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Nov. 4 - 18, 2010

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New waterways to ease flooding in Chaweng Government says the end of problem is in sight. By AKANEE THONGTHARA

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evere flooding problems, especially in some of Samui’s main tourist areas, prompted the national government to grant Bt840 million for the Sustainable Water Management project of the island. The project prioritizes the effective management of water resources, distribution of fresh water to residents and solutions to problems such as flooding and drought. In a recent public discussion with Deputy Prime Minister in Economy Trirong Suwankhiri and Samui mayor Ramnet Jaikwang, experts from the Royal Irrigation Department proposed a possible end to the heavy flooding in Chaweng. According to the irrigation experts, the one-meter deep Chaweng Lake, repository of runoff water from two waterways from Baan Haad Ngam, cannot handle the increased flow of water. “It takes six hours to drain water before the lake can accommodate water from

opinion

Page 10

Samui tattoo-noun, plural -toos: the nickname for a scar resulting from an accident involving a moped or car on Koh Samui.

drainage systems along the Chaweng beach road. This causes overflowing of water in the Chaweng.” The project to create a new waterway which will redirect runoff patterns from surrounding areas directly to Chaweng Bay is earmarked to be completed by the end of next year. The new waterway will be complemented with additional drainage ditches that will be built in Chaweng. Through these new waterways, the 500-rai lake will be able to regularly receive larger flows from drainage lines in Chaweng and ease flooding in the area. The old drainage lines will be dredged and improved to facilitate increased flows especially during the monsoon season. The sewage from drainage systems in Chaweng will be treated before water is sent to the lake. Another point of discussion during the turn to page 4

“Garbage problem taken seriously”

food&wine

Rose & Crown on Page 21

Read report on Page 2

Photo by Natalie Ng

Motorcycle taxi drivers stand by as road in Laem Din become unpassable due to torrential rains and massive flooding in 2007.

CCTV cameras to be installed to secure island Tourists can kick back and relax. By AKANEE THONGTHARA

In a move to strengthen the security on the resort island of Samui, the municipal government will install security cameras at strategic points along the main ring road, Samui mayor Ramnet Jaikwang told the Gazette. The municipality chief said that 70 closed circuit television cameras (CCTV) will be installed at vantage points to combat crimes on Samui. The Bt52 million project, under the “Green,

Clean and Safe” program, will include the set up of a control center which will be manned by the Information Technology Department officials. “We would like to assure all tourists that we are working to enhance security on the island,” said Ramnet. The municipality is now waiting for a private contractor who will roll out the project. Installation is expected to be completed in six months.


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IslandNews

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Samui mayor says garbage problem taken seriously

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he Koh Samui municipality has launched new plans to tackle the island’s rubbish problems after the Maret community members brought the issue to the spotlight through a protest held in September. Even with question marks whether Samui has the funds or manpower to clean up the island, Samui mayor Ramnet Jaikwang told the Gazette that contrary to the protesters’ allegations that the garbage problem is being taken for granted, the issue in fact, is being taken seriously. “Samui’s garbage problem has been present for many years. It is very delicate and it needs to be solved properly,” said the mayor. The municipality chief said they have begun new landfill construction, equipment purchases and discussions with waste disposal experts to ease the garbage problem of the island. The improvement plans include a budget of Bt240,000 to rent the 4-rai dump yard and build a fourth landfill. Waste management has been a growing problem since the garbage incinerator broke down two years ago. The municipality tried to have the machine repaired but the work has not been completed. “The smell of garbage bothers us so much especially during the rainy season,” said a resident living near the dump site. The municipality, according to Mayor Ram-

net, kept their side of the deal with the protesters. Up to 18,000 liters of chemicals are being sprayed everyday to remove the foul smell

ing dump trucks to empty garbage bins located around Samui. The garbage incinerator, on the other hand,

of the garbage. Three industrial solid waste shredders were also purchased to process the trash before disposal at the landfills. “The municipality also increased the bottom liners of the landfills up to three layers [that cost nearly Bt8 million] to make sure there is no contamination of underground water,” said Mayor Ramnet. The government office has been working with a Bangkok-based private company Muang Sa-ad to remove the garbage on the island. The firm has been provid-

is due to be repaired in March next year. The mayor said that even after the repair, the capacity of the incinerator is not going to be as high as it used to be. Mayor Ramnet also told the Gazette that he is not keen about purchasing another incinerator. “I would like to keep it as the last option. It does burn the garbage but its smoke also creates other environment problems.” The municipality will focus on sustainable solutions to the garbage problem creating projects to minimize trash from its primary source.

Chinese tourists avoid Bangkok, travel to Samui instead President of Thai – China Travel Association said that the number of Chinese tourists visiting the country in the last quarter is satisfactory. However, domestic political situation has caused them to change their destination to the South. As for the stronger Thai baht,

the appreciation doesn’t affect the Chinese tourist market because the Yuan has also gone up against the dollar. Unstable political situation including rallies and explosions in Bangkok has caused Chinese tourists to avoid Bangkok and Pattaya,

but opted to travel to the islands of Samui and Phuket instead. The two provinces have seen the number of visitors go up by more than double compared to that of last year. Chartered flights have also gone up to 60 flights a week, up from 20 per week last year.


Island News New Honda

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

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dealership opens on Samui By AKANEE THONGTHARA

Honda’s new showroom on Samui.

Honda lovers on the island no longer have to travel to Suratthani as Honda opens its new dealership on Samui, operated by Sasu Company Limited. The social event held Oct. 23 brought an exclusive group of clients and members of the media in Baan Taling Ngam together. The program was led by Supat Praneejit, Managing Director of Sasu Co. Ltd. The new showroom, located at Lipa Noi near the Raja Ferry port, officially opened Oct. 29 and will serve the entire Samui market. Sasu Co. Ltd. has been operating the Honda dealership in Suratthani for 18 years and felt that a dealership on the island will better serve the robust market on Samui.

The showroom will offer test drives and advice about Honda’s financing schemes to prospective buyers. “We have done marketing on Samui for the last seven years and we believe that local residents on Samui are good clients and have affection for Honda vehicles,” said Supat. The Honda complex houses four display models -- Jazz, Civic, Freed and Accord – although all other Honda models are available upon order. They also have a complete service and parts center. Honda’s presence on the island is in response to a growing demand for Honda’s line of vehicles known for its fuel efficiency.

THE GAZETTE’S PAGE 3 NEEDS YOU. Because we’d like this always fresh, we invite you to send us your cool photos. Email them to editor@thesamuigazette.com.

Kamalaya recognized for enduring excellence

At the fourth annual TATLER UK Spa Awards celebration held Oct. 4, attended by leading travel editors, writers and hospitality leaders and presented by Melinda Stevens, TATLER’s Travel Editor, Kamalaya was honored as the recipient of the TATLER Enduring Excellence Award for 2010. This award honors Kamalaya Wellness Sanctuary and Holistic Spa for its outstanding consistency in maintaining the highest standards of excellence since its conception in 2005. It is with great pride that Kamalaya adds this accolade to the acknowledgements of the destination’s healing hands, and to the achievement of delivering their precious key message “feel life’s potential.”


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IslandNews samui gazette |

nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Diamond Princess docks in Koh Samui The magnificent Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in the port of Nathon recently. The luxury ship arrived on Samui Oct. 18 with some 3,000 passengers on board and was the first ship to arrive on Samui this year. Diamond Princess began operating in March 2004 and is owned and operated by Princess Cruises. She primarily cruises in Alaska during the summer and the

Asia in the winter. This 16-day cruise started sailing from China and stopped in Pusan (South Korea), Nagasaki (Japan), Shanghai, Hong Kong, Nha Trang (Vietnam), Ho Chi Minh, Bangkok, then Koh Samui before heading to its final stop in Singapore. Many of the Diamond Princess passengers went on sightseeing at the Big Buddha temple, Wat Laem

and Chaweng Beach while others went to other attractions such as the monkey show and elephant trekking. Also an option in the itinerary was the four-wheel drive island safari and elephant trek. “We arrived at Nathon Pier around 8:00 a.m. and we are going to leave at 5:00 p.m. Our passengers will go around the island for personal shopping and sightseeing,” said Marlon George, Shore Excursions Manager of Diamond Princess during an exclusive interview with the Gazette. Several vans serviced the tourists while going around town. “I think the huge ship visiting the island is a good thing because local residents earned some income from their shopping,” said a small business owner in Nathon.

New waterways... FROM page 1

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We will work to find solutions to all water-related problems of Samui.

meeting was the shortage of water in T. Maret. Community leaders of Maret questioned the project’s focus in Chaweng. They reported shortage of fresh water supplied for daily consumption and agriculture in Moo 1, 2 and 5 and Moo 3 and 4 in Na Muang. According to the residents, the public was not consulted about the 36-meter dam being built in Na Muang and Maret and the impact it may have on the community. The head of the Maret community pled to the Deputy PM to examine the construction of the dam.


IslandNews

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

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Waterwork office assures island water quality high The Provincial Waterworks Authority (PWA) of Koh Samui, in an exclusive interview with the Gazette, assured residents that Samui’s water quality is above standard. The statement from PWA came

after news reports saying that a worm-like creature came out of faucet in Phang Nga province. The local government official said there will be no such incidence on Samui. “On Koh Samui, we can

assure that water goes through a filtration process before it gets distributed to households,” said Wichan Ningnoy, manager of PWA of Koh Samui. On Oct. 20, news reports in local media said that a

LET’S DRINK TO THAT: PWA Koh Samui manager Wichan Ningnoy says water is safe.

35-centimeter long worm came out of a faucet in Phang Nga while a housewife was laundering her clothes. The reports caused panic among residents on the province and nearby areas although the reports were denied by the water officials saying the worm went inside the faucet and when the tap was opened, the worm was washed out. Wichan further explained that while mountain runoff does include natural erosion deposits and other chemicals found on earth, PWA thoroughly screens and purify water such that it is fit for daily use. The five pumping stations have treatment facilities which screens for debris, clarifies that water with aluminum hydroxide, adjusts the pH level and disinfects with chlorine to remove microbial contaminants. The purified water is kept in an ultra filtration system container to prevent contamination. According to the data of PWA, water on Samui contains 1.2 parts per million (one part substance per million parts water) re-

sidual chlorine and 1.4 ppm turbidity. The levels are within the standard contaminate numbers which is not less than 0.2 in chlorine and not greater than five for turbidity. Another recent issue that was brought up was the yellowish water especially in Bophut. A resident complained of several weeks of discolored water especially during rainy days. PWA of Koh Samui told the Gazette that Namuang Waterworks Station services the Bophut area although it is the last service area. “For residents on the higher altitude area, the pressure may not be sufficient enough,” said Wichan. The office also pointed at the drought which occurred from March until September. “PWA faced water shortage problems and we resorted to dig water from a lower level which has more sediments than the surface level water. The sediments may have remained in the water pipes.” PWA said they will continue to maintain the quality of water for the local residents on the island.


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Police

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Three ladyboys arrested over bag snatch By Cherdchai Taweemuang

Photo by Rob Newman

NO ESCAPE. The Thai Meteorological Department forecasted heavy to very rain in much of Southern provinces including Suratthani over the last week of October. Northeasterly winds went from 20 to 40 kilometers per hour while wave height went from two to three meters. A small marine vehicle pictured above split to two after an hour of beating of strong waves in Bophut.

THAILAND FLOODING Irish victim positively identifies the ladyboys as the thieves.

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n Irish tourist visiting Samui has been robbed by ladyboys along the Chaweng beach road in the afternoon of Oct. 19. Noy Kugman,18, was walking along Chaweng Center when a ladyboy approached him and asked if he needed any help. Another ladyboy snuck behind his back and got his black bag which contained his camera and Bt6,000. The two ladyboys escaped in a motorbike

driven by another ladyboy accomplice. The Bophut Police, led by Pol. Lt. Col. Phongkajorn Sukkasang, were notified of the robbery involving a foreigner and a checkpoint was set up in front of the police station. The suspects were caught at the checkpoint riding a blue Yamaha Mio with plate number 152. Suspects were identified as Sakchai Na-Lumpoon, 29, Abdulwahaba Mayuso, 18, and Wirat Posae, 19. The lady-

boys still had in their possession the victim’s black bag. At the police station, Kugman positively identified the ladyboys as the same people who snatched his bag. Kugman was accompanied by another Irish tourist Dor Azouri. The suspects confessed that this is not their first offense. Suspects said they have resorted to snatching bags of tourists to sustain their drug addiction. The three ladyboys were charged with theft.

