It is a sanctuary of tranquillity, a peaceful haven offering 4 spacious bedrooms to B&B guests. Dinner is also available, and local produce and homegrown vegetables are the mainstay of the country house style of cooking. 5 selfcatering cottages occupy the farmyard and grounds, ranging from 1-3 bedrooms. There is a games room, a tennis court and walks in the grounds or on the beach just 500m away! German and some Italian and French are spoken.

Just a mile south of Sligo town centre, and within easy reach of the N4, the Sligo Park Hotel and Leisure Club is located within a peaceful setting of gardens filled with mature trees and shrubs. The hotel has a choice of 137 tastefully decorated bedrooms equipped with a host of facilities to make your stay more comfortable. There is a 16m swimming pool, steam room, sauna and jacuzzi as well as a high tech gym and a holistic treatment suite available to all guests and members.

Cois Re

The Rathanna Bar opens at 10am(12.30pm Sundays), serves a daily carvery lunch from 12.30-2.15pm and a Bar Menu from 3-8pm. The Hazelwood Restaurant serves dinner daily from 6.30 (7pm Sun)-9.15pm, and lunch between 1-2.15pm on Sunday, all made from the best local ingredients.

Holiday Apartments

Lecarrow Strandhill Tel: 071 916 8867 Mob: 087 957 4358 Email: carmel@coisreapartments.com www.coisreapartments.com

Directions: N4 to Carrowroe interchange, follow signs for Sligo R287. Hotel 1.5km on the right.

4

self catering in the heart * Luxuryof Yeats Country

Spacious, modern two bedroom apartments. Master bedrooms en suite

• • • • • • • •

137 standard and superior bedrooms TV, broadband, hairdryers, tea and coffee Conference centre for 550 people Leisure Club, pool & gym Hazelwood Restaurant and Rathanna Bar Wheelchair accessible rooms Private Parking Open all year

• Fully furnished and equipped • Private secure parking,TV/DVD, sports equipment storage, CH, communal roof terrace • Jacuzzi bath, washing maching/dryer, dishwasher, microwave, linen • Also travel cot, high chair, fold out bed, babysitting service available.

H H H H

At the foot of Knocknarea, overlooking the Atlantic. A short walk from the beach, golf course, bars, restaurants and all amenities. 111

Where to Stay

NEAR DRUMCLIFFE Tel: 071 916 3156 Email:enquiries@ardtarmon.com www.ardtarmon.com


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Ardnua Village

Milligan Place

Self Catering

Self Catering Budget Accommodation

Ardnua Village, comprising purpose built townhouses and apartments in pleasantly wooded surroundings overlooking Lough Gill is on the edge of Sligo Town.The Village, with Failte Ireland 3 star rating, has landscaped gardens, car and bicycle parking, an on-site administration office and full time security.

Milligan Place is located in the heart of Sligo, providing easy access to this vibrant town. It is the perfect base from which to explore both the town and the County. Milligan Place is built around a secluded courtyard, offering accommodation in Single, Double or Twin rooms. Each residence has a fully equipped self catering kitchen and a living room.

Ardnua has individual groups of residences set around courtyards amidst landscaped gardens.These comprise purpose built single or twin apartments, each containing bedrooms with en suite bathrooms that share kitchen and living accommodation. There are also town houses in groups of 3 or 4, which can house between 3 and 7 people.

We offer accommodation to individuals or groups on a nightly or weekly basis with free internet access and on-site parking.

Every residence is equipped with crockery, cutlery, cooking utensils, kettle, fridge freezer, microwave, iron and board.There are also cable TV, vacuum cleaner and linen. The Village, which has a total of 245 beds, welcomes individuals or groups. Situated on the edge of Sligo Town, it is ideally located, as visitors can easily make the most of everything on offer both within the town and the wider area of the county.

Ballinode Sligo Town

Connaughton Road Sligo Town

Tel: 071 914 7760 Email: info@ardnua.com www.ardnua.com

Tel: 071 914 6754 Mobile: 087 687 2406 Email: info@milliganplace.com

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Albanne – making dreams a reality Albanne Tourism Ltd and Albanne Holiday Homes are professional tourism service providers. We provide quality services, from a wide range of accommodation in Sligo and Galway to assistance with planning a holiday in the West of Ireland. Supporting tourists and delegates who come to Sligo and Galway for special events is a very important aspect of our business.

From individual travellers and family reunions to large conferences,Albanne has all the expertise needed to make a holiday break special. In July, 1000 delegates will attend the New Wine Conference in Sligo for the forth year running and are already booked for 2010. This year also sees the 50th anniversary of the Yeats Summer School with 200 participants attending the event. For the first time this year Albanne has attracted a large Language school of over 250 people whose leaders were amazed at what Sligo has to offer. We are delighted that these groups have chosen Albanne as their partners in Sligo.

