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INSTRUCTIONS ON THE PROCEDURES TO BE FOLLOWED IN THE FILING OF CORRESPONDENCE AND THE HANDLING OF FILES ARE CONTAINED IN DEPARTMENTAL AM> SINGLE SERVICE MANUALS

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ROYAL AUSTRALIAN TELEPHONE: 69 0550

HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND AAAF

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: "AIRCOMMAND. MELBOURNE"

IN llEPlY QUOTE

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

5/6/Af.r ( 83) ~

7 JUI_ l967

UN-IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS 1. Enclosed herewith is a copy of a lecture given by Professor James E. McDONALD in WASHINGTON regarding the UFO problem. 2. Professor McDONALD has recently been in MELBOURNE for discussions wi th the CSIRO on meteorological problems, and at the same time, took the opportunity to present an address to members of associations interested in UFO activity .

3. The lecture papers enclosed \Vere brought to this Headquarters by a Mr FRANCESWILLIAMS who professes an avid int erest in UFO ' s, for the information of the authorities handling UFO reports .

~

(L . B. BROWN) Wing Commander For Ai r Officer Commanding Encl /

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that th1s exper1enced pilot had told 1n con- and a JOurnalistic era was thereby

s~ernation

UFOS : GREATEST SCIENTIFIC PROBLEM Of OUR T!KES? ~~s E. McDonald (Prepared !or presentat1on before the 1967 annual ceet1nq of the ~~rican soc1ety of ~ewspaper Editors, washington, D. c., Apr11 22., 1967. )

SUHHARY - An onte~eio~ ar.aZ~•~• of ~"n~reda cf o"teta~d•ng UPO report•, and pereon~t :n:er- _ ui~ue uith doaene of k•N uitneaeee •n •~porta~. caeee, have Led Me to the ~or:cZ"eion ~hat UFO prabz.,., i• en• of e:z:cc~d.,:gLj! grsat B<aentifi• importance. Inetead a! de~eru~r:g the deecrtption of "noneenae probLe~ , un•oh it ha8 had J"ring tucnt~ ~ears of O{~i~ia~ Mi~ha~­ dl'ng it. uarrante the atte>:'t\011 o; •~••r:.lf, pr~••; and pubLic, not Jue~ ui:hin the ~"~~•d S;a:o~a b•t throu,•ho:.: t ;,. u~r~d, ae a '"'"'oue probleM of firot-arJer eign•f~ca~ue. Zhc c•rioue man~er in uhi~h ~his _prob~•m hae b•en kept au' of aig~t and m~•nta>nad :" dierttp~<~tt ie t~za,lnltd her.,. Batnc r<U>por.s• bititv for ita avatemat£~ ~iDrt~pr•a~ntation liee ui th A I r Fore• ProJect BZwoboo.~ uhich, on ,;,t> baeie of firat~<Jnd knouL<.dgD, I ~a>: on£!f d 11 acri.ba ac 11au~ng be•., carn.,d a:<t •" tho past da:~n Nears in a qutt4 aupltrficia~ and ~r.com ­

:h•

p•te'l.t mann•r.

rsar• of A~r Foratt aeeuranc~a ha~e ~~pt th• pubLic, th• preas, ~onu:•~•· and.thB !ai•n •l~lc ca~unit~ wndsr tnc m•••~prees•on tna~ ;r,~ UFO problc~ uae baing atudicd uit~.thor~ oughnc•• and ocicntific •zportiDe . Tro•a I nau• roun~ :o bo co~plstel~ falee. Illwatratiu• cza-pl•• · dra~r. !ro- a Ultl"IJ Za:ac ea~fl•, wiLL be deecribo1 to dc~onetrate ·h~o. It ia urged that th• tiMe ie Zor.g o~erdue 'o,. a •"uH-•caZ. Congreaeio11al ir.vestigation of thv UFO problc~, an ir.vcctigatior. in which pereon• ot.teidc of o!flci.aZ A~r Force chan,.,z., cau put on l'ecord th• aatoundlng h'i.s:or11 of the :Jay in ~hioh a probZc~ o! potentialty enormoua scientifio: i"'porta'laa hae been auapt ""d"r a ~g o! ridicule a"d M~Cr4p~•sentatiDn ;or :~o d.:cad""· rl:~ hyrotheei• that th11 VFDe might be .:ztztatBrr•atJ"ial prob•tJf d4•pit• it• •uaer.o;ingZy to»~

priori probability, ie

~kggeated

Zeaa: ~n•ati•factDrH h~poth~D~6 th~ oo~-avaiZabt~ VFD ovid•n~c.

far

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gzpla~n~ng

INTRODUCTION June 24, 1967 , will mark the twentieth anniversary of what we might whimsically call the "birth of the flying saucer . • For just twenty years earlier, on the afternoon of June 24, 1947, Kenneth Arnold, a Bo~se busi nessman fly1nq in his private a1rcraft, r epor ted seeing a formation of nine disc-like obJects sk~•ng ~long at high speed between him and d1stant Mt. Rainier . ue said that they moved in an unconventional manner "like a sauce r would if you ak1pped lt across the water . • A reporter who interviewed Arnold after he landed that even1ng in Pendleton, Or egon , coined the phrase "fly>ng saucers• to add a feature-story twist to an observation

opened.