Police recover stolen motorbike The Bophut Police received a tip in the afternoon of Oct. 19 about a motorbike tucked in a bush in Soi Panyadee and recovered a red Honda Click stolen the day before. Amporn Upara, 24, reported about the theft at the Bophut Police station. “The motorbike was parked in front of my house yesterday night and this morning the motorbike was gone.” At the scene, the police found the motorbike covered by coconut leaves and hidden in the bush. Investigators said that the motorbike is lined up to be “chopped” and the parts sold to the black market.

“I am impressed that the police are able to retrieve my motorbike,” said Amporn, a staff of Centara Grand Hotel after the police handed the motorbike to her. Bophut Police said that they

have received several complaints of motorbike theft among locals. The police said the alleged gangster targets automatic motorbikes such as Honda Click and Yamaha Fino.

Flood death toll rises to 94

Authorities have reported that almost 100 people have been killed in the nationwide flood crisis. The government vows to offer cash to the families of those who were killed by the ongoing disaster. The Emergency Medical Institute of Thailand said that 94 people have been killed by the ongoing flood in 20 provinces since October 10. Most victims are from Nakon Ratchasima province, followed by Nakonsawan and Lopburi. Meanwhile, the Center for Flood Victims, chaired by Apirak Kosayothin, said it will join hands with the private sector to offer aids to those in need after the flood is over. They proposed that the emergency rescue team called ‘1111’ be established in parts of the Kingdom so that flood victims can receive aid quickly. In addition, the center’s director Sathit Wongnongtoey said he will call a meeting to discuss the progress of flood related measures of many state agencies. He added that he will visit Lopburi province to present 50,000 baht to the families of those who have been killed by the flood. Sathit added that the sum will be doubled if the dead is the family’s leader.

Man’s body found floating in Laem Yai bay

Koh Samui police are investigating after a body was found floating in Ao Khao Laem Yai at the northwestern tip of Samui Oct. 16. The police’s early investigation suggests that the

still unidentified victim appear to have been fatally stabbed and shot before he was thrown to the ocean. A fatal wound was found on his rib area and gunshot wounds on his shoulders.

The Samui Rescue Team recovered the body after a local resident found the victim floating. Investigators described the male victim as Asian in appearance, aged between 25 to 30 years old, about 160 to

170 centimeters tall and with dark skin. Investigators said the victim may have been dead for at least two days before he was retrieved. Residents living nearby do not recognize the victim.

“We assumed that the victim was a crew member of a fishing boat. He may have had a fight with another crew member before he was stabbed and thrown here,” said the Koh Samui police.


TheWorld

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Death toll from Indonesian disasters nears 430

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he fisherman was jolted awake by the powerful earthquake and ran with his screaming neighbors to high ground. He said they watched as the sea first receded and then came roaring back “like a big wall” that swept away their entire village. “Suddenly trees, houses and all things in the village were sucked into the sea and nothing was left,” Joni Sageru recalled Thursday in one of the first survivor accounts of this week’s tsunami that slammed into islands off western Indonesia. The death toll rose Friday to 393 as officials found more bodies, although hundreds of people remained missing. Harmensyah, head of the West Sumatra provincial disaster management center, said rescue teams “believe many, many of the bodies were swept to sea.” Along with the 33 people killed by a volcano that erupted Tuesday more than 800 miles (1,300 kilometers) to the east in central Java, the number of dead from the twin disasters has now reached 426. After a lull that allowed mourners to hold a mass burial for victims, Mount Merapi started rumbling again Thursday with three

small eruptions and another one early Friday. There were no reports of new injuries or damage. The catastrophes struck within 24 hours in different parts of the seismically active country, severely testing Indonesia’s emergency response network. Aid workers trickling into the remote region found giant chunks of coral and rocks in places where homes once stood. Huge swaths of land were submerged. Swollen corpses dotted roads and beaches. In a rare bright spot, an 18-month-old baby was found alive Wednesday in a clump of trees on Pagai Selatan — the same island where the 30-yearold Sageru lived. Relief coordinator Harmensyah said a 10-year-old boy found the toddler whose parents are both dead. More than 100 survivors crowded a makeshift medical center in the main town of Sikakap on Pagai Utara — one of the four main islands in the Mentawai chain located between Sumatra and the Indian Ocean. Some still wept for lost loved ones as they lay on straw mats or sat on the floor, waiting for medics to treat injuries such as cuts and broken limbs. Outside, some rescuers wore face masks as they wrapped corpses in

Tsunami survivors make their way past damaged houses after their village was hit by earthquake-triggered tsunami at Parorogat village, Pagai island, West Sumatra, Indonesia, Oct. 28, 2010.

black body bags. A young woman named Adek sobbed uncontrollably as she tried to talk about her year-old baby who was washed away. “Oh, don’t ask me again,” she said, wiping her tears and turning away. One of the hardest hit areas with 65 dead was the village of Pro Rogat, on Pagai Seatandug island. Villagers there huddled un-

der tarps in the rain and told how many people who had fled to the hills were now too afraid to return home. Mud and palm fronds covered the body of the village’s 60-year-old pastor, Simorangkir. He lay on the ground, partially zipped into a body bag. Police and relatives took turns pushing a shovel into the sodden dirt next to him for his grave.

French protests weaken but still disrupt flights Strikes caused hassles for air travelers in France, but nationwide street protests over a plan to raise the retirement age to 62 failed to draw the massive crowds of weeks’ past — a sign of slackening resolve among the bill’s opponents. Parliament has already approved raising the retirement age from 60 to 62, but union leaders insist they will not give up their fight until conservative President Nicolas Sarkozy actually signs the bill. Still, fewer protesters followed them into the streets this time, and strikes by train and oil workers have been tapering off in recent days. In Paris, demonstrators waved union flags and set off flares, while in southern Marseille, they beat drums and blew whistles. Past demonstrations have drawn more than a mil-

lion protesters into the streets: This time, the Interior Ministry put the figure at 560,000 nationwide. The hard-line CGT union contested that number, putting turnout at 2 million. “It’s true you could say the antireform movement is slowing down, but you need to ask why,” Serba Germain, a 67-year-old retired police officer marching in Marseille, told Associated Press Television News. “People are disappointed, they are frustrated” because the government hasn’t listened. Unions and opposition parties urged Sarkozy not to sign the law, which polls show is unpopular. He is expected to do so by mid-November, after it is cleared by France’s constitutional watchdog. Socialist leader Martine Aubry urged Sarkozy to listen to the peo-

ple. “We will fight until the end,” she said. But Sarkozy has refused to back down, even amid two weeks of strikes that canceled trains, shut down oil refineries and left drivers struggling to find gasoline. A small number of trains were canceled Thursday, but the problem was bigger for airlines. A third of flights at Paris’ Charles de Gaulle airport and half of those at the city’s smaller Orly were canceled. Flights were expected to run as normal Friday. Though the strikes are tapering off, the fuel shortages they caused lingered because of refinery strikes. Some 85 percent of gas stations are now open, the government said Thursday night, but added that the Paris region and central France continued to face some difficulties.

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‘Ate’ or ‘Et’? British Library mulls pronunciation If you say tomato, and I say tomahto, the British Library wants to know. The research institution is inviting people to have their voices recorded as part of a project to chart the way pronunciation and accents in English are changing. The library wants visitors to read aloud a passage from a children’s book — “Mr. Tickle” — so linguists can compare the way people make vowel sounds, learn how they deal with words ending in “ing” and hear whether they pronounce “garage” to rhyme with marriage or mirage. Roger Walshe, the library’s head of learning, said Thursday that the result will be “a snapshot of English in the early 21st century.” Visitors to the Evolving English exhibition, which opens Nov.12, will be able to record themselves in sound booths, and others can submit audio clips on the library’s website, www.bl.uk. The results will be preserved for future researchers in the library’s sound archive. The exhibition traces the development of English over more than 1,000 years, through displays that range from an original manuscript of the Anglo-Saxon epic “Beowulf” to the King James Bible and Victorian pamphlets on how to speak properly. Just what constitutes “proper” pronunciation remains a thorny issue — especially in Britain, whose many accents can often pinpoint the speaker’s regional origin and class background. George Bernard Shaw’s observation in “Pygmalion” that “it is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman despise him” still holds a large measure of truth. Yet linguists say pronunciation is constantly evolving. Young people in Britain are increasingly likely to call the eighth letter of the alphabet “haitch,” rather than “aitch,” and pronounce the past tense of “to eat” as “ate” instead of the old-fashioned “et.” “There is no right or wrong,” Walshe said. “There are just different usages.


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Property

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Condominiums rising on Samui but taking the form of hotels By CITYSCAPE INTELLIGENCE

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Choeng Mon will witness a surge in supply of both villas and condominiums over the next 30 months.

Photo by Samui Estate Corp.

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he last few years has seen the condominium market develop in earnest according to a report released by Colliers International Thailand covering the residential market on Samui. “Before 2007 no condominiums were supplied but by the end of 2010 around 330 units are expected to have been completed,” pointed out Surachet Kongcheep, manager of research at Colliers. But the word condominium may be misleading as most have taken on a hotel method of operation asserts Antony Picon, senior manager of research at Colliers. “Some developers in the early stages realized that buyers wanted to use their units as a full or partial investment, so in some cases the design had to be changed to cater for hotel type services. Many buyers put their units into a hotel pooling system when they are not using them and obtain income that way”. This type of condominium is different to the buy to live or rent variety in Bangkok and Pattaya but leaves the market open to greater volatility. “Residential sales picked up strongly in Bangkok shortly after the April/May demonstrations but for Samui this has continued to be detrimental on sales due to the tourism component,” said Patima Jeerapaet, managing director of Colliers. However Mr. Patima was still upbeat. “Samui attracts those who prefer a more relaxed, chilled out environment compared

to that of Pattaya and Phuket but Samui still provides a decent and improving infrastructure,” he said. The supply of multiple villa developments began in 2004 but the first half of 2010 heralded a greater additional new supply than any previous whole year before that. Nearly 100 units were added in H1 2010 bringing the total number of units to around 350, a number similar to that of condominiums. According to Mr. Kongcheep, Bo Phut is main beach area for residential units. “Nearly two thirds of all existing condominium units are located in Bo Phut while the beach also hosts around 44% of all villa units,” he revealed. But will this be the key area of growth in the future? Mr. Picon points to another beach area that will be the next main supplier. “Bo Phut’s neighbour Choeng Mon will witness a surge in supply of both villas and condominiums over the next 30 months”, he said. “The area, like Bo Phut, is located close to the airport with entertainment facilities, but unlike Bo Phut has good available beach land,” he added. The pattern of growth for Samui will be in the form of quality rather than quantity due to limited direct international flights and building restrictions. “Many developments are eclectic in nature and add value by blending into and even enhancing the current environment” stressed Mr. Patima. “Those developments that impose buildings that conflict with the essence of Samui will find the going tougher,” he warned.


Business&Finance samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

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AOT: Suvarnabhumi Airport safe from flooding The director of Suvarnabhumi Airport is confident that there will no flooding at Thailand’s main international airport, while assuring the public that nearby residents will not be affected by the channeling of flood waters. Suvarnabhumi Airport Director Anirut Thanomkulabutra said that the airport has efficient flood protection measures in place. There are two pump stations, each with the capacity to handle one million

cubic meters of water per day. In addition to the pumping stations, he noted that the airport is surrounded by a 3.5 meter deep moat of a 23.5 kilometer stretch, which is capable of holding 4.6 million cubic meters

and channeling it to the sea. Anirut said the airport will release water if the level exceeds 80 centimeters Meanwhile, Airports of Thailand is attempting to make Suvarnabhumi Airport one of the world’s top ten international airports, by launching the “Airport of Smiles” campaign to encourage officials and staff to serve travelers with hospitality that no other airports can match.

