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1 of 60 The Syntax That Speaks To Us by Ian Beardsley © 2017


2 of 60 After explaining Newton’s Three Laws of Motion, the equations of energy that follow from them, and, the principle of conservation of energy that follows from those, I will show that the syntax we developed for our languages, such as grammatical, mathematical, and computer languages, begins to speak to us of these laws through their syntax we developed for them, and the syntax we developed for the computer languages. 


3 of 60 Newton’s Three Laws of Motion Here I solve the problem of a wooden block sliding down a wooden inclined plane. We start with Newton’s first law of motion, or inertia. The block is at rest and will remain at rest until other wise acted on by a force. We then us Newton’s second law of motion that, the force acting on it is F=ma (force equal mass times acceleration). Then we use his third law of motion that states for every force there is an equal and opposite force. In this case the force is mg (mass times gravity) and the equal and opposite force is due to friction acting against the direction of motion of the block, but, that is proportional to the normal force of the surface of the inclined plane pushing up on the wooden block. We say the net force (ma, or mass times acceleration) is the sum of the forces acting on the block, which is:

where mu is the coefficient of friction. The letter m divides out, and we have the acceleration of the block. Here is where Newton had to invent calculus, the mathematics of change, because acceleration is the change in velocity with time, and we need the velocity after a time t, and the distance traversed after a time t. To get these we integrate the acceleration once for the equation of velocity, and twice for the equation of position. With this, Newton invented mechanics. Now dealing with acceleration, it was only necessary for him to develop a Universal Law of Gravity, because, it is gravity that causes acceleration. This he did, and from it, he was able to derive Kepler’s Laws of Planetary Motion, which Kepler formulated from the data of Tycho Brahe that he gathered on the motion of the five planets known at the time, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. His Universal Law of Gravity was:

Where, F is force, m1 and m2 are the masses of the mutually attracting bodies, r is the separation between them, and, G, is the constant of proportionality. In other words, the force of gravity is directly proportional to the product of the masses attracting one another and, inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.






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7 of 60 From the equations of energy, we can formulate the principle of conservation of energy. This provides us with a way of solving some problems that will save us a lot of work. We do not need now, to analyze all of the angles and components and, it is time independent. We just notice that the block of wood sliding down the inclined plane, only falls, accelerates, through the height, h. As it does this, it loses potential energy, and, gains kinetic energy. By the principle of conservation of energy, the sum of the potential energy and the kinetic energy is equal to a constant: P.E. +K.E. = C That is:

 

In the instance where the block starts at a standstill at height h, then, the final energy after falling through that distance (K.E.) gives:





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Now let us run my programs, and, show how hello, hola, and bonjour, hello in three languages, which are standard input for testing programs, has our syntax speaking to us of Newton’s Laws: 


10 of 60 Let’s consider the EOT (End of Transmission) scramble under hello: jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./stir Give me the key: hello 8 5 12 12 15 To scramble a word, type ./cipher + number from above,.. You will be asked for a word. Type the letter you want rotated. Repeat process until every letter is rotated by the right amount. Make sure cipher.c is in the same folder as this program. To do caesar's cipher typye the key number and the whole word,.. when prompted for word, not just the letter. Use all lower case. jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 8 Give me a word: e m m is mass jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 5 Give me a word: o t t is time jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 12 Give me a word: t f f is force This is Newton’s second law of motion; it describes his equation of force. It says force, f, is the change in velocity of a mass, m, over a time, t. We already found his first law of motion, also called the law of inertia, which was:


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jharvard@appliance (~): cd Dropbox jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./stir Give me the key: hello 8 5 12 12 15 To scramble a word, type ./cipher + number from above,.. You will be asked for a word. Type the letter you want rotated. Repeat process until every letter is rotated by the right amount. Make sure cipher.c is in the same folder as this program. To do caesar's cipher typye the key number and the whole word,.. when prompted for word, not just the letter. Use all lower case. jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 8 Give me a word: hola pwti jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 8 Give me a word: h p jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 5 Give me a word: o t jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 12 Give me a word: l x jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 12 Give me a word: a m jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): If the key is hello and the word scrambled under vigenere is hola (spanish for hello), then the result is ptxm. In physics p is momentum, t is time, x is distance, m is mass. These are the variables for the equation of momentum, which is: p=(x/t)m where x/t=v (velocity) 


