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Discover

CONCORD

SPRING 2020

PATRIOTS’ DAY 2020: EXPERIENCE THE REVOLUTION

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Springtime always feels like a new start to us. Our thoughts turn to new beginnings, daffodils, walks in the springtime woods, and – here in Concord – Revolution! It’s impossible to experience springtime in Concord without remembering April 19, 1775 and this issue of Discover Concord will bring you new insights into the events of that fateful day. For visitors and history buffs, our lead article on page 10, Patriot’s Day 2020: the 245th Anniversary of the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World”, serves as an at-a-glance guide for the many celebrations and reenactments in and around Concord April 18th–20th. Local reenactors, as well as experts at the National Park Service helped ensure the very best is highlighted in this article – and we are grateful for their guidance! And our friends at the Concord Visitor Center are also on hand to help with directions, offer advice, or book tours – please visit them at 58 Main Street. April 19, 1775 was a very different type of day, depending on your role in the world at that moment. See the emergence of the American Revolution through the eyes of Scottish-born Major John Pitcairn on page 20. Feel the thrill of racing to outsmart the British Regulars by following the tale of Colonel James Barrett and his Minutemen and militia on page 22. And empathize with the plight of the ordinary citizen as they realized that Revolution was on their doorstep, whether they wanted it or not, on page 12. Each year, hundreds of volunteer reenactors gather in Concord and neighboring towns to bring history

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alive. Learn about the amazing effort that goes into creating (and maintaining) history appropriate clothing through an interview with Master Historical Costumer Henry Cooke on page 16. Don’t miss the sidebar on some fascinating historical clothing pieces held in the Concord Museum’s collection as well. The American Revolution fought for liberty…but here in Concord in 1775, not all people were free at that time. African Americans have lived here in Concord for almost as long as this town has existed – but little is widely known about their story. The Robbins House seeks to change that with an exceptional museum located near the North Bridge. Learn about the Robbins House and the fascinating legacy of Caesar Robbins, a previously enslaved veteran of the Revolutionary War, and his descendants (several of whom became civil rights advocates) on page 14. But let us turn our thoughts away from Revolution for a moment – and revel in the glorious season of Spring! Concord comes alive in the nicer weather with parades, outdoor celebrations, arts & culture, special exhibits, and so much more! See page 8 for our curated list of the Top 15 Things to See & Do in Concord this Spring. A detailed list of live music, theatre, and gallery exhibits can be found on page 52. 2020 is the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote. We celebrate the women of 18th and 19th century Concord who were among the early leaders in the suffrage movement. For example, did

you know that Louisa May Alcott was the first woman to register to vote in Concord? Read about her and others in Voices, and Votes, For Women: Concord’s Early Pioneers on page 24, and in “The Most Remarkable Woman of Our Time” Margaret Fuller, Transcendental Feminism, and Women’s Rights on page 36. And finally, we are honored and grateful to have been named New Business of the Year by the Middlesex West Chamber of Commerce. Thank you so much to those who nominated us! It’s gratifying to hear that our new publication has been helpful to visitors and interesting to locals. We always want to hear how we can improve and be of better service to our community – so please write to us anytime! And of course, we would not be here without the amazing support of our Advisory Board, authors, photographers, advertisers, friends, colleagues, readers, and supporters. You mean the world to us. Thank you all so much! And so we invite you to step outside – enjoy all that this amazing town has to offer. Welcome to Spring. Welcome to Concord.

Cynthia L. Baudendistel Co-Founder

Jennifer C. Schünemann Co-Founder


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atriots’ Day 2020: The 245th P Anniversary of the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World”

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Revolution on Our Doorstep The Robbins House

Historical Costumer Henry Cooke Recreates the Past ajor John Pitcairn’s High Road M to Concord & Low Road Home Colonel Barrett’s Hustle

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oices, and Votes, for V Women: Concord’s Early Pioneers

List of Shops & Restaurants Walking Maps of Concord

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Appleton Design Group ur Big Backyard: Exploring O Nature in Concord ” The Most Remarkable Woman of Our Time” - Margaret Fuller, Transcendental Feminism, and Women’s Rights Contents Continued on Page 6

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Beyond Midnight

Paul Revere and His Ride

Exploring the political activist and Revolutionary War legend February 14 through June 7, 2020, open daily 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

www.concordmuseum.org A joint exhibition is concurrently on view at the Worcester Art Museum Organized by the American Antiquarian Society with generous support from CHAViC, Center for Historic American Visual Culture, AAS; The Henry Luce Foundation; and The Richard C. von Hess Foundation.

Sustaining Sponsor

Official Hotel

Revere Hotel Boston Common Images: Lantern, one of the two used as a signal April 18, 1775, Concord Museum; N.C.Wyeth, Paul Revere, 1922, The Hill School, Pottstown, PA


© Dave Witherbee

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CO-FOUNDER Cynthia L. Baudendistel CO-FOUNDER Jennifer C. Schünemann ART DIRECTOR Beth Pruett

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DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR Wilson S. Schünemann ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR Olga Gersh

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SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Ricky Ortiz ADVISORY BOARD Bobbi Benson North Bridge Antiques

Patricia Clarke Sara Campbell

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contents

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Concord Tour Company

The Little Shop that Could: A Retailer’s Love Affair With Community & Food

Nature Watch Guide Paul Revere’s Iconic American Silver

Revolutionary Books for Minutemen, Militia, and Loyalists

Jan Turnquist Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House

Jerry Wedge The Umbrella Arts Center

Jim White

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Runway for Recovery: A Town Cares for its Own he Chris Ridick Team at T Compass: A Revolution in Concord Real Estate Arts Around Town

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© 2020 Voyager Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form by any means without the prior written permission of the publisher. ISSN 2688-5204 (Print) ISSN 2688-5212 (Online) For reprint and permission requests, please contact cynthia@voyager-publishing.com 314-308-6611

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COVER PHOTO: Minuteman and the Flag ©Bay Colony Media AUTHORS/CONTRIBUTORS: Cynthia Baudendistel Olivia Achtmeyer Boger Victor Curran Jaimee Leigh Joroff Kristi Lynn Martin Alida Orzechowski Jennifer C. Schünemann Beth van Duzer Abby Gurall White Dave Witherbee David F. Wood PUBLISHED BY:

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Earth Earth Day Day

Things to See & Do in Concord this Spring

Help welcome Spring with the Spring Equinox Full Moon Meditation at the Old Manse, Friday, March 20th from 6 to 8PM. Enjoy readings from Emerson and Thoreau before taking time for quiet reflection under the full moon (and perhaps even hear the sounds of Spring). A fire will keep you warm – and provide hot coals for s’mores!

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Put on your dancing shoes and join the Folk Arts Center of New England in the 35th Balkan Music Night on March 21st from 7PM to 1AM. Enjoy the exciting rhythms and soulful melodies of Bulgaria, Macedonia, Greece, Albania, Serbia, Bosnia, Croatia, Romania, Turkey, and more. Dance the night away, or just enjoy the music from the concert seating upstairs. More information at balkanmusicnight.facone.org 8

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If you loved our cover story in our Winter issue, then you won’t want to miss the chance to hear Gregory Maguire, author of Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, as well as numerous other books for adults and children, speak at the Concord Players on April 5th at 4PM. This event is free, but you must rsvp at www.concordplayers.org

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Pay tribute to the brave souls who perished at the Battle at the North Bridge, relive the “Shot Heard ‘Round the

World,” and witness other exciting Patriots’ Day celebrations and reenactments. April 18th through 20th. See our feature article on page 10.

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Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day on April 25th with a River Ceremony at the Old Manse followed by a parade through town, culminating in Musketaquid’s biggest Earth Day Festival ever (water themed!) at the newly renovated Umbrella Arts Center on Stow Street. TheUmbrellaArts.org/Earthday

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The Concord Women’s Chorus spring concert will be held on Saturday, May 9 at 4 pm at Trinity Episcopal Church. The entire repertoire will be works by European and American female composers. Catch this


31st 31st Annual Annual Garden Garden Tour Tour

amazing performance just before the group takes their program on tour to France with performances scheduled in Paris, Normandy and the Loire Valley. https://concordwomenschorus.org

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Honor the men and women who have served our nation on Memorial Day, May 25th. Two parades – one at 9AM from Rideout Field, and a second at 11AM from Monument Square – will pay tribute to our veterans, including the nearly 1,000 veterans who live in Concord today. Revel in Spring with the Concord Museum’s 31st Annual Garden Tour on June 5th and 6th. This unique opportunity to visit outstanding private gardens in the Concord area is organized by the Concord Museum Guild of Volunteers. www.concordmuseum.org

istock.com/traveler1776

Juneteenth Juneteenth at at the the Robbins Robbins House House

Music lovers delight! The free outdoor Middlesex Jazz Festival features a mix of 20-piece big bands, Latin jazz, jump blues, and smaller ensembles. Saturday June 6th from 1pm to 6:30pm (rain date Sunday June 7th) in Concord Center. Visit the very home where Louisa May Alcott wrote the beloved story of Little Women. The Louisa May Alcott Orchard House tour is not to be missed. Do plan a bit of extra time, as this destination is even more popular following the recent release of the Sony Pictures film. Louisamayalcott.org

©Concord Museum

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The 5th Annual Stow Street Block Party on May 16th is a free community event that will feature activities for all ages including Touch a Truck, music, food, games, and more. This year’s event will also incorporate the 2nd Annual Concord Cycling Celebration!

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Celebrate Juneteenth at the Robbins House on June 15th from 12:30 to 2pm. Concord joins other African American communities for this oldest known celebration of the end of slavery in the United States. Bring a picnic lunch and learn about the history – through living history reenactors – of the Robbins House and its fascinating inhabitants. https://robbinshouse.org

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Explore the exhibition Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere and His Ride through June 7th at the newly renovated Concord Museum. Learn more about the political activist and Revolutionary War legend at www.concordmuseum.org.

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Enjoy the beauty of nature at Walden Pond, Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, the Bruce Freeman Rail Trail, and so many other wonderful parks and trails around Concord. Visit https://concordma.gov for maps and more information.

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Take the time to explore the fascinating shops, boutiques, and restaurants of Concord Center and West Concord. See our list of “Where to Shop” and “Where to Eat” – along with walking maps – on page 27.

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| discoverconcordma.com

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PATRIOTS’ DAY 2020: the 245 Anniversary of the th

“Shot Heard ‘Round the World ”

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BY JENNIFER C. SCHÜNEMANN

Each year, thousands of people come from all around the globe to celebrate the events that gave birth to a new nation. The battles of Lexington and Concord are synonymous with freedom, liberty, and rebellion. The amazing reenactors, park rangers, tour guides, and museum docents in and around our community are all here to help and guide you as you experience the energy and excitement of the events leading up to that fateful day April 19, 1775. This year, for the 245th Anniversary of the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World,” there are many events planned in and around Concord during Patriots’ Day weekend. Here are a few favorites you won’t want to miss:

SATURDAY, APRIL 18TH 9:30AM to 12PM at the Hartwell Tavern and Captain William Smith House along the Battle Road – reenactors share the harrowing tale of fleeing civilian refugees. The sight of hundreds of British Regulars sent many of the town residents into a panic. If you had to leave your home in a hurry, uncertain of your return, what would you take with you? Learn about these locals who struggled to save their homes and their families from the oncoming war headed their way. 12:45PM – Parker’s Revenge Battle Demonstration – this is one of the most popular events of the weekend, so leave plenty of time. Captain Parker seeks revenge for the militiamen killed in Lexington earlier that day, and he shall have it! Witness hundreds of reenactors, civilian evacuations, musket firing, and fast-paced battle action along the actual Battle Road of 1775! 4PM – Tower Park Battle (Massachusetts Ave., by Pelham Rd.) – follow the British Regulars’ retreat as they fight the Colonial 10

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© BayColonyMedia.com

militia and Minutemen! The crowd gathers along the stone wall, which commands an incredible view of the battle as it unfolds. “In my opinion, this is the best battle,” said seasoned reenactor Steve Crosby (who plays Isaac Davis, the leader of the Acton Minutemen at the North Bridge). “It is truly EPIC. We get to play on the actual field – the battle swept through this actual area!” 7:45PM – The Patriot Vigil and Candlelight Procession – this beautiful ceremony honors the lives of all who were lost that fateful day. Anyone who would like to participate is welcome – but no flashlights or LEDs. Candle lanterns only, please, out of respect for this hallowed ground. The lantern procession will leave from the North Bridge visitors’ center and walk down to the North Bridge, where poetry, music, and historic remarks will take place before a reading of the names of colonists and Regulars who perished on April

19th will be read aloud. This park staff favorite is the brainchild of Ranger Jim Hollister and has quickly become a cherished tradition and a beautiful way to pay respects to the fallen.

SUNDAY, APRIL 19TH 6AM – as part of a ceremony dating back to the late 18th century/early 19th century, the Concord Minutemen and the Concord Independent Battery gather to honor the opening battle of the American Revolution with a 21-gun salute with musket and cannon fire. 1PM to 4PM – Warlike Preparations! – children and adults alike will help bring history alive at the Colonel James Barrett House, 448 Barrett’s Mill Road, as they help to hide military supplies as the British Regulars appear on the horizon. The soldiers march right into the house and search everyone and everything to uncover the hidden supplies!


“I have this feeling that I belong somewhere on the timeline of what took place on April 19th, 1775,” said Steve Crosby. “I grew up in Acton, watching the Minutemen march by my house every year. As a boy, I would walk behind them as the townspeople still do. And now I have the honor of leading this column! It’s such a special feeling to be a part of the mechanism that remembers and honors these brave souls. It fills me with a bright light to walk along the Isaac Davis trail from his house in Acton to the old North Bridge in Concord to lead one of the most important battles in our nation’s history.”

MONDAY, APRIL 20TH

Courtesy of Minuteman National Historical Park

5:30AM – Lexington Battle Reenactment – as the British Regulars enter the town of Lexington, they find a militia formed up on the town green. The goal of the militia is not to engage the troops, but to show defiance to the Crown. The British officers are indignant at their risky move and order them to lay down their arms and disperse. Most men do. Some do not hear the order and stand fast. Suddenly a shot rings out (nobody knows who shot first), discipline breaks down, and more shots are fired at the fleeing citizens. When the smoke clears,

Historical Reeanctors at the Bridge

eight militiamen are found shot dead, several more are wounded. This sparks outrage as the column marches on to Concord. But fear not! Captain Parker will have his revenge! 8:45AM – Commemoration of the North Bridge Fight and Concord Parade – just hours after the tragedy on Lexington Green, the Regulars enter Concord. One detachment heads to secure the North Bridge, where a combination of Minutemen and militia forces from Concord and many surrounding towns are waiting on the far side. Smoke rises from the center of Concord, leading the locals to believe the Regulars are burning down the town. The order comes to load their muskets. The men advance towards the Bridge, led by Isaac Davis of the Acton Minutemen, to the astonishment of the British Regulars. Tired and hungry from the long overnight march, the Regulars retreat off the bridge and form into firing positions. As the colonists advance, the Regulars fire and kill Isaac Davis, making him the first commissioned officer to die for what would become the United States. The order is then given to the Minutemen and militia: “Fire, fellow soldiers, for God’s sake fire!” And thus begins the American Revolution.

Marching to Concord © JR Covert/Wikipedia Commons

“Last year, I had all the kids hide the supplies, just as was done in 1775,” said Ranger Jim Hollister, Education and Living History Coordinator, Historic Weapons Supervisor at the National Park Service. “When the event was over, we put everything back in the house – the next day I realized that there was a box of candles missing….so I went back to the house and looked everywhere! The brilliant kid who had hidden it in the old barn foundation had covered it with dirt and leaves and it was the ONLY thing the British didn’t find that day. It’s a good thing that kid was on our side!!”

National Park Service staff will be on hand to help guide you to parking, but please plan well ahead for these enormously popular events. Dress in layers, wear comfortable shoes, and bring water. Restrooms are available, but could be spaced far apart. Please stay behind the rope lines. While all reenactors are firing blanks, it is still dangerous to step into an active reenactment site. If park staff see a person cross the ropes, they will stop the entire scene to keep people safe. Please respect the hard work that goes into preparing these events, and abide by the rules. Muskets and cannon fire are loud. Those with sensitive hearing and small children may be more comfortable watching from a distance. And while your trusted furry friend may THINK he wants to come along, many dogs are frightened by loud noises. They might be more comfortable at home. The Patriot Vigil allows candle lanterns only. No flashlights or LED lighting please, out of respect for those who passed on this important day in our nation’s history. For updates on events – including what to do in the event of inclement weather – visit the National Park Service website at www.nps.gov/ mima/patriots-day.htm

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REVOLUTION on Our Doorstep

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BY VICTOR CURRAN

Imagine regiments of heavily armed men marching past your front door with grim determination—almost 800 of them, half the population of Concord in 1775. That was the scene that greeted the residents of the town on the morning of April 19th of that year. If you weren’t one of the well-trained Minutemen loading your musket at the North Bridge, what was it like to be in Concord on the morning of that historic day? If you were Concord’s patriot preacher, Rev. William Emerson,* you would have been up since the wee hours, when Samuel Prescott woke the town to warn of the approaching Redcoats. Emerson hurried to the ridge overlooking the Bay Road (now Lexington Road) and urged the outnumbered Minutemen to launch a pre-emptive strike, which they prudently didn’t do. When he

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returned to the parsonage (now preserved as the Old Manse), a crowd of the town’s women and children turned up at his door seeking refuge. Rev. Emerson welcomed the terrified townspeople with open arms, and even offered them an alfresco breakfast. Later that morning, his wife Phebe Bliss Emerson would witness the importance of that day, as the Redcoats exchanged deadly fire with the colonists in her back yard. Many historians believe that her husband stood shoulder to shoulder with the Minutemen at the North Bridge as Phebe watched from a window of the Old Manse, surrounded by her children, including 8-month-old Mary Moody Emerson and 5-year-old William (whose son, Ralph Waldo Emerson, would later immortalize that moment as “the shot heard ’round the world”).