Energy Ministry to cut energy consumption by 25% in 20 years Amidst continued concern over the problem of global warming, Thailand may soon implement an aspiring plan to cut back on energy utilization and promote the use of renewable energy within two decades. Energy Ministry’s Permanent Secretary Norkun Sitthiphong said that Thailand is determined to increase the utilization of alternative energy to 20.8 percent of the country’s total consumption in 2022. Along with this ambitious goal, the Energy Ministry

will soon present to the government a plan to help the country save energy consumption by 25 percent within 20 years. Norkhun stated that, with Thailand now considered one of the world’s leading low carbon societies, the new energy saving plan will aim towards cutting down carbon dioxide emission by 32 million tons per year. The Energy Ministry’s Permanent Secretary spoke of the plans in detail at the international seminar titled “Energy and Climate

Change In APEC 2010” in Bangkok. Asia Pacific Energy Research Centre President Kenji Kobayashi said during the seminar that he is worried about the severe flooding in Thailand, which was caused by global warming. He has also expressed concerns over the protest against nuclear power plants, which can help effectively tackle the greenhouse gas and reduce the country’s reliance on fossil fuel.

The ‘James Bond’ 1964 Aston Martin DB5, is viewed by the media, in London. The car which was the road car in the Bond movie ‘Goldfinger and the effects car in ‘ Thunderball ‘ both staring Sean Connery is expected to sell for around $5.5 million (euro3.9 million). (AP Photo/ Alastair Grant)

Looking for a car? Try 007’s Aston Martin

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or the discerning driver, it’s got an ejector seat, machine guns, and a worldclass pedigree. Problem is, it’s going to cost a truckload of dough. One of the world’s most famous James Bond cars — the specially equipped Aston Martin first driven by Sean Connery in “Goldfinger” — will be auctioned in London on Wednesday evening, and it’s likely to fetch one of the highest prices ever paid for an automobile. The unique car, which also has rotating license plates and other spy gear, is expected to go for more than 3.5 million pounds ($5.5 million). The silver Aston Martin DB5 coupe was used by Connery to elude various villains in both “Goldfinger” and “Thunderball” — generally regarded as early classics in Hollywood’s longest running and most successful film franchise. It is closely associated with the Connery-era Bond films, often preferred by aficionados, who rate him above George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton and the current 007, Daniel Craig. The use of the Aston Martin, with a rear bulletproof shield that could be activated with the push of a dashboard button, pro-

vided a major boost for the British carmaker, which received worldwide publicity when the car was featured in “Goldfinger” in 1964. It was the Bond movies that made Aston Martin a household name, even though its handmade cars remained far too expensive for most. The street version of the Aston Martin DB5 was released in 1963 and had a top speed of 145 miles (233 kilometers) per hour. The car being auctioned by RM Auctions Automobiles of London is one of two Aston Martins factorymodified for use in the early Bond films, and it is the only surviving example. It is described as being in excellent condition. The other 007-modified Aston Martin was reported stolen in 1997 and has never been recovered. The auction company said Wednesday’s auction will mark the first time the James Bond car has ever been offered for sale to the public. Even though the price tag will be staggering, the buyer will get a few perks: A signed photograph of Connery standing with the Aston Martin on location in Switzerland during the filming of “Goldfinger,” and several other bits of film memorabilia.

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Opinion Thailand the

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

benchwarmer

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon’s working visit to Thailand was a reminder of the bustling state of the region at present. It seems the Kingdom has grown accustomed to the sluggish and detached nature of Asia and has become the last to acknowledge the sudden awakening the continent has been experiencing. With the UN Secretary-General to visit Cambodia, Vietnam and China next, and a slew of major events soon to take place in its neighboring countries, Thailand has to snap out of its trance and start paying attention. Thailand missed a prime opportunity to make a subtle but needed statement. Its a common occurrence that at every visit of UN officials, non-government organizations, civic groups and activists will also emerge from the woodwork to hand in their petitions and letters. This was a golden chance to show the world the new tolerant, open minded administration at the helm of the nation. Instead however, police blocks and passiveaggressive restrictions displayed a country still paranoid of public expression. The regretfulness of this event is doubled by the intention of Ban’s visit, which was to tap Thailand’s shoulder to head the push for a more democratic Myanmar. On the economic front was the G-20 Summit in South Korea, a precursor to a much larger industrial nation gathering to take place in Seoul in early November which will tackle the very immediate topic of the “Currency War.” Even though Thailand does not have any major role in such meetings and is not a member of G-20, it can not simply sit along the sidelines. Asian giant China will use the upcoming discussions to decide whether or not it will take the stance of friend or foe towards the United States, a decision that will be the catalyst for the world economy for decades to come. Closer to home, fellow ASEAN members Vietnam and Indonesia are also poised to make major plays during the gatherings. In the ASEAN itself is the East Asia Summit in Hanoi, Vietnam. The meeting will see leading economies such as Japan, India, Australia and China turning their attentions to South East Asia. The success of EAS could potentially guarantee the United States’ participation next year, bringing the key player to the now budding region. Other pressing matters such as the Chinese Yuan make for a time of exciting economic prospects all with direct effects on the Kingdom of Thailand. Non-economic issues may also see some attention during the EAS as many are hoping Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao and his Japanese counterpart Naoto Kan will see the meeting as a good opportunity to work out their two countries’ conflict in the South China Sea. This is not to mention all the other less popular sideline topics that are usually given attention during international summits. Whether for better or worse, it is an exciting time to be an Asian nation, but the continent’s liveliness is less a party and more a contact sport. Thailand cannot simply mingle and mix casually over finger food but has to run and jump if it wants to keep up and take advantage of all the opportunities coming its way. The time for indecision and second-guessing has come and pass for all of Asia and Thailand must be ready to act beyond its usual shouldershrugging.

lighthouse cartoons

Translated and Rewritten by Itiporn Lakarnchua

RAMBLES ON Charles Rambles

The Samui Tattoo Samui tattoo-noun, plural -toos: the nickname for a scar resulting from an accident involving a moped or car on Koh Samui. Have you driven around the roads on Samui recently? Sorry to start with such a stupid question, of course you have unless you have suddenly sprouted wings or built a pair like Icarus or happen to be born on the planet Krypton. Any road up, the main source of transport for most is a moped of sorts and the roads on Samui can be an adventure to say the least. Dodging water and cement trucks, buses and 4x4s, plus cars and other bikes thrown in it can be hard enough. As the rainy season is upon us, the roads are as bad as they can be with the excessive rainfall, causing many floods and making driving a bike that little more tricky. We all have to be that little bit more careful as we drive around this beautiful Island.

As I was driving home from the supermarket several bags in tow and with the rain lashing down, it was crazy even while I consider myself to know the roads like the back of my hand, like where the sand and water gathers and where the potholes are. Suddenly the mandatory stray dog decides to run out in front of you, you swerve to avoid it and realize that the pot hole you know is there but hidden beneath water cannot be avoided. You pray that this will not be your last pothole which after the latest downpour hasn’t doubled in depth or sprouted some new wire mesh, like some kind or man trap. You shut your eyes (metaphorically) and pray to whatever is your God of choice. Survived phew! No trip to the emergency room to get your Samui tattoo seen too or much worse which doesn’t bear thinking about. So apart from people not wearing helmets and drunk drivers and people who just can’t drive, maybe the roads

being fixed may help a bit. When you hear of so many accidents, minor and fatal, local Thais and farangs alike and then all the tourists it’s not surprising that Samui has one of the highest road accident rates in Thailand. You just have to go and sit in any of the 15 or so hospitals in Chaweng and watch as casualty after casualty come in and then leave with their wrist, elbow, knees and ankles bandaged if they are lucky. Fixing the roads may help a bit. But we should all drive a bit more carefully. Beware the potholes and flooding that will surely occur. Drive slowly and always wear your helmet. Anyone who has been in an accident im sure would agree with me we could meet up and compare Samui tattoos. Charles has been living on Koh Samui for over 12 years in this life with no plans on leaving and thinks he was probably here before in one or another shape or form.

Samui Gazette

A publication of YuCiNo Enterprises Co., Ltd. with office at 124/524 Moo 3, Lamai Centre Unit 61/2, Lamai Beach Road, Koh Samui Telefax: 077-430789 | Email: info@thesamuigazette.com | www.thesamuigazette.com

Editorial

Sales/Advertising & Circulation

YuCiNo Enterprises Co. Ltd.

Editor: P. Bunsan Managing Editor: Sandy Dela Cruz Reporters: Akanee Thongtara, Cherdchai Taweemuang Contributors: Kev Bee, Steve Bray, Neal Hoptman, David Paul Janes, Jules Kay, Omesh Langmann, Rob Newman, Jo Rowkins, Geoff Whitlie, TAN Network

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Directors: P. Bunsan, Joseph A. Noble

Art & Production Design: YuCiNo Enterprises Co. Ltd. Production Asst: Kanlayanee Seamkung

Publication Information YuCiNo Enterprises Co. Ltd. publishes Samui Gazette. All content of this issue is © Copyright 2010 by YuCiNo Enterprises Co. Ltd. and may not be reprinted or retransmitted without the expressed written content of the publisher. Samui Gazette is available throughout Koh Samui.


Opinion

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Letters to the Editor Love us? Hate us?

Send letters to editor@thesamuigazette.com or 124/524 Moo 3 Lamai Centre Unit 6 1/2 Lamai Beach Road, Koh Samui Letters may be edited for length and clarity. The opinions are those of our readers and not necessarily those of the Newspaper.

Samui, paradise no more Great [BIO AID] article. However, please do not call Samui a paradise. It used to be but not any more. Why has not National Geographical put Samui on its 100 most beautiful islands list? -- BRIAN KENNEDY

Anti-smoking ordinance I am a 34-year old mother of a very active toddler. I write to thank the Koh Samui municipality for its plan to strictly enforce anti-smoking laws on the island. My son has a history of asthma and when he is near someone who is smoking, it’s hard for him to breathe. It would be great to be able to go out and have a nice lunch outdoors with my family and not worry about someone smoking next to us. -- SARAH GRIMM

GREEN CORNER Jules Kay

Responsible tourism on Samui? Wild Asia recently announced the winners for the 5th Responsible Tourism Awards 2010 from Thailand, Indonesia and Sri Lanka at ITB Asia. Now in its fifth year, the awards are an important part of Wild Asia’s Responsible Tourism Initiative which helps promote sustainable practices in the region through tourism. With one billion tourists expected to be travelling around the globe this year, the tourism industry’s impact on environment and local communities throughout the world is immense. The Awards showcase exemplary resorts, hotels and tour operators that are committed to sustainable practices and actually provide benefits to the local community beyond economic gain. “The purpose of the Awards is not to give out ‘gold stars’ to candidates each year,” explained Dr Reza Azmi, Wild Asia founder and director. “Our intent is to share the best practices of responsible operators with a broader audience and seek out new operators engaging in innovative programmes.” This year’s awards attracted a larger and more diverse number of entries from across the Asian region. As well as a number of Thai participants, countries included

India, Sri Lanka, Maldives, and hotels in China, Philippines, and even Irian Jaya in Indonesia. The requirements for selection are very strict and require proof of both environmental and social responsibility. Being recognized as a responsible business carries more and more weight in the global tourism market, so increasing numbers of businesses are switching their focus to keep pace with change. “The network and awareness of Responsible Tourism is building up,” added Deborah Chan, Wild Asia’s Programme Manager. “Travel operators from around the region are truly striving to make a difference for a better and greener future.” With competition now fierce across South East Asia and tourists making their destination choices based on factors that go far beyond room rates and beaches, responsible tourism is becoming an important differentiator. Koh Samui has the potential to become a leading force in terms of environmental and social practices. The island still has plenty of natural beauty worth preserving and with a strong cultural identity remaining in the villages, the island also presents opportunities for operators who want to highlight the more traditional side

of island life, while helping local people preserve their way of life through tourism. Adopting responsible approaches to nature and the local community is not only a worthy choice, it is now also a decision that significantly improves the island’s appeal and therefore also revenue potential from tourism. Many hotels already apply green approaches and support local initiatives, but more effort and focus is required to reach a level where Samui business can be considered truly responsible. An award such as those given by Wild Asia would be recognition that Koh Samui is serious about preserving its culture and natural assets. If you own, manage or even know of a business that may be eligible. Visit www.wildasia.org to find out how to become more involved in responsible tourism. This year’s winners of Wild Asia’s 2010 Responsible Tourism Awards were: Heritance Kandalama, Dambulla, Sri Lanka, Sarinbuana Ecolodge, Bali, Indonesia and Andaman Discoveries, Phang Nga, Thailand. Jules Kay has lived on the island for 10 years and regularly contributes to a number of publications and websites about Samui. He also volunteers as a media representative for the Samui Mala and Green Island Project. Email Jules at samuieditor@gmail.com.

