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The blessing of motherhood Breastmilk, a gift of nourishment Infertility no longer women’s issue

In photo, Andrea Jantzi and Adaya Photo by: MB Graphics & Events

International Adoption Teacher leaves impact The gift of a servant heart Delicious Recipes

Seasonal Tips

Did you know... Reflexology...


CONTENTS 5

Two young women battle the birthing odds and win Andrea and Krista witness the blessing of motherhood

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Infertility no longer women’s issue Plan ahead before conceiving a child, advises Dr. Elliott, ND

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Naturopathic Medicine treats infertility Assisting Conventional Medicine Dr. Susan Joyce, N.D .

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Family perfection comes in all shapes and sizes An inspiring adoption story

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Babies receive nourishment through the power of social media Cheryl Dove gives her baby the best start through the generosity of others Retired teacher makes a huge impact, and not just on kids Janet Shillinglaw great is remembered fondly by parent, Kerrie Magnus

Like Us On Facebook Discovering Women Magazine

( Previously: Peterborough Women Magazine)

www.Discovering-Women.com Design / Photography: MB Graphics & Events Managing Editor /Writer: Linda Doran Viscardis Publisher: Miryam Buchahim Editorial: linda@discovering-women.com Advertising Inquiries: miryam@discovering-women.com Text: 705-768-1035 or Call: 705-749-1551

RM takes the mystery out of midwifery Midwifery in Ontario

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T’is the season to be frugal Tips to save money during the holidays

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Experience, skill and a servant heart bless women stressed by unplanned pregnancy Helen de Luna is an encourager

Promo Video

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Contributors: Andrea Jantzi & Adaya (on the cover) Krista McMillan Kerrie Magnus Helen de Luna Carol Lawless Cheryl Dove Janet Shillinglaw Dianne Smith Heather Elliott Betty Halman-Plumley Connie Pappas Dr. Dana Marshall N.D. Dr. Susan Joyce N.D.

Discovering Women Magazine and its logotype is a registered name. The publication is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced by any means without permission of the publisher. Discovering Women Magazine is produced and distributed four times a year. Subscriptions: Telephone 705-749-1551 Four issues for $15 plus taxes. Canada only. The publisher cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or visual material. Letters to the editor, press releases and promotional material in whole or in part or in any medium may be used, reproduced, published, stored or archived without compensation of any sort. This does not apply to materials, pitches, photography and illustrations submitted in accordance with known industry practices. Discovering Women Magazine will not be held liable for opinions expressed by authors.

2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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To Our Readers, from the Editorial Team Linda Viscardis and I are so grateful for the opportunity to introduce to you several women whose stories just had to be told. We hope you enjoy reading them as much as we enjoyed discovering them. We were thrilled with the positive response from the readers of our first two issues, published under the banner of Peterborough Women. We are encouraged by the number of people who have linked arms with us under our new name, Discovering Women, in our mission to tell stories that educate, inspire and empower others to live their best lives and into their greatest potential. We are excited about the relationship we are growing with our readers through the efforts of our collaborators, Dr. Susan Joyce and Dr. Dana Marshall, Naturopathic Doctors, who contribute to the print magazine, as well as to our Consult the Doctors Facebook® page. And the input and feedback we are receiving through our Facebook® page, and the visits we are getting to the online version of the magazine are very encouraging. We invite you to visit us at www.discovering-women.com and www.facebook.com/DiscoveringWomen. In our last issue, Linda promised that I would share a little about myself. I look forward to your getting to know me, just as I enjoy meeting and getting to know so many of you. I was born in Mexico City, and I came to Canada in 2003. Far from my country and my family, I am a single mom of two amazing children, twins, Alexander and Sophia. Because of Alexander, I have become an advocate for Autism awareness, and I’ve learned to see the world in a very special way. Sophia’s strong personality and kind heart endear her to everyone who meets her. Together, they have taught me to enjoy every moment of my day. I call them my Little Miracles.

As a child, I always felt attracted to telling stories. My degree in media and communications, and my skill as a graphic designer and photographer, allow me to tell stories with pictures. I love interacting with people to discover their amazing stories. It is inspiring to see that every person has a story to tell, if only we take the time to listen. With Linda’s gift of words and my design, we are able to tell stories that help women to know that they are not alone. Discovering Women allows me to nurture a supportive and healthy community for all our readers. My life is guided by this thought: following my dreams keeps me alive, and I am only limited by my imagination. No matter how dark the path, I need only take a breath and keep walking until I see the light at the end. Then I should prepare myself to enjoy all the blessings that are waiting for me. This is what I want for you. You are important to us. We invite you to submit story ideas and nominations of women whom others would enjoy discovering, as well as feedback about how we can improve. Join our Facebook® page, and watch for our promotions, contests and events. Consider advertising with us – your support will ensure we continue on our road to discovery for a long time to come. And lastly, because of feedback from our readers who wish to have the magazine delivered to their door, we are now offering subscriptions at a low introductory rate. You’ll find the form inside. Thank you for taking the time to enter briefly into the lives of the women we introduce in the following pages. We hope you enjoy our Winter issue. - Miryam Buchahim

We invite you to submit your story ideas, photos and event announcements. Please email: miryam@discovering-women.com For advertising and design, email: mbgraphicsevents@yahoo.com

In Photo: Miryam Buchahim

Hello Discovering Women readers! Welcome to the Winter issue. This issue, in keeping with the season, has a theme unique to women - “New Life.”