If you were in the militia, you might have been sent somewhere other than the North Bridge. The town’s leaders dispatched saddle maker Reuben Brown to ride to Lexington and verify the report of an approaching British force. Brown arrived there at daybreak, just as two companies of Redcoats advanced toward the Lexington militia guarding the town common. He rode back to Concord in haste, too soon to witness the volley that killed eight Lexington men and wounded ten more. When Major Buttrick asked him if the British soldiers were firing live ammunition, he could only reply “I do not know, but think it probable.” Reuben Brown’s work wasn’t done, though. He reportedly rode 100 miles that day, spreading the alarm to towns as far away as Hopkinton. He came home to find his


house on the Bay Road had been looted by the retreating Redcoats, who took saddles, cartridge boxes, and a carriage to transport their wounded comrades. They set fire to his barn, too, but the fire was extinguished before it did much damage. If you were hiding weapons, you might try to guard them from the Redcoats. Ephraim Jones was a versatile fellow who was the town’s jailer and also kept an inn, conveniently located next door to the jail. He had hidden three cannons in the jail yard, and when British Major John Pitcairn tried to search his premises, Jones blocked his way. Pitcairn knocked him down, swearing at him all the while, and his men took the cannons, but they missed another treasure, thanks to Hannah Barnes, a server at Jones’ tavern. Henry Gardner, the treasurer of the Provincial Congress, was storing a chest of money and important papers at the tavern, and Barnes kept the Redcoats out of Gardner’s room by insisting that the room was her own. After his scuffle with Jones, Major Pitcairn adjourned to the Wright Tavern, where he made his famous remark about wanting to “stir the damned Yankee blood.” What Pitcairn didn’t know was that the First Parish communion silver was probably hidden right under his nose, where it had been concealed in a barrel of soap as a precaution against looting. The retreating Redcoats did raid the

Courtesy Concord Free Public Library

Rev. Dana McLean Greeley of First Parish Church with communion silver

Shutterstock.com/Everett Collection

The Battle of Concord April 19, 1775

Meetinghouse, but succeeded in stealing only a two-volume Bible. Like Hannah Barnes, the wife of patriot Amos Wood appealed to the British soldiers’ sense of propriety to conceal military stores in her house by the South Bridge. An officer pointed to a closed door and asked if there were “some females” in there. Mrs. Wood sternly declared, “I forbid anyone entering this room!” Col. James Barrett had stored a quantity of weapons and ammunition at his farm (preserved by the National Park Service on present-day Barrett’s Mill Road), including a real prize—two pair of bronze cannons. Barrett’s sons had buried the cannons in the freshly-plowed fields, and their mother, Rebecca Hubbard Barrett, had hidden the rest in casks and covered them over with feathers. The Regulars came to the door, announcing “Our orders are to search your house . . . from top to bottom,” but they found nothing except some gun carriages. They asked for food and drink, which Mrs. Barrett graciously provided, and refused their offer of money, saying “We are commanded to feed our enemies.” They threw a handful of coins at her, and she sneered, “This is the price of blood.”

Or if you were Martha Moulton, you might have turned out to be the most heroic noncombatant of the day. Described as “an aged widow,” she worked as a housekeeper for Dr. Timothy Minot, whose house overlooked the town’s Liberty Pole (near the present-day roundabout in Monument Square). The Redcoats “made a bonfire of the town’s Liberty Pole. The fire spread to the roof of the nearby courthouse,” and Mrs. Moulton ran into the street to implore the soldiers to put out the fire. They waved her away, saying “O mother, we won’t do you any harm!” She finally got their attention by shouting, “The top of the house is filled with powder, and if you do not put the fire out, you will all be killed.” They extinguished the fire, and the town was saved. The Minutemen’s victory at the North Bridge was the most visible part of a coordinated effort that depended on the support of their neighbors and families, who share in the victory they won 245 years ago. ————————————————————————— Victor Curran teaches the Concord Town Guide Course, gives tours of historic Concord, and is an interpreter at the Old Manse and the Concord Museum.

*Read more about Rev. Emerson in the Winter 2019 issue of Discover Concord. Principal Sources: David Hackett Fischer, Paul Revere’s Ride, 1994; Robert Gross, The Minutemen and Their World, 1976; Lemuel Shattuck, History of Concord, 1835; Ruth R. Wheeler, Concord: Climate for Freedom, 1967

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The The Robbins Robbins House House

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If historical Concord had toto bebe summed upup in in If historical Concord had summed one sensational newspaper headline it might one sensational newspaper headline it might read something like, “TINY TOWN THAT read something like, “TINY TOWN THAT TROUNCED BRITISH BATALLION ALSO TROUNCED BRITISH BATALLION ALSO BELOVED BYBY BOOKWORMS”. BELOVED BOOKWORMS”. Fortunately, most pilgrims toto Concord Fortunately, most pilgrims Concord don’t rely onon alliterative excerpts ofof history don’t rely alliterative excerpts history when they visit, and yet, there’s soso much when they visit, and yet, there’s much more toto our story than armies and authors. In In more our story than armies and authors. particular, there is is a great deal just waiting toto particular, there a great deal just waiting bebe learned about Concord’s African American learned about Concord’s African American history, a complex and very human story that history, a complex and very human story that farfar predates our nation. predates our nation. AA short drive down Monument Street and short drive down Monument Street and across from thethe venerable Old North Bridge, across from venerable Old North Bridge, sits a restored early-19th century vernacular sits a restored early-19th century vernacular farmhouse, such asas can bebe found allall over farmhouse, such can found over

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Preserving Preservingthe theLegacy Legacyof of African AfricanAmerican AmericanHistory Historyin inConcord Concord

BYBY ALIDA ORZECHOWSKI ALIDA ORZECHOWSKI

New England. What sets this farmhouse New England. What sets this farmhouse apart is is that it belonged toto thethe family ofof apart that it belonged family Revolutionary War veteran Caesar Robbins, Revolutionary War veteran Caesar Robbins, who was enslaved atat birth around 1745. who was enslaved birth around 1745. Robbins was probably emancipated before Robbins was probably emancipated before oror atat the time ofof hishis enlistment, and may have the time enlistment, and may have taken part in in the first battle ofof the American taken part the first battle the American War forfor Independence onon April 19th, 1775. HeHe War Independence April 19th, 1775. would later participate in in anan early alarm in in would later participate early alarm Bennington, Vermont. Bennington, Vermont. After surviving the war, Robbins returned After surviving the war, Robbins returned toto Concord, married twice, and raised sixsix Concord, married twice, and raised children in in a small dwelling out onon the “Great children a small dwelling out the “Great Field”, one ofof the isolated parts ofof town where Field”, one the isolated parts town where little clusters ofof African Americans settled. little clusters African Americans settled. In In 1823, the settlement there expanded 1823, the settlement there expanded when Caesar’s son, Peter, known asas the “big when Caesar’s son, Peter, known the “big

burly son ofof Caesar”, bought a newly-built burly son Caesar”, bought a newly-built farmhouse, along with 1313 acres ofof land. farmhouse, along with acres land. Humphrey Bennet, the grantor ofof the land, Humphrey Bennet, the grantor the land, reserved the ‘easterly half’ forfor Robbins’ sister, reserved the ‘easterly half’ Robbins’ sister, Susan. Susan was married toto Jack Garrison, Susan. Susan was married Jack Garrison, a man who had emancipated himself from a man who had emancipated himself from slavery in in New Jersey, the last state in in the slavery New Jersey, the last state the north toto outlaw it. it. north outlaw Susan Robbins Garrison was a founding Susan Robbins Garrison was a founding (and only known black) member ofof thethe (and only known black) member Concord Female Antislavery Society (CFAS), Concord Female Antislavery Society (CFAS), in in 1837. While this group sought toto promote 1837. While this group sought promote abolition and equality, thethe reality both in in abolition and equality, reality both Massachusetts and other free states was that Massachusetts and other free states was that racial discrimination was still quite common. racial discrimination was still quite common. In In one instance during a procession in in one instance during a procession Concord, Jack and Susan’s 12-year-old Concord, Jack and Susan’s 12-year-old


Both images courtesy of the Concord Museum - www.concordmuseum.org Both images courtesy of the Concord Museum - www.concordmuseum.org

daughter Ellen was mistreated and “crowded daughter Ellen was mistreated and “crowded out” when she tried toto participate. SoSo when out” when she tried participate. when preparations began forfor the bicentennial preparations began the bicentennial celebration in in 1835, Susan, wishing toto avoid celebration 1835, Susan, wishing avoid further indignity forfor her daughter, forbade further indignity her daughter, forbade Ellen toto walk in in the parade. It was only after Ellen walk the parade. It was only after Abba Prescott, a white school mate (whose Abba Prescott, a white school mate (whose mother was a fellow member ofof the CFAS), mother was a fellow member the CFAS), offered toto walk with Ellen and hold her hand offered walk with Ellen and hold her hand that Susan relented, and soso the two girls that Susan relented, and the two girls defiantly marched together: defiantly marched together: “And notwithstanding thethe incredulous gaze of of “And notwithstanding incredulous gaze thethe school…[the two girls went holding hands] school…[the two girls went holding hands] in in thethe procession...beneath thethe gaze of of curiosity, procession...beneath gaze curiosity, surprise, ridicule, and admiration.” (Excerpt surprise, ridicule, and admiration.” (Excerpt ABOVE : Carte-de-visite ABOVE : Carte-de-visite from Abba Prescott Brooks’ obituary, 1851) from Abba Prescott Brooks’ obituary, 1851) of of a man identified a man identified Thus was Ellen’s life-long activism ignited, Thus was Ellen’s life-long activism ignited, asas Jack Garrison, Jack Garrison, and a few years later she joined in in solidarity and a few years later she joined solidarity c. c. 1866, Gift of of Mrs. 1866, Gift Mrs. forfor another marginalized group: Cherokee another marginalized group: Cherokee Olive Brooks Banks Olive Brooks Banks Indians. Along with 200 other Concord Indians. Along with 200 other Concord RIGHT: Ambro(1913). RIGHT: Ambro(1913). type of of John Garrison women, her mother, and her sister, Ellen type John Garrison women, her mother, and her sister, Ellen Gift of of (1815-1872), Gift signed a petition toto Congress protesting the signed a petition Congress protesting the (1815-1872), Cummings E. Davis Cummings E. Davis forcible removal ofof the Cherokee from their forcible removal the Cherokee from their (1886) (1886) ancestral land in in Georgia. ancestral land Georgia. Expanding her advocacy and her world, Expanding her advocacy and her world, that wewe can, who areare that can, who Ellen left Concord forfor Boston and participated Ellen left Concord Boston and participated identified with them?” identified with them?” in in a variety ofof abolitionist campaigns a variety abolitionist campaigns Joining hundreds Joining hundreds and causes, donating, organizing, signing and causes, donating, organizing, signing ofof other Northern other Northern petitions, and allall the while allying herself petitions, and the while allying herself women, both black women, both black with some ofof the area’s leading black and with some the area’s leading black and and white, Ellen and white, Ellen white reformers. white reformers. became one ofof the became one the After a short marriage ended with the After a short marriage ended with the most dedicated teachers in in the South’s new most dedicated teachers the South’s new untimely death ofof her first husband, John W.W. schools untimely death her first husband, John for freed blacks, helping African schools for freed blacks, helping African Jackson, Ellen went onon toto become a school Jackson, Ellen went become a school Americans ofof allall ages, and often in in spite ofof Americans ages, and often spite teacher, and was teaching in in Rhode Island teacher, and was teaching Rhode Island violent opposition. violent opposition. byby 1863. Inspired byby President Lincoln’s 1863. Inspired President Lincoln’s After the Civil War, Ellen’s most public After the Civil War, Ellen’s most public Emancipation Proclamation, and the Emancipation Proclamation, and the protest would take root and blossom protest would take root and blossom American Missionary Association’s (AMA) American Missionary Association’s (AMA) in in a train station in in Baltimore. With the a train station Baltimore. With the goal ofof establishing schools forfor freed people goal establishing schools freed people passage ofof the Civil Rights Act ofof 1866 passage the Civil Rights Act 1866 in in the South, Ellen sent the AMA a letter in in the South, Ellen sent the AMA a letter that supposedly put anan end toto segregation, that supposedly put end segregation, which she explained, which she explained, Ellen and fellow teacher Mary C. Anderson Ellen and fellow teacher Mary C. Anderson “I “I have a great desire to to gogo and labor among have a great desire and labor among availed themselves ofof the station’s waiting availed themselves the station’s waiting thethe Freedmen of of thethe South. I think it is duty Freedmen South. I think it our is our duty room that was reserved forfor whites only. room that was reserved whites only. asas a people to to spend ourour lives in in trying to to elevate a people spend lives trying elevate Their reward forfor bravely trying out the new Their reward bravely trying out the new ourour own race. ForFor who can feel forfor usus if we dodo notnot law own race. who can feel if we in in public was toto bebe “forcibly ejected” byby law public was “forcibly ejected” feel forfor ourselves, and who can feel thethe sympathy feel ourselves, and who can feel sympathy the station master. “We were injured in in ourour the station master. “We were injured

persons asas well asas ourour feelings”, Ellen wrote persons well feelings”, Ellen wrote toto the AMA onon May 9, 9, 1866, “For it was with the AMA May 1866, “For it was with nono gentle hand that wewe were assisted from that gentle hand that were assisted from that room and I feel thethe effects of of it still.” room and I feel effects it still.” In In what was possibly the first case in in the what was possibly the first case the nation toto test the effectiveness ofof the Civil nation test the effectiveness the Civil Rights Act, Mary and Ellen – granddaughter Rights Act, Mary and Ellen – granddaughter ofof a man who fought forfor freedom and a man who fought freedom and independence forfor America - sued the railroad independence America - sued the railroad company forfor discrimination. However, in in company discrimination. However, a pattern ofof injustice that would become a pattern injustice that would become deeply entrenched, the suit was dismissed deeply entrenched, the suit was dismissed and courts around the country would failfail and courts around the country would toto extend civil rights protections toto African extend civil rights protections African Americans. It would Americans. It would take another century take another century before the country before the country began toto uphold itsits own began uphold own laws in in earnest. laws earnest. If “all history is is If “all history biography”, asas Ralph biography”, Ralph Waldo Emerson once Waldo Emerson once said, then Concord’s said, then Concord’s unabridged narrative unabridged narrative can only truly emerge can only truly emerge through the many voices through the many voices ofof itsits diverse people, diverse people, and, in in sharing these and, sharing these vital stories that laylay vital stories that beyond the half-finished beyond the half-finished headlines ofof history. headlines history. ToTo learn more about the lives ofof Caesar, learn more about the lives Caesar, Peter, Susan, Ellen, and the other residents ofof Peter, Susan, Ellen, and the other residents the Robbins House, and toto explore more ofof the Robbins House, and explore more Concord’s history, visit robbinshouse.org. Concord’s history, visit robbinshouse.org. The Robbins House is home to to Concord’s The Robbins House is home Concord’s African American history, and one of of thethe only African American history, and one only known historic sites commemorating thethe legacy of of known historic sites commemorating legacy a previously enslaved Revolutionary War veteran. a previously enslaved Revolutionary War veteran. Concord Tour Company, in in partnership with Concord Tour Company, partnership with thethe Robbins House, is proud to to offer Concord’s Robbins House, is proud offer Concord’s only guided African American History tour, only guided African American History tour, beginning in in April 2020, and to to pledge 5%5% of of beginning April 2020, and pledge allall proceeds to to The Robbins House, a non-profit proceeds The Robbins House, a non-profit organization. organization.