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But let’s look back to scrambling EOT (end of transmission) with the key bonjour, we now move from Newton’s Laws of Motion, to conservation of energy. We have gdh, which says an object falls through a distance of height h under earth gravity, g which is the equation of potential energy. jharvard@appliance (~): cd Dropbox jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./find Give me an integer: 4 That is char: EOT (end of transmission) jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./stir Give me the key: bonjour 2 15 14 10 15 21 18 To scramble a word, type ./cipher + number from above,.. You will be asked for a word. Type the letter you want rotated. Repeat process until every letter is rotated by the right amount. Make sure cipher.c is in the same folder as this program. To do caesar's cipher typye the key number and the whole word,.. when prompted for word, not just the letter. Use all lower case. jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 2 Give me a word: e g g is earth gravity jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 15 Give me a word: o d d is distance jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 14 Give me a word: t h h is height



13 of 60 Here are the programs that I wrote to produce this results which, are, in the programming language C: stir.c

#include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> int main (void) { char key[15]; printf(" "); printf("Give me the key: "); scanf("%s", key); for (int i=0, n=strlen(key); i<n;) { printf("%d ", key[i]-96); i++; } printf("\n"); printf("\n"); printf("To scramble a word, type ./cipher + number from above,..\n"); printf("You will be asked for a word. Type the letter you want rotated.\n"); printf("Repeat process until every letter is rotated by the right amount.\n"); printf("Make sure cipher.c is in the same folder as this program.\n"); printf("To do caesar's cipher typye the key number and the whole word,..\n"); printf("when prompted for word, not just the letter. Use all lower case.\n"); printf("\n"); printf("\n"); }


14 of 60 cipher.c #include <stdio.h> #include <cs50.h> #include <string.h> int main (int argc, string argv[1]) { int k = atoi(argv[1]); if (argc>2 || argc<2) { printf("Give me a single string: "); } else { printf("Give me a word: "); } string s = GetString(); { for (int i=0, n=strlen(s); i<n; i++) { if (s[i]+k<=122) { printf("%c", s[i]+k); } else { printf("%c", s[i]+k-26); } } printf("\n"); } }â&#x20AC;Š


15 of 60 find.c #include <stdio.h> #include <cs50.h> int main (void) { int search=0, found=0, i; int dec[50] = {0,1,2,3,4,5,6}; char *s[100] = {"NUL","SOH","STX","ETX","EOT","ENQ","ACK"}; printf("Give me an integer: "); scanf("%d", &search); for (i=0; i<=7;i++) { if (search==dec[i]) { found = 1; break; } } if (found) printf("That is char: %c", *s[i]); char *t[100] = {"U", "O", "T", "T", "O", "N", "C"}; for (i=0; i<=7;i++) { if (search==dec[i]) { found = 1; break; } } printf("%c", *t[i]); char *u[100] = {"L", "H", "X", "X", "T", "Q", "K"}; for (i=0; i<=7; i++) { if (search==dec[i]) { found = 1; break; } } printf("%c\n", *u[i]); }â&#x20AC;Š


16 of 60 This all started when I produced the three sets of letters that I consider to be at the heart of mathematics (a,b,c), (x,y,z), and (i,j,k):â&#x20AC;Š