Discovering Women is pleased to announce the winner of the tickets for the Imagination Movers performance at Showplace Performance Centre. Kim MacMillan was thrilled to accept the tickets after being told that her story was judged to be most inspiring. Kim entered the contest on behalf of her sister, who just completed chemo therapy in her fight against breast cancer. “The children had a great time dancing in the aisles to the music,” says Kim. “Thank you so much.” 4

Issue #3 | www.Discovering-Women.com | 2012


Two young women battle the birthing odds and win Two young couples do not know one another, and yet their stories are so alike, you would think they compared notes. For both couples, the journey through infertility to parenthood has been challenging, but, in one mom’s words, it was a million times worth it. For Krista McMillan and her husband, Darryl, of Peterborough, Ontario, the journey began in 2007, when, after being married for three years, they began trying to conceive their first child. “We just assumed it would happen, and it did,” says Krista. “But we miscarried at eight weeks.” This was just the beginning of what would soon become a very long process of scheduling visits to a Toronto fertility specialist, medical tests and procedures. After discovering a tubal blockage that could not be corrected, the couple decided to try in vitro fertilization, or IVF, a process that sees the egg fertilized outside the body.

“We always thought we would have biological as well as adopted children,” says Andrea. “But things did not go as planned. We just weren’t getting pregnant.” Andrea and Scott were told by their specialist, located in Hamilton, that IVF was a viable option for them. After much consideration, and the failure of an intra uterine insemination, or IUI procedure, they chose a more specific IVF procedure called intracytoplasmic sperm injection, or ICSI. This procedure sees several eggs injected with a single sperm, with the eggs then being transferred into the woman’s uterus. For both Krista and Andrea, the most difficult part of their journey was not the many appointments with the fertility specialist, the hours and hours spent on the road and in waiting rooms, or the often painful poking and prodding they had to endure.

“The hardest part was the emotional part of it,” says Krista. “Seeing other little babies out there, and not knowing why I couldn’t have my own baby. The physical side, the multiple needles in my stomach, the multiple drugs you have to take, the multiple tests you have to undergo, you just plough through that because you have to do it.” “It was such a roller coaster ride,” agrees Andrea. “Every single month, dealing with feelings of inadequacy, feeling like my body was letting me down, being jealous of others who seemed to have children so easily – that was hard.” See Andrea and Krista witness the blessing of motherhood...12

Andrea Jantzi and her husband, Scott, of Elmira, Ontario, like Krista and Darryl, always knew they were meant to be parents.

Photo by: MB Graphics & Events Location and Clothing by: Tia Star Boutique Make up: Faces by 2 Hairstyle: Burgandy’s In the photo Andrea Jantzi with 7-month-old daughter, Adaya

2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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Emergency .................................................................................................................911 Police (non-emergency) ................................................................................................705-876-1122 Hospital ................................................................................................705-743-2121 Activity Haven Seniors’Centre ................................................................................................705-876-1670 Alcoholics Anonymous ................................................................................................705-745-6111 Bereaved Families of Ontario - Peterborough ................................................................................................705-743-7233 Big Brothers Big Sisters of Peterborough ................................................................................................705-743-6100 Children’s Aid Society ................................................................................................705-743-9751 City of Peterborough Municiple Police Victim Services Unit ................................................................................................705-743-8922 Community Care ................................................................................................705-742-7067 Community Counselling Resource Centre ................................................................................................705-743-6976 Community Living Peterborough ................................................................................................705-743-2411 Community Race Relations Committee ................................................................................................705-742-9658 Elizabeth Frye Society of Peterborough ................................................................................................705-749-6809 Family Counselling Service and Volunteer Information ................................................................................................705-742-4258 Five Counties Children’s Centre ................................................................................................705-748-2221 Good Neighbours Care Centre ................................................................................................705-742-9800 Greater Peterborough Area Economic Development Corporation Business Advisory Centre....................................................................705-743-0777 Hospice Peterborough ............................................................................................... 705-742-4042 Kawartha Community Midwives ................................................................................................705-745-7640 Kawartha Food Share ................................................................................................705-745-5377 Kawartha Participation Projects ................................................................................................705-745-4122 Kinark Child and Family Services ................................................................................................705-742-3803 Labour Ready Inc ................................................................................................705-760-9111 Legal Aid Ontario ................................................................................................705-743-5430 Literacy Ontario Central South ................................................................................................705-749-0675 Mapleridge Seniors Recreation Centre ................................................................................................705-742-1481 Niijkiwendidaa Anishnaabe-Kwewag ................................................................................................705-741-0900 Ontario Disability Support Program ................................................................................................705-742-9292 Ontario Early Years Centre - Peterborough ................................................................................................705-748-9144 Ontario Works ................................................................................................705-742-9292 Peterborough Access Centre ................................................................................................705-743-2212 Peterborough Chamber of Commerce ................................................................................................705-748-9771 Peterborough Clinic ................................................................................................705-743-2040 Peterborough Community Legal Centre ................................................................................................705-749-9355 Peterborough County - Children’s Services Division ................................................................................................705-748-8830 Peterborough County - City Health Unit ................................................................................................705-743-1000 Peterborough Family Resource Centre ................................................................................................705-748-9144 Peterborough Public Library ................................................................................................705-745-5560 Peterborough Sport and Wellness Centre ................................................................................................705-742-0050 Peterborough Pregnancy Support Services ................................................................................................705-742-4015 The Learning Disabilities Association of Peterborough ................................................................................................705-748-9455 Tri-County Behavioural Services ................................................................................................705-876-9245 Tri-County Community Support Services ................................................................................................705-876-9245