The Village Clarion Road

Tel: 071 913 8945 email: tourism@albanne.ie www.albanne.ie

Self Catering - B&B - Full Board

HHH

Just 10 minutes walk from Sligo Town centre, these 2,3 & 4 bedroom apartments have double and single rooms with showers en suite.They have open plan living areas and are serviced by lifts. The Clarion Hotel, with all its facilities, is within the complex.The Village offers flexible accommodation options on a nightly or weekly basis.

Clarion Road Ballytivnan

Sligo

Tel: 071 913 8945 Fax: 071 914 9768 Email: tourism@albanne.ie www.albanne.ie

Yeats Village Self Catering - B&B - Full Board & Yeats Village Apartments

HHH

Just 10 minutes walk from Sligo Town centre, the village can accommodate 500 people in houses or apartments, some suitable for the disabled.The properties have en suite shower rooms, kitchens, sitting rooms, cable TV and linen.Yeats Village offers flexible accommodation options on a nightly or weekly basis from one night to a month.

Ballinode Sligo Tel: 071 913 8945 Fax: 071 914 9768 Email: tourism@albanne.ie www.albanne.ie

The Grove Clarion Rd, Ballytivnan, Sligo

Self Catering - B&B - Full Board Just 10 minutes walk from Sligo Town centre, these luxurious 3 bedroom apartments offer double and single rooms with bathrooms en suite.They have open plan living space and are serviced by lifts. The Grove, which benefits from having The Clarion Hotel and all its facilities within its complex, offers flexible accommodation options on a weekly or nightly basis.

Ballinode Sligo Tel: 071 913 8945 Fax: 071 914 9768 Email: tourism@albanne.ie www.albanne.ie 113

HHH

Where to Stay

The Albanne Team is a dynamic, motivated tourism company, focused on helping guests enjoy the West of Ireland, whether on a relaxing break or a business/conference trip. Our facilities can host 500 in Yeats Village, 800 in The Village Clarion Rd and the Grove Apartments - all of which are in Sligo. In Galway, Dunaras Village can host up to 400 people.

Albanne Tourism Ltd


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A Wild, Wet Weekend!

It was a blast. Bit like having a live animal on the leash, not the board – it doesn’t stay still, even in really shallow water! Anyway, we got the hang of it. Linda was really nice and SO patient! Aisling turned out to be a natural, in no time she was ‘popping up’ as they call it - standing up on her board.All I can say is, I got close up and personal with alot of water, but it was really fun – even catching waves lying flat on the board was fantastic! It all went by in a flash.They had organised a massive barbecue – thank goodnees, because I’ve never been so hungry in my life! Aisling and Shona went for another lesson in the afternoon, but Liz and I just chilled on the beach with Mary, one of the girls from Kilkenny. She wants to do media/journalism, same as me. Some people from H2O Skincare were there, giving free facials so we went and had one which was fantastic and then someone told us about Kilcullen’s Bath House so Aisling and I went to try it out. Hot seawater and seaweed! Mary said she’d had enough seawater for one day, but actually it was really relaxing! Just wanted to go to sleep afterwards. We got some food and went back to the campsite and flaked out.Then Mary and Niamh came by and dragged us up to the nightclub. I don’t think I’d have even noticed a bug in my sleeping bag that night, I was exhausted! In fact, should have headed for my lovely little tent sooner - it was a bit of a struggle making it onto the beach next morning. Still, you only live once and it was a hilarious evening.