17 of 60 jharvard@appliance (~): cd Dropbox jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./lowerascii Ascii Values for Lowercase Letters: 97 is a 98 is b 99 is c 100 is d 101 is e 102 is f 103 is g 104 is h 105 is i 106 is j 107 is k 108 is l 109 is m 110 is n 111 is o 112 is p 113 is q 114 is r 115 is s 116 is t 117 is u 118 is v 119 is w 120 is x 121 is y 122 is z Numeric Values For Letters: 1 is a 2 is b 3 is c 4 is d 5 is e 6 is f 7 is g 8 is h 9 is i 10 is j 11 is k 12 is l 13 is m 14 is n 15 is o 16 is p 17 is q 18 is r 19 is s 20 is t 21 is u 22 is v 23 is w 24 is x 25 is y 26 is z a,b,c, are the numbers for x,y,z, in a coordinate system i,j,k a,b,c are 97,98,99, the three numbers before 100 where 100 is totality (one hundred percent) i,j,k are 9,10,11, are the three numbers before 12 where 12 is totality because it is the smallest abundant number (most divisible for its size) x,y,z are 120, 121, 122, the first three numbers before 123 123 takes us back to the 1,2,3 of a,b,c jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): #include <stdio.h> int main (void) { printf("\n"); printf("Ascii Values for Lowercase Letters:\n"); for (int i=97;i<97+26;i++)//the lowercase letters start at 97// //and there are 26 letters in the alphabet// { printf("%i is %c ", i, (char)i); //if i is 97, (char)i is 97th character(a)// } printf("\n"); printf("Numeric Values For Letters:\n"); for (int a=1; a<=26; a++) { printf("%i is %c ", a, (char)a+96); } printf("\n"); printf("a,b,c, are the numbers for x,y,z, in a coordinate system i,j,k \n"); printf("a,b,c are 97,98,99, the three numbers before 100\n"); printf("where 100 is totality\n"); printf("i,j,k are 9,10,11, are the three numbers before 12\n"); printf("where 12 is totality because it is the smallest abundant number\n"); printf("x,y,z are 120, 121, 122, the first three numbers before 123\n"); printf("123 takes us back to the 1,2,3 of a,b,c\n");â&#x20AC;Š


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This is a program I wrote for Caesar’s Cipher. Caesar’s Cipher is the oldest Cipher. It takes a word and rotates the letters in the word by a specific number called the key, to scramble the word. Only the person intended to unscramble the secret message has the key.



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Here I have removed the curly brackets in the program so it only rotates the first letter in the word to be scrambled. Rotating standard input of hello by simplest values 1, 2, 3, produces i,j,k (the unit vector corresponding to the x,y,z coordinate system of values a,b,c).â&#x20AC;Š


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How Nine-fifths Came To Be An Important Number Amarjit Manuel


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I found myself in the medioambiente (atmosphere) of an Indian ethnomusicologist from the University of Delhi, taking tabla lessons. First he explained to me that he was not an idle man, that he had many students and taught from five in the morning to 6 in the evening, and that during that time he prepared a special soup for all those that were his students. One of the first things he told me was that in India there are many false gurus, that will not really teach you, but that this was not his consciousness, that he would really teach me. He said he would put me on a program of learning to play Bahjrans and Kirtans, rhythms of 6 and 7 which fall under the category of Guzals, or Indian romantic music, but that he would be playing and composing temple music, called tin tal, which was the cycle of 16 considered the highest and most spiritual form of North Indian Classical music. The training began with the history of the tabla which has its origins in the mridangam. It was the Muslim King in India, Amir Kusuro, who took the mridangam, which was closed on both ends, the left side played with the left hand and the right side played with the right hand, and broke it into two, the Dayan and Bayan, with the Dyan being the high tones and the Bayan being the low tones played with right and left hands respectively. In the center of each is a circle of dry ink that allows the drums to be tuned to precise pitches. The ink is rubbed into the tabla, as was explained to me, with a stone that floats on water and glows like a cat’s eye and only exists in a few secret, undisclosed locations, only known to tabla makers. Amarjit, that was his name, had made it a point of telling me that among the rhythms I would be learning was a cycle of seven and one half and a cycle of 13 1/2. I find that interesting. If a person stretches that out by multiplying it by two, one gets a cycle of 15. It was the Gypsy Shaman, Manuel, who first pointed out to me that 15 was of primary importance, and as a scientist, I can’t help but think in reference to that, the earth rotates through 15 degrees in an hour, and the most abundant element in the earth’s atmosphere is nitrogen which is in chemical group 15 in the periodic table. Let us multiply Amarjit’s 7 1/2 by the 16 of his tin tal. It is 120. 120 are the degrees in the angles of a regular hexagon, an equal angled, equal sided polygon with six sides. Let us subtract 120 from the 360 degrees that are in a circle and divide the result by that same 360 and then add the result to one: 360-120 = 240 240/360 = 2/3 2/3+1 = 5/3 This is the value that represents the yang of the cosmic yin and yang that came to us from the Gypsy Shaman, Manuel, that represents six-fold symmetry, or the physical aspects of nature, like snowflakes. The biological aspects are in five-fold symmetry, derived as above: 360/5 = 72 360-72 = 288 288/360 = 4/5 4/5 + 1 = 9/5 = 1.8 Let us divide Amarjit’s stressed cycle 13.5 by 7.5. We find it is 1.8, which equals the yin of 9/5 that is representative of the organic aspects of nature to which the Gypsy Shaman, Manuel