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Issue #3 | www.Discovering-Women.com | 2012


Infertility no longer women’s issue

The medical definition of infertility, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) is “the failure to conceive following 12 months of unprotected intercourse.”1 The incidence of infertility may appear to be on the rise because today’s women may feel free to discuss the issue more openly, but, according to the WHO, global estimates of infertility range between eight and 12 per cent of couples with women of childbearing age, affecting between 50 and 80 million people.2 Although perceived as a predominantly female disorder, infertility is caused in 50 per cent of couples by problems with the man’s ability to reproduce. About 20 per cent of infertility overall cannot be attributed to either gender, according to the WHO, and is instead of unknown origin.3 Dr. Heather Elliott is a Naturopathic Physician and Chinese Medicine Practitioner, practicing near Sydney, Australia. Forty per cent of her practice is dedicated to women and couples who are experiencing fertility issues. “Infertility was once seen as a women’s issue, but not any more,” says Dr. Elliott. “Today men are tested earlier in the fertility process and poor sperm morphology seems to be the parameter that is mostly at fault. We know that sperm is highly sensitive to environmental toxins.”

But women today, as in the past, believe that they will be able to conceive the moment they decide to start a family, even at 40, according to Dr. Elliott. They are often shocked when a pregnancy results in miscarriage, or when they are unable to conceive at all. They often wait until they are older and more established, and then are discouraged to find out that there are problems. “Traditional Chinese Medicine says that the third cycle of a woman’s life (age 21) is the best time to conceive a baby and, up to the fourth cycle (age 28), there should be fewer problems conceiving,” says Dr. Elliott. Assisted Reproduction Treatments (ART) and In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) are increasing the outcomes for those who have identifiable problems, such as endometriosis, tubal issues and male identified issues, such as sperm problems. These treatments are not without huge impacts on the lives of both the man and the woman, according to Dr. Elliott. See We are not spending enough...19 1 www.who.int/genomics/gender/en/index6.html 2 Ibid 3 Ibid

Although it is understood that gonads and ovaries are susceptible to environmental stressors, Dr. Elliott is convinced that there is more to consider in the effort to understand the increasing rate of infertility. “I believe we need to start looking for the problem in previous generations,” she says. “What the grandparents were exposed to likely has an impact on the current generation’s ability to conceive and carry a child to term.” Things such as a grandparent’s exposure to such toxins as cigarette smoke, vaccines and pesticides may be having an impact on the viability of a pregnancy or the ability to conceive. Dr. Sarah Lantz, PhD, in her recent research, noted that over 200 different chemicals were found in the placenta of women in every major city in Australia. Some of the chemicals found (such as DDT) have not even been used in Australia for over 30 years, according to Dr. Elliott.

2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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Ask Dr. Susan Naturopathic Medicine treats infertility Trying to get pregnant can be an emotional roller coaster. Naturopathic Medicine can address many of the factors that can affect a couple’s ability to conceive. Maintaining a Balanced Menstrual Cycle A woman’s menstrual cycle is produced through an amazing balance of hormones. Many women have cycles that are not “optimal” for conceiving a child. Perhaps they have a short luteal phase, or they ovulate too early. Naturopathic Doctors use tools such as herbal medicine and acupuncture to ensure a woman’s cycle is working as well as possible for conception. Improving Quality of the Egg and Sperm Conventional approaches such as medications and surgeries, although sometimes successful, do little to improve the quality of the eggs and sperm. By doing a thorough analysis of a couple’s diet, lifestyle and environmental exposure, suggestions can be made to improve the quality of both eggs and sperm, thereby improving the chances of achieving and maintaining a pregnancy. Timing of Intercourse As we know, timing is everything. How do couples know when to have intercourse? We work with couples as they track their menstrual cycle in order to ensure they are trying to conceive at the optimal time.

Assisting Conventional Medicine Naturopathic Medicine can also be a great adjunct therapy for those women who wish to pursue conventional options such as Clomid or In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). Acupuncture has been repeatedly shown to improve the success rate of IVF. One of the greatest joys in our practice is seeing couples become pregnant. Our goal is not only to help with conception, but to improve overall health and prepare the body for the changes of pregnancy and parenthood. Susan Joyce BSc (Hons), N.D. Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine This column is a regular feature in Discovering Women Magazine. We encourage our readers to submit their health-related questions to our Consult the Doctors Facebook® page. Although Dr. Susan Joyce and Dr. Dana Marshall will not be able to answer everyone’s questions, they will answer those that address issues of relevance to our broad reading audience. Dr. Marshall and Dr. Joyce may be contacted directly at Healthy Foundations Naturopathic Clinic, located at 219 Sherbrooke Street in Peterborough (second floor). For more information call 705-243-5163 or info@healthyfoundations.ca.

There are numerous conditions that can affect fertility, including Endometriosis and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. Diet, supplements and acupuncture can work very well to re-balance hormones and greatly improve these conditions. Many couples who cannot get pregnant go through a number of tests only to discover there is “no known reason as to why they cannot get pregnant.” This is where Naturopathic Doctors excel. We are trained to think outside the box and look for possible contributing factors, such as food allergies, toxin exposure or mineral deficiencies.