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© Steve Crosby

Reenactor Steve Crosby in a coat created by Henry Cooke

Historical Costumer Henry Cooke

Recreates the Past

I

Excerpted from Journal of the American Revolution

How did you get started in this unusual business? It started out as a practical matter – I got into reenacting in 1974 and needed clothing. My mother was a sewing teacher and dressmaker, but the only patterns I could 16

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get were from the publication Sketchbook ’76, which had rough patterns and minimal information, and no instructions. As time went on, I got involved in creating the 10th Massachusetts Regiment in 1977 and had guys who needed uniforms. The only supplier we knew was in New Jersey and his quality didn’t seem too good, and I said I could do better, and so started making uniform clothing for the guys in my unit. Word spread, and I started making clothing for others. Meanwhile, as an undergrad at Tufts University, I changed Henry Cooke majors from geology to history, and began to learn how to do documentary and material cultural research and began to understand better how clothing of the Revolutionary era was constructed. I decided that I wanted to get into the heads of the tailors of the past to better understand their techniques and technology and began to use my historian skills to do

primary source research and began to visit museums to study original garments. I will always be grateful to the generosity of those curators who welcomed me into their institutions and allowed me hands-on freedom to study garments, taking notes and occasionally patterns. Your work requires a combination of historical research and craftsmanship. How do you apportion your time between these two distinct pursuits? It depends on the project. Some require more research than others, and often for museum figures, the research has already been done, and I just need to learn more about the clothing and its construction finishing and embellishment and find sources for the materials needed to do the job.In other cases, I need to do considerable research to literally develop a description of an ensemble for a specific persona, and the individual garments and accessories within it. In the case of a military figure, this might also require determining the proper equipment and arms and then finding sources for them.

Henry Cook photo ©Todd Andrlik. Used with permission from Journal of the American Revolution

If he had lived in the eighteenth century, Henry Cooke would have been called a Master Tailor. Today we call him a Historical Costumer, but his tailoring is no less masterful. In an era when all clothing was hand- made, proper fit was important. Achieving the right fit and the right look means understanding the way clothing was constructed. Cooke has made a livelihood out of studying original garments, finding the best materials, and mastering the techniques of measurement, cutting and construction that make reproduction clothing look like the real thing; if you’ve been to a museum, a site with historical interpretation, or a reenactment, you may have seen his work or at least seen his influence. Journal of the American Revolution interviewed him about his remarkable profession.


Some of your work goes to people who will wear it while performing everyday period tasks, while some of it is strictly for display. Do you approach these two types of projects differently? Not really. Sometimes the clothing for historical interpreters is requested to be made entirely by hand, while others are made with inside seams sewn by machine, with all finishing and visible stitching done by hand.

clothing as a mould of the body within it proved a useful skill. As I worked as part of a team that included sculptors, historians, and a forensic anthropologist we gained insights into the shape of the “real” George Washington, and through that insight gained a better understanding of the physical presence of this Founding Father, how it affected his personality, attitude and actions.

have good basic skills, and can make clothing that will fit and function well and correctly. I also learned that while some people want to learn the inner art of tailoring, many are content with picking up a few skills needed to make a particular garment they want to make, be it a coat, vest, or legwear. The most rewarding part is helping someone discover their sewing abilities and see the pleasure they take in their accomplishment.

How do you handle customers who want things that don’t make sense from a historical perspective, whether it be inaccurate designs, inappropriate colors or materials, or unlikely combinations of garments? I try to encourage them to follow known and documented historical practices, and always reserve the right to refuse to take on a project if it doesn’t meet my standards for historical authenticity.

Are there some projects you find more rewarding than others? Repair and conservation of original garments is very rewarding, because you are helping to save a piece of history and make it so it can be displayed and appreciated. Helping a customer create a persona through my clothing is also rewarding, as it allows me to use all my skills as a researcher and my creative and production skills. Museum mannequins can also be rewarding as they allow me to stretch my skills and help create figures that are believable down to the smallest details.

What is the benefit to historic sites, reenactors and others in using clothing that is accurately made, as opposed to things that simply look OK from a distance? Clothing made in a historically correct manner will function like the original garments did, enhancing the abilities of the reenactor or interpreter to bring the past to life in a believable way. The clothing, beyond being a visual prop, itself becomes part of the material culture of the historical interpreter and another interpretive object to be used in helping to tell the story of the interpreter better. Properly made and fitted military clothing allows the equipment worn to fit properly and move with the body, and not inhibit the reenactor’s abilities or safety.

Coat: Per2056 Gift of Mrs. Leete and Miss Farmer (1905). Vest: Per 2056a Gift of Mrs. Leete and Miss Farmer (1905). Breeches: Cos71.7a. Shoes: Per 114a-b. All images Courtesy of the Concord Museum www.concordmuseum.org

What has been your most challenging project? To date, the most challenging project was the research and production of clothing to outfit three figures of George Washington for the Ford Center at George Washington’s Mount Vernon. It was a tremendous learning experience. Originally, I was supposed to just make clothing, but as the project developed, my understanding of

In addition to creating garments, you host workshops and seminars where you teach people how to make their own. Has this achieved the results you hope for, and do you find it rewarding? I learned a long time ago that I couldn’t make clothing for everyone, and many folks

Preserving History The Concord Museum maintains a fascinating

Excerpted with permission from Journal of the American Revolution, November 2015. allthingsliberty.com

of fashion in its day, possibly of English manufacture. “A poor man’s” version of an embroidered waistcoat. These breeches (pants) were made circa 1770 in the Concord area. They are of black glazed wool with a wool or homespun cream lining and

collection of historical clothing, including these

an interesting gather at the knee. Henry Cooke noted, in Aug 2007, that

beautifully preserved items:

these are a locally produced object, an example of middle class, everyday

This stunning olive-green great coat was made in 1784-1785. It’s made of wool with green

use clothing. This pair of beautiful white linen shoes

glazed wool lining and large pewter buttons

were made 1770-1785. They are embroidered

with an incised fan design. The coat is similar

in flower or strawberry pattern and bound

in style to military dress with a close fit. This

with pale green ribbon. The shoes are hand

“fall down” style is typical of coats from early

sewn and are probably very early with heavy

1170 - 1780s. Notes from Henry Cooke (Aug.

silver buckles. Although there were many

2007) indicate that this is an example of a coat for middle class, everyday

cobblers at work in this country, American

(or at least Sunday) use. The coat was used by Daniel Chester French in

milliners often imported fancy English shoes like these for sale to their

modeling the “Concord Minute Man (Minuteman)” statue.

customers in the 18th century. The strawberries embroidered on these

The square cut waistcoat is made of printed, glazed, worsted wool

shoes call to mind a similar motif that can be found in contemporary

or cotton front with a plain cotton back and lining. The diamond pattern

Boston needlework samplers. Toward the end of the century the production

in green, cream and brown is edged with a floral pattern in brown and

of shoes came to be more centralized and new technologies abetted the

cream. The floral edge is a continuous pattern, not a separately sewn

manufacturing process. The town of Lynn, Massachusetts, was famous as a

tape. Henry Cooke (Aug. 2007) tells us that this waistcoat was the height

shoe production center in the early 19th century.

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THREE STONES GALLERY

Nature Scrolls

Abstract Queries

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Mixed media works by Timothy Dunnbier (above) and Brenda Cirioni. Through April 11

Textile arts by Merill Comeau (above), watercolor by Jillian Demeri, ceramics by Marty Wallace. June 9 - July 31

Paintings by Lynne D. Klemmer (above) and Ghetta Hirsch. April 14 - June 6

Three Stones Gallery / Contemporary Art @ThreeStonesGallery

All this history is making me hungry! Where can we grab a quick lunch without any fuss?

Let’s try the takeout lunch counter at THE CHEESE SHOP OF CONCORD! It’s just a block from The Concord Visitor Center Creative sandwiches made to order —— Soda, juice, beer, wine, coffee —— Hundreds of cheeses cut to order —— Breads, crackers, candy, nuts and other gourmet goodies

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istock.com/northwoodsphoto

Major John

Pitcairn’s

HIGH ROAD to Concord & LOW ROAD

HOME

T

BY JAIMEE LEIGH JOROFF

There are places where you can stand for a moment between worlds. Concord Center’s Main Street is one of them. Over it, on April 19th, 1775, British officer Major John Pitcairn crossed from a world securely under English sovereignty and into one at war, fast on its way to American Independence. Pitcairn’s road to Concord started in Scotland where he was born in 1722. Scotland was divided with some Scots (Jacobites) loyal to an exiled King James Stuart, others (Loyalists) to the reigning monarch King George II. Pitcairn’s father was a local minister, and although family lineage traced back to ancient Scottish King Robert the Bruce, the Pitcairns were loyal to King George. In his twenties, Pitcairn joined His Majesty’s 7th Marines of Cornwall and soon found his regiment involved in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745. This rebellion ended with the Jacobites’ defeat at the Battle of Culloden in 1746.

20

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After the battle, legend tells of two Jacobite brothers, one mortally injured, awaiting execution in England’s Carlisle prison. Knowing he would die, the injured man told his brother to escape without him, saying, “‘You take the high road, and I’ll take the low road, and I’ll be in Scotland before you.” His words referenced the old Celtic belief that the spirit of a soldier who died in a foreign land would be carried home on “the low road” through the fairy world, an unseen place below the “high roads” of the living. With the rebellion over, Pitcairn returned home, married, and had a large family before he was sent to Canada in 1755 during the French and Indian War. Around that time, unrest was growing in America, the colonies divided between Loyalists and Patriots favoring independence. After the 1773 “Boston Tea Party,” Parliament sent a full army to occupy Boston and quash further rebellion. In 1774, Pitcairn, now a

Major, was dispatched from Canada to Boston to command 600 marines. Upon arrival, Pitcairn discovered a disorderly bunch; the marines were bored and drunk. In Pitcairn’s words, the men were “animals”— and they were short. Pitcairn wrote to the Earl of Sandwich, “I am a great deal hurt and mortified to find the marines so much shorter than men are in the regiments.” Complained Pitcairn, why couldn’t he have anyone over 5’6” tall? Pitcairn sobered and hardened up his “animals” with marches through the countryside and disciplined drills. His justness and interest in each man soon earned him their respect. Fondness for Pitcairn extended into the Colonist community. Pitcairn was billeted with Francis Shaw, an ardent Patriot and neighbor of Paul Revere. Despite their political differences, Shaw observed Pitcairn’s pleasant demeanor and fairness, especially to


MassachusettsProvincial ProvincialCongress Congress(then (then Massachusetts headquarteredininConcord’s Concord’smeeting meetinghouse), house), headquartered thetaverns tavernswere werethe theplace placefor forinformation. information. the WhileLt.Lt.Col. Col.Smith Smithset setupupa acommand commandpost post While in the Wright Tavern (located by the town in the Wright Tavern (located by the town green),Pitcairn Pitcairnhastened hastenedupupMain MainStreet Streettoto green), Jones’tavern. tavern.Now Nownonolonger longerininexistence, existence, Jones’ Jones’tavern tavernwas waslocated locatednear nearthe theSouth South Jones’ Burying ground (by Main Street and Keyes Burying ground (by Main Street and Keyes Road) and owned by town representative and Road) and owned by town representative and jailorCaptain CaptainEphraim EphraimJones. Jones. jailor Bangingon onthe thedoor, door,Pitcairn Pitcairndemanded demanded Banging Jones open-up! Jones refused. Brigadiers Jones open-up! Jones refused. Brigadiers brokedown downthe thedoor, door,Pitcairn Pitcairnstepped stepped broke through,and andknocked knockedJones Jonestotothe thefloor. floor. through, Bellowingthreats, threats,Pitcairn Pitcairnpressed pressedhis hispistol pistol Bellowing

Public Domain Public Domain

Shaw’sson sonwhom whomPitcairn Pitcairnsaved savedfrom froma a Shaw’s duel.InInShaw’s Shaw’shouse, house,Pitcairn Pitcairnhosted hosted duel. gatheringsbetween betweenBritish Britishofficers officersand and gatherings Patriots, allowing civil discussion of their Patriots, allowing civil discussion of their differences. Ever the minister’s son, Pitcairn differences. Ever the minister’s son, Pitcairn attendedBoston’s Boston’sOld OldNorth NorthChurch Churchservices services attended andwas wasknown knownasasa aholy-tongued holy-tonguedman man and onSundays Sundayswho whocould couldswear swearlike likethe thedevil devil on Mondays through Saturdays. Mondays through Saturdays. Thelatter lattervocabulary vocabularywould wouldflow flowfreely freely The onApril April19th, 19th,1775, 1775,when whenGeneral GeneralGage Gage on dispatchedLt.Lt.Col. Col.Smith Smithand andthe theKing’s King’s dispatched troopstotoConcord Concordtotofind findand anddestroy destroya a troops military stockpile. Pitcairn volunteered military stockpile. Pitcairn volunteered toto andled ledthe thefront frontcolumn. column.Arriving Arrivingnear near gogoand dawnininLexington, Lexington,they theyencountered encounteredarmed armed dawn

AmosDoolittle Doolittleengraving engravingshowing showingBritish Britishregulars regularsgathering gatheringininfront frontofofthe theWright WrightTavern, Tavern,which whichstill still Amos stands at the corner of Main Street and Lexington Road. Further up Main Street, near Keyes Road, once stands at the corner of Main Street and Lexington Road. Further up Main Street, near Keyes Road, once stoodJones’s Jones’sTavern. Tavern. stood

Minutemenon onthe thetown towncommon. common.Pitcairn Pitcairn Minutemen demanded the colonists lay down their arms demanded the colonists lay down their arms anddisperse. disperse.An Anunknown unknownshot shotrang rangout outand and and firingcommenced commencedfrom fromboth bothparties. parties.Under Under firing ordersnot nottotoharm harmcitizens, citizens,Pitcairn Pitcairnshouted shouted orders for the English soldiers to cease fire, butbyby for the English soldiers to cease fire, but thetime timeorder orderwas wasrestored, restored,eight eightcolonists colonists the hadbeen beenkilled. killed. had Theregiments regimentspressed pressedon ontotoConcord Concord The where they split up to search the town,and and where they split up to search the town, Pitcairn and Smith went into two taverns Pitcairn and Smith went into two taverns inin ConcordCenter. Center.Gathering Gatheringplaces placesfor forlocal local Concord militia,minutemen, minutemen,and andmembers membersofofthe the militia,

Jones’throat throatand anddemanded demandedhehereveal revealthe the totoJones’ stockpile location. stockpile location. gunpoint,Jones Jonesled ledPitcairn Pitcairntotothe thejail jail AtAtgunpoint, yard,where, where,too tooheavy heavytotoquickly quicklyhide, hide,there there yard, remainedthree three24-pounder 24-poundercannons; cannons;each each remained approximately ten feet long, 6,000 pounds, approximately ten feet long, 6,000 pounds, andcapable capableofofbombarding bombardinga acity. city.Supplies Supplies and neededtotooperate operatethe thecannon cannonwere werealso also needed present.Pitcairn Pitcairnordered orderedtheir theirdestruction. destruction. present. Trunnionswere wereremoved, removed,and andwooden wooden Trunnions trenchers, spoons, and sixteen carriage trenchers, spoons, and sixteen carriage wheelspiled piledininthe thetown towncenter centerand andburned. burned. wheels Businessdone, done,Pitcairn Pitcairnreleased releasedJones, Jones, Business

accompaniedhim himback backinto intohis histavern, tavern, accompanied orderedbreakfast breakfastfor forhis hismen, men,and andpaid paidininfull. full. ordered Meanwhile,outside, outside,things thingswere werenot notgoing going Meanwhile, well.Embers Embersfrom fromthe theburning burningsupplies suppliesset set well. the town house roof ablaze, and the fight the town house roof ablaze, and the fight occurredatatthe theNorth NorthBridge. Bridge. occurred Franticmessengers messengersalerted alertedPitcairn Pitcairntotothe the Frantic troubleand andpanicked panickedregiments regimentsretreating retreating trouble fromthe thebridge. bridge.Rapidly Rapidlyretracing retracinghis hissteps steps from over Main Street, Pitcairn joined other officers over Main Street, Pitcairn joined other officers strugglingtotomaintain maintainorder orderduring duringa aday-long day-long struggling runningbattle battlefrom fromConcord Concordback backtotoBoston. Boston. running OnJune June17th, 17th,1775, 1775,worlds worldsagain againcrossed crossed On for Pitcairn in what today is called the Battle for Pitcairn in what today is called the Battle of Bunker Hill. Climbing the blood-slicked of Bunker Hill. Climbing the blood-slicked hillside,Pitcairn Pitcairnraised raisedhis hissword, sword,shouted, shouted, hillside, “Forthe theglory gloryofofthe themarines!” marines!”and andled ledthe the “For charge uphill. Pitcairn was shot but pressed charge uphill. Pitcairn was shot but pressed onuntil untilhehefell. fell.His Hisson sonWilliam William(a(amarine marine on Lieutenant)carried carriedhim himfrom fromthe thefield. field. Lieutenant) AsPitcairn Pitcairndied, died,his hismarines— marines—whom whom As Pitcairndeveloped developedinto intothe thebravest bravestofofHis His Pitcairn Majesty’s forces— took the hill and won the Majesty’s forces— took the hill and won the dayfor forEngland. England. day CriedWilliam Williaminindespair, despair,“They “Theyhave havetaken taken Cried myfather!” father!”Echoed Echoedthe themarines, marines,“He “Hewas wasallall my ourfather!” father!” our Pitcairn’s deathwas wasgrieved grievedbybyLoyalists Loyalists Pitcairn’s death andPatriots Patriotsalike. alike.Wrote WroteColonist ColonistEzra EzraStiles, Stiles, and “Hewas wasa agood goodman maninina abad badcause.” cause.”Pitcairn Pitcairn “He wasburied buriedininBoston’s Boston’sOld OldNorth NorthChurch Church was crypt. Years later, his Scottish family paida a crypt. Years later, his Scottish family paid Bostonian(locally (locallyregarded regardedasasa aswindler) swindler) Bostonian sendPitcairn’s Pitcairn’sremains remainshome. home.ItItisismurky murky totosend thecorrect correctcoffin coffinwas wassent, sent,but butPitcairn’s Pitcairn’s ififthe descendantsbelieved believedititwas. was. descendants The Wright Tavern still standsininConcord Concord The Wright Tavern still stands Center.ItItisiscurrently currentlya aprivate privatebuilding, building,but but Center. nexttime timeyour yourroad roadtakes takesyou youbybyititand andup up next MainStreet, Street,keep keepananeye eyeout, out,and andmaybe, maybe, Main for just a moment, you’ll glimpse Major John for just a moment, you’ll glimpse Major John Pitcairnhovering hoveringbetween betweentwo twoworlds; worlds;one one Pitcairn footon onthe thehigh highroad, road,the theother otherheading heading foot towardshis hislow lowroad roadhome. home. towards Source list: email barrowbookstore@gmail.com Source list: email barrowbookstore@gmail.com ————————————————————————— ————————————————————————— Concordnative, native,Jaimee Jaimeeisisthe themanager manager AAConcord theBarrow BarrowBookstore BookstoreininConcord ConcordCenter Center ofofthe which specializes in Concord history, which specializes in Concord history, transcendentalism,and andliterary literaryfigures. figures.She She transcendentalism, hasbeen beenananinterpreter interpreteratatallallofofConcord’s Concord’s has historicsites sitesand andisisa alicensed licensedtown townguide. guide. historic