23 of 60 guided us in my story Gypsy Shamanism and the Universe, which I will present following the story we are telling now. After my tabla lesson, I left the room and just as I came out, several people from India were coming into the house. I noticed in the living room was lots of clothing and art from India. I was introduced to these people, who obviously ran a store, and they told me they were just coming back from an interactive convention between Indians and Mexicans. The interchange was one between ideas in the cooking of Indian food and Mexican food. They were all wearing name tags that said on them, “Friendly Amigo”. Later I met with Amarjit and he took me to a music store to give me a lesson in buying instruments. On our way back, with his student driving, me in the front seat, Amarjit laid stretched out on the back back seat telling me that the store owner’s refusal of our price offer for a crude guitar indicated that he was “A very greedy man and would not get far in life”. At some point I told Amarjit that I had dreams of him giving me tabla lessons. He told me he could communicate with me in this way. Upon learning that God told me the Gypsy Shaman, Manuel, always second guesses him, and Manuel telling me that because of this, he goes out into the world to do God’s work for him at his request, Amarjit and his students were going to change their course from one of merging with God, to one of merging with Manuel. Ian Beardsley May 15, 2015



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Manuel


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Gypsy Shamanism And The Universe I wrote a short story last night, called Gypsy Shamanism and the Universe about the AE-35 unit, which is the unit in the movie and book 2001: A Space Odyssey that HAL reports will fail and discontinue communication to Earth. I decided to read the passage dealing with the event in 2001 and HAL, the ship computer, reports it will fail in within 72 hours. Strange, because Venus is the source of 7.2 in my Neptune equation and represents failure, where Mars represents success. Ian Beardsley August 5, 2012â&#x20AC;Š