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Photo by Mb Graphics & Events Dr.Susan Joyce N.D.

Addressing Conditions such as Endometriosis, PCOS and “The Unknown Cause”


Family perfection comes in all shapes & sizes

When Carol Lawless, of Peterborough, was 32 years old, she and her now former husband began trying to start the family they both wanted. They could never have imagined where their journey would take them.

“Both of our girls fit into our lives so beautifully,” says Carol.

“I could not conceive, but no one could t ell me why, ” says Carol. “We finally discovered I had endometriosis. We did artificial insemination for four to five years, but none of the eggs implanted.”

The remarkable thing to most people is the way these parents choose to put the needs of their children first.

Years of treatment took its toll. Carol, too ill to continue treatments, began to consider her former husband’s suggestion to look into adoption. “Finally, we met a social worker,” says Carol. “She said, ‘If you aren’t concerned that your child doesn’t physically resemble you, would you consider an international adoption?’” A year later, the couple was on their way to Changsha, China, where they met their new daughter, Grace, then aged nine months, through Children’s Bridge, an international adoption organization. Then, when Grace was four years old, the small family went back to Changsha to meet Grace’s new baby sister, Joan, aged 15 months. Grace and Joan

Now, years later, Grace is 12 years old, Joan is 9, and Carol and her former husband are co-parenting their children.

“The girls are beautiful, funny, happy and well-adjusted,” says Carol. “They are delightful, and this is a credit to their father, his partner and myself working together. We are good friends. In my opinion, you would never know that these children come from a family of divorce.” It is all about acceptance, and priorities, according to Carol. “I have realized through my journey that everything is perfect, although it may not seem that way at the time,” she says. “Adoption was the gateway for a fulfilling and rewarding life as a mother to my girls.” Visit www.childrensbridge.com international adoption.

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Carol and Grace

2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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Babies receive nourishment through the power of social media A woman decides that she would like to give her newborn the best start in life by breastfeeding. The baby arrives and all is going according to plan, until it is determined that either the new mom is unable to produce milk, or a medical emergency has occurred that prevents her from breastfeeding. What is a family to do? Cheryl Dove turned to social media. Six months ago, when her daughter, Julia, was just four weeks old, Cheryl was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, IDC is also known as infiltrating ductal carcinoma. This is a cancer that began growing in the breast’s milk duct and has invaded the fatty tissue of the breast outside of the duct. IDC is the most common form of breast cancer, representing 80 per cent of all breast cancer diagnoses. Very soon after Cheryl’s diagnosis, a total bilateral simple mastectomy left baby Julia without the benefit of breast milk. A friend told Cheryl about connections being made on Facebook between women who have extra breast milk and those who have none.

“It’s very grassroots,” says Cheryl. “Breast milk is like liquid gold. Some moms have a lot of excess milk, but they don’t want to throw it away. I’m very grateful, because Julia is now almost seven months old and has never had formula.”

Only two formal milk banks exist in Canada, one in Vancouver and one in Calgary. For information about efforts to increase breast milk availability, visit www.theglobeandmail.com and search for Breast Milk Bank.

Women who have breast milk to share, and those who need milk, may want to consider connecting with one another by joining one of the Facebook® groups that Cheryl uses. Although they are not registered milk banks, and users are encouraged to adopt a “buyer beware” attitude, Human Milk 4 Human Babies and Eats on Feets ~ Ontario are open to all.

Cheryl Dove lives in Huntsville, Ontario, with her husband Mike and their two children, Jenna, 3, and Julia, 7 months. Discovering Women readers who wish to know more about Cheryl’s story are invited to contact her directly at cheryldove@hotmail.com.

Cheryl finished her chemo therapy in mid-October and, at age 33, is proving to be a very strong cancer conqueror.

For information about guidelines for breast milk donation, visit the Human Milk Banking Association of North America at www.hmbana.org and click on Donate Milk.

“I can’t change the diagnosis,” she says. “But I can change how I look at it. If it had not been for the Facebook® groups, I would never have met these amazing women, whose fundamental kindness brings me to tears. Now, I’ve met some really great people, and they get to watch Julia as she grows.”

Mike, Cheryl, Julia and Jenna

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Issue #3 | www.Discovering-Women.com | 2012

For more information about IDC, visit Johns Hopkins Medicine at www.hopkinsmedicine.org and search for Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC).


Retired teacher makes a huge impact, and not just on kids Kerrie Magnus, of Peterborough, has a teaching degree today, all because of an amazing Junior/Senior Kindergarten teacher who never even taught her. It was a simple conversation with Kerrie’s daughter’s teacher that made the difference. Janet Shillinglaw, now retired, had taken the time to ask Kerrie about her dreams, something that no one else had ever done. “I told her that I wanted to be a teacher,” says Kerrie. “I had taken a few courses, but had never gotten around to finishing my degree. Janet said, ‘You’ve got to follow your dreams.’ She sounded so sure. I graduated in June. I made my dream come true because of her belief in me.” Kerrie’s story illustrates what it is about Janet Shillinglaw that has supported so many students in getting an outstanding start in life. Known for decades as the Rainbow Teacher, Janet focused on ensuring each person was successful. Success became the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

It was way back in 1981, just out of Teachers College, that Janet found something that would give her classroom its own identity. A stuffed cloud and rainbow at a local department store got her creative juices flowing, and Janet decided to create Rainbowland, a little reading nook in a corner of her classroom. She had no idea that Rainbowland would take on a life all its own.

in Peterborough. The money was used to purchase 144 team jerseys, now used for every team event in which the students participate.