The trip down from Dublin was much quicker than I’d expected, only two and a half hours (even in Aisling’s car!) and we found Enniscrone really easily. Gorgeous sunshine and amazing beach. We decided to put the tent up straight away, which was just as well, as we might not have managed it later! Aisling’s brother said it would be a doddle and actually it wasn’t difficult – just neither of us had done it before. Anyway it was a good laugh and we got to meet the girls right next to us, Shona and Liz, who weren’t quite as clueless as us, luckily. Great campsite – really good loos and showers (I’d been imagining peeing behind a bush, not being much of a camper!) Nice people at the campsite too – said they got lots of surfers. Surfers! I thought, if you knew I’d never even set foot into a wetsuit, you’d laugh out loud! Anyway we headed off up to Gilroy’s where there was a band playing. LOADS of women had come down for the weekend – I couldn’t believe it! Enniscrone was just humming, a good few golfers it turned out, but mostly women there for the wild weekend. Had a great evening – we stayed for a while but Aisling and I really wanted to head off down the beach for a walk – it looked so fantastic, especially wtih staying light so late! Amazing – but then, we’re used to Dublin, it seems to get dark much quicker in the city. ‘11am on the beach’ they’d told us, the organisers. They were really nice, the ones I’d met anyway, Zoe and Linda. We just about made it. (Thank God I didn’t end us sharing my sleeping bag with any creepy crawlies – I was really dreading finding some spider or something!) There were loads of us on the beach, even more than I’d thought, must have been a couple of hundred, and some older than my mum! We split up into groups – we went in with Shona and Liz and some girls who’d come up from Kilkenny, 8 of us altogether. Linda had a great pile of equipment, everything we needed. It was brilliant, we didn’t have to bring anything – except the tent and all. Anyway, we learned about safety and the gear and that kind of stuff and did a few warm up exercises (that was a shock to the system!) The hardest thing was getting the wet suit on – I’m sure there’s some design fault! I don’t think it helped that we couldn’t stop laughing. Then Shona had put hers on back to front (pure luck I didn’t do the same - why wouldn’t you have the zip at the front?) Eventually we got in the water.

Photos: © Zoe Lally

Rachel Brierton

I was surprised (once I’d got into the wetsuit, that is!) how much easier it all seemed the second time round. It was even more fun than the first day and – wow, don’t faint! – I got up, sorry, ‘popped up’ on the board really quickly. Great waves – not too big, thanks be to God. What you would do if one of those monster waves came at you, I can’t imagine, but I guess you get better and better. I was really sorry when the session came to an end.We had another huge barbie (ravenous again!) and after we’d nearly destroyed Sean’s tent, taking it down, we spent a great afternoon sitting around. Made loads of friends, and Aisling has fixed up some weekend for us to come back and do it all again, on our own – well, with Liz and Shona (and the tent)... (Women’s Wild Wet Weekend is organised by the Irish Surfing Association under the Sport’s Council Women in Sport initiative. isasurf.ie)

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Strandhill Caravan & Camping Park Strandhill Co Sligo Phone: 071 916 8111

Recommended by: Alan Rogers, ADAC, DCC, ACSI, AA, Kosmos, Caravan Club, Camping and Caravan Club

Atlantic Caravan Park

Enniscrone Co Sligo Phone: 096 36132 Fax: 096 36890 Email: atlanticcaravanpk@eircom.net www.atlanticcaravanpark.com Welcome to the Atlantic Caravan and Camping Park situated in the heart of the charming resort of Enniscrone in County Sligo. With its perfect beachside location and breathtaking panoramic views of Killala Bay, this is the ideal setting for a memorable family holiday or a relaxing weekend getaway.

The past few years have seen numerous improvements to this friendly, family run site. There are a wide variety of facilities available including safe children’s play areas, spacious touring pitches with electric hook up, overnight onsite security, heated shower rooms and a kitchen. Convenience is one of the park’s greatest assets as it is within close distant of the nearby championship golf course, 5km of unspoilt beaches, surf school, seaweed baths, indoor swimming pool complex and spa facilities in addition to local shops, bars and restaurants. The Atlantic Caravan and Camping Park is open virtually all year round and caters for mobile homes, touring caravans, camper vans and tents. Please note it is a children and family orientated site.

Greenlands Caravan & Camping Park Rosses Point Co Sligo Phone: 071 917 7113

This is the ideal family site, situated on a slight rise with direct access to two safe and gently shelving sandy beaches. The Championship Links Golf course is beside the site, while the sailing club is just 100m away. The views from the site are magnificent, with mountains and sea all around. Shops, pubs and Restauants are a short 500m walk away, while the site itself is well equipped with all the usual facilities including toilets, showers, chemical disposal unit, laundry room, TVcommon room and campers kitchen. There is a special toilet/washing room for disabled campers. The site area has recently been increased to 6 acres, with 100 Hard standings for caravans, all with electricity, while tents are pitched on sandy grass which does not become muddy in rain. Rosses Point is just 8km from Sligo City and all the attractions of the area are within a short drive. The Park is easily found, beside the County Sligo Golf Club. We are open from Easter until mid-September. Recommended by: Alan Rogers, ADAC, DCC, ACSI, AA, Kosmos, Caravan Club, Camping and Caravan Club

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Where to Stay

The site is situated right at the famous beach of Strandhill, mecca for surfers from all around the world, while the flat sands of Culleenamore, more suitable for family fun, are just 2km away. The Golf club is 500m from the site, while shops, pubs and restaurants are within 100m. The toilet-block includes showers, chemical disposal unit and a laundry room. TV and common rooms can be found in the Reception block. There are 78 hard standings for caravans, all with electricity and as the site has now been enlarged to 20 acres, tent campers have a very large area to choose from. The grass is on a sandy base and so never becomes muddy in rain. Strandhill is a place for walkers, with miles of sandy beach and dunes to explore. Knocknarea mountain with it's cairn rises behind the site. Horse riding is available 5km away, while Sligo City, 8km away, has many attractions to offer including a swimming pool and sports complex. The Megalithic tombs at Carrowmore are just 5km from the park. You will find the Caravan & Camping Park in the Village of Strandhill, 8km west of Sligo City, just off the road to the Airport and right beside the beach. We are open from Easter until the end of September.