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Chapter One It must have been 1989 or 1990 when I took a leave of absence from The University Of Oregon, studying Spanish, Physics, and working at the state observatory in Oregon -- Pine Mountain Observatory—to pursue flamenco in Spain. The Moors, who carved caves into the hills for residence when they were building the Alhambra Castle on the hill facing them, abandoned them before the Gypsies, or Roma, had arrived there in Granada Spain. The Gypsies were resourceful enough to stucco and tile the abandoned caves, and take them up for homes. Living in one such cave owned by a gypsy shaman, was really not a down and out situation, as these homes had plumbing and gas cooking units that ran off bottles of propane. It was really comparable to living in a Native American adobe home in New Mexico. Of course living in such a place came with responsibilities, and that included watering its gardens. The Shaman told me: “Water the flowers, and, when you are done, roll up the hose and put it in the cave, or it will get stolen”. I had studied Castilian Spanish in college and as such a hose is “una manguera”, but the Shaman called it “una goma” and goma translates as rubber. Roll up the hose and put it away when you are done with it: good advice! So, I water the flowers, rollup the hose and put it away. The Shaman comes to the cave the next day and tells me I didn’t roll up the hose and put it away, so it got stolen, and that I had to buy him a new one. He comes by the cave a few days later, wakes me up asks me to accompany him out of The Sacromonte, to some place between there and the old Arabic city, Albaicin, to buy him a new hose. It wasn’t a far walk at all, the equivalent of a few city blocks from the caves. We get to the store, which was a counter facing the street, not one that you could enter. He says to the man behind the counter, give me 5 meters of hose. The man behind the counter pulled off five meters of hose from the spindle, and cut the hose to that length. He stated a value in pesetas, maybe 800, or so, (about eight dollars at the time) and the Shaman told me to give that amount to the man behind the counter, who was Spanish. I paid the man, and we left. I carried the hose, and the Shaman walked along side me until we arrived at his cave where I was staying. We entered the cave stopped at the walk way between living room and kitchen, and he said: “follow me”. We went through a tunnel that had about three chambers in the cave, and entered one on our right as we were heading in, and we stopped and before me was a


27 of 60 collection of what I estimated to be fifteen rubber hoses sitting on ground. The Shaman told me to set the one I had just bought him on the floor with the others. I did, and we left the chamber, and he left the cave, and I retreated to a couch in the cave living room.â&#x20AC;Š


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Chapter Two Gypsies have a way of knowing things about a person, whether or not one discloses it to them in words, and The Shaman was aware that I not only worked in Astronomy, but that my work in astronomy involved knowing and doing electronics. So, maybe a week or two after I had bought him a hose, he came to his cave where I was staying, and asked me if I would be able to install an antenna for television at an apartment where his nephew lived. So this time I was not carrying a hose through The Sacromonte, but an antenna. There were several of us on the patio, on a hill adjacent to the apartment of The Shaman’s Nephew, installing an antenna for television reception. Chapter Three I am now in Southern California, at the house of my mother, it is late at night, she is a asleep, and I am about 24 years old and I decide to look out the window, east, across The Atlantic, to Spain. Immediately I see the Shaman, in his living room, where I had eaten a bowl of the Gypsy soup called Puchero, and I hear the word Antenna. I now realize when I installed the antenna, I had become one, and was receiving messages from the Shaman. The Shaman’s Children were flamenco guitarists, and I learned from them, to play the guitar. I am now playing flamenco, with instructions from the shaman to put the gypsy space program into my music. I realize I am not just any antenna, but the AE35 that malfunctioned aboard The Discovery just before it arrived at the planet Jupiter in Arthur C. Clarke’s and Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey”. The Shaman tells me, telepathically, that this time the mission won’t fail. Chapter Four I am watching Star Wars and see a spaceship, which is two oblong capsules flying connected in tandem. The Gypsy Shaman says to me telepathically: “Dios es una idea: son dos”. I understand that to mean “God is an idea: there are two elements”. So I go through life basing my life on the number two. Chapter Five