“Rainbowland really was just a name,” says Janet. “But it became a place where we all became the Rainbow Family, with all of us moving as a unit toward a common goal, each of us at our own rates, by helping each other. Each child was keenly accepted and welcomed and felt a deep sense of belonging. The students always felt that we were all in this together.” That sense of community extended beyond the classroom into the lives of the families whose children were in Janet’s classroom. “Janet was my biggest fan,” says Kerrie. “Her belief in me was contagious. If you have any self doubt in any aspect of your life, as an adult, as a parent, or as one of her students, she can reach down inside of you and help you think that anything is possible.” Janet Shillinglaw retired in June, 2012. She was one of over 500 people nominated for the Great Canadian Teacher Award through the Canadian Family Magazine. Judges from the University of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) whittled that number down to 30, and then down to 13 finalists. Janet came in third place, with a $2,500 prize going to her school, St. Patrick Catholic School,

Photo by: Karla Sampson

Janet Shillinglaw

2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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Andrea and Krista witness the blessing of motherhood Continued from page 5 Now, both Andrea and Krista are proud and happy moms. Andrea’s Adaya Hope is seven months old, while Krista’s twins, Kyla and Kaden, are two and a half years old. Both young moms agree that it was worth the long wait and the enormous amount of effort to see the ultimate result of the birth of their children. Both women feel that they have witnessed a miracle. “The most amazing thing was seeing the embryos on the screen the day of the transfer,” says Andrea. “We saw our little star, that’s what we’ve always called her. Most people see their baby at 12 weeks during an ultrasound, but we saw ours at three days. We saw her so early on, as her life was being knit together.”

wanted and never giving up hope, and trusting that I would be a mom some day.” Both women have a similar message to others who may be embarking on a similar journey to theirs. “You are not alone,” says Andrea. “Reach out and find people to support you. Have faith that you will be parents, and always hold onto the hope that your family will grow. If you don’t try and believe in the miracle, you won’t get the miracle.”

Both Krista and Andrea invite others to contact them through Discovering Women. If you would like to know more details about their journeys, please contact us at linda@discovering-women.com We will be happy to forward your message.

“Never lose hope,” agrees Krista. “Do everything you can, because if you have that sense that you are supposed to be a mom, you will be. You just have to find your way, that’s all. Your way might just take a little longer, but it’s so worth it. When you see your baby,

And each woman found strength within themselves that they did not even know was possible. “For me, the most amazing thing, besides the birth of the twins, was how I became a stronger person, and how my husband and I grew closer as a couple,” says Krista. “I hit rock bottom so hard, but then I learned to control my fears, my anger and my tears, and I saw that my life was not about things always falling into place perfectly. For me, it was about fighting for what I

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you’ll know this is what you were meant to do. You will be so grateful because everything that happened brought you to that moment, and led you to that baby.”

Issue #3 | www.Discovering-Women.com | 2012

ICSI Procedure


RM takes the mystery out of midwifery

DW: What is a midwife? DS: Midwives are experts in the care of pregnant women, newborns and new mothers, and they are experts in normal childbirth. They bring a great deal of clinical knowledge to their work, and are committed to supporting and advocating for women’s informed choice. DW: Can you provide a brief history of midwifery in Ontario. DS: This can’t be done “briefly.” However, regulated midwifery in Ontario arose because of women’s demands for safe, comprehensive, women-centred care. In my own experience, it is the women-centred aspect of midwifery care that perpetuates it in the province. For details about the history of Ontario Midwifery, please refer to the College of Midwives of Ontario website at www.cmo.on.ca/midwife_history.php. DW: What is the demographic that chooses this type of birthing support? DS: I don’t think there is a specific demographic. Midwifery consumers come from all walks of life, professions, income levels, ethnicities, educational backgrounds and ranges of experience. The things that most midwifery consumers have in common transcend demographic definitions. They want support for normal birth without unnecessary use of technology; they want individualized care; and they want a non-authoritarian kind of care where their informed

Under midwifery care, women have choices around where they would like to give birth. For example, in Muskoka, women can choose to deliver in one of three hospitals (Huntsville, Bracebridge or Orillia), or at home. However, the impact of their choice has to be explored first. A midwife would guide them through the decision-making, exploring the risks and benefits of delivery at each location. After the birth of the baby, midwifery clients receive anywhere from three to five visits during the first week, whether in home or hospital, to assist with breastfeeding and to monitor the health of the newborn and the woman’s post-partum recovery. Care continues until the baby is six weeks old.

DW: What advice do you have for people who are thinking about conceiving a child, or who have just found out they are pregnant? DS: Seek out people who have experienced birth with obstetricians, midwives and family doctors. Listen to them. Listen to your heart. Identify what is important to you. Be thoughtful. Try to consider the long-term impact of your choice. Whichever caregiver you choose, know the advantages and limitations of each. All have merits. DW: Is there anything else our readers should know about midwifery? DS: Midwifery is paid for by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. There is no out-of-pocket expense to consumers. You do not require a referral to access midwifery care. The Association of Ontario Midwives maintains a list of midwives in the province. You can search for a midwife near you at www.ontar iomidwives.c a/ne wsroom/kit/faq. If you wish midwifery care, call early. In most parts of the province demand exceeds supply. DW: May I invite our readers to contact your organization, or you specifically? DS: Yes, of course. I can be reached through our clinic at midwivesofmuskoka@g mail.com.