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Sligo International Tourist Hostel

Harbour House Finisklin Road Sligo Town

Tel: 071 917 1547 Fax: 071 917 1547 Mob: 086 259 8293 Email: harbourhouse@eircom.net www.harbourhousehostel.com Directions: On leaving bus/train station turn left on Lord Edward St walk to traffic lights, turn left on to New Motorway (N4) walk for approx 300m. Turn left at Finisklin Road, walk on under the bridge. It is approx 10 mins until you reach the hostel (roundabout nearby) Strandhill Airport - 8 kilometres Knock Int. Airport - 54 kilometres

Budget Accommodation Prices • 50 beds ranging from single, twin and double, standard and en-suite plus dormitory beds • Self-catering kitchen • Within walking distance from town centre and bus/railway station • Laundry facilities • Free coach and car parking • Free internet access • Free local and national telephone calls Major credit cards accepted

www.harbourhousehostel.com 116

Photo: ©Ulrike Schwier


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The Sky's the Limit! The Enterprise & Technology Centre beside Sligo Airport at Strandhill is now a well established and very successful initiative by the Sligo County Enterprise Fund that acts as a catalyst to promote economic development in the county. This purpose-built business enterprise park provides state of the art office units for lease at competitive rates.

The new Centre at Strandhill is rapidly expanding the county’s business base, with a wide range of companies moving into the units. These include Sleater & Co, Electrical & Automation Systems; North West Consulting, Management Consultancy & Training; VOYA, Seaweed Products; Raw Consulting, An Environmental and Geo-Environmental Consultancy; Arrotek Medical Ltd, Medical Device Design; Storage On-Line, Data Storage Solutions and Disaster Recovery; Innovative Science Ltd, Design & Manufacture of Specialist Data Printers; Booktec Ireland, a publishing company; White Young Green, Environmental Consultants and ProAdjust Ltd, Insurance Claims Consultants.

www.sligoairport.com Tel: +353 71 9168280 Book early for best fares.

Strandhill is an ideal base for such a business park. Only 8km west of Sligo City, it is situated on a scenic peninsula and is the location of Sligo’s Regional Airport, with international connections through Dublin Airport. Two return flights a day to Dublin, each taking just 40 minutes, mean that Sligo is always within easy reach of the capital. Sligo Airport is this year increasing its hangarage space to accommodate the other businesses based here. One of these is Usher Aviation, an aircraft maintenance company which maintains aircraft all over Ireland.

Sligo Airport agents for Aer Arann AVIS and FairSure travel insurance

The North West’s Coast Guard and Air Sea Rescue base also operates from Sligo Airport, with two helicopters in service, including a Sikorsky S-61 permanently based at Strandhill, which covers the extensive area from Galway to Belfast. The chopper might fly rescue missions of 200 miles if necessary. In addition to Search and Rescue emergencies, the Coast Guard is the agency called in for pollution and salvage cases. The Sligo Aeronautical Club and Flying School are also based at Strandhill. The flying school is fully licensed by the Irish Aviation Authority and provides introductory flights and flight training in a Cessna 152 training aircraft. The Aero Club has a 32 year record of expert and safe instruction, and has been the starting point for recreational flyers (PPL) as well as those interested in a flying career. The Airport, whose facilities comprise a Terminal Building, Restaurant, Bar, ample parking facilities and car hire has a 1200m tarmac runway with lighting, PAPI’s, NDB and DME and is home to a selection of private aircraft as well. SLIGO - DUBLIN Flight Schedule Sligo to Dublin Monday - Friday Saturday & Sunday Monday - Friday Saturday Sunday

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Dublin to Sligo Flight No. RE212 RE212 RE218 RE218 RE218

Depart 08.50 11.30 18.15 17.35 17.15

Arrive 09.35 12.15 19.00 18.20 18.00

Monday - Friday Saturday & Sunday Monday - Friday Saturday Sunday

Flight No. RE211 RE211 RE217 RE217 RE217

Depart 07.35 10.15 17.05 16.30 16.10

Arrive 08.25 11.05 17.50 17.15 16.55

Getting Here

Sligo is the commercial capital of the North West, with a manufacturing base of considerable importance. Already the centre for Ireland’s tool-making industry, its well educated and motivated workforce with diverse managerial, professional and technical skills, has also attracted many international companies in plastics, health/medical services, precision engineering and technology to choose the county as their European base.