29 of 60 Once one has tasted Spain, that person longs to return. I land in Madrid, Northern Spain, The Capitol. The Spaniards know my destination is Granada, Southern Spain, The Gypsy Neighborhood called The Sacromonte, the caves, and immediately recognize I am under the spell of a Gypsy Shaman, and what is more that I am The AE35 Antenna for The Gypsy Space Program. Flamenco being flamenco, the Spaniards do not undo the spell, but reprogram the instructions for me, the AE35 Antenna, so that when I arrive back in the United States, my flamenco will now state their idea of a space program. It was of course, flamenco being flamenco, an attempt to out-do the Gypsy space program. Chapter Six I am back in the United States and I am at the house of my mother, it is night time again, she is asleep, and I look out the window east, across the Atlantic, to Spain, and this time I do not see the living room of the gypsy shaman, but the streets of Madrid at night, and all the people, and the word Jupiter comes to mind and I am about to say of course, Jupiter, and The Spanish interrupt and say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, you are right it is the largest planet in the solar system, you are right to consider it, all else will flow from it.â&#x20AC;? I know ratios, in mathematics are the most interesting subject, like pi, the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter, and the golden ratio, so I consider the ratio of the orbit of Saturn (the second largest planet in the solar system) to the orbit of Jupiter at their closest approaches to The Sun, and find it is nine-fifths (nine compared to five) which divided out is one point eight (1.8). I then proceed to the next logical step: not ratios, but proportions. A ratio is this compared to that, but a proportion is this is to that as this is to that. So the question is: Saturn is to Jupiter as what is to what? Of course the answer is as Gold is to Silver. Gold is divine; silver is next down on the list. Of course one does not compare a dozen oranges to a half dozen apples, but a dozen of one to a dozen of the other, if one wants to extract any kind of meaning. But atoms of gold and silver are not measured in dozens, but in moles. So I compared a mole of gold to a mole of silver, and I said no way, it is nine-fifths, and Saturn is indeed to Jupiter as Gold is to Silver. I said to myself: How far does this go? The Shamanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son once told me he was in love with the moon. So I compared the radius of the sun, the distance from its center to its surface to the lunar orbital radius, the distance from the center of the earth to the center of the moon. It was Nine compared to Five again! Chapter Seven I had found 9/5 was at the crux of the Universe, but for every yin there had to be a yang. Nine fifths was one and eight-tenths of the way around a circle. The one took you back to the beginning which left you with 8 tenths. Now go to eight tenths in the other direction, it is 72 degrees of the 360 degrees in a circle. That is the separation between petals on a five-petaled flower, a most popular arrangement. Indeed life is known to have five-fold symmetry, the


30 of 60 physical, like snowflakes, six-fold. Do the algorithm of five-fold symmetry in reverse for six-fold symmetry, and you get the yang to the yin of nine-fifths is five-thirds. Nine-fifths was in the elements gold to silver, Saturn to Jupiter, Sun to moon. Where was fivethirds? Salt of course. “The Salt Of The Earth” is that which is good, just read Shakespeare’s “King Lear”. Sodium is the metal component to table salt, Potassium is, aside from being an important fertilizer, the substitute for Sodium, as a metal component to make salt substitute. The molar mass of potassium to sodium is five to three, the yang to the yin of nine-fifths, which is gold to silver. But multiply yin with yang, that is nine-fifths with five-thirds, and you get 3, and the earth is the third planet from the sun. I thought the crux of the universe must be the difference between nine-fifths and five-thirds. I subtracted the two and got two-fifteenths! Two compared to fifteen! I had bought the Shaman his fifteenth rubber hose, and after he made me into the AE35 Antenna one of his first transmissions to me was: “God Is An Idea: There Are Two Elements”.

It is so obvious, the most abundant gas in the Earth Atmosphere is Nitrogen, chemical group 15 and the Earth rotates through 15 degrees in one hour.


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The Bronze Age

Often the one thing you are looking for is the one thing that was left out of the story. If you are an archaeologist you understand that gold and silver were important to early civilizations, especially to be used for ceremonial jewelries. But, you would also know that copper was used earlier and more as it is a soft and malleable metal that can be worked without being heated, pounded out into flat sheets. Copper (Cu) used tin (Sn) as an alloying metal to make bronze, which was the beginning of the Bronze Age in Mesopotamia around 3500 BC. These elements are the elements left out of Manuelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Amarjitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stories, and so are just what are being suggested. Today the alloying metal for bronze is zinc (Zn). Let us look at the ratio of the molar masses of tin to zinc: Sn/Zn = 118.71/65.39 = 1.8154 ~ 1.8 = 9/5 It is the nine-fifths around which our stories have been centered. Ian Beardsley May 15, 2015


32 of 60 Now that we have established that nine-fifths is an important number, let us consider the ninth and fifths letters in the alphabet. They are “i” and “e”. “i” and “e” are central to computer science. We have: iPhone email iPad iBook ebook…. We have already shown that there are three sets of letters that are at the heart of mathematics, namely: (a, b, c) and (x, y, z) and (i, j, k) There are only two vowels in these and they are “a” and “i”. “a” and “i” is AI, the abbreviation for Artificial Intelligence.