11

Unique Ethiopia: Wildlife, history, 13month year

For many people around the world, mentioning Ethiopia brings to mind its devastating 1984 famine. The specter of the disaster haunts the country’s international image and still hurts the growth of its fledgling tourism industry. But here’s the reality that awaits those few adventurous visitors who do make the trip: A high plateau of lush, green hills that’s more like Scotland than the desert; decadent nightlife in Addis Ababa; and historic sites like the island monasteries of Lake Tana and Lalibela, a remarkable complex of 12th-century churches. In addition, Ethiopia’s wildlife parks are teeming with game, but unlike Kenya, where packs of tourists compete for a glimpse of lions, here you might have the animals all to yourself. Traveling in Ethiopia, however, can be uniquely disorienting. Ethiopians insist on doing things their own way. They have their own calendar — with 13 months; their own year — it’s currently 2003; and their own time — 6 a.m. is their midnight. The national language, Amharic, has Semitic roots, like Arabic and Hebrew, and a unique alphabet. (Rest assured, English is widely spoken.) Roughly two-thirds of the people are Ethiopian Orthodox — a creed with its own rites, different from those of the Russian or Serbian Orthodox churches — while a third is Muslim. A trip to Ethiopia, then, is less like a sojourn in Africa than a visit to some farflung island, where everything is strange and compelling. You’ll need a couple of weeks to even begin to do justice to this sprawling country — bordered on the north by Sudan, on the south by Kenya and Somalia and on the east by Djibouti and Eritrea, which gained independence from Ethiopia in 1993 after a 30-year guerrilla war. Roads are generally poor, and it can take long hours or even days to travel several hundred miles (kilometers) overland — particularly in the April-September rainy season. Luckily, Ethiopian Airlines — widely considered Africa’s premier carrier — operates flights from the capital, Addis, to the main must-see sites, including Lalibela. Addis is a sprawling city of congested thoroughfares and hidden residential neighborhoods with nar-

row streets that dissolve into thick mud every time it rains, and it can seem a dismal place to start an Ethiopian sojourn. But resist the temptation to flee and the city will open to you, revealing scores of cute cafes, hot nightspots, chill lounges and gourmet restaurants. Top suggestions include Eyoha or Fasika national restaurants, where remarkably athletic dancers showcase the country’s unique shoulder-shaking traditional dance styles as diners tuck into heaping plates full of local delicacies. Ethiopian cuisine, which is heavy on sauces and served on spongy crepe-like bread called injera, leaves no one indifferent. You either love it or you hate it. Love it, and you can eat like a king, splurging on multi-dish meals of wot, a sauce of goat or lamb, and kifto, marinated raw meat. Made from an Ethiopian grain called tef, injera is eaten at every meal and also serves as cutlery, used to scoop up the juicy sauces. Hate it, and you stand a good chance of shedding some serious weight. Besides a dozen top-notch places in Addis, restaurants serving foreign cuisine are few and far between. Order the spaghetti marinara in some provincial town, like I did, and you might find yourself using scraps of injera to scoop up earthwormsized bits of cold pasta drenched in what appeared to be ketchup. Vegetarians be warned: Ethiopian Orthodox adherents normally go vegetarian twice a week, on Wednesdays and Fridays, and fast for the 56 days preceding Ethiopian Orthodox Easter. But for the month after Easter, so-called “fasting foods,” or meat- and dairyfree dishes, are scarce. For all-night dancing, try Club Platinum or the Gaslight, at the Sheraton hotel, where the mix of Ethiopian and R&B beats is infectious. Just be aware that at both establishments, as in other clubs across Ethiopia, most of the women on the dance floor are prostitutes. Addis has the best shopping in the country, with a wide range of regional specialty products and styles. Try the area around Piassa for the heavy silver disc earrings from the northern Tigray region and Persian Gulf-inspired necklaces in oversized beads of silver and resin — all sold by the gram.


12

Night&BeachLife samui gazette |

BARS

SAMUI SHAMROCK

Lamai Beach Road

If you need a daily dose of live music then The Shamrock is where you need to be heading featuring live acts every night of the week.

ARK BAR

Chaweng Beach Almost an institution in itself. Extremely busy with the 18 to 30 something crew, fantastic atmosphere and a great place to hang out if you’ve just arrived on the island. Party every Wednesday with free BBQ from 4pm and DJs spinning funky house and classics.

MINT Soi Green Mango, Chaweng THE DEAL: Each night features a different music policy. I’d recommend Thursday’s Deep Blue featuring deep and jackin’ house. This is probably Samui’s smallest and most intimate club, normally fills up around 11pm. Great for a knees up with your mates! Friday’s are always great if you’re looking for good party music and if breaks are what you’re looking for then pop on down there on Sunday.

THE DEAL: Opens everyday for breakfast, lunch, dinner and amazing sunset cocktails. Set on the quieter side of the island Nikki beach is ideal for getting away from it all even for just one day. From jet setters parting for the weekend to the local sexy sunbather, you’ll find it all here. Kick back and relax on their king sized daybeds enjoying endless brunch buffet, refreshing Miami mojitos and poolside entertainment for the ultimate beach club experience. DJ Andy Vier is spinning soulful US each and everyday to get that body grooving round that extremely curvy pool! Amazing Sundays is the big day at Nikki with one of the largest buffets I’ve seen for a long time. The champagne seems to flow endlessly and anything within the realms of possibility can happen!

BEACH REPUBLIC

SOLO BAR

Lamai Opens everyday for breakfast, lunch & dinner and offers a rather large beach side pool and spa. Soulful Saturdays: Drinks and tapas specials. Music policy anything from northern soul to house. Sunday Sessions: groove on down to the resident DJs playing some cool beachside vibes. Massive buffet brunch from 11.30pm ‘til 3.30pm.

HENDRIX BAR

CD Profiles

Soi Solo, Chaweng Solo Bar welcomes back the “Latino Bro’s” for their weekly Monday night percussion and sax party with DJ Simon Solo. Party Nights on Friday and Saturdays. Soi Solo, Chaweng Just by its name, this bar doesn’t need much of an introduction. It’s a real Samui treasure and probably what many a theme pub tries to aspire to be. The resident DJ spins the best in rock, indie and forgotten 80s classics. He’ll take requests and even bump you up the request list if you buy him a drink!

BONDI

Chaweng Just under a year old, Bondi has been turning heads and making a name for its quality Aussie pub grub, live music and sports, let alone the cold beers and friendly staff on hand to assist in your needs. Open daily from 10am – 2am. Happy Hours Daily 10am-6pm.

CASTAWAY BAR

Bangpor Open the weekend up with The Reggae Sundowner Beach Party with BBQ & reggae / cosmic sounds - sunset “til late!

Wannai

Bophut For something off the beaten track why not check out Wannai Restaurant, situated near Bophut traffic lights perched on the side of a lake. Dine and chill to some really cool classics played by their resident guitarist and vocalist.

CLUBS

BEACH CLUBS

NIKKI BEACH Lipa Noi

nov. 5 - 18, 2010

SOUND

Soi Green Mango, Chaweng THE DEAL: Samui’s largest club with one huge main dance floor looking up to the heavens. Music policy: upfront electro house and remixes Room2: Very cool and dark, great for getting some AC action and out of the thick of things: music policy R&B and hip-hop

THE BLACK MOON PARTY (NOW AT SOUND!) Samui’s largest party without a doubt and it could be argued that it’s Samui’s equivalent to The Full Moon Party, although with just one huge sound system it’s a little easier on the ears. Usually starts to fill up around midnight and goes on until the sun rises. Resident DJ A is one of Asia’s best DJs and full moon legend!

X PARTY (Chaweng, behind Bondi) Nov. 12 What normally starts off as a most civilised occasion usually ends up in complete mayhem and destruction! Hosted by Mr Pepe featuring DJs Andy Vier (Nikki Beach) & Steve Bray (Movement Party) with some live percussion thrown in for good measure. Party starts at 9pm.

The Orb featuring David Gilmour - Metallic Spheres If you cannot get enough of those vintage Pink Floyd jams, then the new album by The Orb featuring David Gilmour may quell your desire. The electronic mavens collaborate with the legendary guitarist on “Metallic Spheres,” a two-part opus that hearkens back to the experimental sounds of Gilmour’s old band. A few minutes into the first track, “Metallic” (the album’s other track is called “Spheres”), and it sounds as if Alex Paterson and Thomas Fehlmann have channeled the flavor of “Ummagumma” and “Atom Heart Mother” and built an entire album around them. It is a more refined yet every bit as spacey, aided by modern recording techniques. Inspired by the likes of Kraftwerk and Brian Eno, the Orb’s unique tonal imagery, known as ambient techno, consists of layering various instruments and natural sounds that essentially are built in the post-production phase. Gilmour was brought in to add his distinct guitar sound to the mix, much like a singer that records over an accompanying track. The earthy feel of the movement comes from Paterson and his nature recordings. He seems to incorporate every type of natural sound, from the splashing of a waterfall to rustling leaves, even the echoes of a cave’s interior. Mixed with the layered instrumentation, the album’s two songs allows room for Gilmour’s distinctive guitar play to shine. Throughout the

Darius Rucker - Charleston, SC 1966

Top Track: On “Southern State of Mind,” one of the album’s breeziest cuts, the South Carolina native observes how his regional customs sometimes do not align with life in New York or California. Fortunately, the details and his delivery avoid the confrontational tone too often found in country songs that draw lines between rural and urban lifestyles. Darius Rucker’s second country music album ditches the traditional songs included on his previous album, “Learn to Live.” Instead, on his new “Charleston, SC 1966,” he focuses solely on contemporary, radio-directed songs, a clear sign that he knows the country audience, and country radio, has embraced him. The shift is understandable, since the former Hootie & the Blowfish frontman won the 2009 CMA New Artist of the Year award thanks to three No. 1 radio hits. But his new focus loses the creative sweep and emotional force that made his first country album so compelling. Rucker’s voice remains a stout, immediately identifiable instrument. When he applies that voice to a compelling story line (“Whiskey and You”) or an inventive arrangement (“Love Will Do That” and “I Don’t Care,” the latter co-written with Brad Paisley), he shows how effective of a pop-country artist he can be.


Classified

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

13

Please patronize our advertisers and tell them you saw their ad at the Samui Gazette.

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com. For information, call 0850438122. BEACH HOUSE Bt15,000/month. Located in Bangrak near Big Buddha & Plai Lem. Fully furnished. Call 081892-4162. LAMAI BEACH RESIDENCE 18 luxury apartments for rent daily or monthly. Special rate starts at Bt990. 100 meters from the beach and town center. Walking distance to all amenities in Lamai. Call 077-458314. COMMERCIAL SPACE No key money. Bt12,000/month including water, toilet. Located in Chaweng. Near all amenities and top tourist destinations. Call 077-601072. CAR Ford 4x4 New Model. Excellent condition. 800 baht day (min 3 days) 20,000 baht per month. Call: 086 8859670

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BUSINESS FOR SALE Chill Out Cafe Renovated to include 38 more table settings and a 4 meter projection screen for sports on the outdoor patio. Located between Fisherman’s Village & Maenam, known for its delightful staff and superb cuisine. Bt3 million, comes with an 11-year lease. Rent Bt40,000 per month & services about Bt5,000. Sold with ALL fittings and

fixtures, pool table, large tv, satellite. Bar Restaurant & 5Storey Guest House Located in central Chaweng. 9 rooms w/ AC, bathroom, cable TV, big ref; 9 rooms w/ fan, bathroom, ref. Durther 2 AC rooms on top floor of the 5-storey building w/large terrace area w/ nice overview of Chaweng. Busy Irish Pub and Restaurant. Call 081 892 1990 for details and pricing.