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Getting to County Sligo

SLIGO ~ Gateway to the North-WestMain Visitor Centres & Parks of Surrounding Counties Co Mayo: A Foxford Woollen Mills B Ceide Fields C Knock Shrine D Museum of Country Life E Westport House & Adventure Park F Croagh Patrick Mountain Co Galway: G Connemara National Park

Co Roscommon H Cruachan AĂŒ - Heritage Centre J Strokestown House & Famine Museum K King House Gallery & Museum Co Leitrim: L The Organic Centre Co Fermanagh: M Marble Arch Caves & Geo-park N Florence Court House & Demense O Belleek Pottery & Visitor Centre 118

Co Donegal: P Lough Derg - Place of Pilgrimage Q Slieve League - Sea-Cliffs Shannon & Erne Waterways 1 Lough Derg 2 Lough Ree 3 Lough Boderg 4 Lough Key 5 Lough Allen 6 River Shannon - Erne Waterway 7 Lough Erne Lower 8 Lough Erne Upper 9 Royal Canal 0 Grand Canal


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Useful Numbers Emergency Services

Dial 999 or 112 and ask for one of the following: Ambulance Fire Brigade Gardai/Police Lifeboat Mountain/Coastal Rescue Other Sligo General Hospital 071 917 1111 Chemist Shop late opening: Tohers, O’Connell St Sligo Town Tel: 071 914 2896 Mon - Fri ‘til 8pm, Sat ‘til 7pm, Sun 12noon – 6pm

Barton Smith Lock & Safe Our Business is your Security Millennium House Stephen Street Sligo

O71 914 4344 www.barton-smith.ie E-mail info@barton-smith.ie

EF

Transport

Sligo Airport Tel: 071 916 8280 Sligo Bus Station (Bus Eireann) Tel: 071 916 0066 Sligo Train Station (Iarnrod Eireann) Tel: 071 916 9888 Car Keys Locked in Car Tel: 071 914 2357 (Barton Smith) Discover Sligo Bus Hire Tel: 071 914 7488

Agencies & Support Groups Al-Teen - Family Alcohol Problems Tel: 01 873 2699 AWARE - Depression Support (Local Rate) Tel: 1 890 303 302 Cancer Helpline (Freephone) 1 800 200 700 Childline (Freephone) 1 800 666 666 Citizens information Tel: 1890 77 71 21 Email: callcentre@comhairle.ie Drugs/Alcohol Advice & Support for young people & families Tel: 071 914 3316 Drugs/HIV Helpline 1 800 459 459 Eating disorders - Bodywhys (Local Rate) Tel: 1 890 200 444 Email: info@bodywhys.ie Gay Switchboard Tel: 01 872 1055 Email: info@gayswitchboard.ie Rape Crisis/Sexual Abuse Centre (Freephone) 1 800 778 888 / 071 917 1188 The Samaritans 071 914 2011 Sexual Health Centre (Freephone) Tel: 021 427 5837 Email: info@sexualhealthcentre.com Young People’s info, help, advice, discussion www.spunout.ie Sligo Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Animal Helpline 087 216 6216 Horses & Donkeys Sathya Sai Sanctuary 071 966 6196 Sligo Volunteer Centre Tel: 071 911 1042 119

Churches & Religious Groups in Sligo

Roman Catholic Cathedral Tel: 071 916 2670 Sunday Mass: 8.30am, 10.30am, Noon, 7pm Polish Mass: 6pm every Saturday The Friary (Roman Catholic) Tel: 071 914 2700 Sunday Mass: 9am, 11am, 12.15pm, 7pm Church of Ireland Cathedral (Anglican) Tel: 071 914 6513 Sunday Service: 10.30am Calry Church (Anglican) Sunday Service: 11.30am Methodist Tel: 071 914 2346 Sunday Service: 10.15am Presbyterian Church Tel: 071 916 2337 Sunday Service: 11.30am Elim Pentecostal Church Tel: 071 913 0237 Sunday Service: 11am Baptist Church Tel: 071 913 0332 Sunday Service: 11am The Church of Christ Tel: 071 914 7022 Sunday Service: 11am The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Tel: 071 916 6582 Sligo Islamic Mosque Sligo General Hospital Tel: 086 810 7165 Muslim Assoc of Ireland Tel: 01 269 4699