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Colonel Barrett’s Hustle BY BYJAIMEE JAIMEELEIGH LEIGHJOROFF JOROFF

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their theirown ownarmy armyififneeded. needed.The Thesupplies supplieswere were being beingstored storedininboth bothConcord Concordand andthe thefartherfartherwest westtown townof ofWorcester. Worcester.Barrett, Barrett,aamember member of the Provincial Congress’s of the Provincial Congress’sCommittee Committeeof of Safety, Safety,was wasresponsible responsiblefor foroverseeing overseeingthe the collection collectionand andsecurity securityof ofthe thesupplies suppliesinin Concord, the majority of which Concord, the majority of whichwere werestored stored on his farm. on his farm. Like Likespiderwebs, spiderwebs,extensive extensivenetworks networksof of both bothLoyalist Loyalistand andPatriot Patriotspies spiesinvisibly invisibly stretched stretchedover overthe theProvince Provinceof ofMassachusetts Massachusetts Bay, secret messengers constantly Bay, secret messengers constantlyon onthe the move. move.InInMarch Marchof of1775, 1775,General GeneralThomas Thomas Gage, Gage,the theroyally royallyappointed appointedmilitary militarygovernor governor of Massachusetts, received a tip that of Massachusetts, received a tip that provisions provisionsfor foran anarmy armywere werebeing beingcollected collected ininConcord. Concord.Gage Gagebegan beganto togather gatherinformation information and andplan planaaresponse. response. Back in Concord, Back in Concord,Barrett Barrettwrote wroteaadetailed detailed inventory of the items under inventory of the items underhis hiswatch. watch. His Hislist listincluded includedcannons, cannons,mortars, mortars,musket musket balls, balls,cartridges, cartridges,flints, flints,gunpowder, gunpowder,medical medical supplies, supplies,tents tentsand andtent tentpoles, poles,dishes dishesand and spoons, barrels of dried food, and more. spoons, barrels of dried food, and more.And And then thenthe thelist listfell fellinto intothe thewrong wronghands. hands. Their Theirname nameunknown unknownto tohistory, history,aaloyalist loyalist

Barrett BarrettFarm Farm

spy, spy,likely likelyaacitizen citizenof ofConcord, Concord,acquired acquired Barrett’s Barrett’slist listand andsent sentititto toGage. Gage.Writing Writinginin French Frenchas asaaform formof ofdisguise, disguise,lest lestthe theaverage average simply-educated colonist came across simply-educated colonist came acrossthe the correspondence, correspondence,the theinformant informantalso alsoprovided provided aadetailed, detailed,hand-drawn hand-drawnmap mapof ofConcord Concord showing: showing:the themain mainaccess accessroads; roads;the theNorth North and South Bridges that should be secured and South Bridges that should be securedinin case casecolonists coloniststried triedto tomove movesupplies suppliesover over them; them;Barrett’s Barrett’sfarm; farm;and andother otherhouses housesand and barns barnsininwhich whichmilitary militarystores storescould couldbe befound. found. Now well informed, Gage told the British Now well informed, Gage told the British army armyto toprepare preparefor foran anexpedition expeditionto toConcord Concord ininthe thecoming comingdays. days. InInthe thedaylight daylightof ofApril April8th, 8th,observing observing sudden increased activity of British sudden increased activity of Britishtroops troops ininBoston, Boston,Paul PaulRevere Revererode rodefrom fromBoston Bostonto to

SaveOur OurHeritage HeritageFoundation Foundation ©©Save

H

Have Haveyou youever evertried triedto toquickly quicklyclean cleanup upthe the house housebefore beforelast lastminute minuteguests guestscome comeover? over? Heart Heartpounding poundingdown downthe theseconds secondsuntil untiltheir their obnoxiously presumptuous fists knock obnoxiously presumptuous fists knockon onthe the door, door,you youdo doaalittle littlefrantic franticshoving, shoving,maybe maybe commit commitaalittle littlebit bitof oftreason, treason,and andhope hopethe the house looks presentable. house looks presentable. April April19th, 19th,1775, 1775,33AM: AM:65-year-old 65-year-oldfarmer, farmer, Massachusetts MassachusettsProvincial ProvincialCongress Congressmember, member, and andlocal localmilitia militiacommander commanderColonel ColonelJames James Barrett lay sleeping next to his wife Rebecca Barrett lay sleeping next to his wife Rebecca inintheir theirfarmhouse farmhousetwo twomiles milesoutside outsideof of Concord ConcordCenter. Center.The Thefields fieldsaround aroundtheir theirhome home and andnearby nearbymill millwere werequiet quietininthe thedarkness darkness --and andfull fullof ofartillery artilleryand andstores storesneeded neededto to support a Continental Army in the support a Continental Army in themaking. making. InInthe thedistance, distance,the thetown townbell bellstarted started frantically franticallyringing ringingand andaafew fewmoments momentslater later horse’s hooves galloped to a fast halt outside horse’s hooves galloped to a fast halt outside Barrett’s Barrett’shome. home.AAmessenger messengershouted shoutedfor for Colonel ColonelBarrett Barrettto toawake! awake!The TheKing’s King’stroops troops were werecoming comingto tosearch searchthe thetown townand andseize seizethe the war supplies. Not a moment or a head to lose war supplies. Not a moment or a head to lose for fortreason, treason,up upsprang sprangBarrett Barrettand andhis hiswife. wife. For months now, the colonists had For months now, the colonists hadbeen been amassing amassingweapons weaponsand andprovisions provisionsto tosupply supply


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and Concord andmilitia militiafrom fromnear near Concordand andalerted alertedColonel ColonelBarrett Barrettto tohis his and far began suspicion that the British were readying to and far beganaaswift swift suspicion that the British were readying to journey march journeytowards towards marchto toConcord Concordto tocapture capturethe thesupplies. supplies. Concord. Immediately, Concord. Immediately,Barrett Barrettand andother othermembers members April of April19th: 19th:Up Upat at ofthe theCommittee Committeeof ofSafety Safetybegan beganmoving moving the Barrett farm, the stockpiles. As described in Shattuck’s the Barrett farm,an an the stockpiles. As described in Shattuck’s awakened 1835 awakenedCol. Col.Barrett Barrett 1835History HistoryofofConcord, Concord,“four “fourcannon cannonwere were carried turnedhis hisattention attentionto to carriedto toStow, Stow,six sixto tothe theouter outerparts partsof oftown, town, turned concealing whatever and some others covered with hay, stra[w], concealing whatever and some others covered with hay, stra[w], artillery manure…. artillerywas wasleft. left. manure….Loads Loadsof ofstores storesof ofvarious variouskinds kinds Inside the were Inside thehouse, house, werecarried carriedto toActon, Acton,and andother othertowns, towns, Unwelcome Unwelcomevisitors visitorsat atBarrett’s Barrett’sFarm Farm Rebecca and Rebeccaraced racedup up andmany manyothers otherswere wereconcealed concealedininprivate private and buildings SearchingBarrett’s Barrett’sFarm Farm anddown downto tothe theattic, attic, Searching buildingsininthe thewoods.” woods.” stashing musket balls, Ten days passed; enough time to move stashing musket balls, Ten days passed; enough time to move cartridges, most cartridges,flints, flints,and and mostof ofthe thearsenal arsenaland andreduce reducesigns signsof of other stockpiling othersmall smallitems items stockpilingfor foran anarmy. army. inincasks, April casks,and andthen then April18th: 18th:General GeneralGage Gagesent sentthis thisorder order covering them to British Officer Lieutenant Colonel Smith: covering themwith with to British Officer Lieutenant Colonel Smith: feathers. “Sir, Having received intelligence, that a feathers. “Sir, Having received intelligence, that a Dawn quantity Dawnarriving, arriving, quantityof ofAmmunition, Ammunition,Provisions, Provisions,Artillery, Artillery, Col. Tents Col.Barrett, Barrett,rode rode Tentsand andsmall smallArms, Arms,have havebeen beencollected collected into Concord at Concord, for the Avowed purpose of into ConcordCenter Center at Concord, for the Avowed purpose of and raising and supporting a Rebellion against andrendezvoused rendezvoused raising and supporting a Rebellion against with His withthe theMinutemen Minutemen HisMajesty, Majesty,you youwill willMarch March…with …withutmost utmost and expedition andmilitia militiawho who expeditionand andSecrecy Secrecyto toConcord, Concord,where where were continuing you will seize and destroy all [the above]. were continuingto to you will seize and destroy all [the above]. grow But you will take care that the Soldiers do growininnumbers. numbers. But you will take care that the Soldiers do time timeto togive givethe theorder orderfor forthe thecolonists coloniststo to Agreeing not Agreeingwith withthe theConcord Concordmen mento toobserve observe notplunder plunderthe theInhabitants Inhabitantsor orhurt hurtprivate private march to the town when they mistakenly march to the town when they mistakenly and property…. andnot notinstigate instigateconfrontation confrontationwith withthe thenow now property….You Youwill willobserve observeby bythe the[map] [map] thought thoughtitithad hadbeen beenset seton onfire. fire.Thus Thusbegan began arriving that arrivingBritish Britishtroops, troops,Barrett Barrettraced racedback backto to thatititwill willbe benecessary necessaryto tosecure securethe thetwo two the thefirst firststeps stepsto tothe thebattle battleat atthe theNorth North his Bridges hisfarm farmto tocontinue continueconcealment concealmentefforts. efforts.InIn Bridgesas assoon soonas aspossible….” possible….” Bridge Bridgeand andthe theshot shotheard heard’round ’roundthe theworld. world. aastory Just storylater latertold toldby byhis hisgreat-granddaughter great-granddaughter Justbefore beforemidnight, midnight,Lieutenant LieutenantColonel Colonel Forty days later, when news of the events Forty days later, when news of the events Smith toConcord Concordwriter writerMargaret MargaretSidney, Sidney,Barrett Barrett Smithand andnearly nearlyeight eighthundred hundredBritish Britishtroops troops to and andBritish Britishretreat retreatfrom fromConcord Concordreached reachedKing King and left andmen menat athis hisfarm farm leftBoston. Boston. George GeorgeIII, III,the themonarch monarchwrote, wrote,“Lieutenant “Lieutenant began Again, beganrapidly rapidlyploughing ploughing Again,Paul PaulRevere Reverewas was General GeneralGage Gagemay maynot nothave havebeen beenstrong strong two furrows. watching. two furrows.Barrett Barrettleft left watching.Revere, Revere,and andother other enough to disperse the Provincials assembled enough to disperse the Provincials assembled COLONEL COLONELJAMES JAMES them network themmoments momentsbefore before networkriders, riders,galloped galloped at Concord….[but] the object of sending BARRETT HOUSE at Concord….[but] the object of sendingthe the BARRETT HOUSE three ahead threecompanies companiesof ofBritish British aheadof ofthe theBritish, British, detachment 448 detachmentwas wastotospike spikecannons cannonsand anddestroy destroy 448Barretts BarrettsMill MillRd., Rd.,Concord, Concord,MA. MA. soldiers spreading soldiers(~225 (~225men) men)arrived arrived military stores, this has been effected….” spreadingout outover overpreset preset View military stores, this has been effected….” Viewfrom fromthe theoutside outsideor or at his farm. The routes awakening the at his farm. Themen mencalmly calmly routes awakening the Unfortunately check with Minute Man Unfortunatelyfor forKing KingGeorge GeorgeIII, III,he hewas was check with Minute Man continued colonists continuedworking workingthe the colonistsand andspreading spreadingthe the wrong. Thanks to Colonel Barrett and those National Historical Park for wrong. Thanks to Colonel Barrett and those National Historical Park for fields alarm fieldsdiscreetly discreetlydropping dropping alarmthat thatthe theregulars regularswere were under special events and open hours. underhis hisdirection, direction,most mostof ofthe themilitary military special events and open hours. muskets coming musketsinto intoone onefurrow furrow comingout! out! stores storeshad hadbeen beensaved savedand andthe theContinental Continental and InInLincoln, andcovering coveringthem themwith with Lincoln,aaBritish Britishpatrol patrol Army CONCORD’S NORTH Armywas wasjust justgetting gettingstarted. started. CONCORD’S NORTH dirt from the other. Despite captured dirt from the other. Despite capturedRevere, Revere,ending ending BRIDGE BRIDGE&&VISITOR VISITORCENTER CENTER aasearch his searchof ofBarrett’s Barrett’shouse house hismidnight midnightride, ride,but but 174 Source 174Liberty LibertySt., St.,Concord, Concord,MA. MA. Sourcelist: list:email emailBarrowbookstore@gmail.com Barrowbookstore@gmail.com and farm, the troops found Concord doctor and fellow and farm, the troops found Concord doctor and fellow ———————————————————————— ———————————————————————— few rider, fewsigns signsof ofaasignificant significant rider,Samuel SamuelPrescott, Prescott, MINUTE MINUTEMAN MANVISITOR VISITOR arsenal. carried Jaimee CENTER arsenal. carriedthe themessage messageinto into JaimeeLeigh LeighJoroff Joroffisisthe themanager managerof of CENTERIN INLINCOLN LINCOLN Barrett rejoined the Concord Barrow Bookstore in Concord. She has 250 N. Great Rd., Lincoln, MA. Barrett rejoined the Concordcenter centeralerting alertingthe the Barrow Bookstore in Concord. She hasbeen been 250 N. Great Rd., Lincoln, MA. Minutemen and militia by Minutemen on night duty. an View their excellent Minutemen and militia by Minutemen on night duty. aninterpreter interpreterat atall allof ofConcord’s Concord’shistoric historic View their excellent the Word sites multimedia theNorth NorthBridge, Bridge,just justinin Wordwas wasout! out!Minutemen Minutemen sitesand andisisaalicensed licensedtown townguide. guide. multimediapresentation. presentation.