VIEW-LAND View-Land-for SALE, in beautiful and peaceful Lem Sor village area. 800 mtrs. from ocean. Two WorldGenius Co. Ltd. plots/or as one piece, 65 TWAH 1.25 Mil THB-Chanot Wireless Outdoor-indoor solution. Next to it: another 63 TWAH 1.2 Install Wifi hotspot, house and Mil THB-Chanot title. hotel. www.worldgenius-it.com Or as one piece together:2.25 Mil Tel. 081-2710580 THB Tel. Lak 087-0975889 CLASSIFIED DISCLAIMER/CONDITIONS All advertisements are published by the advertiser that the advertiser is authorized to publish the entire contents, and subject matter thereof, that the contents are not unlawful and do not infringe the rights of any person or entity and that the advertiser has obtained all necessary permissions or releases. In consideration of the publication of advertisements, the advertiser will indemnify and save Samui Gazette from and against any loss or expenses arising from publicaton of such advertisements. The publisher reserves the right to revise, reject or omit without notice any advertisement at any time. Samui Gazette accepts no liability for its failure, for any cause, to insert an advertisement. Liability for any error appearing in an advertisement is limited to the cost of the space occupied. To qualify for an adjustment, an error must be reported within 10 days of publication date. Drawings, artwork, and articles for reproduction are accepted at the advertiser’s risk and should be clearly marked to faciliate their return. Samui Gazette reserves the right to revise the advertising rates at any time. Announcement of an increase shall be made at least two weeks in advance. No verbal agreement altering the rates and/or the terms shall be recognized.


14

Entertainment

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

BOOK

Universal Crossword

{REVIEWS} Book collects f irsthand accounts from 20th century “We Were There: An Eyewitness History of the Twentieth Century” (The Overlook Press, $30), edited by Robert Fox: This book is a collection of stories from people who escaped the Titanic, fought in the trenches, spent hard time in prison camps, met the Beatles, saw the mushroom cloud and went to the moon. The idea of grouping a bunch of eyewitness historical accounts into a book is not new, but “We Were There: An Eyewitness History of the Twentieth Century” is still a fun read. This selection, edited by Robert Fox, covers mostly the 20th century, from the time of the Wright brothers’ flight to the recent mass protests in Iran. Pages in between include accounts of two world wars, communist uprisings, sieges and head-spinning cultural changes. Readers meet Adolf Hitler, Osama bin Laden and some more inspiring folks, too. Rosa Parks provides an almost matter-of-fact account of the evening she was too tired to stand on the bus, and the doomed Antarctic explorer Robert Falcon Scott writes with heartbreaking desperation about his men as they succumb to exhaustion and cold. Be warned, this book is heavy on war stories — stuff like soldiers getting shelled and shot down from the sky. There are a few duds, too. John Updike is represented with a meditation on watching the fall of the Twin Towers on Sept. 11 from across the East River. The piece’s distant mood is no match for the gripping accounts that were printed by the dozens in the weeks following the tragedy. But even the less engaging pieces are short. It’s easy to flip a few pages to find another fascinating peek into the 20th century.

Paris hardly skipped a beat during Nazi occupation “And the Show Went On: Cultural Life in Nazi-Occupied Paris” (Alfred A. Knopf, $28.95), by Alan Riding: In what was arguably the darkest period in the history of France, the lights at theaters, cinemas and cabarets in Paris never gave up their glow. During the four years of World War II in which France was under Nazi occupation, artists painted; musicians and singers performed; fashion designers turned out haute couture; and novelists, poets and playwrights produced work at a pace that reflected the City of Light’s renown as a cultural beacon and a place where intellectuals were held in high esteem. As author Alan Riding explains in “And the Show Went On,” his broadranging book about cultural life during the occupation, it was in the interest of conqueror and vanquished alike that such pursuits be allowed to continue. For the German occupiers, the cultural activities offered a distraction for the Parisians and themselves; the French kept their culture alive, which provided a source of pride after the crushing defeat of their once-vaunted military. The book includes solid examinations of the prewar and postwar cultural milieu, but the heart of Riding’s work focuses on how many of the leading figures in the arts and letters coped with life under the Third Reich. Riding catalogs the prodigious output of all cultural endeavors and details the fascinating characters and stories of the arts scene during the occupation. There is the salon of the wealthy American Florence Gould, a weekly soiree that drew Paris’ leading literary figures. For film buffs, the steamy affair between leading lady Danielle Darrieux and Dominican diplomat-playboy Porfirio Rubirosa provided grist for movie magazines. Riding’s detailed and well-researched account is sure to appeal to Francophiles, admirers of French culture and readers seeking to heighten their understanding of an emotionally charged and morally complex aspect of World War II. More than that, it offers insights into the ethical dilemma that many of France’s luminaries faced during a critical time in their nation’s history and the different ways in which they chose to respond.

ACROSS 1. Halting sign, pl. 6. Priestly vestment 9. Dog pest 13. Judge Judy’s room 14. Grazing field 15. In need of hot wax? 16. What seamstresses often do 17. Be ill 18. Sac enclosing embryo, pl. 19. Medvedev, e.g. 21. *7th inning _______ 23. Do like Lindsey Vonn 24. Scottish word for fog 25. Spelling competition 28. *Albert Pujols won this four times 30. English confection 35. Another spelling for #26 Down 37. Mother ____ 39. *Only American teams play in this Series 40. Do over 41. Spooky 43. Irritate or disturb 44. “Superman” Christopher 46. Fertilizer for limedeficient soil 47. View as, often used before “necessary” 48. Criminal’s fear 50. Team homophone 52. Has double helix structure 53. Assume a posture

Sudoku

55. “New” prefix 57. *First president to throw first ball, given name 61. *Last year’s champs 65. Halves of diameters 66. “The Three Faces of ___,” movie 68. “...when out on the lawn there _____ such a clatter...” 69. Are not 70. Ctrl+Alt+___ 71. Archaic 2nd person singular of ‘can’ 72. Attention grabber 73. Unagi 74. Sound of “s,” pl. DOWN 1. Old wound mark 2. Cough syrup balsam 3. *3 per inning 4. *_____ box, where reporters sit 5. *No World Series in 1994 because of this 6. Actor Alda, e.g. 7. Hawaiian necklace 8. Light craft wood 9. *Baseball Hall of ____ 10. Dryer fire hazard 11. *____ Davis of the World Champion Reds 12. Indian nursemaid 15. Soil-smoothing cultivator 20. Theater passage 22. Make lacework 24. Supply water

25. *Player with most world titles 26. African chieftain 27. Duck valued for its soft down 29. Poe’s “Annabel Lee”, e.g. 31. *Pitcher with greatest number of Series wins 32. Type of food often high in cholesterol 33. Ex “Idol” judge DeGeneres 34. Swelling of human organs 36. Key player in George W. Bush presidency 38. Republic of Ireland 42. Helen in Russia 45. Liveliness of mind 49. Likewise 51. “Dennis the ______” 54. *Helped throw the 1919 Series, _____ Risberg 56. Southern cuisine staple, pl. 57. Tortilla sandwich 58. Argo’s propellers 59. Lyric poems 60. By force, power 61. *Fan reaction 62. Longest division of time, pl. 63. “Ich ____” for “I eat”, German 64. Tennis “innings” 67. Victory sign


15 samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Calvin & Hobbes

Comics

For better or for worse

Cul de sac


16

Movies&tv

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

100-word reviews

‘Hereafter’ elegantly probes great beyond “Hereafter” itself is a departure for Eastwood thematically as it tackles questions of what happens after we die and whether we can communicate with those who have gone before us. But again, there is an elegance and an efficiency in the storytelling. Eastwood weaves among disparate yet intrinsically connected story lines smoothly and without hurry. The pacing may feel a bit too languid, but it allows us to get to know these characters by observing who they are as opposed to what they do. Even if you have no spiritual inclinations about any sort of afterlife, “Hereafter” refrains from being too preachy or heavyhanded; it is never alienating. “Hereafter” is rated PG-13 for mature thematic elements including disturbing disaster and accident images, and for brief strong language. Three stars out of four.

Frights with no frills in 2nd ‘Paranormal’ If there was any lesson to draw from the first “Paranormal Activity,” it would be that men should take their girlfriends’ worries seriously, especially when it comes to encounters with the demonic. Like the first, “Paranormal Activity 2” is presented like found footage. After what the family thinks is a break-in, Dan hires a security company to install cameras throughout the house. These surveillance views, with running time code in the corner, are our perspective for most everything. “Paranormal Activity 2” is better made and not quite as paper thin as the original, but by replicating the bare-bones B-film, the sequel sacrifices any chance for distinction. “Paranormal Activity” is rated R for some language and brief violent material. One and a half stars out of four.

Online TV spats mean fewer free shows on Web

UNIVERSAL CROSSWORD

making it easier to watch those shows on regular TV sets. “Basically, they’re trying to work hard to ensure that ‘cord-cutting’ is not an attractive option anymore,” said analyst Derek Baine of research firm SNL Kagan, referring to the phenomenon of people cutting their cable subscriptions and catching shows online to save money. BTIG Research analyst Rich Greenfield put it more bluntly in a blog post. “Consumers must be made to realize that nothing is free anymore,” he wrote. Fox’s tactic wasn’t entirely successful. It inadvertently drew into the dispute the Cablevision Internet customers who got their TV feeds from other companies such as DirecTV Inc. Fox abandoned its Internet blockade after about 12 hours following protests from several lawmakers, including Rep. Edward Markey, a senior member on a House subcommittee that oversees technology and the Internet. Fox TV stations have remained off Cablevision lineups since Oct. 16, though, as the two companies remained locked in dispute. Cablevision has about 3.1 million TV subscribers in the New York area. The Walt Disney Co.’s ABC, General Electric Co.’s NBC and CBS Corp. also have been blocking Google TV’s Web browser from playing their full shows on websites such as ABC.com and TV.com. The Sony television that came pre-installed with the Google software package can still access their channels like any other TV. Google Inc. conceded that it could not force the broadcasters to make their content available, even though they do so freely through other outlets.

SUDOKU

U.S. broadcasters took a big step toward eliminating free TV shows on the Web after they blocked access to their programming online this month to enforce their demands to be paid. Recent actions by Fox, ABC, NBC and CBS in two separate fee disputes suggest that after a few years of experimenting with free, ad-supported viewing, broadcasters believe they can make more money from cable TV providers if they hold back some programming online. That could mean new limits on online viewing are coming: Broadcasters might make fewer of their shows available to begin with, or delay when they become available — say, a month after an episode is broadcast, rather than the few hours it typically takes now. It would make it tougher for viewers to drop their cable TV subscriptions and watch shows online instead. If cable and satellite TV providers can hang on to more subscribers, broadcasters can then demand more money from them to carry their stations on the lineups. Last weekend, News Corp.’s Fox made TV programming history by blocking online access to its shows, including “Glee” to 2.6 million Cablevision Systems Corp. broadband Internet subscribers. It was part of a fee dispute over how much Cablevision pays to carry the signals of Fox-owned TV stations. At around the same time, ABC, NBC and CBS turned off access to full episodes when accessed from the new Google TV Web browser, which became available this month. Both actions sent the message that broadcasters are demanding to be paid for their shows wherever they are seen — just as new devices are

ANSWERS

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Features

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

DISCOVERING SAMUI

Conquering the vast unknown

Rosanne Turner

Rosanne Turner has recently relocated to Koh Samui from Africa, and is relishing the adventure. She is a trainer at Island TEFL, as well as being a travel writer for several international publications. Share Rosanne’s discoveries of all things Eastern, curious and extraordinary.