Cois Inbhear Markievicz Road Sligo 071 914 6008 (switch) 071 914 7991 (fax) info@dacaccountants.com

Useful Services

Est 1788


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Index of Members Member

Page

Member

Page

7th Wave Surf School Adams Childrens Wear Academic Enrichment Workshops Albanne Property Management Allure Ard Nua Village Ardtarmon House Artisan Arigna Mining Experience Atlantic Caravan Park Austies Bar & Restaurant Ballisodare Pharmacy Barton Smith Lock & Safe Barton Smith Sports Bella Vista Bar & Restaurant Bistro Bianconi Café Fleur Café Society Castle Dargan Hotel Castle Dargan Golf Club Cat and the Moon,The Cawley’s Guest House Centra Supermarket (Cosgroves) Chez Philippe-Creporie Bretonne Clarence Hotel Clarion Hotel - Sligo Classiebawn Restaurant (Radisson Hotel) Clevery Mill Clifford Electrical Cois Re Apartments Coleman Irish Music Centre Coleman School of Music Co Sligo Heritage & Genealogy Centre Cummins & Co Accountant Crafter’s Basket,The Daragh Design Davis’s @ Yeat’s Tavern Discover Sligo www.DiscoverSligo.com Discover Sligo Bus Hire Discover Sligo Shop Discovery Tours Dmac-Media Dorothy Perkins Drumcliffe Tea House & Craft Shop Eagles Flying Firefly (Foot Orthoses) Fisheries Board, NW Regional Gaiety Cinema Glasshouse Hotel,The Glencar Worldwide Water Company Greenlands Caravan & Camping Park Gourmet Parlour Hall Door,The (Castle Dargan Hotel) Happy Days Adventure Play Centre Hargadons (Bar*Food*Wine) Harp Tavern,The Hawkswell Theatre Henry Lyons & Co Icon Spa @ Castle Dargan IIC&CC Island View Riding Stables IT Sligo Joe Mc Gowan

46 61 21 113 58 112 111 63 89 115 94 66 91, 118 32 72, 94 95 54 95 39, 40, 98, 108 39, 40 64 71, 108 30 57 12 48, 102, 109 96 95 35 111 19, 51, 69, 89 51 90 118 62 2 68, 96 62, 116, 121, 123 123 116 62, 121 20 2 61 80 51, 86 76 42, 44 11 98, 110 104, 124 115 96 98 51 15 14 19 61 106 3 37 22 70

Johnston Court Shopping Centre Kate’s Kitchen Ken Hunter Menswear King’s Chinese Restaurant Kitchen,The (Glasshouse Hotel) Lough Key Forest Park Lynda Gault Ceramics Lyons Café Mc Canns Menswear Mc Carrick Motors Mc Dermott’s Bar & Restaurant Mortgage Centre Sligo,The Melody Maker Mill Falls Milligan Place Self Catering Model Arts & Niland Gallery Mullaghmore Sailing Club Mullaney Bros. Drapers M V Excalibur M.V Spirit NW Surf School O’ Donnell’s Pub Osta Café & Wine Bar Outerpoint Poppadoms Restaurant Quay’s Bar & Restaurant (City Hotel) Quayside Shopping Centre Radisson BLU Hotel Riverbank Restaurant Rula Bula Sakura Oriental Restaurant Sealview Photography Shafin Developments Shenanigans Bar & Restaurant Shoes & Sports Silver Apple,The Sinergie Restaurant (Clarion Hotel) Sligo Airport Sligo County Council Sligo City Hotel Sligo International Tourist Hostel Sligo Tea Room,The Sligo Park Hotel Sligo Yacht Club (Rosses Point) Sports Centre, Regional SSPCA Stables,The Strandhill Business Park Strandhill Caravan & Camping Park Strandhill Golf Club Strandhill Surf School Swingle Tree Carriage Tours Taylor’s Art Gallery Texaco Service Station (Grange) Tobergal Lane Café & Restaurant Tom Yam,Thai Restaurant Tracey’s Surf Shop Turf ‘n Surf @ Clarion (Clarion Hotel) Voya Seaweed Baths Venue,The Waterfront,The Walking Clinic Yeat’s Society Yeat’s Suppers @ Broc House

53 57 61 98 98 51 63 61, 100 60 4 83, 98 28 16 67 112 18 49 55 70 45 46, 69 14 102 47 93, 100 94 58, 59 95, 106, 110 101 50 101 62 67 102 61 101 102 117 24 94, 109 116 88 111 49 29 23 14 117 115 41 47 37 63 68 12, 102 101 46 48 106 14, 103 70, 103 74 86, 88 99

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Discover Sligo Shop Tourist & Local Information Sligo Arts & Crafts Located on Markievicz Road, in Sligo Town Centre

This town-centre shop adds to our existing services: • • • •

Discover Sligo.com – Sligo County’s Portal Website Discover Sligo Magazine Discovery Tours Discover Sligo Shop is right beside the Tour Coach Parking, so we can be of maximum assistance to tour groups on arrival in Sligo.