33 of 60 Finally of interest is:â&#x20AC;Š


34 of 60 This program finds chars for ascii codes 0 to 7: #include <stdio.h> #include <cs50.h> int main (void) { int search=0, found=0, i; int dec[50] = {0,1,2,3,4,5,6}; char *s[100] = {"NUL","SOH","STX","ETX","EOT","ENQ","ACK"}; printf("Give me an integer: "); scanf("%d", &search); for (i=0; i<=7;i++) { if (search==dec[i]) { found = 1; break; } } if (found) printf("That is char: %c", *s[i]); char *t[100] = {"U", "O", "T", "T", "O", "N", "C"}; for (i=0; i<=7;i++) { if (search==dec[i]) { found = 1; break; } } printf("%c", *t[i]); char *u[100] = {"L", "H", "X", "X", "T", "Q", "K"}; for (i=0; i<=7; i++) { if (search==dec[i]) { found = 1; break; } } printf("%c\n", *u[i]); }


35 of 60 jharvard@appliance (~): cd Dropbox jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./find Give me an integer: 3 That is char: ETX jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./find Give me an integer: 6 That is char: ACK jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./find Give me an integer: 5 That is char: ENQ jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox):

The Earth circles the Sun once every 365 days. 3 in ascii computer code is the ETX (End of Text) key on the keyboard. 6 in ascii computer code is the ACK key on the keyboard and 5 in ascii computer code is the ENQ key on the keyboard meaning Enquiry. Therefore, I believe we have the message from ETs: "ET X End of Text, Acknowledge Enquiryâ&#x20AC;?.â&#x20AC;Š


36 of 60 The Nephilim We produced Newtons Laws of motion and potential energy, now we produce the equations of motion, x (distance is velocity times time), v (velocity is distance per time) and time t, is x over v, by scrambling Nephilim with the key of hello under the vigenere cipher, which is the Hebrew word for the Sumerian Anunnaki (those who came from above), hypothesized ETs that gave the Sumerians agriculture and science about 12 to 14 thousand years ago:â&#x20AC;Š


37 of 60 jharvard@appliance (~): cd Dropbox jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./find Give me an integer: 3 That is char: ETX jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./find Give me an integer: 6 That is char: ACK jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./find Give me an integer: 5 That is char: ENQ jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./find Give me an integer: 4 That is char: EOT jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./stir Give me the key: hello 8 5 12 12 15 To scramble a word, type ./cipher + number from above,.. You will be asked for a word. Type the letter you want rotated. Repeat process until every letter is rotated by the right amount. Make sure cipher.c is in the same folder as this program. To do caesar's cipher type the key number and the whole word,.. when prompted for word, not just the letter. Use all lower case. We scramble nephilim (those who came from above) with the key hello jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 8 \ Give me a word: n v jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 5 Give me a word: e j we have j of (i, j, k), b of (a, b, c), y of (x, y, z) all vertical jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 12 Give me a word: p b jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 12 Give me a word: h t jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 15 Give me a word: i x jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 8 Give me a word: l t jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 5 Give me a word: i n n is number or integer jharvard@appliance (~/Dropbox): ./cipher 12 Give me a word: m y we have the 3 equations of motion vjbtxtny : v=(x/t) in the y or j direction (up); x=vt; t=x/vâ&#x20AC;Š


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60 of 60 The Author

The Syntax That Speaks To Us  

After explaining Newton’s Three Laws of Motion, the equations of energy that follow from them, and, the principle of conservation of energy...

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