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o truly discover a new place, once should incorporate all the senses, not just sight. It is all very well seeing a place through a camera lens, but occasionally put the camera down and experience the destination, or you may as well stay at home and watch the travel channel. Travel and food are intertwined, fused together, inseparable. Smells and tastes can define a location as much as the scenery and it is often these senses that trigger memories of a good holiday. Why would someone travel to a new country, only to eat the same fish and chips that they do back home, when they can offer their taste buds a gastronomic adventure? Throughout my travels, I have always been determined to eat local wherever possible, which has sometimes led to disastrous situations. Let me add at this point, that I am a vegetarian, so getting my point across of “no meat – vegetables only” in a foreign country can prove to be quite a challenge when the locals don’t speak English. Mime and gesture works for non-plant foodstuffs such as beef, chicken, fish or even pork, but have you ever seen anyone act out a squid, without looking as though they are having

an epileptic fit? It’s not a pretty sight, but laughter will get you through most situations. Add to this the fact that in Thailand “Moo” refers to pork and not beef as one would expect, and you can see where I am going with this. My curiosity will not let me walk past a food stall selling something out of the ordinary. This doesn’t mean I will try it, but I have a burning need to find out what it is. Food on a stick is very popular I have discovered, and why wouldn’t it be? No plates or cutlery required, and wooden sticks are biodegradable. This idea of food on a stick should be introduced to the rest of the world, but somehow it seems to be an Asian trade secret. It seems you can cook anything on a stick: various forms of meat and sausages, odd little balls of who knows what; fish, frogs and other unfortunate flattened creatures that resemble road kill. But as bizarre as some of these foods may appear, the enticing aromas cause an olfactory overload and you can’t walk past without your nose twitching in the air like a sniffer dog following a trail. In my quest to eat and cook local, I have visited the Bophut fresh market several times. This is not a quick event, as I ponder

and pause at each stand, trying to familiarize myself with completely unfamiliar fruits, vegetables and other fresh produce. From vivid purple eggplant, and red fuzzy rambutans, to the aptly named dragon fruit and rows of green and yellow hanging bananas, walking down the fruit and veggie isle is visually overwhelming. I do wonder if anyone not born in Asia knows the difference between the vast array of Asian greens. My cooking repertoire would previously include your garden varieties of lettuce, cabbage, spinach and even, for an adventurous dinner party, pak choi. But here the selection of greens is endless, and I have absolutely no idea what they are called or how I should prepare them. Trial and error it shall be. The meat isle at the market is not as appealing to the eye as the fruit and vegetable section, with whole pig heads and chickens with feet in the air as if they keeled over in fright. After recently purchasing a bird for a dinner party, I tucked its head away as a sign of respect, and because I just couldn’t stand it staring at me anymore, eyes pleading “I don’t want to leave this earth as green curry!” So my food adventure continues, as I am determined to conquer the vast unknown.

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Dengue Fever? What is Dengue Fever? Dengue Fever is a viral disease that causes high fever, headaches, eye pain, muscle pain, joint pain, a runny nose, a sore throat, and a red itchy rash that covers your entire body. In children younger than 15, a more severe Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever can develop and can be fatal. It is caused by one of four virus categories and is spread by the same mosquito that causes yellow fever, the aedes aegypti mosquito. How Does a Person Get Dengue Fever? You can get dengue virus infections from the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito. Mosquitoes become infected when they bite infected humans or monkeys. The mosquito later transmits infection to other people they bite. Two main species of mosquito, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, have been responsible for all cases of dengue transmitted in this country. Dengue is not contagious from person to person. Three to six days after being bitten, the person gets sick. The rash starts on the fifth day. How Prevalent Is Dengue Fever? The mosquitoes that spread Dengue Fever live in the tropics and the semi-tropics. Epidemics of the fever tend to occur every 10-40 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Globally, there are 50 million to 100 million cases of Dengue Fever each year. Around 5 percent of the cases prove fatal. The most likely time for anyone to catch Dengue Fever is while traveling in an area that has an outbreak. How Can Dengue Fever Be Prevented? Currently, there is no Dengue Fever vaccine available, although one is being tested. The only sure way to prevent the disease is to kill the mosquitoes. To be sure, if you are traveling in an area where you are at risk for Dengue Fever, wear mosquito repellent that contains at least 20 percent DEET. The best ways to kill mosquitoes in your home are with your hands, insecticide spray, or electronic rackets sold at stores. Insecticide spray can have side effects such as headaches, especially for children. I can usually kill mosquitoes with my hands, but with hands or a racket, you should aim low because mosquitoes instinctually dive when they sense anything heading their way, be it a predator or your hand.


Life

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samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Remind and Remember

By EDDIE CORBYN

PART 1 of 2 All In Your Mind Through the experience of living our life, we pick up many misconceptions about what life is and what it means to have a life experience. During the coming months I will share with you what I believe and what I know beyond belief about what life is and isn’t and what the purpose of having a life experience really is. Many years ago I realized that to solve any problems or challenges, we need to get to the root cause of them. Through introspection, research and study, I began inquiring into the challenges of my life and discovered that my own mind was the root cause of all my challenges. It’s easy to look at your life and lay blame for your current circumstances outside or upon another, but the truth is everyone’s problems and challenges are self-created by the thoughts we habitually think and are sustained by the beliefs we hold. Understanding this enables us to move beyond victimhood and into a life experience that’s consciously chosen by us. By considering and implementing the ideas that I’ll outline, which may be new to you, you’ll be fully self-empowered to make new decisions concerning the direction of your life. You’ll begin to realize that: life isn’t hard, unless through the choices you make you make it so, life’s supposed to be fun and

you’re supposed to reside in a state of well-being and happiness. Nothing New To be clear, nothing I’ll be writing is actually new to any of us. Deep down each of us already knows and understands all I’ll be saying, but some people may want or need to be reminded in order to re-connect or re-member with

awakens every morning and loves the nature all around him. The snow capped mountains, trees, plants, grass lands and animals all inspire a feeling of love and oneness with nature within him. He loves his life and enjoys every moment of being alive. From his perspective nothing more is needed, there’s nothing to add, all is good.

“Life isn’t hard, unless through the choices you make, you make it so.” their spiritual or higher self. Our higher self is that part of us which knows the best way for us to achieve anything in our life and how to get there in the fastest time. The information in this series will be concerning both our personality and our higher self. Nature Choice Furthermore, it’s understood that no one needs to hear anything I may say. For example: consider the analogy of a simple sheep herder in the remote hills and valleys of the northern Himalayas or some such place. The sheep herder

Conversely, others, who are living in larger communities and interacting with many people through family, work, jobs and businesses in their daily life, may be experiencing stressful situations. Due to the perceived stress many people are not feeling so good about their life, have health challenges or are lacking love and indeed, may have forgotten their true connection to nature. The Big Stuff If you’re anything like me, you are passionate about being reminded of the important things in

life, and you want to understand who you really are and what life really is. That’s the primary intention of communicating this knowledge and these ideas to you throughout this Remind and Remember series. A big part of knowing who we really are is in the realization that we create our own reality. Actually, it’s more accurate to say that we choose which part of creation we now want to experience, but I’ll elaborate on that in a later article. And why is it important to know that you create your own reality? It’s important because once you remember this point; you realize that you wouldn’t have created an experiential reality unless there was something in it for you. In other words, you wouldn’t create it unless it contained something that you wanted to learn or remind yourself of. And in turn, this means that any reality you’ve created and are currently experiencing is OK, there’s nothing wrong, all is how it’s meant to be. All is how you wanted it to be in order for you to learn from it. This realization also means that if you’re currently unhappy with your life, you and you alone have full power within you to change your current experience into something that you say you now prefer, by changing your mind.

Thai maskmaker keeps disappearing tradition alive Any taxi can take you to one of Bangkok’s glitzy new shopping malls, but you will have to poke around and trod carefully down a crumbling, fetid old alley in a working-class district to find a true artifact of genuine Thai culture. The neighborhood used to be a thriving community of makers of Khon masks, the keystones of ornate glittering costumes used in the stylized classical Thai dance form known as Khon. A street sign for tourists boasts of its glorious past, but most workshops in the Saphan Mai (“Wooden Bridge”) area were shuttered years ago. Come to a small, tin-roofed house some weekend, however, and you will find 56-year-old Prateep Rodpai, one of Thailand’s last traditional Khon maskmakers. The Khon tradition was imported from India around the 10th century. It evolved from a Hindu religious ceremony into a morality play in Siamese royal courts and has since enjoyed royal favor. The cultural equivalent of Japan’s kabuki, Khon used to be performed at important social functions such as funerals. A typical Khon performance recounts an episode from the Hindu epic Ramayana, called the Ramakien in Thailand. Dancers dressed in glittering

costumes perform carefully modulated acrobatic moves to classical Thai music. The exquisitely painted Khon masks are essential to conveying the characters and moods of a Khon performance. But in a case of trickle-down culture, the masks are also used as decorative objects, displayed in many homes and even Thai restaurants abroad, and as objects of worship. Prateep can be found most weekends at his Bangkok home working on his masks as he waits for customers to pick up their orders. “I am the last one to still be doing this here,” said Prateep, noting that the food vendor whose stall is a few yards (meters) away had been, when he was a boy, a cutter of glass ornaments, a crucial element that gives Khon masks their sparkle. Though some years ago Prateep followed most craftsmen to nearby provinces, moving his workshop to Ang Thong about 70 miles (110 kilometers) north of Bangkok, he still keeps a tiny space here, borrowing an old neighbor’s room for storage. “Some customers refuse to go all the way to Ang Thong to pick up the masks,” he explains. One recent rainy Saturday, Prateep

sold three masks, all representing characters from the Ramakien. Two were for a Khon troupe and the other for a shaman to use in his ritual. Some customers come from as far away as the United States. Prateep said many Thai restaurants abroad display his masks. “Each culture has its distinct motif. And the Khon mask is probably most representative of Thai culture,” said Prateep. “Masks do not have to be worn to retain their cultural significance.” In their Bangkok workspace, Prateep and his wife, Pinthip, are putting the final touches to some masks, painting a spot here, gluing some ornaments there. The whole process is intricate, with the masks requiring three days to dry in the sun. He can work on two to three masks a day,if inclement weather does not back up the production line. Prateep’s uncle, the late Sakorn Yang-keawsot, a Khon performer more famous as a puppeteer, taught him the rudiments of Khon mask-making. Prateep still uses the formula passed down from his uncle for his clay: a mixture of rice powder, some paper starch, a pinch of calcium talc and plenty of cement; he keeps the proportions a closely guarded secret. Chalermchai Chimchanvej, who

rents Khon costumes to media productions and manages a troupe that performs at private functions, has been Prateep’s customer for many years. “I come back for the quality. It is much more difficult now to find masks with good value.” “We were lucky that factory-made Khon masks are impractical and not permeable,” comments Prateep. “Only the handmade masks are breathable. So dancers prefer ours. That leaves us with some room to survive.” Fortunately for Khon, it can still count on Queen Sirikit, wife of King Bhumibol Adulyadej, as a major patron.


Health

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Are you getting your greens? A guide to green smoothies

Jo Rowkins dipNT MBANT is a nutritionist and the executive health adviser at The Spa Resorts, Lamai. She is available for one-on-one nutrition and lifestyle consultations (or online). Contact 082-2813078 or jorowkins@ hotmail.com. We all remember being told to eat our greens when we were children, but if eating your greens brings back memories of soggy cabbage and mushy peas, read on to discover why green leafy vegetables are so good for you and how you can get them into your diet in a tasty, easy way. Step in the green smoothies! Plant power Green leafy vegetables are a powerhouse of nutrition. They are packed with iron, calcium, vitamin K, vitamin C, folic acid and magnesium, along with dietary fibre, potassium and a wonderful array of health-enhancing phytochemicals, such as beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-carotene. Green chemical cocktail The carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, found in dark green leafy vegetables, play a role in protecting the eye as they are present in high concentrations in the lens and macular region of the retina. Eating your greens will help protect your eyes from macular degeneration and cataracts as you age. These powerful plant chemicals also boost the immune system and have been associated with prevention of heart disease. Antioxidants to the rescue Green veggies are packed with carotenoids, flavonoids and other powerful antioxidants that all have cancerprotective properties. Cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts and broccoli pack their anti-cancer punch with indoles and isothiocyanates. All sprouts are a concentrated version of the adult plants and broccoli sprouts contain a potent dose of a substance called sulforaphane, another anticancer plant chemical, particularly preventative of hormonal related cancers. Quercetin, another bioflavonoid in your greens, has anti-inflammatory actions in

the body, helping to dampen down allergies and hayfever. Chlorophyll – the lifeblood of plants The green pigment chlorophyll has potent health benefits and with only one atomic bond difference in the molecular structure between chlorolphyll and the haemoglobin in our blood, it has been hailed as an effective “blood builder”, helping in the production of red blood cells. The magic of green Chlorophyll has been shown to: • strengthen the immune system • enhance wound healing by reducing inflammation and inhibiting bacteria • neutralize and deactivate carcinogens • deodorize the body encouraging fresh breath and body odour • remove and detoxify drugs, toxins and heavy metals from the body • fight infection by breaking down undesirable bacteria • improve liver function • counteract radiation • promote healthy intestinal flora Greens not milk Greens are packed with calcium and vitamin K aiding in bone health, so are an important tool in the fight against osteoporosis. (Spinach and Swiss chard are not great for calcium as their oxalic acid content blocks the uptake of calcium). Green delights From the sweet taste of lettuce to the bitterness of rocket, the earthiness of spinach to the peppery flavour of watercress, green leafy vegetables cover a wide taste spectrum. Their colours range through varying shades of green to the blueygreen of kale to the stunning shade of purple sprouting broccoli. Old leaves are yellow and are a sign that the leaves are beyond their best. • Spinach • Bok choy • Collards • Swiss chard •

Rocket • Mustard greens • Watercress • Morning glory • Lettuce • Cabbage • Broccoli Getting your greens in a glass The basic green smoothie recipe consists of: • A handful of green leafy vegetables • Some soft fruit, such as mango or pineapple • A banana • Water to blend Simply pop everything in a blender and blend until smooth. Try adding ground seeds and nuts and superfoods, such as spirulina or chlorella. You may wish to add some fresh juice for a sweeter flavor. Liquid nourishment Blending your greens in a smoothie allows the nutrients to be taken into your bloodstream with minimum digestion, giving the body a powerhouse of nourishment without taxing the digestive enzymes. In fact, the raw leafy vegetables and fruits are packed with enzymes themselves. Enzymes are considered the life force of plants and are the reason why raw foods are so good for us. With just one big green smoothie a day you’ll be on your way to more vibrancy, health and vitality. Your skin will glow, your eyes will shine and your friends will be green with envy!