In photo: Dianne, Miranda and Bishop

Following is an interview conducted with Dianne Smith (DS) by Discovering Women (DW).

choices are valued and supported. DW: What sets this type of birthing support apart from the typical birthing experience that includes monthly checkups with an OB/GYN and a birth in hospital? DS: The word “midwife” is derived from two old English words: “mid,” meaning “with,” and “wif,” meaning “woman.” We live up to our title: midwives spend time with women. Midwifery appointments last anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. What this means is that we know our clients well by the time they are ready to deliver, and care is truly individualized.

In photo: Dianne Smith (RM)

Dianne Smith is a Registered Midwife (RM), registered with the College of Midwives of Ontario, and is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant. She is in her ninth year of practice, in Bracebridge, Ontario, which is central to Muskoka District. Her practice, which she began in 2005, is called Midwives of Muskoka (MoM for short).

2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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T’is the season to be frugal

This Christmas season, why not buck the trend of using credit to purchase memories for your family. According to Betty Halman-Plumley, Financial Services Consultant with Investors Group in Peterborough, by trying even a few of the following suggestions, families may enjoy fabulous festivities without the fear of unmanageable credit card bills in the New Year. “The ideal start to any special occasion is pre-planning,” says Betty. “Planning ahead ensures we have the money already set aside. This is a good stress reliever.” Betty’s Tips: - Set aside a pre-determined amount of money each month during the year leading up to the Christmas season. - Have the chosen amount automatically transferred from your bank account to a Tax Free Savings Account set up. specifically for Christmas expenses - Make a list, including who you are buying for, what you intend to buy, where you will buy it, and the maximum amount of money you intend to spend. “We often feel pressured to buy for absolutely everyone, but this really is not very practical,” says Betty. “Instead, buy gifts only for those on your list.” Betty’s Tips: - Avoid buying gifts out of a sense of obligation. - Draw names, so you buy only for one or two people. - Choose to buy only for the young children in the family. “Sometimes it’s the simplest of gifts that makes the biggest impact,” says Betty. “The people we love will often appreciate it more when we give something of ourselves.”

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Betty’s Tips: - Make a gift rather than buying it ... for example, some baking, a knitted scarf, a painting. - Create a recipe cookbook for someone who eats vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, or dairy-free meals, adding in some of your favourite tips for success. - Make your own wrapping paper using newsprint, paint and stamps. - Wrap up a gift certificate for someone special, giving them the gift of you ... offer to babysit, or to take Grandma out for tea. “Although it’s probably not the best advice,” says Betty, “Sometimes, the best gifts will be available at a significant discount if you wait until the last moment.” Betty’s Tip: - Take advantage of last minute sales, and save up to 50 per cent. “We often feel pressured to just buy something, anything, for someone we love,” says Betty. “Instead, focus on gifts that will last a lifetime.” Betty’s Tips: - Set your children or grandchildren up with a Registered Education Savings Plan RESP). - Tell extended family members that your financial consultant will happily make a deposit to the children’s RESP on your behalf. - Set up a Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) for family members who live with disabilities; tell extended family members that, with every deposit, the Government of Canada may contribute a Canada Disability Savings Grant (CDSG) and Canada Disability Savings Bond (CDSB) to the RDSP, the amounts of which will depend on the disabled beneficiary’s family net income and the value of the contributions made in a given year,

Issue #3 | www.Discovering-Women.com | 2012

as well as any room carried forward from up to the 10 preceding years. And, finally, Betty says, “When all else fails, meet with your Financial Consultant to consolidate your debt, so you enjoy a better interest rate and save money over the long term.” For further information, our readers are invited to contact Betty Halman-Plumley directly at (705) 876-1282 or by email at betty.halman-plumley@investorsgroup. com www.investorsgroup.com.


Places & Events Peterborough and Surroundings

DEC

CHRISTMAS IN THE VILLAGE Dec 06, 2012 - Dec 06, 2012 King Street Millbrook 5pm-9pm tmillbrookbia.com 705-932-1600 KEENE SANTA CLAUS PARADE Dec 08, 2012 Rice Lake Gallery Begins at Edwards Dr. and ends at the Keene Lions Den, Keene, tosmtownship.ca/calendar.php 705-742-8509

JAN

HOGMANAY Jan 01, 2013 Hutchison House Museum, 270 Brock Street, Peterborough 1pm-3pm Hogmanay is a Scottish celebration of the New Year hutchisonhouse.ca 705-743-9710

FEB MARCH

LACE UP: PASSION FOR SKATING Jan 20, 2013 - Mar 31, 2013 Peterborough Museum and Archives, 300 Hunter Street, Peterborough peterboroughmuseumandarchives.ca 705-743-5180