Voices, and Votes, for Women:

I

BY BETH VAN DUZER

It should come as no surprise that the early laws of this country were derived from English laws, or that those laws were written exclusively by men for men. While Concord of the 19th century was relatively progressive, a wife was still considered merely an extension of her husband, and the laws did not provide her with the right to vote as an individual. Men felt it was good enough for them to cast a vote for both husband and wife, while unmarried women or women of color simply had no say at all. Not all women agreed. One of these outspoken voices was Abigail Adams, third cousin to Louisa May Alcott. According to a letter dated March 31, 1776, Abigail reminded her husband John not to forget about the rights of women. “I long to hear that you have declared an independency – and by the way in the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favourable to them than your ancestors,” she entreated. “Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If perticuliar (sic) care and attention is not paid to the Ladies we are determined to foment a Rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation.” [1] Abigail was rightly concerned about women being left out of public discussion, which is exactly what happened in the country’s newly adopted laws. It would take more than a century to right the wrong through the cohesion of many women’s voices from around the nation, including several of Concord’s own. By the 1830’s, Anti-Slavery Societies were being formed throughout the United States, including in Concord, MA. The Concord Female Anti-Slavery Society (CFASS) had its first meeting on October 18, 1837. Founding members included Susan Robbins Garrison (the group’s only woman of color), Cynthia, Helen, and Sophia Thoreau (Henry David

Concord’s Early Pioneers

Thoreau’s kin), as well as Abigail May Alcott (mother of Louisa May Alcott), and Lidian Emerson (wife of Ralph Waldo Emerson). Eventually, the children of the members, including Louisa May Alcott, Ellen Tucker Emerson, and Ellen Garrison, would help not only with the abolitionist cause, but with keeping women’s rights in the forefront. Their generation became the backbone of the movement. In 1870, Ellen Tucker Emerson broke a proverbial glass ceiling by being elected to the Concord School Committee. Apparently, not all of the family thought being on the school committee to be a desirable position, as Ellen seemed to be defending herself in a letter to her cousin, John Haven Emerson, on May 6, 1870, when she wrote “You needn’t be sorry I am on the school committee. I think I shall like it very much.”[2] She served until 1876, when her brother

heads, no earthquake shook the town.” Louisa May Alcott enjoyed puns and included hidden messages in her stories, including a reference to the suffrage movement in her 1886 novel Jo’s Boys. “The first figure was a stately Minerva; but a second glance produced a laugh, for the words ‘Women’s Rights’ adorned her shield, a scroll bearing the motto ‘Vote early and often’ hung from the beak of the owl perched on her lance, and a tiny pestle and mortar ornamented her helmet.”[3] Minerva is the goddess of wisdom. The mortar and pestle were a nod to a woman’s work in the kitchen. Louisa’s message was clear: voting and cooking were compatible; women wouldn’t shirk their home responsibilities in order to gain their equal right to be heard. Thanks to the many women in Concord’s history, along

The 1879 Register of Female Voters in the Town of Concord is held by the Town of Concord Archive, Special Collections, Concord Free Public Library. Used with permission.

Edward Emerson became Superintendent of Schools. It is particularly worth noting that it was not until 1879 that Massachusetts gave women the right to vote in school elections, which means the men of Concord voted Ellen onto the committee nine years before it was officially sanctioned. In another first, on July 23, 1879, the first woman to register her name to vote in Concord was Louisa May Alcott. She wrote the following in her journal, “Was the first woman to register my name as a voter,” and playfully mused after voting in her first election that “no bolt fell on our audacious

with an entire nation of brave, determined suffragist voices over many decades, August 18th of this year will hold special meaning. Together, we will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, guaranteeing Women’s Right to Vote. Those early Concord pioneers of women’s freedom would be proud. ————————————————————————— Concord resident Beth van Duzer is General Manager of the Concord Tour Company and a licensed town tour guide. Beth is currently pursuing a Masters in History.

[1] Abigail Adams, “Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams, 31 March – 5 April 1776,” Massachusetts Historical Society, Adams Family Papers. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/archive/ [2] Ellen Tucker Emerson, The Letters of Ellen Tucker Emerson: Volume 1.ed. Edith E. W. Gregg. (Kent: The Kent State University Press: 1982), 552. [3] Louisa May Alcott, Jo’s Boys, (Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1886), 250.

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740 Elm St 320 Baker Ave

WHERE TO SHOP Concord Center *Albright Art Supply + Gift Artinian Jewelry Artisans Way Barrow Bookstore Blue Dry Goods Cheese Shop of Concord Colonial Stores Comina Concord Bookshop Concord Lamp and Shade Concord Market Copper Penny Flowers Craft.ed Creative Studios Dotted i Fairbank and Perry Goldsmiths Footstock Fritz & Gigi French Lessons George Vassel Jewelry Gräem Nuts and Chocolate Grasshopper Shop Irresistables J McLaughlin Jack & Toba Lacoste Gallery Lyn Evans Montague Gallery Nesting North Bridge Antiques Patina Green Priscilla Candy Shop *Revolutionary Concord Sara Campbell Ltd Tess & Carlos The Umbrella Arts Center Thistle Hill Thoreauly Antiques Vanderhoof Hardware Viola Lovely Walden Liquors Walden Street Antiques Winston Flowers

West Concord 32 Main St 39 Main St 18 Walden St 79 Main St 16 Walden St 29 Walden St 24 Main St 9 Walden St 65 Main St 21 Walden St 77 Lowell Rd 9 Independence Court 44 Main St 1 Walden St 32 Main St 46 Main St 79 Main St 8 Walden St 40 Main St 49 Main St 36 Main St 16 Walden St 14 Walden St 17 Walden St 25 Main St 29 Main St 10 Walden St 44 Main St 28 Walden St 59 Main St 19 Walden St 32 Main St 41 Main St 81 Main St 40 Stow St 13 Walden St 25 Walden St 28 Main St 38 Main St 18 Walden St 23 Walden St 32 Main St

Thoreau Depot ATA Cycles Concord Provisions Concord Toy Shop Crosby’s Supermarket Frame-ables Juju Juju For Men

* Money Saving Coupon on p.55

93 Thoreau St 75 Thoreau St 89 Thoreau St 211 Sudbury Rd 111 Thoreau St 82 Thoreau St 97 Thoreau St

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74 Commonwealth Ave 23 Commonwealth Ave 23 Commonwealth Ave 135 Commonwealth Ave 113 Commonwealth Ave 98 Commonwealth Ave 84a Commonwealth Ave 49 Commonwealth Ave 33 Bradford St 101 Commonwealth Ave 115 Commonwealth Ave 152 Commonwealth Ave 53 Commonwealth Ave 106 Commonwealth Ave 1215 Main St

WHERE TO EAT Concord Center Caffè Nero Comella’s *Fiorella’s Cucina Haute Coffee Helen’s Restaurant Liberty at the Colonial Inn Main Street’s Market & Café Merchant’s Row at the Colonial Inn Sally Ann’s Bakery & Food Shop Trail’s End Cafe

55 Main St 33 Main St 24 Walden St 12 Walden St 17 Main St 48 Monument Square 42 Main St 48 Monument Square 73 Main St 97 Lowell Rd

Thoreau Depot 80 Thoreau Bedford Farms Ice Cream Chang An Restaurant Dunkin’ Donuts Farfalle Italian Market Café Karma Concord Asian Fusion New London Style Pizza Sorrento’s Brick Oven Pizzeria Starbucks

80 Thoreau St 68 Thoreau St 10 Concord Crossing 117 Thoreau St 26 Concord Crossing 105 Thoreau St 71 Thoreau St 58 Thoreau St 159 Sudbury Rd

West Concord 99 Restaurant & Pub Adelita Club Car Café Concord Teacakes Dino’s Kouzina & Pizzeria Dunkin’ Donuts Nashoba Brook Bakery Reasons to Be Cheerful Saltbox Kitchen Walden Italian Kitchen Woods Hill Table

13 Commonwealth Ave 1200 Main St 20 Commonwealth Ave 59 Commonwealth Ave 1135 Main St 1191 Main St 152 Commonwealth Ave 110 Commonwealth Ave 84 Commonwealth Ave 92 Commonwealth Ave 24 Commonwealth Ave

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Barrett Sotheby’s Int’l Realty Barrow Bookstore The Cheese Shop Coldwell Banker Residential

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LandVest

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William Raveis Real Estate

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*Revolutionary Concord

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Patina Green

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Montague Gallery

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*Debra’s Natural Gourmet J’Aim Joy Street Life + Home Reasons to Be Cheerful

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W With longer days, fresh breezes, and the bright colors of Spring, many of us will be looking to refresh our homes as we stretch into the delightful season ahead. West Concord is proud to welcome a new gem in the design and build world – Appleton Design Group. Owner Nathalie Appleton and her building partner Tino Fazio help make renovation dreams come true through a seamless experience that offers everything from architectural services, to general contracting, to interior design - all under one umbrella. Big Dreams, Local Shop “There’s something comforting about working with people you trust,” said Nathalie Appleton. “We make a point to take the time to get to know our clients. We want to understand their vision so we can help them make their design dream a reality. We are a small shop – so the same people that help walk you through the creative process are

right there to swing the hammers and make it happen for you.” Your Kitchen – the Hearth in Every Home “With kitchens, it’s more than just a new look,” said Nathalie. “Creating a better flow, optimizing new (and greener!) technologies to make cooking a pleasure, and making

space for kids to hang out and do homework while we cook and chat makes the kitchen a real center piece of the household.” Tub or Shower – the Beauty of a WellDesigned Bathroom Utility and comfort come together in an ideal bathroom. From deep soaker tubs, to sophisticated tiled showers, the subtle touches of bathroom fixtures can add elegance or whimsy to any home. Appleton Design Group helps clients create a peaceful haven from the stresses of everyday life through creative touches that connect a moment of calm to even the smallest of spaces. “Renovating a home doesn’t have to be overwhelming – and you don’t need to do the whole project at once,” said Nathalie. “I tell my clients that if they do nothing else, renovating and modernizing their kitchen and bath will make the whole house feel new and updated. It’s a great place to start!”

Appleton Design Group would be delighted to meet with you to discuss your home design and build dream. No project is too small, so they encourage you to stop by for an informal chat or to make an appointment to dive deeper into your dream. Call or visit today! Appletondesigngroup.com | Tel. 978-369-3322 | nathalie@appletondesigngroup.com | 51 Commonwealth Avenue, Concord MA 01742

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77 Lowell Road Concord, MA 01742 978-369-7500 www.theconcordmarket.com

Specializing in delicious everyday & custom designed cakes & cupcakes for every occasion. Fantastic scones, coffee cakes, muffins & a wide variety of wonderful, freshly baked goods, including hand-painted shortbread cookies. Artisanal Prepared Foods & Deli | Prime Meat, Fresh Fish & Seafood | Fresh Baked Breads & Pastries | Gourmet Cheese & Specialty Foods | Craft Beer & Fine Wine | Floral Bouquets & Arrangements

59 Commonwealth Ave. West Concord • 978-369-7644 1 mile from Route 2 and Concord Rotary Mon-Fri 6 am - 5 pm • Sat 7 am - 5 pm • Sun 8 am - 1 pm

www.concordteacakes.com

Greater Boston’s Newest Professional Theater The Specialty Store with Department Store Selection

WAR PAINT H O S I E R Y

April 24 – May 16, 2020

“Thoroughly compelling and masterfully entertaining” musical tale of cosmetics titans Elizabeth Arden & Helena Rubenstein TheUmbrellaStage.org I 978-371-0820 I 40 Stow Street 32

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| Spring 2020

Celebrating 50 Years in Historic Concord _ 24 Main Street MAKEUP, FRAGRANCES, LINGERIE, HOSIERY, SLEEPWEAR, INTIMATES, AND MORE

24 MAIN STREET, CONCORD, MA | 978.369-5000 www.colonialstoresconcord.com


“ ‘Tis the good reader that makes the good book.” ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

Barrow Bookstore RARE AND GENTLY READ BOOKS

Specializing in Concord Authors and History; Transcendentalism; Revolutionary War, American, and Military History; Children’s Literature; and a wide selection for the eclectic reader. Literary-themed gifts, postcards, and beeswax candles. 79 Main Street, Concord, MA (behind Fritz and Gigi) | www.barrowbookstore.com | 978-369-6084

The visitors are coming! The visitors are coming!

And we can’t wait to meet you! Unique and Fun Walking Tours | Custom,

Group, & Private Outings | Engaging Events & Corporate Excursions | Reenactments &

Living History | Ghost Tours & Seasonal Events | Entertaining Lectures & Educational Programs for All Ages

Let us help you be victorious in your visit! Check out concordtourcompany.com for a complete list of tours and events

I came. I saw. I Concord. Discover CONCORD

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istock.com/Pepe Charlie Photography istock.com/Pepe Charlie Photography

Nature trail in Minute Man Nature trail in Minute Man National Historic Park National Historic Park

BY ABBY GURALL WHITE BY ABBY GURALL WHITE

Our Big Big Backyard: Backyard: Our

“I went into the woods because I wished to “I went into the woods because I wished to live deliberately…” Henry David Thoreau’s live deliberately…” Henry David Thoreau’s words echo my own sentiments while making words echo my own sentiments while making a conscious choice to move back to Concord a conscious choice to move back to Concord years ago to raise my children. As a child years ago to raise my children. As a child living in Concord, I spent hours playing, living in Concord, I spent hours playing, imagining, and creating in the woods. As an imagining, and creating in the woods. As an adult, I continue to seek the solace, reflection, adult, I continue to seek the solace, reflection, and wisdom of nature – both on the sunniest and wisdom of nature – both on the sunniest days and on the cold, grey ones. Concord’s days and on the cold, grey ones. Concord’s open space, comprised of public and private open space, comprised of public and private lands, is one of our most lands, is one of our most treasured gems. Our treasured gems. Our town and its residents town and its residents have chosen over the have chosen over the years to preserve a years to preserve a healthy dose of nature. healthy dose of nature. There is something so There is something so utterly vulnerable about utterly vulnerable about being in nature. It helps Bluebells being in nature. It helps Bluebells me center myself and me center myself and remember the “human”-ness of existence for remember the “human”-ness of existence for all of us. Animals scurry and flutter around, all of us. Animals scurry and flutter around, habitat-making in a confluence of raw talent, habitat-making in a confluence of raw talent, learned behavior, and survival instinct. Trees learned behavior, and survival instinct. Trees stretch majestically toward sunlight in the stretch majestically toward sunlight in the forest, while others are uprooted in wetlands, forest, while others are uprooted in wetlands, are choked by invasive species, or lose are choked by invasive species, or lose branches in a winter storm. I process these branches in a winter storm. I process these images while ambling through the forest and images while ambling through the forest and bring them into daily life beyond the trees. bring them into daily life beyond the trees. 34

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I am present in the woods, later integrating I am present in the woods, later integrating new discoveries to make sense of the chaos new discoveries to make sense of the chaos of life. The woods feel safe, simple, and real. of life. The woods feel safe, simple, and real. As a Concord resident, my “backyard” As a Concord resident, my “backyard” is Punkatassett Preserve, October Farm, is Punkatassett Preserve, October Farm, Estabrook Woods, Barrett’s Mill Farm, the Estabrook Woods, Barrett’s Mill Farm, the River Confluence, Great Meadows, Walden River Confluence, Great Meadows, Walden Woods, Minute Man National Historical Park, Woods, Minute Man National Historical Park, and the many other trail networks around and the many other trail networks around town. Town residents also share a diverse town. Town residents also share a diverse network of open spaces with one another. network of open spaces with one another. Our own private backyard is Our own private backyard is an extension of our home. We an extension of our home. We look forward to spring, summer, look forward to spring, summer, and fall when we gather and and fall when we gather and eat meals on the patio or play eat meals on the patio or play in the grass. Staying connected in the grass. Staying connected to nature in our day-to-day life to nature in our day-to-day life gives us balance. Our senses gives us balance. Our senses kick in; hearing water flow past kick in; hearing water flow past rocks in a stream, feeling the rocks in a stream, feeling the sun, or watching life unfold in the yard on an sun, or watching life unfold in the yard on an early spring day. My kids and I still thrill at early spring day. My kids and I still thrill at spring sprouts emerging from the ground…the spring sprouts emerging from the ground…the miracle of life. We wonder why one vulnerable miracle of life. We wonder why one vulnerable seed successfully makes it to the surface and seed successfully makes it to the surface and another does not. These ponderings help another does not. These ponderings help us reflect on our own life and what matters us reflect on our own life and what matters for each of us. It helps us look at the myriad for each of us. It helps us look at the myriad of possibilities and choices we undertake of possibilities and choices we undertake in a day and choose a direction confidently, in a day and choose a direction confidently, istock.com/Robert Warner istock.com/Robert Warner

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ExploringNature Naturein inConcord Concord Exploring with purpose. Reflecting on nature helps us with purpose. Reflecting on nature helps us radically accept that our choices are one path radically accept that our choices are one path of many and that we, as humans will make of many and that we, as humans will make mistakes. We need nature to remind us we are mistakes. We need nature to remind us we are human. And as humans, we can head into the human. And as humans, we can head into the woods to find ourselves. We can make peace woods to find ourselves. We can make peace with our choices or find a new path to follow. with our choices or find a new path to follow. “I went to the woods because I wished to “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived…I wanted to live discover that I had not lived…I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath rout all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms...” reduce it to its lowest terms...” — Henry David Thoreau — Henry David Thoreau ————————————————————————— ————————————————————————— Abby White is a Concord resident and a real Abby White is a Concord resident and a real estate consultant driven by a true passion estate consultant driven by a true passion for the town in which she lives. Abby loves for the town in which she lives. Abby loves to explore Concord’s trails and conservation to explore Concord’s trails and conservation land on foot, skis, or bike – together with her land on foot, skis, or bike – together with her husband, Tim, their three children, and their husband, Tim, their three children, and their yellow lab, Winston. yellow lab, Winston. Proud Supporters Proud Supporters of Love Local/ of Love Local/ Runway to Runway to Recovery Recovery


Boutique Bed and Breakfast in Concord's historic mile 7 luxury guest rooms 462 LEXINGTON ROAD, CONCORD MA 01742 PHONE 978.369.5610 WWW.HAWTHORNEINNCONCORD.COM

The Concord Players Centennial Celebrating 100 Years of Quality Community Theater ❖

In April, the Concord Public Library, which houses much of the Players’ early archives, will host an exhibit featuring scrapbooks, programs, posters as well as set pieces and costumes from the Players’ own collection.