We can provide: • • • • • • •

Information on Sligo’s Tourist and Recreation Attractions Accommodation Booking Service Coach Tour Guides Walking Tour Guides Driving Tours Group Tour Itinerary Planning Services Activity, Recreation, Cultural and Educational Group Tours by arrangement with Discovery Tours • Ground-handling Services • Sligo’s Tourism, Recreation and Lifestyle Magazine – Discover Sligo • Unique Sligo gifts & crafts by local artisans and books by local authors • DS Portal Website • Street-side Window Advertising

Discover Sligo Info-Shop, Markievicz Road, Sligo Tel: 071 914 7488 Email: info@discoversligo.com www.discoversligo.com 121

Useful Services

This independent Tourism & Recreation Info-Shop aims to make it easy for visitors and locals to access all the information they need to enjoy every aspect of Sligo.


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My Sligo Childhood To celebrate the 50th year of the Yeats Summer School, Discover Sligo’s Roving Reporter managed to persuade Senator WB Yeats, who was a poet, dramatist and one of the co-founders of Dublin’s Abbey Theatre and who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923, to share his childhood memories of Sligo. (Posthumously of course!) Of course, you must remember that I spent much of my childhood in England. My Father determined to give up the law and take up portrait painting and moved us, lock stock and barrel from suburban Dublin to London. I distinctly remember sailing from Kingstown, Dun Leary as it’s now known, and how excited I and my sisters, Lilly and Lolly were as the steam ship drew away. Jack was only a baby in Mother’s arms, and they both cried all the way over. Leaving Ireland was an adventure for us children, but a great change for her as she worried about money and so on all the time. Indeed, my Father’s subsequent career as an artist was never affluent – he was far too interested in talking philosophy and such like. However I do recall one holiday in Dorset, where Mother’s family originally hailed from. We had a glorious time on the beach - it reminded us so of Sligo!

When Grandfather retired, they moved to Merville, a beautiful villa on the Strandhill side of Sligo. He walked regularly into town to supervise the building of his tomb in St John’s Churchyard. I won’t tell you what my Father said when we reported that to him back in London! As I grew older I frequently stayed with Henry Middleton, Mother’s Cousin, at his summer house, Elsinore in Rosses Point, or in the winter at Avena House in Ballisodare. Elsinore was right on the water, like Hamlet’s castle in Denmark, and was filled with ghosts. Deadman’s Point was just beside it and the spirit of Captain Black, builder of the house and a renowned smuggler could be felt at night. It was on the beach there that I first experimented with Thought Transference, trying to exchange visions with Cousin George Pollexfen.We were greatly encouraged by Henry’s housekeeper, Mary Battle who regularly read the tea leaves in our breakfast cups and told us what the day would bring, often remarkably accurately!

Of course, Mother came from Sligo. She was a Pollexfen and her father, together with his Middleton Cousin, owned much of the town. Her life there had been very comfortable and secure. I’m afraid that marrying Father was a big change from all that certainty! Sligo remained for her the most special place in the world and she talked about it constantly when we were living in Bedford Park in London. Naturally we came for a visit every summer. Grandfather Pollexfen owned the Sligo Shipping Company and ran ships from Sligo to Liverpool and back three times weekly, so once we managed the train fare to the port we were on our way! I can still remember the excitement – all the crew knew us and we them!

As I grew to be a poet all the inspiration for my early works came from Sligo – the landscape, the heritage and the stories of the place. It was in Ballisodare, near the family’s flour mills that I first heard a tinker singing a local version of ‘The Salley Gardens’. I loved venturing out to the Hawk’s Well near Coolaney, to Knocknarea, Lough Gill, Dooney Rock and so on. In those days one thought nothing of walking ten mile out and then ten back! Oh, those were the days! I remember one winter in the late 90’s when Lough Gill froze over entirely and all of us, Lilly, Lolly and I went skating out to the islands.Winters then could be very harsh.

When we arrived, we were always greeted with great love and affection by Grandmother and the Aunts. Grandfather Pollexfen, I’m afraid, was very stern and serious and we were a little wary of him! With the others we’d have great fun, often taking a horse and carriage – charabancs they were called – and driving to the waterfall at Glencar where we’d have tea at Siberry’s thatched tea house. Sometimes we might go out to Knocknarea, and bathe at Strandhill where once a year Grandmother guiltily indulged in a seaweed bath in Morrow’s Bathhouse. ‘For the rheumatics’, she would say, and ‘Don’t tell your Grandfather!’