POLAR FEST KAWARTHA MINIATURE VILLAGE Feb 01, 2013 - Feb 03, 2013 Nov 23, 2012 - Jan 11, 2013 Several locations throughout the Township Portage Place, 1154 Chemong Road, of Smith-Ennismore-Lakefield. 6:30 am-4 Kawartha Miniature Village Annual Christ- pm mas Display featuring our local churches as polarfest.ca 705-292-9507 30 CRAFT MARKET well as other models in our collection com| Issueto#1|www.PeterboroughWomenMagazine.com |2012 Dec 08, 2012 plimented by decorations celebrate the HARRY MANX WORLDS AFFAIRS Peterborough Public Library, 345 Aylmer St. Christmas season. TOUR N, Peterborough rcheeseman1@sympatico.ca 705-876-9732 Feb 15, 2013 30craftmarket.ca 705-760-9108 Market Hall Performing Arts Centre, 336 OHL HOCKEY WITH THE PETES George St. North, Peterborough. 8 pm-10 THREE DAYS OFGIVINGWITHTHREE Jan 10, 2013 - Jan 10, 2013 pm markethall.org 705-749-1146 DAYS GRACE Peterborough Memorial Centre 7pm-10 Dec 11-13, 2012 pm The Venue Peterborough, 286 George St. N., 151 Lansdowne Street West, Peterborough RELAY FOR LIFE AT TRENT gopetesgo.ca 705-743-3561 Peterborough UNIVERSITY All Ages Show! Tickets $35 plus service fees March 22, 2013 REELKIDS FILM FESTIVAL – available at all Ticketmaster location. Relay For Life youth events took place in Jan 14, 2013 - Jan 18, 2013 venueptbo.ca 705-876-0008 over 100 communities across Canada Showplace Performance Centre, Market convio.cancer.ca MAX & RUBY IN THE Hall Performing Arts Centre, Downtown NUTCRACKER SUITE Peterborough. 9:45 am-2:15 pm Dec 14, 2012 reelkids.ca 705-745-3238 ext. 400 290 George St. North, showplace.org (705)742-SHOW (7469) 2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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Connie’s

Irresistible Mocha Cheesecake

Ingredients: 2 (8oz) pkgs cream cheese, softened (Tip: use unripened goat cheese for higher nutritional value) ½ cup sugar (Tip: cut the amount of sugar by using a sugar substitute such as Stevia or Xylatol; consider avoiding white sugar) ½ tsp pure vanilla extract 2 packets of mocha coffee mix (Gano Mocha optional) 2 eggs 1 graham cracker crust (Tip: for gluten free option, substitute any type of crunchy gluten-free cookie)

Directions: Mix cream cheese, sugar, vanilla and mocha mix at medium speed until well blended. Add eggs. Mix again until well blended. Pour into crust. Bake at 350°F for 40 minutes or until centre is almost set. (Place pan with 1 inch of water on bottom rack while baking to keep cheesecake moist.) Cool and then refrigerate 3 hours before serving.

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KEEN WHAT????

Quinoa Chili

Quinoa, pronounced ‘keen wah,’ has been a relatively unknown superfood, until recently. Now it is creating quite the hype in North America. Although commonly mistaken as a grain, quinoa is a seed that is considered a complete protein and is also gluten free. Quinoa is high in fibre, easily digested and rich in vitamins such as riboflavin, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, folic acid and phosphorus. It is such a versatile food - enjoy its unique nutty taste by trying it ground as a flour in baking, as an alternative to oatmeal for breakfast or substituting it for rice at dinner.

This is a delicious, wholesome chili for a cool winter’s night! The addition of quinoa makes it a healthy, yet hearty, meat-free alternative. The red curry paste adds a nice Asian flare to it. This recipe is sure to become a family favourite!

GUILT FREE Quinoa Cookies by Dr. Dana Marshall, N.D. Ingredients:

Ingredients:

Susan Joyce BSc (Hons), N.D. Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine

4 large bananas 2 tbsp almond butter 1/2 cup coconut sugar 1/2 tsp vanilla extract 1 1/2 cup cooked whole-grain quinoa 1 cup uncooked quinoa flakes (or oatmeal flakes) 1 cup unsweetened, shredded coconut 1/2 cup chocolate chips 1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1 ½ tsp red curry paste (add more if you like it more spicy) 1 tsp ground cumin 3-4 cups low-sodium vegetable broth ¾ cup uncooked quinoa 1 large sweet potato, diced 1 large red pepper, diced 1-15 oz can navy beans, rinsed and drained 1-15 oz can coconut milk 1-28 oz can diced tomatoes

Directions:

Directions:

Preheat oven to 380 degrees F. In large mixing bowl, mash bananas with a fork and add almond butter, vanilla and coconut sugar, then mix well. Add quinoa, quinoa (or oat) flakes and coconut. Mix until well combined. Stir in chocolate chips and walnuts. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and drop batter on cooking sheet. Reduce heat to 350 degrees, and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until browned. Remove from oven and let cool.

In a large pot, mix the curry paste, cumin and some broth until the spices become a nice smooth paste. Add the rest of the broth, quinoa, sweet potato and red pepper. Bring to a boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer for about 10-15 minutes. Add beans, coconut milk and diced tomatoes. Simmer uncovered until the chili is thick and the flavours have all combined. Enjoy!