Author and Concord resident, Gregory Maguire, will be sitting down for a chat on April 4th.

Don’t miss our final regular show of the season, the beautifully written, poignant and funny, Steel Magnolias, April 24 – May 9.

The celebration will culminate with a special cabaret-style performance, Places Please! Celebrating 100 years in 100 minutes, featuring some of the very best shows we’ve done. June 6th & 7th. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit concordplayers.org.

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“The Most Remarkable Woman of Our Time” Margaret Fuller, Transcendental Feminism, and Women’s Rights

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BY DR. KRISTI LYNN MARTIN

Margaret Fuller (1810-1850) was a “feminist” before the word existed. Fuller’s father rigorously educated his eldest child as if she were a son, bestowing on her a formative belief in the genderequality of the mind and spurring her own career as a teacher. In her thirties, Fuller’s erudite reputation preceded her as a leader in the emerging Transcendentalist movement, a philosophy that revitalized the role of the individual in society in the decades preceding the American Civil War. Along with Elizabeth Peabody, Sophia Ripley, Abigail May Alcott, and Lidian Emerson, Fuller was among those women who actively shaped Transcendentalism and used its impetus to further social aims. Concord, Massachusetts was a sometime home to these women, excepting Fuller, who nonetheless spent significant time at the Emerson house, visiting with the Hawthornes at the historic “Old Manse”, and with her sister and brother-in-law, poet Ellery Channing. As protégée of Ralph Waldo Emerson; editor of the Transcendentalist journal, The Dial; leader of a public conversational series (183736

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1844); and a correspondent for the New York Tribune, Fuller was the movement’s foremost female voice. She used education and her writing to empower women. A journalist and author of several books, most notably Women in the Nineteenth Century (based on an 1843 Dial article expanded in 1845, three years before the Seneca Falls convention), Fuller argued for the enfranchisement of women and the emancipation of humanity from confining gender roles. She appealed to the Transcendentalist ideals - promoting cultivation of the individual, an Emersonian self-reliance, and a reform impulse - as a means to feminist empowerment. Having struggled to support her family following the death of her father, Fuller was keenly aware of the societal inadequacies that did not recognize women’s equality with men. To improve their condition, women needed “legal protection.” Fuller argued for their recognition as full citizens, and, further, as autonomous individuals and sexual beings.1 Eschewing arguments based in women’s moral superiority, Fuller made women’s

rights a human rights issue. Opponents defended the sanctity of women’s place in the domestic sphere and characterized public life as a threat to familial harmony (they contended, much as abolition disrupted the national economy and union). Fuller decried “ludicrous” imaginings of “ladies in hysterics at the polls, and the senate chambers filled with cradles.” She reasoned that a woman was not merely the hand or the heart of the family, but she had a head of her own – and natural law demanded her divine right to use it. Fuller argued that women’s choices were not matters beholden to societal or male approval, but to a woman’s own “consent” as an individual being.2 In a world where women had little legal recourse and were themselves considered property, Fuller embarked on a high-minded and Transcendentalist search for spiritual remediation and social justice. Women and men were, in Fuller’s Transcendentalist view, no less than equal and androgynous souls, universal beings bound by cultural constructions of biology. She boldly declared, “We would have every arbitrary


The only known The only known daguerreotype of of daguerreotype Margaret Fuller (by Margaret Fuller (by John Plumbe,1846) John Plumbe,1846)

Photos © Wikimedia Commons Photos © Wikimedia Commons

barrier thrown down. We would have barrier thrown down. We would have every path laid open toto women asas freely every path laid open women freely 3 3 asas toto men.” men.” Following her assignment asas a foreign Following her assignment a foreign correspondent forfor thethe Tribune and correspondent Tribune and embroilment in in thethe Italian Revolution, embroilment Italian Revolution, Fuller’s return toto America in in 1850 held Fuller’s return America 1850 held potential promise for her leadership potential promise for her leadership in in thethe women’s rights movement then women’s rights movement then gaining momentum, with thethe Worcester gaining momentum, with Worcester convention scheduled three months later. convention scheduled three months later. Tragically, Fuller’s death (along with that Tragically, Fuller’s death (along with that of of her domestic partner and their son) in in her domestic partner and their son) a shipwreck offoff thethe shore of of Fire Island, a shipwreck shore Fire Island, New York, thwarted allall such hopes of of her New York, thwarted such hopes her involvement, but Fuller’s feminist energy involvement, but Fuller’s feminist energy lived onon asas anan inspiration. Her students lived inspiration. Her students Ednah Dow Cheney and Caroline Healy Dall Ednah Dow Cheney and Caroline Healy Dall became leaders of of thethe women’s suffrage became leaders women’s suffrage movement, and prominent figures, such asas movement, and prominent figures, such Pauline Davis, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Pauline Davis, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and 4 4 Susan B. B. Anthony, recognized her influence. Susan Anthony, recognized her influence. Fuller’s ideas offered possibilities forfor Fuller’s ideas offered possibilities “new womanhood.” “new womanhood.” Suffragists were among thethe literary Suffragists were among literary pilgrims who made Concord their pilgrims who made Concord their destination, adopting thethe town’s symbols of of destination, adopting town’s symbols political and literary revolution to their own political and literary revolution to their own 5 5 fight forfor independence. The living legacy fight independence. The living legacy of of Transcendentalism was a welcoming Transcendentalism was a welcoming invitation toto generations of of women wanting invitation generations women wanting toto exercise their own minds. Female exercise their own minds. Female intellectuals and reform-minded women intellectuals and reform-minded women could visit thethe Emerson House (a(a home could visit Emerson House home ironically divided over women’s rights, ironically divided over women’s rights, with Lidian Emerson a local leader of of thethe with Lidian Emerson a local leader movement and her daughter Ellen opposed), movement and her daughter Ellen opposed), asas if in thethe footsteps of of Margaret Fuller. if in footsteps Margaret Fuller. Louisa May Alcott, thethe first woman toto vote Louisa May Alcott, first woman vote in in Concord’s school board election in 1880, Concord’s school board election in 1880, noted thethe many “M. Fullers’ in in white muslin” noted many “M. Fullers’ white muslin”

drawn toto thethe Concord School of of Philosophy, drawn Concord School Philosophy, which welcomed both female presenters which welcomed both female presenters 6 6 and audiences. Alcott’s father, Bronson, and audiences. Alcott’s father, Bronson, who founded thethe school, was a colleague of of who founded school, was a colleague Fuller’s. HeHe called her “the most remarkable Fuller’s. called her “the most remarkable woman of of our time,” a model toto thethe “benefit woman our time,” a model “benefit 7 7 of of many young women.” Fuller many young women.”Although Although Fuller never resided in in thethe town, a 1903 tourist never resided town, a 1903 tourist guidebook even promoted a “Margaret Fuller guidebook even promoted a “Margaret Fuller 8 8 house” onon Concord’s Main Street. house” Concord’s Main Street.

Fuller’s feminist ideals remain modern and Fuller’s feminist ideals remain modern and relevant. Again, amidst debates over national relevant. Again, amidst debates over national prosperity and disunion, in in 2020 – the oneprosperity and disunion, 2020 – the onehundredth anniversary of the 19th amendment hundredth anniversary of the 19th amendment - Fuller’s arguments forfor thethe protection of of - Fuller’s arguments protection women’s citizenship and human rights toto their women’s citizenship and human rights their own bodies and lifelife choices remain prescient own bodies and choices remain prescient toto social dialogues. So,So, too, does herher belief in in aa social dialogues. too, does belief gender-fluid humanity. Fuller’s voice gender-fluid humanity.Margaret Margaret Fuller’s voice is is one forfor thethe 21st century. one 21st century. —————————————————— —————————————————— Dr.Dr. Kristi Lynn Martin is is anan independent Kristi Lynn Martin independent interdisciplinary scholar, specializing in in interdisciplinary scholar, specializing Concord’s nineteenth-century literary circle. Concord’s nineteenth-century literary circle. AsAs a public history/museum and archives a public history/museum and archives professional, she is is proud toto have worked professional, she proud have worked with allall ofof Concord’s literary-historic sites, with Concord’s literary-historic sites, including portraying Margaret Fuller in in living including portraying Margaret Fuller living history programming. history programming.

The impact of of Ms. Fuller’s work continued onon long after herher passing – culminating in in thethe passage of of The impact Ms. Fuller’s work continued long after passing – culminating passage thethe 19th Amendment, granting thethe right to to vote to to allall women 19th Amendment, granting right vote women

1 2 2 3 1 3 4Phyllis Fuller, “Woman in the Nineteenth Century,” 1845. Ibid. Ibid. Cole, “The Nineteenth–Century Women’s Rights Movement andand thethe Canonization of Margaret Fuller,” ESQ: A Journal of the Fuller, “Woman in the Nineteenth Century,” 1845. Ibid. Ibid. 4Phyllis Cole, “The Nineteenth–Century Women’s Rights Movement Canonization of Margaret Fuller,” ESQ: A Journal of the 5 5 American Renaissance, (No. 27,27, 1998): 1-28. Todd H. Richardson, “‘Another protest thatthat shall be be ‘heard round thethe world’:’ TheThe Woman’s Journal andand Woman’s Pilgrimages in Concord, Massachusetts,” American Renaissance, (No. 1998): 1-28. Todd H. Richardson, “‘Another protest shall ‘heard round world’:’ Woman’s Journal Woman’s Pilgrimages in Concord, Massachusetts,” 6 6 TheThe Concord Saunterer: A Journal of Thoreau Studies, Vol.Vol. 23 23 (2015), 20 20 – 49. JoelJoel Myerson, Daniel Shealy, Madeline Stern, Eds. TheThe Journals of Louisa May Alcott (Athens: TheThe University of Georgia Press, Concord Saunterer: A Journal of Thoreau Studies, (2015), – 49. Myerson, Daniel Shealy, Madeline Stern, Eds. Journals of Louisa May Alcott (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1997), 235; Tiffany Wayne, “The Concord school of Philosophy andand thethe Feminization of Transcendentalism after thethe Civil War,” Woman Thinking: Feminism andand Transcendentalism in Nineteenth-Century 1997), 235; Tiffany Wayne, “The Concord school of Philosophy Feminization of Transcendentalism after Civil War,” Woman Thinking: Feminism Transcendentalism in Nineteenth-Century 7 8 8 7 America, (Lantham: Lexington Books, 2005), 107-128. Richard L. Herrnstadt, Ed.Ed. TheThe Letters of A. Alcott, (The Ames, Iowa: TheThe Iowa State University Press, 1969), 541.541. Souvenir & Guide to Historic America, (Lantham: Lexington Books, 2005), 107-128. Richard L. Herrnstadt, Letters of Bronson A. Bronson Alcott, (The Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press, 1969), Souvenir & Guide to Historic Concord andand Lexington, (Concord, MA: John F. Craig, 1903). Concord Lexington, (Concord, MA: John F. Craig, 1903).

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The Little Shop That Could:

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Debra Stark, founder of Debra’s Natural Gourmet, has published a new book that is simply delightful. In its pages, Debra tells the tale of a young woman with a crazy dream to bring organic foods and a holistic way of living to the neighborhood of West Concord in the early 1990s. This book is a fun, lighthearted, and compelling story that reveals through its pages why Debra has become such a beloved figure in and around Concord (and nationwide!). The story tells tales about regulatory law and potlucks, explains why Debra ordered 6,000 pounds of olives in 5-gallon pails just in time for the shop’s opening in 1989, and shares lessons learned along the way.

For those Seeking a Heartwarming Tale of Family and Friends

You can find a copy of The Little Shop That Could at the Concord Bookshop or at Debra’s Natural Gourmet at 98 Commonwealth Ave. in West Concord. To sign up for Debra’s monthly newsletter with terrific articles and recipes, go to www.DebrasNaturalGourmet.com.

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Debra’s Natural Gourmet started with Debra’s mom – who reared her children on organic foods (there was no Jiffy® peanut butter in the Stark household) and natural medicine. Years later, and armed with great recipes and lots of knowledge from her mother, Debra would take that same philosophy (think garlic, green tea, and laughter), and apply it to her fledgling shop. “When I started my shop,” said Debra. “most people in the neighborhood thought I was crazy. People in town actually placed bets that we’d go belly up in a couple of months.” Now, a generation later, Debra’s son Adam is partnering with Debra to lead the way for this little shop in Concord. The book shares their funny and heartwarming stories of friends who have gathered in the aisles of the shop over the years to share their happy moments, comfort each other through trying times, and to rejoice in one another’s successes. Reading the book, you will start to learn what makes Debra’s Natural Gourmet such a special treasure for so many. For the Entrepreneur In the 1990s, organic foods and natural medicine sounded more like voodoo than good advice to the

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The Stark Family, Debra and Adam

©Debra’s Natural Gourmet

A Retailer’s Love Affair with Community & Food

people in Concord. Most people had never heard of things like chia seeds or tofu. Some bemoaned the replacement of the local knitting shop with a store selling ‘kale’. And the men in the neighborhood missed their bar, too. Why did Debra’s have to move in and ‘change everything’?! Thirty years later, Debra’s Natural Gourmet is a pillar of the thriving and creative West Concord business community. The Little Shop That Could is teeming with great lessons for entrepreneurs: How to create alliances. How to pivot and learn in real time as you grow your business. And how to slowly and steadily use networking, community building, and education to shape your environment to be more receptive to your products and services. For Foodies The plethora of easy, delicious, and tempting recipes found in the pages of this book make it worth buying just to try them all! The recipes are creative, and will tempt the reader to experiment with organic foods. Debra believes you’ll love them! “I hope that people in the town read this book and are proud of what we have all achieved together,” said Debra. “I want everyone to know how wonderful organic foods and natural medicine are – and, most of all, I hope the readers laugh like crazy at all the shenanigans that go on in this wonderful little shop that could.”


Experience sustainable farm to table cuisine right here in West Concord. Choose from fine dining at Woods Hill Table or relaxed, casual Mexican cuisine at Adelita! For more information, or to make a reservation, visit: www.woodshilltable.com www.adelitaconcord.com 978.254.1435 978.254.0710 We hope to see you soon!

TASTEFUL | TIMELESS | MADE IN USA

Visit us and find your new favorite party dress!

Home Decor • Gourmet Food Vintage & Imported French Specialty Items Unique Gifts • Locally Handcrafted Pieces (508) 954 - 9848 23 Commonwealth Ave, Concord, MA

41 MAIN STREET, CONCORD (978) 369-3223 WWW.SARACAMPBELL.COM | @SARACAMPELLLTD

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Deborah Richardson, Deborah Richardson, Handcrafted Sterling Silver, Handcrafted Sterling Silver, Gold filled and Gold filled and 14k Gold Jewelry 14k Gold Jewelry www.deborahrichardsondesigns.com www.deborahrichardsondesigns.com

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OOPPEENN SSTTUUDD Jean Lightman, Jean Lightman, Fine Art Fine Art inin the Boston School the Boston School Tradition Tradition jeanlightman.com jeanlightman.com

Max Payne, Fiber Arts Max Payne, Fiber Arts mixedmax@earthlink.net mixedmax@earthlink.net

N SSTTUUDDIIOOSS 22002200 VISITTHESE THESEARTISTS ARTISTSAND ANDDOZENS DOZENSMORE MOREAT ATTHE THEUMBRELLA UMBRELLA AT VISIT AT pril 44&&55 PTHE ENN TTUUDDI IOOSS 22002200 | | pril PTHE E UMBRELLA UMBRELLA TheUmbrellaArts.org/Studio-Arts | 40 Stow Street TheUmbrellaArts.org/Studio-Arts | 40 Stow Street

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Louise Arnold, Louise Arnold, Landscape Paintings Landscape Paintings Giclée Prints Cards Giclée Prints & & Cards www.louisearnoldart.com www.louisearnoldart.com

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Barrow Bookstore Presents:

Trivia

Q 1

Which King is remembered for losing both the American Colonies and his sanity? a) King James Edward Stuart b) King George the II c) King George the III d) King George Washington e) King Burger

2

True or False: On April 19th, 1775, Concord Patriots and Loyalists were all considered citizens of the crown.

3

©istock.com/dcroswhite

True or False: Paul Revere completed a ride to Concord and alerted the town that British forces were coming to search the town for military supplies.