I don’t get back there now very much. I spend winter in the South of France for my health. I expect life has changed somewhat. Society was very rigid then – after all, Grandfather was the most important man in Sligo business and the great Anglo Irish families ran the estates across the county, places like Lissadell and Hazlewood. Since Independence in 1922 all’s greatly changed, but I see great hope as the nation gets underway.Yes, I daresay Sligo is changing these days, but I am certain it retains its charm. Images Courtesy of The National Library of Ireland 122


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Editorial In recent months a number of Sligo's tourism and recreation operators have begun to work together to explore what needs to happen for County Sligo to be promoted as one of Ireland's leading activity hubs.

Angling has been a backbone sport in the county for many years, which is hardly surprising as Sligo abounds with lakes and rivers, quite apart from its 110 miles of Atlantic coast. This is a popular place for coarse or game fishing, and for those who fancy landing a shark there are opportunities for deep sea angling at several of the county’s seaside resorts. Hillwalkers are spoilt for choice with the Dartry Mountains, the Ox range, the Curlews and the Bricklieves, and for any who enjoy walking but don’t have a head for heights, there are fabulous sandy beaches all along Sligo’s coast – many almost deserted – as well as headlands and small peninsulas, while inland there are many lake and woodland walks. There are sailing clubs at Rosses Point and Mullaghmore; there are cycling trails (Sligo forms part of the North West Trail), swimming, rowing, diving – the list goes on. The county is one big outdoor arena, but there is plenty of sports infra-structure as well. There are clubs with coaches, instructors, equipment and guides for hire, information outlets – everything you could want to help you get started or back you up if you are an experienced player already. And the extra bonus is that all of this is set against Sligo’s fabulous scenery, and with all the ‘off piste’ opportunities for relaxation and refreshment you could want, either in the county or Sligo Town itself, which is a vibrant, cultural city with lots going on – shops, cafes, restaurants, bars, theatres and galleries. Our sister business, Discovery Tours (www.discoverytours.ws), provides a tour planning and ground-handling service for groups that come from across the globe to visit Ireland. Often we find that these groups fall so in love with Sligo, that on subsequent visits to Ireland they elect to spend a greater prropotion of their time here than elsewhere in the country.

looking for information on the northwest?

This year Discover Sligo celebrates its 10th year in business. The magazine has been going since 2003 and today it is Sligo’s number one magazine, catering for both visitors to the county and those who live here alll year round. In each edition we provide a variety of articles, not just on tourism and recreation, but also on some contemporary issues. Enjoy the read – Do please tell us what you think, and above all, contact us if we can help in any way as you or your friends Discover Sligo.

Useful Services

Those of us fortunate enough to live in Sligo know full well that the county and surrounding region has a wealth of excellent outdoor activity resources. Indeed many are of world class standard. Just check through the pages of this magazine and you will see what we mean. Better still, use this magazine, log on to our portal website – Discover Sligo.com - or visit our Info-Shop on Markievicz Road in Sligo town centre (along the river from the Yeats Statue) to get the information and help you need to get out and about and enjoy the region's activities and pursuits.

In fact one of our longest standing customers, who has been with us for close on ten years, has now dropped London and Paris from their itinerary so they can spend more time in Sligo!

share the experience Editor PA Assistant Technical Support Graphics Managing Director Sales Staff DS Shop Discovery Tours

Lorely Forrester Hanneke van den Eertwegh Lorna Kirrane Simon Malcolm Daragh Stewart Keith McNair Patrick Stewart Hannah Maguire Donal Doherty Debbie McNair

Discoversligo.com

Discover Sligo – share the experience ISSN: 1649 – 8534 Where possible images have been credited. Other photographs: © Brierton Forrester design, Donal Doherty, Itchy Feet Promotions, James Connolly, Joe McGowan, Michael McCormick, Patrick Stewart, Sligo Champion, Steve Rogers, Tobergal Lane, Ulrike Schwier, Zoe Lally and contributors.

Discover Sligo Loughanelton Calry Co Sligo Ireland Tel: 071 914 7488 Email: info@discoversligo.com www.DiscoverSligo.com

This publication is copyright to Discover Sligo Ltd, 409458 Directors K McNair D McNair Loughanelton, Sligo, Ireland. www.discoversligo.com ISSN 1649-8534

daraghstewartdesign Graphic Designer

[e] daraghdesign@gmail.com [t] 087 125 7100

sligo’s portal website


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