HINT: Try baking only half and freezing the rest to have on hand for unexpected visitors. YIELD: 18-24 cookies, depending on size

YIELD: 4 servings NUTRITION per serving (approximate): 455 calories; 69g carbs; 13g fat; 17g protein

NUTRITION per serving (approximate, based on 24 cookies): 146 calories; 8g fat; 0mg cholesterol; 10mg sodium; 81mg potassium; 2g fibre; 9g sugar; 3g protein; Vitamin A .3%; Vitamin C 3%; iron 3% 2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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Plan ahead, advises Dr. Elliott, ND Continued from page 7 “We are not spending enough on research papers to identify how these treatments are affecting these couples,” she says. “For instance, we are observing increases in post 4 partum depression in women who have undergone IVF pregnancies.” According to the WHO, both women and men experience considerable psychological distress when experiencing reproductive health problems, including “feelings of low self-esteem, isolation, loss of control, sexual inadequacy and depression.” The WHO defines health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” 5 It is therefore important to remember that infertility is a source of diminished health and social well-being. This is why, for Dr. Elliott, tending to fertility issues must be more than just treating the disease; it is very important to look for the cause. And prevention, the simple act of planning well in advance before trying to bring a child into the world, is just as important, according Dr. Elliott.

Did You Know ....

If natural conception is not the outcome, a couple who has done the best preconception care will always be in a better position to deal with the emotional and physical demands of ART or IVF.

* Reflexology is the practice of applying pressure to the feet and hands, in which the therapist utilizes her thumb, finger and hand. * Reflexology has been practiced in Egypt, India and China for more than 4,000 years. * The practice is based on the premise that the body is divided into 10 zones and organs; glands and parts of the body are reflected on feet and hands. * Reflexologists believe that energy running through these zones, when unbalanced, will affect the body. * Reflexology helps to stimulate this energy flow and to bring the body back to balance, or homeostasis. * Reflexologists believe that the practice removes toxins from the body, improves circulation, balances hormone production and regulates menstruation and ovulation; it also relieves tension and creates relaxation, thereby minimizing stress. * Most reflexologists believe that applying pressure to the reproductive system or minimizing stress through relaxation helps women to conceive.

Recommended Reading:

Visit the Pacific Institute of Reflexology, Vancouver BC at www.pacificreflexology.com/abstract/Women to read about research studies evaluating the effectiveness of reflexology in conditions affecting women, and specifically about a study conducted by Leila Ericksen, FDZ Research Committee, Denmark, entitled Has Reflexology an Effect on Infertility?

“Maintain an ideal weight, and enjoy moderate, regular exercise,” advises Dr. Elliott. “Consume food as clean as you can afford. Use your money to buy good fats. Buy organic meat. Make sure your blood is in good shape; deal with anaemia before trying to get pregnant – in Chinese Medicine it’s important that the blood is good and can move easily to ensure a good conception outcome. Stay free of sexually transmitted diseases. Ensure the liver is working well. Take the time to balance the body if periods are a problem, and cleanse the whole body from the inside out before conceiving.”

“Seek out a Chinese Medicine Practitioner to support your journey,” advises Dr. Elliott.

Children of a Toxic Harvest: An Environmental Biography, by Eve Hillary, sheds light on the problem of acute environmental attack. Chemical Free Kids: Raising Health Children in a Toxic World, by Dr. Sarah Lantz, PhD, is a community program and book about chemicals and the impact on the bodies and health of kids - how they get into their bodies, the health and behavioural problems they cause, why kids are particularly exposed to chemicals and what we, as a society, industry, and parents, can do about it.

2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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EXPERIENCE, SKILL AND A SERVANT HEART BLESS WOMEN STRESSED BY UNPLANNED PREGNANCY

Helen de Luna is drawn to women who are feeling the stresses of unplanned pregnancy. In her role as Executive Director of Peterborough Pregnancy Support Services, Helen often has the opportunity to tell the agency’s clients about her own journey through tough times. She hopes that her story will inspire these young women to reach their full potential. “I was born in the Philippines into a ily,” says Helen. “I was the third youngest and there was not a lot to go around. early to put my siblings before myself. servant heart.”

blended famof 10 children, I learned very I grew into a

Helen acknowledges that the staff at the Centre plays a huge role in supporting the women who come through their doors. She lives in Peterborough with her husband, Dr. Rod de Luna. The Peterborough Pregnancy Support Services Centre is a faith-based organization dedicated to providing compassionate help and hope to those dealing with an unplanned pregnancy. Contact the Centre at 705-742-4015.

Helen’s family was not wealthy, but she was determined to get a good education. She knew that the only way to achieve her goal would be to get a scholarship. Helen drew her strength from her mother, who always wanted Helen and her siblings to succeed. “My mother was an encourager,” says Helen, who, despite all odds, got her medical degree and became a doctor. She practiced in the Philippines for seven years before deciding to dedicate her time to raising a family. Then, in 1993, Helen and her children joined her husband, Rod, who had immigrated to Canada six years previously. “Now, I am a servant to the women who come into the Centre,” says Helen. “I use my skill as a doctor, my experience as a mother, and the circumstances of my childhood to encourage these women, who are often unprepared for pregnancy, and who are seeking non-judgmental information about their options. I am an encourager, like my mom.” According to Helen, it is not only the women she serves who benefit from the work she does. “There is something great about helping women especially,” says Helen. “I love this job more than any other. This is like a dream job, because I get to tell women about who I am and what I’ve gone through. When you share your experiences with others, and they see you are successful, they are able to see the possibilities for themselves. I can really make a difference.”

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Issue #3 | www.Discovering-Women.com | 2012

Helen de Luna


2012 | www.Discovering-Women.com | Issue #3

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