4

In what town was “the shot heard round the world” fired? a) Lexington b) Concord c) Boston d) Arlington

A

1. C: “I’ll take a large inheritance with a side of ‘oops’.” George the III ascended his father’s throne in 1760 and, from then on, history didn’t go well for him. 2. True.

3. True! On April 8th, 1775, alerted by increased British troop movement in Boston, Revere rode in the daytime to Concord to warn the town of a potential search. Ten days later, on the eve of April 18th when the British troops finally were enroute, Revere once again attempted to alert Concord. A British patrol captured Revere in Lincoln, and despite Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s literary license in “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere”, his ride was cut short before Concord.

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5

8

6

9

True or False: In the opening of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, the March girls’ father is away serving as chaplain in the American Revolutionary War. If you were in the battle at the North Bridge on April 19th, 1775, which of the following instruments might you have heard? a) Snare drum b) Tin whistle c) Fife d) Bass drum

7

A common exclamation in the Colonial era, what did “huzzah!” indicate? a) Fear b) Joy c) Sadness d) Anger

4. Concord. Memorialized in Ralph Waldo Emerson’s poem “The Concord Hymn”, the “shot heard round the world” refers to the deliberate order given by Concord’s Major John Buttrick to fire on the King’s troops. While first shots were fired in Lexington, the order in Concord marked the first intentional act of aggression against Great Britain.

5. False. Mr. March is a chaplain in the American Civil War.

6. A, C, and D. The snare drum, fife, and bass drum were common instruments used for signaling by both the Colonists and the British troops. The tin whistle was invented in 1843 by Englishman Robert Clarke.

7. B. Joy.

Brothers and sisters making each other famous. Published in 1868, Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women made her and her publisher famous. What was the publishing company?

©istock.com/filo

CONCORD

Which of the following are annual events held on Patriots’ Day in Massachusetts? a) Reenactment at Lexington Common b) Reenactment at North Bridge in Concord c) The Boston Marathon d) Red Sox home game

10

In which Concord museum can you learn about history involving the American Revolutionary War, the Underground Railroad, the real events upon which Little Women is based, the rise of the American Gothic Literature genre, and the creation of the Children of the American Revolution?

8. Roberts Brothers, Boston. Formed in 1857, Roberts Brothers was originally a bookbinding company. In the 1860s, they began publishing books. Louisa’s Little Women was a success, and her book established Roberts Brothers’ reputation as publishers. 9. All the above! Huzzah! If you plan and hustle, you can make it to every event. Check local schedules.

10. The Wayside Museum. Residents included Samuel Whitney, Concord Minutemen’s Muster master on April 19, 1775; the Alcotts, 1845-52; Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1852-69; and the Lothrop family, 1883-1965. Now it’s your turn! Visit the Wayside and become part of its history.


VOTED BEST PHOTOGRAPHERS IN CONCORD

2 YEARS IN A ROW

go see for yourself PIERRE.COM


S

CYNTHIA BAUDENDISTEL AND DAVE WITHERBEE BYBY CYNTHIA BAUDENDISTEL AND DAVE WITHERBEE

Monarch butterfly: Monarch butterflies Monarch butterfly: Monarch butterflies areare one of the most readily identifiable butterflies one of the most readily identifiable butterflies true treasures is its plethora of parks, trails, true treasures is its plethora of parks, trails, in North America. Their bright orange in North America. Their bright orange andand black coloring makes them easy to spot black coloring makes them easy to spot onon and nature preserves. Our friend Dave and nature preserves. Our friend Dave a lovely spring also predators a lovely spring dayday andand also letslets predators Witherbee together a collection Witherbee hashas putput together a collection know they’re poisonous! Monarchs know they’re poisonous! Monarchs areare oneone of some of his favorite Spring images of some of his favorite Spring images to to of few migratory insects. In the summer they of few migratory insects. In the summer they range north southern Canada. In the range as as farfar north as as southern Canada. In the inspire outside explore! inspire youyou to to getget outside andand explore! though, fall,fall, though, thethe Great places started include Great places to to getget started include eastern population eastern population Walden Pond (there’s a beautiful trail that Walden Pond (there’s a beautiful trail that (those butterflies (those butterflies east of the Rocky goes way around pond), east of the Rocky goes all all thethe way around thethe pond), thethe Mountains) Mountains) Minute Man National Historical Park Minute Man National Historical Park (a (a migrates migrates to to great way combine nature history), great way to to combine nature andand history), central Mexico. central Mexico. Bee on buttonbush: Buttonbush is native Bee on buttonbush: Buttonbush is native Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, caterpillars, Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, AsAs caterpillars, North America a favorite of bees, to to North America andand is aisfavorite of bees, monarchs feed monarchs feed Fairhaven Bay, Bruce Freeman Fairhaven Bay, or or thethe Bruce Freeman RailRail butterflies, hummingbirds. It likes butterflies, andand hummingbirds. It likes wetwet exclusively exclusively onon Trail great option those who prefer Trail (a (a great option forfor those who prefer a a soil, soil, look buttonbush in woodlands so so look forfor buttonbush in woodlands andand thethe leaves leaves of of along edges of ponds. nice, paved path with very little incline). along thethe edges of ponds. nice, paved path with very little incline). milkweed. milkweed.

Spring is finally here! One of Concord’s Spring is finally here! One of Concord’s

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All images by Dave Witherbee

All images by Dave Witherbee

Nature Watch Watch Guide Guide Nature


Kayaking Concord: Getting Kayaking onon Concord: Getting outout onon oneone of of area rivers a great way enjoy nature. thethe area rivers is aisgreat way to to enjoy nature. Relax with a leisurely paddle downriver Relax with a leisurely paddle downriver andand watch ducks, swans, hawks, deer, watch forfor ducks, swans, hawks, deer, andand other wildlife. other wildlife. Young great Young great horned owl: horned owl: Great horned Great horned owls owls cancan found found Daylilies: Originally from Asia, daylilies Daylilies: Originally from Asia, daylilies areare be be throughout now grown over world. Although each throughout now grown all all over thethe world. Although each North America North America flower lasts only day, another flower flower lasts only oneone day, another flower and are excellent and are excellent same stem frequently open onon thethe same stem willwill frequently open thethe hunters of hunters of next day. Common daylilies easy grow next day. Common daylilies areare easy to to grow rabbits, squirrels, rabbits, squirrels, multiply quickly, which is why you’ll andand multiply quickly, which is why you’ll hawks, snakes, hawks, snakes, frequently them along roadsides frequently seesee them along roadsides or or other andand other abandoned buildings. abandoned buildings. small animals small animals birds. Great horned owls hunt at night, andand birds. Great horned owls hunt at night, sometimes at dusk, so you might see them sometimes at dusk, so you might see them onon early evening walk. an an early evening walk.

Hummingbird moth balm: Hummingbird moth onon beebee balm: Hummingbird moths move Hummingbird moths fly fly andand move justjust likelike hummingbirds! They have long tongues hummingbirds! They have long tongues likelike hummingbirds well love many of the hummingbirds as as well andand love many of the same flowers, balm. Hummingbird same flowers, likelike thisthis beebee balm. Hummingbird moths during day, keep a close moths fly fly during thethe day, so so keep a close watch and you may see one this Spring. watch and you may see one this Spring.

Spring patio: Your own backyard is also Spring patio: Your own backyard is also a a wonderful place observe nature. quietly wonderful place to to observe nature. SitSit quietly one day and you’ll be surprised how many one day and you’ll be surprised how many species of birds, animals, insects, plants species of birds, animals, insects, andand plants might see. youyou might see.

a garden tour

friday, june 5 & saturday, june 6 in concord, massachusetts

explore six private gardens in historic Concord

31st Annual Garden Tour organized by the Guild of Volunteers of the Concord Museum Featuring pop-up shops • Ask an Arborist booth Tickets and information www.concordmuseum.org • 978-369-9763, ext. 235 Thank you to our many generous Garden Tour sponsors and supporters. Please visit our website for more information. Discover CONCORD

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New England’s Handmade Guitar Gallery Located in beautiful historic Concord Custom, Commissions, New & Pre-Owned

By Appointment Only | wilson@minutemanguitars.com | 617.460.9610 | www.minutemanguitars.com

What’s easier than a drink run?

Staying at the party with your friends.

46

Same day wine, beer, and liquor delivery means one less item on your party planning list. We even offer post-party pickup of leftover liquor, wine, and beer for weddings, house parties, and corporate events!

A unique shop with gifts you love to give…and receive!

Order online or get a beverage catering quote at www.westconcordwine.com or call 978.369.3872

49 Commonwealth Ave. Concord MA 01742 joystreetgifts.com

Discover CONCORD

| Spring 2020


YOUR PARTNERS IN REAL ESTATE

COMING TO THE CONCORD MARKET SPRING 2020

THE BUTLER WHEELER TEAM MAKING HOUSES HOMES Leah Butler | 617.223.1382 leah.butler@nemoves.com Lisanne Wheeler | 617.306.2145 lisanne.wheeler@nemoves.com Butlerwheelerteam.com BUTLER WHEELER TEAM

11 MAIN STREET CONCORD, MA 01742

Home Decor Jewelry Accessories Stationery

Apothecary Childrens Garden Just For Fun

Patina Green

Contemporary. Vintage. Whimsical. 59 Main Street, Concord @patinagreenshop

978-369-1708

Discover CONCORD

www.shoppatinagreen.com | discoverconcordma.com

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Paul Revere’s Iconic American Silver

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Discover CONCORD

| Spring 2020

Above: Paul Revere, Tea Service, made for John and Mehitable Templeman, 1792-93, Silver, wood. Lent by the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Below: Silver teapot made in the Revere Shop; Concord Museum, Gift of Mrs. Clara Whitney May (1972), Courtesy Concord Museum.

which was formed into an oval, with the ends beveled and overlapped, then soldered and riveted together. Revere was fabricating silver teapots like a boilermaker. Interestingly, Revere actually did make boilers. Fifteen years after the Templeman order, he made the copper boiler for Robert Fulton’s pioneering steamboat, the Clermont. Revere’s mark is found on most of the dozen or so surviving teapots of the same form as the Templeman example, but not all. A fluted teapot in the Concord Museum collection bears the mark of Boston silversmith Nathaniel Austin; two other fluted teapots are marked by Joseph Loring. The construction and decoration make it clear that they come from the same source as the Templeman teapot. Neither Loring nor Austin

had the skills, tools, or craftsmen needed to make teapots like these. The most iconic form of American neoclassical silver was the exclusive product of Paul Revere. Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere and His Ride This new national exhibition on view at the Concord Museum, February 14 to June 7, 2020, re-examines Revere’s life as a political activist and Revolutionary War legend. Organized by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS), Beyond Midnight features objects connected to the events of 1775 — including the Concord Museum’s famed lantern ordered hung as a signal by Revere himself. ————————————————————————— David F. Wood is Curator of the Concord Museum and has published several books and articles on the Museum’s collections, cabinetmaking, and clock-making in Concord.

Images courtesy of Concord Museum

T

The most extensive Federal-era tea service Paul Revere’s shop ever produced is included in the exhibition, Beyond Midnight: Paul Revere and His Ride, at the Concord Museum. Made for John and Mehitable Templeman in 1792, the set includes a teapot, tea caddy, sugar bowl, and cream pot that are fluted in emulation of the fluted columns of classical antiquity. If the style of this tea set summons the ancient past, its manufacture conjures the industrial future. Colonial teapots began with an ingot of silver which was hammered out into a sheet. The sheet was then hammered into teapot form on iron stakes set in the work bench, a process known as raising. In the 1790s, Paul Revere employed a flatting mill, which uses steel rollers to flatten the ingot. This was the first one used in Boston and one of the first used in America. By about the year 1800, Revere used a similar technology to establish his copper rolling manufactory in Canton, Massachusetts. This earned him lucrative contracts to bottom the ships of the fledgling United States Navy. The famous copper-clad Revere Ware had its roots in Canton. The fluted teapot in the Templeman service started out as a sheet of rolled silver

BY DAVID F. WOOD


Revolutionary Books

for Minutemen, Militia, and Loyalists BY JAIMEE LEIGH JOROFF

Whether your loyalties lie with the King or the colonists, you can catch up with some of the best books on the subject this spring. Paul Revere’s Ride by David Hackett Fischer “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere” has wound its way into American legend; the image of a Sons of Liberty Rider spotting two lanterns hanging in the steeple of Boston’s North Church and then galloping towards Concord. David Hackett Fischer’s book opens the lanterns and casts a broad light onto the life of Paul Revere and America at the time of the Revolutionary War. An engaging and informative read, Paul Revere’s Ride is an example of when the truth is as captivating as the legend it leaves behind. The Minutemen and Their World by Robert A. Gross If you’ve ever wondered what is was like to be a Minuteman, who they were and what they believed, this is your starting book. A favorite with historic interpreters, scholars, and the curious, Robert Gross escorts readers into 18th century New England, examining the concerns and conflicts between fellow

citizens with divided loyalties. With a focus around Concord, Gross’s brilliant mix of anecdotes and history leaves you feeling like you were standing on the town commons, or the farm and battle fields, with the Minutemen — sharing in the moments, and their hopes for the future. Historic Concord and the Lexington Fight by Allen French Who has time to read when the British are on the march right now to Lexington and Concord? Not you! You’ve got to go grab your musket and assemble with the Minutemen, militias, or the King’s troops. And with this book, you can do it. A brief yet comprehensive guide to April 19th, 1775, French’s book marches you through the places and battles in Lexington and Concord. Read it and get going! The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War by J.L. Bell The Road to Concord ignites the days leading to the American Revolutionary War and shows readers how stealing cannons and angering King George III

and his appointed Military Governor of Massachusetts, General Thomas Gage, created an epic problem that ultimately cost Great Britain part of its empire. The Road to Concord is packed with anecdotes and facts, many brought to light for the first time by Bell in this well-researched history. Spies, Sons of Liberty, British soldiers, Minutemen, militia, plots, and planning abound. John Adams by David McCullough If you’ve ever wanted to spend time with one of the Founding Fathers of America and learn what they really thought, this book is your chance. Beyond the action and chaos unfolding in the streets before and during the American Revolutionary War, there was a steady, fair-minded, and thoughtful figure at work: John Adams. In this biography of Adams, McCullough humanizes the New England Patriot whom Thomas Jefferson called, “the colossus of Independence.” ————————————————————————— Jaimee Leigh Joroff is the manager of Barrow Bookstore in Concord. She has been an interpreter at all of Concord’s historic sites and is a licensed town guide. Stop by Barrow Bookstore and Jaimee will be happy to help you find the perfect book on the American Revolution.

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Runway For Recovery:

A Town Cares for its Own

F

BYOLIVIA OLIVIAACHTMEYER ACHTMEYERBOGER BOGER BY

everyone,but butititwas wasright rightfor formy mymom, mom,and and everyone, it empowered each of us after her death it empowered each of us after her death toto honorthe thegift giftofofchildhood childhoodinindifferent differentways. ways. honor Forme, me,the thebest bestway waytotohonor honorher herwas was For to find a way to shift the breast cancer to find a way to shift the breast cancer experiencefor forother otherfamilies. families.InIn2007, 2007,I I experience gathered a few volunteers, taped some gathered a few volunteers, taped some Christmaslights lightstotothe thefloor floorofofNashawtuc Nashawtuc Christmas Country Club to form a “runway,” andasked asked Country Club to form a “runway,” and those in my immediate community who those in my immediate community who weretouched touchedby bybreast breastcancer cancertotocome come were “model”with withme measasaatestament testamenttotohope, hope, “model” courage, and tenacity in the face of the courage, and tenacity in the face of the disease. The idea stuck, and over the next1313 disease. The idea stuck, and over the next years, “The Runway Show” rapidly outgrew years, “The Runway Show” rapidly outgrew venuesacross acrossthe theMetro Metroarea, area,packing packinginin venues crowds 700+toto crowds ofof700+ cheer on “models” cheer on “models” whoare aresurvivors survivors who andfamilies families and affected bybreast breast affected by cancer. In doing so, cancer. In doing so, we raised hundreds we raised hundreds thousandsofof ofofthousands dollars annually. dollars annually. Unlike most Unlike most otherbreastbreastother cancer-oriented cancer-oriented nonprofits,we we nonprofits, do not fund do not fund ErinHackman Hackman(pictured (picturedhere herewith withher herfamily) family)will willbe behonored honoredatatthis thisyear’s year’s research, research,aacure, cure,oror Erin Love Local: Concord event. treatment.ItItisisour our Love Local: Concord event. treatment. firm belief that there are things we can do, completely insulated from her illness up firm belief that there are things we can do, completely insulated from her illness up today, to radically shift the experience of until her very last week of life — she brought today, to radically shift the experience of until her very last week of life — she brought familieswho whoare areaffected affectedby bybreast breastcancer. cancer. halftimesnacks snackstotomy mysisters’ sisters’afternoon afternoon families halftime 2019,I Ileft leftaacareer careerininindependent independent gameone oneday, day,and andwas wasininthe thehospital hospitalfor forthe the InIn2019, game schools — having spent the majority last time later that evening. schools — having spent the majority last time later that evening. of my career at Fenn and Middlesex In those days, the breast cancer landscape of my career at Fenn and Middlesex - In those days, the breast cancer landscape workwith withRunway RunwayFor ForRecovery Recovery was very different and there were far fewer totowork was very different and there were far fewer (www.runwayforrecovery.org)full fulltime, time, peopletalking talkingopenly openlyabout abouttheir theirexperience experience (www.runwayforrecovery.org) people with the goal of narrowing our focus onthe the and sharing resources. By keeping her illness with the goal of narrowing our focus on and sharing resources. By keeping her illness wellbeing of children after losing a parent. from us, my mom had made a selfless wellbeing of children after losing a parent. from us, my mom had made a selfless Wetook tookour ourgrantmaking grantmakingprocess processin-house, in-house, decisiontotoattempt attempttotopreserve preserveaa“normal “normal We decision andI’ve I’vespent spentthe thepast pastyear yearvisiting visitingevery every childhood.”It’s It’snot notaacomfortable comfortabledecision decisionfor for and childhood.”