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LIVING WELL Neal Hoptman

Healing environments We have all noticed the impact that walking into a beautiful garden-with its lushness, fragrance, dynamism and vitality-has on our sense of well-being. Likewise, we can all recall entering a building that prompted us to look for an immediate way out, given its lack of fresh air, stale smells, haphazardness, noise and low energy. The environment can set the tone of our emotions. It conditions us in many ways of which we may not even be aware. Given human differences and the diverse nature of the world around us, it cannot be assumed that everyone agrees on what constitutes a quality environment. Rather than trying to detail specific objects or a specific design that you should include in your workplace, for example, this chapter is all about general guidelines to be aware of when designing your own quality environment. The notion of taking the time to reflect on your present environment and whether it is conducive to a healthy lifestyle is the key. The first stage of creating a healthy environment is awareness. Before we can alter the factors contributing to a lack of well-being, we must first become aware of what they are. The answer to questions of what gives you a sense of balance or what promotes positive and meaningful interactions will allow you to tune into the concept of a quality environment. Look around, carefully walking into and out of the rooms. Remember that as you change, as the seasons change, as the world changes around you, your environment can change also. By identifying factors that are conducive to a quality environment, as well as those that are impediments to it, you have made an immediate place to begin. Now try as much as possible to incorporate your ideal environment into your surroundings. You may add objects that are symbolic of this ideal environment. Take time to create that special environment right from the start. Our tendency is not to bother addressing this issue once we have become accustomed to our present environment. Evaluate your environment on a regular basis, allowing your creative nature to flow forth with improvements and variety. Remember that the environment is also a product of the company you keep. The influence of the moods, attitudes, and habits of the people with whom you associate is a very significant part of environmental awareness. When you find yourself in a difficult physical environment, try to create a pleasant atmosphere with others who are in it to help transform your thoughts and feelings. Remember, your body responds to what is happening in your mind as though it were real. If physical change is impossible, the mind is an excellent place in which to begin creating a quality environment. As our environments change for the better so will our health when this becomes a priority in our lives. There is no better time than now to make a commitment to creating a new approach to health enhancement.

More not always better with in vitro fertilization

More tries aren’t necessarily better when it comes to in vitro fertilization. New research found that about 1 in 3 women had a baby the first time they tried a test tube embryo, and that improved to nearly 1 in 2 with a second try. However, undergoing a third cycle boosted success rates very little and leveled off with subsequent attempts. “Don’t quit if the first cycle

isn’t successful. Your chances go up with the second cycle,” said lead researcher Barbara Luke of Michigan State University. But “if you haven’t gotten pregnant by the third, the chances are slim to continue.” In vitro fertilization involves mixing egg and sperm in a laboratory dish. The resulting embryo is then transferred into the womb to grow into a baby. Earlier this month,

British researcher Robert Edwards won the medicine Nobel Prize for pioneering the technique that has led to 4 million test tube babies. Infertility treatment is expensive. The average cost for an IVF cycle is about $12,400, according to the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Some insurance companies cover it. Desperate couples often try over and over to conceive, and

there are no ethics standards on when doctors should stop helping them try. Fertility clinics report success rates based on the number of cycles attempted, but that doesn’t indicate how likely an individual woman is to get pregnant with each IVF cycle she undergoes. The new study is the first to examine that nationally. It looked at in vitro procedures around the country between 2004 and 2008.

Over the five-year period, some 300,000 women had more than half a million IVF cycles that resulted in 171,327 first-time deliveries. The live birth rate was 36 percent on the first IVF try, 48 percent with a second cycle and 53 percent with a third attempt. The findings show “diminishing returns” after three IVF cycles, said lead researcher Luke. “The results are not going to be much better.”


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Food&Wine

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

Secret Chef Society’s second feast

An encore of the abundant, seemingly endless fare of exceptional and delectable quality that left guests in a satiated awe at the initial launch of The Society in August, has been raptly awaited for since. This propelled the second in what is to be an ongoing series of events to one of the top “can’t-miss” happenings on the island. Attendees were treated by the prominent head Chefs of all five restaurants belonging to The Society who debuted the latest dishes on the exclusive

menus available solely to members of this rapidly growing diner’s club. Accompanied by free-flowing champagne and wine, the evening was a cornucopia of delights if not simply the feast of a lifetime. This time around the decadent culinary soiree was held at The Cliff Bar and Grill, exchanging the resplendent sunset of Lipa Noi for the majestic sight offered by The Cliff’s strategic location. Halfway between Chaweng and Lamai, the rock face in which The Cliff is situated in and aptly named after provides a spectacular view of the inlet and beach below.

SAMUI Fresh & Local - be a part of the local community Samui Fresh & Local, a popular and friendly weekly food delivery service in the north of the island, is set to go island-wide with a new daily delivery service. Samui Fresh and Local provides a much needed connection between the many delicious foods being made, grown, created as well as imported on the island with the scattered island community. Many local bakers, chefs and vendors lack the time and resources to fully expose their creative endeavors to the whole community, so this service helps them get out there. Shopping with Samui Fresh & Local means you are: 1. SUPPORTING YOUR LOCAL COMMUNITY by buying from local small businesses. 2. SAVING YOURSELF & YOUR ENVIRONMENT by making fewer trips and stops. 3. ENJOY HEALTHIER LIVING by eating food that is fresh, made to order, and have not travelled too far Samui Fresh & Local delivers everything you could need from environmentally friendly cleaning products, high quality essential oils and stunning earth-friendly candles, to products from local bakers, makers, farmers and chefs around the island many of whom create exclusive weekly specials for this service. They also offer a supporting shopping service from the local markets and supermarkets to cover all your needs. Samui Fresh & Local customers enjoy an ever growing list of products as more suppliers, and requests are included. If you know of products or foods you think the whole island might enjoy just let them know. They also actively seek out the best local suppliers, and ask that they keep the following in mind (and out of their food) - MSG, trans-fats and any other bad fats, refined sugars, artificial sweeteners that are not conducive to good health. For a FULL LISTING, or to enjoy BREAKFAST, BBQ , PICNIC, VEGETARIAN or VILLA WELCOME packs call 0806 942 842.

Rene Redzepi: Capturing time and place in cooking To cook like the world’s best chef you might try his recipe for snails, which instructs the reader to feed them lettuce for a couple of days, put them in a pan of water, and bring it to a boil, “making sure that the snails don’t escape.” It’s not your typical cookbook entry. But Rene Redzepi is hardly your typical cook. At age 32, he is the chef of the moment, ever since his Copenhagen restaurant, Noma, grabbed first place on Restaurant Magazine’s list of the world’s 50 best restaurants last spring. He stole the spotlight from perennial “it” restaurant elBulli in Spain and established with surprising suddenness the supremacy of a movement known as neo-Nordic cuisine. When Noma opened seven years ago, Nordic gastronomy was an oxymoron. Danish colleagues mocked Redzepi for his pledge to use indigenous ingredients in a region where very little grows, and where haute cuisine was either French or Italian. But Redzepi stubbornly resisted, foraging for wild herbs and experimenting with Icelandic cheese and Norwegian razor clams. Yet he felt he was still cooking in a style borrowed from the places he had trained, including elBulli and Thomas Keller’s The French Laundry. Redzepi’s culinary epiphany came while he was hunting for musk-ox in Greenland, the temperature a frigid 55 below zero. “It was healthy to take time out and think, ‘Why I am doing these things?’” he said. “Suddenly I could put a word to it, that the main thing people should experience is a sense of time and place.”


Food&Wine

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

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Peter’s Rose & crown By SUZANNE BUCHANAN

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here are so many places to eat and drink on Koh Samui -- some good, some not quite so good and some that are frankly a little hit and miss. If you are looking for a really great bar/restaurant that serves ice cold beers, delicious wholesome food and you enjoy great conversation as well as those little extra touches, that so many places are devoid of, then we have found a place you will love. The Rose and Crown in Chaweng is located near the popular Poppies resort and is only one hundred yards from the beach. Owned and run by Peter, a very personable and entertaining chap from London, the Rose and Crown focuses on providing quality, quantity and value for money. Peter and his partner Goi have created the Rose and Crown in the style of an English Country pub, the sort of place that Peter would enjoy back home. This spacious bar offers plenty of personal space where you can hold a conversation without being overheard, as well as split screen TVs and a pool table. Happy Hour at the Rose and Crown goes on from 4pm until late so not only is it comfortable it is affordable too. Aside from a superb menu that has 28 authentic Thai dishes and enough European dishes to satisfy any requirements, Rose and Crown also offers a special BBQ menu from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m.

on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays for only Bt199. The BBQ includes six different cuts of meat, a bread roll, salad, a jacket potato, a vegetable kebab and sweet corn. If a generous Sunday lunch is your fancy, this is certainly the place to be. Tantalize your taste buds with a hearty helping of beef, pork or chicken accompanied by roast and mashed potatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, Yorkshire puddings, Paxo stuffing and thick Bisto gravy for an incredibly affordable Bt295! Other popular choices at the Rose and Crown include Peter’s homemade Cornish Pasties and pies, spring rolls that certainly take some beating, pizza, lasagna, Indian curries, exceptional 100% prime beef burgers and a hearty English breakfast that includes a deliciously seasoned flat sausage that has to be tasted to be believed. There is also very nice children’s menu as well as lighter dishes such as baguettes, salads and soups. If you are still hungry then try some of the delicious homemade desserts. Apple pie, blueberry topped cake, chocolate cake, ice cream and pancakes all scream out from the menu to be enjoyed. The difference at the Rose and Crown is Peter. Peter has a great deal of experience and knowledge of food and food preparation, taste and presentation. Peter understands the art of cooking and has skills that he not only uses himself but has passed

on to his staff who now shares his creative approach to good honest food. Peter’s experience as a chef has given him an understanding of what is required in a kitchen and what is needed to cook nutritious and hygienic food. A quick glance through the serving hatch will give you all the assurance you need that Peter insists on the highest standards in cleanliness and like the rest of the venue the kitchen is immaculate, as are the toilets. Peter shops for freshness and has a great handle on stock rotation. Another very pleasing aspect is how well Peter looks after his staff knowing that happy staff results in happy customers. Peter says the biggest compliment he gets is his repeat business and this is his measure of success. Peter really listens to his customers’ needs and then fills them. How many bar/restaurants do you know that offer the menu in Russian? Of course as well as excellent food, the Rose and Crown has a well stocked bar, a well chosen and very reasonably priced wine menu and offers cocktails and shooters, Magners Irish Cider, draught Stowford Press cider, liquor coffee and the Rose and Crown Topper coffee that has both Brandy and Baileys. The Rose and Crown also has six rooms and a penthouse available for short or long term let. For more information check out the website www.roseandcrownsamui.com


22

Sports

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

SAMUI Pool UPDATES

K.S.S.C. SNOOKER REPORT

By JOHN GREENWOOD

League of Gentleman After a thoroughly entertaining fifth season which saw the Bamboo Bar retain their title and Lords Bar show their metal, the League of Gentlemen pool league has already set in motion its sixth season. Now with an expanded division, the original eight teams are joined by four new contenders. Arada Bar, Bamboo Bar, Bungy Bar, Cork and Cask, Elephant and Castle, Lords Bar, Premier Bar, and Riks Bar are now joined by B.O.B (Birds of Bamboo), KSSSC, Lazy Coconut and Tams Bar. This could and should shake up the league as a few new names and some old ones come into the frame. Hopefully this can only add to the atmosphere and attitude in which this league is played, which is for everyone to have a good time first, and winning second. Everyone is welcome to come to watch at any of the pool nights and support their favorite bar and maybe join in with the fierce local rivalry and banter that comes with it. The first games started Nov. 3 and the league will have a winter break with no games to be played Nov. 22, Dec. 29 and also Jan. 5, 2011 and April 13. The last games to be played are on April 27. After last season’s great finish we can look forward to a great season ahead. In other news The League of Gentlemen pool competition is looking for a sponsor. Please enquire johnny@ thesamuigazette.com.