© Runway For Recovery © Runway For Recovery

Formy mythree threesiblings siblingsand andI,I,growing growingup up For in Concord was idyllic. My parents loved in Concord was idyllic. My parents loved raisingtheir theirfamily familyininaasmall smalltown townand andmy my raising mother,Cande, Cande,flung flungherself herselffully fullyinto intothe the mother, inner workings of it joining boards of the inner workings of it - joining boards of the Old Manse, the Concord Museum, The Fenn Old Manse, the Concord Museum, The Fenn School and Nashoba Brooks School, and the School and Nashoba Brooks School, and the CCHSScholarship ScholarshipFund. Fund.Into Intoour ourteenage teenage CCHS years, we were blissful beneficiaries this years, we were blissful beneficiaries ofofthis close-knit town, but we’d soon find out close-knit town, but we’d soon find out justhow howimportant importantthis thiscommunity communitywould would just becometotoour ourfamily. family. become For a decade, from1991 1991toto2001, 2001,my my For a decade, from mother battled breast cancer in private. mother battled breast cancer in private. Shechose chosetototell tellonly onlyher herhusband husbandand andaa She selectfew fewfriends. friends.My Mysiblings siblingsand andI Iwere were select

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| Spring 2020

cancercenter, center,hospice, hospice,and andsocial socialworker workerwho who cancer will answer my calls to reach families who will answer my calls to reach families who havelost lostaaparent parenttotobreast breastcancer. cancer.Through Through have processguided guidedby byaateam teamofofsocial socialworkers workers aaprocess trained in palliative care and grief, we identify trained in palliative care and grief, we identify key activities and programs for each family key activities and programs for each family thathave havebeen beenaffected affecteddue duetotothe thedeath deathofof that theirloved lovedone one——most mostoften oftenbecause becauseofofthe the their loss of a second income — and grant funds loss of a second income — and grant funds directlytoward towardthose thoseprograms programsininorder ordertoto directly restore routine and healing into their lives.InIn restore routine and healing into their lives. ourfirst firstround roundofofgrant grantfunding, funding,we wecovered covered our the costs of groceries and house cleaning, the costs of groceries and house cleaning, ensuredkids kidswould wouldbe beable abletotoparticipate participateinin ensured extracurricular activities or summer camp, extracurricular activities or summer camp, andfunded fundedaccess accesstotoquality qualitytherapists therapistsand and and grief counseling. grief counseling. Runway’sstory storyisisinextricably inextricablyconnected connected Runway’s with Concord and with my mother. The with Concord and with my mother. The secondmy mymom mompassed, passed,the thetown townofof second Concord rallied around my family, andthey they Concord rallied around my family, and are still doing so today. Every time we host are still doing so today. Every time we host Runwayshow, show,half halfthe thetown townappears, appears, aaRunway donatingauction auctionitems itemsand andoffering offeringcorporate corporate donating sponsorships. sponsorships. Thisyear, year,we’re we’reespecially especiallyexcited excitedtotobe be This hosting an event on May 29, 2020 called hosting an event on May 29, 2020 called LoveLocal: Local:Concord, Concord,totohonor honorthe thetown townand and Love bring the community together. We’ll feature bring the community together. We’ll feature pop-upshopping shoppingwith withlocal localboutiques, boutiques, pop-up wine, beer, and light bites. A shortprogram program wine, beer, and light bites. A short willhonor honorErin ErinHackman’s Hackman’sfamily familyand andraise raise will money for families in need. Erin was a money for families in need. Erin was a Runwaymodel modelfor fortwo twoyears, years,and andthe thelove love Runway and legacy that she left behind in Concord and legacy that she left behind in Concord veryperfectly perfectlyembody embodyeverything everythingthat that sosovery we stand for here at Runway. Honoring we stand for here at Runway. Honoring herisissmall smalltown townliving livingatatits itsbest, best,and andwe we her hope we can include you in celebrating the hope we can include you in celebrating the communitythat thathas hasseen seenususthrough throughititall. all. community ————————————————————————— ————————————————————————— OliviaAchtmeyer AchtmeyerBoger BogerisisExecutive ExecutiveDirector Director Olivia of Runway For Recovery. This article was of Runway For Recovery. This article was supportedby byLandVest LandVestConcord. Concord. supported


The Chris Ridick Team at Compass: A Revolution in Concord Real Estate

W

LEFT TO RIGHT: Andrew Martini, Annie Juanzi Liu, Chris Ridick, Kristie Ridick, Kim Piculell

Wright Tavern in Concord Center was once the gathering place of patriotic revolutionaries. Today, this same building is home to an innovative team with a revolutionary approach to real estate. The Chris Ridick Team, one of the top real estate teams in New England, joined Compass real estate this Fall and opened a new office at the Wright Tavern.

Keeping the Revolution in the Center of it All “Many people fall in love with Concord right here in the town center - where some of our nation’s most fascinating history began,” says Chris Ridick, Managing Director of Compass in Concord. “The Wright Tavern was such an integral part of that story - which is absolutely why we wanted our office to be here.” Trailblazing a revolution in their own right in the real estate industry, Compass is a modern real estate brokerage with a

strong emphasis on technology and in house marketing to enhance the home buying and selling process. “The incredible technology and exclusive programs at Compass provide our clients with a superior level of service that’s unmatched by any other agency.” The Team is Everything “Our team of five talented real estate agents all grew up or live in and around Concord. We know the history and the ins and outs of Concord and the surrounding towns,” said Andrew Martini, Managing Director. “Our local market knowledge combined with the world class marketing and cutting edge technology at Compass creates a powerful - and pleasant - experience for our clients.” The team has sold over $200 million in real estate sales in the past three years alone, consistently placing them among the top teams in Massachusetts.

Introducing Compass Concierge With a laser focus on helping clients sell their property faster, and at a better price, Compass has pioneered a new approach to home improvements. They cover all upfront costs of any agreed upon improvements (from painting, to flooring, to renovations and landscaping), collecting payment for these services only at the time of closing. “It’s one thing to have creative ideas of how to optimize the selling price of a home – but it can be stressful to front those costs,” said Chris. “By taking care of these costs for our clients, we help our clients stay focused on their future plans and their family time – and still realize the upside to making strategic updates and renovations before the sale. It’s a big part of what makes us different!”

Compass is the #1 largest independently owned real estate brokerage in the country, with unparalleled technology and marketing capabilities. The talented team at Compass in the heart of Concord looks forward to meeting you to create the perfect plan to help you sell your property, or to find a new home. Please call or visit today! chrisridickteam@Compass.com | 617.593.3492 Wright Tavern, 2 Lexington Road, Concord, MA 01742

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istock.com/Pornpak Khunatorn istock.com/Pornpak Khunatorn

Arts Around Town

Jazz Fest Jazz Fest

Indigo Girls Indigo Girls © High Road Touring © High Road Touring

MUSIC MUSIC

Live music abounds in Concord. Check these venues for regular Live music abounds in Concord. Check these venues for regular performances of live music from a variety of talented groups: performances of live music from a variety of talented groups: CONCORD CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC CONCORD CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 1317 Main Street | concordconservatory.org 1317 Main Street | concordconservatory.org CCM Jazz: Friday, April 17 at 7:30 pm CCM Jazz: Friday, April 17 at 7:30 pm Bluegrass Band Scramble: Saturday, May 2 at 4:00 pm Bluegrass Band Scramble: Saturday, May 2 at 4:00 pm

MIDDLESEX JAZZ FEST AT CONCORD CENTER MIDDLESEX JAZZ FEST AT CONCORD CENTER 58 Main Street | www.middlesexjazzfest.org 58 Main Street | www.middlesexjazzfest.org June 6 from 1:00 – 6:30 (rain date Sunday, June 7) June 6 from 1:00 – 6:30 (rain date Sunday, June 7) Bring your friends and enjoy this free outdoor jazz festival led by Bring your friends and enjoy this free outdoor jazz festival led by BY VICTOR CURRAN the Concord Recreation Center, featuring aBY mix of 20-piece big VICTOR CURRAN the Concord Recreation Center, featuring a mix of 20-piece big bands, Latin jazz, jump blues, and smaller ensembles. bands, Latin jazz, jump blues, and smaller ensembles.

CONCORD ORCHESTRA CONCORD ORCHESTRA 51 Walden Street | www.concordorchestra.com 51 Walden Street | www.concordorchestra.com Into The Woods: March 27-28 Into The Woods: March 27-28 Fall under the spell of Tapiola, Sibelius’ atmospheric tone poem about Fall under the spell of Tapiola, Sibelius’ atmospheric tone poem about forest spirits. Listen to Carlisle native, Alex Kinmonth, play a rarely forest spirits. Listen to Carlisle native, Alex Kinmonth, play a rarely heard classical oboe concerto. heard classical oboe concerto.

THE UMBRELLA ARTS CENTER THE UMBRELLA ARTS CENTER 40 Stow Street | theumbrellaarts.org 40 Stow Street | theumbrellaarts.org Indigo Girls in Concert: June 19 Indigo Girls in Concert: June 19 The Indigo Girls have spent thirty-five years performing together, The Indigo Girls have spent thirty-five years performing together, produced fifteen albums (seven gold, four platinum, and one produced fifteen albums (seven gold, four platinum, and one double platinum), earned a Grammy and seven Grammy double platinum), earned a Grammy and seven Grammy nominations, and have toured arenas, festivals, and clubs the nominations, and have toured arenas, festivals, and clubs the world over. It is rare to find musicians together so long, rarer still world over. It is rare to find musicians together so long, rarer still with such profound successes. The Umbrella is thrilled to host with such profound successes. The Umbrella is thrilled to host this global legend and showcase their hauntingly beautiful music this global legend and showcase their hauntingly beautiful music in Concord’s newest, state-of-the-art theatre. All proceeds from in Concord’s newest, state-of-the-art theatre. All proceeds from this special fundraising concert will support the renovation and this special fundraising concert will support the renovation and expansion of The Umbrella Arts Center, and help to expand their expansion of The Umbrella Arts Center, and help to expand their programming across the arts. programming across the arts.

Pops! Journey to New Lands: May 15-17 Pops! Journey to New Lands: May 15-17 It’s festive. It’s fun. It’s Pops! Immerse yourself in Gershwin’s 1920’s Paris It’s festive. It’s fun. It’s Pops! Immerse yourself in Gershwin’s 1920’s Paris soundscape, and be entertained by Bernie Hoffer’s wonderful American soundscape, and be entertained by Bernie Hoffer’s wonderful American Songbook arrangements and Sarasate’s violin showpiece, Zigeunerweisen, Songbook arrangements and Sarasate’s violin showpiece, Zigeunerweisen, interpreted by Concord residents, Jeff Korn and Siri Smedvig. interpreted by Concord residents, Jeff Korn and Siri Smedvig.

TRAIL’S END CAFÉ TRAIL’S END CAFÉ 77 Lowell Road | www.thetrailsendcafe.com 77 Lowell Road | www.thetrailsendcafe.com From swing, to jazz, or American standards, Trail’s End brings a wide From swing, to jazz, or American standards, Trail’s End brings a wide variety of artists to town. Live music is available regularly. Check the variety of artists to town. Live music is available regularly. Check the website to see who’s playing. website to see who’s playing.

CONCORD’S COLONIAL INN (THE FORGE TAVERN) CONCORD’S COLONIAL INN (THE FORGE TAVERN) 48 Monument Square | www.concordscolonialinn.com 48 Monument Square | www.concordscolonialinn.com Live music Wednesday through Saturday nights 7:30 pm to 10:30 pm Live music Wednesday through Saturday nights 7:30 pm to 10:30 pm Jazz, pop, rock, or country – whatever your choice you can find it at the Jazz, pop, rock, or country – whatever your choice you can find it at the Forge Tavern this spring. Check their website to see who’s playing tonight. Forge Tavern this spring. Check their website to see who’s playing tonight.

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VISUAL ARTS ART WEEK 2020 IS MAY 1-10 See www.artweekma.org for exciting activities around town. CONCORD ART | www.concordart.org Concord Art is bringing us three exciting exhibitions this spring. Don’t miss the chance to meet these artists and discover their latest work. Members’ Exhibition: Feb 20-Mar 20 Tracy Spadafora and Claudia Ruiz Gustafson Members’ Exhibition: Mar 26-Apr 26 Marcia Crumley and Jane Henry Parsons Nature Redux: Apr 30-May 31 Brenda Steinberg, Sirapi Walzer and Gretchen Warsen

THREE STONES GALLERY www.threestonesgallery.com Abstract Queries. Tim Dunnbier and Brenda Cirioni: Feb 25 – April 11 Tim Dunnbier and Brenda Cirioni climb into their beings scouting for and receiving glimmers and visions that they paint onto canvas and paper. They inhabit the realm of the abstract, with ‘reality’ shining through, in their own unique way. Works by Ghetta Hirsch and Lynne Klemmer: April 14 – June 6 Visit the website for show information.

Courtesy of Three Stones Gallery

THE UMBRELLA ARTS CENTER 40 Stow Street | theumbrellaarts.org Spring brings two of The Umbrella’s most popular events, the Annual Group Show and the Annual Artrageous Art Auction. You won’t want to miss any of these events! Aperture: Studio Artist Annual Group Show: Feb 27 - April 5 Open Studios: April 4-5 Earth Month Exhibition: Water Theme: April 15-May 20 Annual Artrageous Art Auction: May 29

THEATRE CONCORD PLAYERS 51 Walden Street | concordplayers.org Steel Magnolias: April 24 - May 9 Alternatively hilarious and touching, Steel Magnolias is a beloved comedy-drama by Robert Harling which portrays the bond among a group of Southern women in northwest Louisiana. It reveals, over time, the depth of the strength and purposefulness of its unforgettable characters — ladies who are “as delicate as magnolias but as tough as steel.”

Brenda Cirioni, Barn Series, White Hill, mixed media, 36x36.

97 Lowell Road Concord, MA 01742 978-610-6633 www.thetrailsendcafe.com

THE UMBRELLA ARTS CENTER

© Umbrella Arts Center. Used with permission.

Home Decor Apothecary | theumbrellaarts.org Jewelry 40 Stow Street Childrens 29 Accessories Bent: March 13 –Garden Just For FunBENT is the Stationery Profound and provocative,

story of courage and survival in the face of extreme hate and circumstance. Set in 1930’s Berlin where homosexuality is viewed as worse than being Jewish, Max and Rudy attempt to flee before being caught by Nazi soldiers. War Paint: April 24 – May 16 Hailed as “thoroughly compelling and masterfully entertaining” WAR PAINT is the true-to-life story of Elizabeth Arden and Helena Rubenstein, masters of selfContemporary. Vintage. Whimsical. invention and titans of the cosmetics industry who became 59 Main Street, Concord the country’s first 978-369-1708 major female entrepreneurs in a time when only men were thought to @patinagreenshop www.shoppatinagreen.com be capable of building international empires.

Patina Green

Make a night of it! Just show us your e-ticket for The Umbrella Breakfast | Brunch | Lunch | Dinner Theater on the day of the show and get 15% OFF food On and Off-Site Catering | Private Event Space (excluding taxes, gratuity, alcohol)

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Let uJ �ive ';1ou � ye�Jon to be cheeyful Reasons to be Cheerful, voted Concord's best homemade ice cream featuring 30 fantastic flavors and specials that rotate daily.

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Visit our showroom and let our certified staff help you choose the perfect high-quality, custom-crafted shed or gazebo. Over 20 models on display and sold at Colonial Gardens.

101 Commonwealth Ave West Concord www.ReflectionsConcord.com Facebook/Instagram: @Susan & Kim

442 Fitchburg Tpke (Rte 117), Concord 978-369-2554 | www.colonialgardensflorist.com

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Concord's destination for Concord's destination for gourmet food Concord's destination for gourmet food Concord’s destination for gourmet food

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