TechWorx Pool League DIVISION 1 This the 12th week and the Bamboo bar start us off with a sound and true, fun-filled 4-2 beating of Jacks Bar and in doing so stay at the top of division one. Hot on their trail is the Chillin Bar who remained in second place by squeezing the juice out of Lemons Bar 4-2. On’s Live Wire, to keep in contention had a moral boosting electrifying 5-1 victory over The Cork and Cask. The InternaPos

P

W

L

D

FF

FA

+-

PTS

1

Bamboo Bar

11

8

2

2

43

23

20

26

2

Chillin Bar

11

7

3

3

41

25

16

24

3

On’s Livewire

11

7

2

3

43

23

20

23

4

Lemon’s Bar

11

6

1

0

37

29

8

19

5

International

11

6

0

7

38

28

10

18

6

Jacks Bar

11

3

0

2

26

40

-14

9

7

Premiere Sports Bar

11

1

1

3

20

46

-26

4

8

Chaweng Sila Le Chablis

11

1

1

3

16

50

-34

4

Premier Boys do battle

T

he Koh Samui Sports & Social Club Snooker League saw a dramatic turn around at the top of the league table. Lincoln easily cruised past the usually in form Steve Harker who put in one of his worst performances of the season. With Lincoln playing his best snooker and Steve his worst, this was a one sided affair that quickly finished 3 nil in Lincoln’s favor. Meanwhile on the table with the most spectators, crowd favorite Flea played well above his usual standard. Playing the current league champion T-Bone, Flea always knew he would

LEAGUE TABLE Pos

have to bring his” A” game to stand any chance of winning and this is exactly what he did. With great breaks and even better safety play, Flea ran out a 3 nil winner in a match that has completely changed the look of the league. Jay Cuddy also put in a good performance with a 3 nil victory over the usually steady John Martucci. Jay who has been playing well below his ability showed glimpses of why all players in the league need to be weary when he is on form. On another table Ian Baxendale beat Paul Feeney 3 v 1 in an entertaining match. With both players making

P

W

D

L

F

A

+-

PTS

1

Lincoln

13

12

0

1

38

9

26

24

2

T-Bone

13

11

0

2

35

8

27

22

3

Jersey Steve

13

9

0

4

27

16

11

18

4

Flea

13

8

0

5

25

16

9

16

5

Premier Ian

13

7

0

6

25

22

3

14

6

Jay Cuddy

13

7

0

6

25

23

2

14

7

Premier John

13

4

0

9

15

31

-16

8

8

Todd

13

3

0

10

13

30

-17

6

9

GB Simon

13

3

0

10

13

34

-21

6

10

Robbie Tremarco

13

1

0

12

9

36

-27

2

high breaks this match was a close encounter which could have gone either way, but it was Ian who made the critical pots. Robbie Tremarco produced his best match of the season with an impressive 3 nil victory over GB Simon. Robbie who has struggled most weeks will now have some confidence that may see him able to move from the bottom of the table and out of the Wooden Spoon position. With players all jostling for positions the league is really hotting up to see who wins the “Tropical Interiors’ Cup and gets to wear the much sought after League Crown.

tional Bar gave The Premier Bar a resounding 5-1 seeing to, putting them hot on the heels of 4th spot. This could be a great final run-in, who can claim the title? With only three games left it is still anybody’s to grasp.

DIVISION 2 Pos

P

W

L

D

FF

FA

+-

PTS

1

Lords Bar

11

9

0

2

53

13

40

29

2

Lazy Coconut

11

7

2

2

40

26

14

23

3

The Hut

9

5

2

2

30

24

6

17

The top three teams all drawing their games saw not much change in this division. Lords Bar still top with a surprise draw to Hyena Bar. Second and 3rd place Lazy Coconut and The Hut drawing 3-3 saw the table not too dissimilar this week. Watch out for The Huts games in hand.

DIVISION 3 P

W

L

D

FF

FA

+-

PTS

Lords Bar

11

9

0

2

53

13

40

29

Lazy Coconut

11

7

2

2

40

26

14

23

The Hut

9

5

2

2

30

24

6

17

Sandy Resort beat their closest rivals The Solo Bar 4-2 to keep the top spot. Mango Tree could only draw against The Bungy Bar.

Young athletes receive Bt500,000 for sports meet After being impressed by the young athletes’ determination during training, Samui mayor Ramnet Jaikwang pledged support towards emerging young talents in sports on Koh Samui. The mayor granted Bt500,000 to cover all of the 43 athletes’ expenses when they represented Koh Samui in a provincial level sports meet in Nakhon Si Thammarat. The sports tourney called Tungsong Game was held from Oct. 23 to Nov. 3. “I am glad to see all the lovely students who exerted great effort in training for competition. But win or lose, the most important is the effort everyone put into becoming better athletes. That is what everyone should be proud of,” said Ramnet. The students competed in several sports disciplines such as badminton, petanque, futsal, beach volleyball and track and field. The budget was used to cover all the expenses including food, transportation, sports gears, uniforms and stipend.


On theIsland

samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

23

Absolute Sanctuary, Neuronium bring exclusive world premiere New Year’s Eve Concert Absolute Sanctuary, Thailand’s premier detox & yoga resort will be tying up for the first time with Neuronium, a Spanish electronic music group headed by Michel Huygen for a special exclusive New Year’s Eve concert.

The inaugural event held at the resort’s poolside, will see Michel playing for the first time in a live concert, pieces of music from his three new albums released in 2010: ETYKAGNOSTRYKA, HYDRO 2/THE DEEP

END and also KRUNG THEP. This will be the first time that he will play in concert pieces from the last two albums. The highlight of the World Premier concert will not only be the music

KOH SAMUI TOP TEN LIST Rob Newman

TOP TEN NEW WAYS BEING CONSIDERED FOR SAMUI HOSPITALS TO INCREASE REVENUES 10. . “Frequent Crasher Program.” After every two motorcycle accidents and hospital stays, all hospital costs for third crash are FREE. 9. Emergency Room Foam Parties every Friday night. 8. 2:1 Pain Pill Happy Hour. Between 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. daily, buy one Vicodin or Percocet, get the second one free. Use it or take home! 7. New Idea: “Johnny Walker Massage Ambulance:” On slow nights, hospital ambulance to pick up drunk tourists and drive them to their hotel, give them Johnny Walker Black Label IV drips, and offer them traditional Thai massage along the way. And still 50% cheaper than a regular Koh Samui Taxi!” 6. Botox Clinic Bus to be parked outside of Nikki Beach every Sunday and Botox to be included in price of every Sunday buffet. 5. New idea! Ring Road traffic stops outside hospitals

for big bellied people--if you have a big belly, Liposuction to be offered curbside at discounted rate. Very popular with Germans and Russians! 4. “Bangkok Airways Blood Pressure Special.” To qualify for this, you’ll be hooked up to a blood pressure machine and shown the Sunday night Bangkok Airways fares from Koh Samui to Bangkok. If your blood pressure goes up at least 20 points, you’re entitled to 50% off blood pressure medication (Note: To date, all island residents with the exception of Bangkok Airways management have qualified for this discount). 3. Create billboard campaign to discourage motorcycle helmet use. New tag line to be: “Only long living sissies wear motorcycle helmets.” 2. Hospital doctors to now recommend minimum three day hospital stay if you get shampoo in your eye. 1. Every heart bypass now comes with “happy ending.”

Rob Newman is a television commercial producer who first fell in love with Koh Samui in 1995. With blessed thanks to his United Airline 1K status, he now commutes between his homes in Los Angeles and Koh Samui. Rob can be reached WaldoIsOnKohSamui@gmail. com.

but also a special visual display of cosmic, relaxing dreamy images of Michel’s own paintings which will be projected on a screen in tandem with the flow of music to create a surreal atmosphere for listeners to “fly away” in the still of the night. The Moroccan inspired boutique wellness resort has specially created two packages for New Year’s Eve to incorporate the concert for their end of the year celebrations. A simple package consisting of a special New Year’s Eve buffet dinner at the resort’s Spa Cuisine restaurant The Love Kitchen with a welcome mocktail, raffle prize draw ticket & the concert tickets and “Celebrate You,” a 4 day/3nights package incorporating spa treatments, yoga classes, nourishing spa cuisine, New Year’s Eve buffet dinner and concert tickets. “We specifically chose to tie up with Neuronium. His music ties up with the concept of our resort where all our wellness programs seek to help guests achieve harmony,” explains Executive Director Claire Bostock.


On theIsland samui gazette | nov. 5 - 18, 2010

LOY KRATHONG: Festival of Lights As the full moon of the twelfth lunar month lights up the night sky, hundreds of thousands of ornatelydecorated krathong or traditional banana leaf floats are set adrift in rivers and waterways in a spell-binding ritual called Loi Krathong or the “festival of lights,” one of the Kingdom’s oldest and best-preserved traditions. Krathong floats typically take the shape of lotus in full bloom, swans, chedis (stupas), and Mount Meru from Buddhist mythology. However krathong floats in the shape of lotus blossoms are most popular. The Origins of Loi Krathong There are various fascinating accounts about the origins of Loi Krathong. It is not known as to when the tradition first began but authorities speculate that it is of Indian origin and based on the “Deepavalee” ritual which is also accompanied by floating lights in an act of worship of the Brahmin gods - Brahma, Siva and Vishnu. According to another school of thought, the ritual is said to be undertaken to pay respect to the sacred footprint of the Lord Buddha on the bank of the mythical Nammadhammahantee river. However, given the riverbased culture that formed the foundation of the traditional Thai way of life, Loi Krathong evolved into a ritual in which offerings are made to Mae Khongkha – Mother of Waters, the Thai equivalent of the Hindu goddess of water, in

an expression of gratitude for providing life-sustaining water throughout the year. Some believe that by setting the krathong adrift, one symbolically casts away one’s grief, misery and ill-fortunes. For the romantic at heart and young couples, Loi Krathong is the time to make wishes for happiness together and success in love. At dusk, as the full moon begins to rise, the krathong is decorated with fresh flowers and the candles and incense sticks are placed in the krathong. The float is then taken to a waterway where the candle and incense sticks are lit and the krathong set adrift. The floats are carried downstream by the gentle current, candlelight flickering in the wind. Soon after, attention turns to celebration. The evening’s festivities consist of impressive firework displays, folk entertainment, stage dramas, song and dance. Scenes as described in ancient Thai literary accounts are still very much in existence today. On Samui, the popular Noppamas Beauty Contest will be held from Nov. 20 to 22 at the Nathon Pier. The pageant for adults is slated for Nov. 21 while the children’s division on Nov. 20. Qualified contestants can apply at the Education Department of Koh Samui until Nov. 12. Grand winners will get cash prizes, crowns and trophies. For more info, contact 077234315.

Samui Gazette Edition 07  

Your First stop for News, Island Politics, sports and Entertainment on Samui

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