:.s one d1gs back through the subsequent

of the UFO problem, it becomes ev1dent that a wave of Uf~ aiqhtinq8 actually beqan several dllys prior to Arnold's observatlon, but 1t was not unLil about ~uly 4 that press incerest rose exponentially and "flyinq saucers" were headline news throughout the country. I hAve recently had the opportun1ty o! re•:1ew1ng 11 c:ompllat1on of UFO s~ght1ngs for those first few weeks of what 1s usually reqarded as the beginning of UFO observat>ons, a compilation being prepared by T. R. Bloecher for publicauon later this yeor, probably by the Nat1onal In\~stigat1ons Committee on Aerial Phenomena (NICAPI. Although 1 was already fam1l1ar w1th much UFO h1story when I beqan to exazune Bloechcr's matenal, t was startled to see the large number of reports of high-speed unconventional objects that flooded into press offices throughout the country 1n that early period, far more than 1 had ever guessed . Only 4 small fraction of the reports were carried by national wire services, so it has been necessary for Bloccher to dig into old newspaper files in many major U. S . cities to ~earth the d1mensions of that wave of siqhtings . I cite this early per1od as exempl1fy1n9 much that has happend subsequently, althouqh most of the reports of that period have never been checked as were later cases, so one cannot yet regard the evidence for all the 1947 sightinqs as conclusive. A mixture of denials led to a rather qu1ck fall-off in news value of the "flying saucers" 1n late 19~7 . Hoaxes were headhned •.;ith about as much ct11phas1s as wer e reports from experienced observers . The pub lished reports fell off, and for awh1le it a9peared that one h~d w1tnessed just another

hi~tory

•silly season

pheno~enon,•

as some newspaper-

described 1t . But, surpris>nqly, the UFO reports began cropping up again . Here and there they r eceived press coverage, ~ostly non - ~ire coverage in local paper. . By 1948, conslderably nore reports were com1ng ~n. and mil1tary concern (which had probably never died out) was responsible for establ1shing an official investigatory project, Project Sign (often loosely called "Project Saucer"). S1gn was set up ~anuary 22, 1948, w1th headquarters a t ~right- Patterson AFB, within the then newly creat~d United States Air force . That date marks the beginning of A1r Force responsibility for 1nvestigating UFO phenomena , a respons1b1lity 1t carries to this date . I think it is rather str1king that USAF was exact~y seven days old when it was handed the UFO problem in 1949 . Project S1gn gave way to "ProJect Grudge" in february, 1949; and, with ups and downs , Grudge cont1nued until about March , 1952 , when it was superseded by "Project Bluebook," an organizational entity that surv1ves today, still headquartered at Wrlght-Patterson AFB . The summer of 1952 brought one of the greatest waves of UFO reports on record, and the first Bluebook Off1cer, Capt. E. J. Ruppclt, has related (Ref. ll the hectic efforts of his staff ~en


2

of 4b~t ten Air Foree p rsonr l t o kceF ~ec w_th the reports t t. pou d 1.nto WP u that su:n:'!er . he famou tl shinQtc, ' a t ona- Airport a_ghtlng. o! July lq and 26, 19S2, wh~~h _nc_uded N\ r dar ob r ationa, ~ re1al a1r!1nes pilot obscrvatior~. nd grour ot3crvat1ons, created the rear st th1no to a ~nic­ stt~~ttor. thAt has c er evolv d fror UFO rqor Aft r hit House Uer"' and r.~ rou conqreas1on 1 nd Fr d mards for an account> q, pres on! r ~ ealltd and the entire series of rv tions ~~re "explained" as ~u to 4" lo r dar Fropagation and rage-type r fraction events. (I have carefully x 1ned Lhese official cx?lanatl.ons and find th ent1rel~ 1n dequatc, 1nc1dent~l~ .J Althoug pr sa attention cuts1ded ~ the race of thea assur ncas, Air Force concer behind-th -sc n s cort1nued, and early 1n tho follaJ1n9 year a panel of scientists was ~sser.bled to review t e situation.

THE

ROBERTSO~

REPORT

A~O Jij(

CIA

T>,e Rob rtson PanC!l (chalred b\' Calteeh theoretical physicist 11. P. Robertson) rret 1n January, !953, end re"iewed selected UFO re1•ort.G - apparently about ci9ht 1n detul and ~~ut fifteen others on ~ briaf•ng-basis . Two ..,ork1ng Clays o! ease-reviews followed by two days of s~~~rl~inq and report-drafting constituted the entire actlvit~· of thi.s Panel during the period January l:-17. 1953 . I describe that P nel's work in more than passing manner because J believe that ~ Rob~rtson £ane1 marked a turnin" 001nt 1n the history of

oro

ln~at1~-

-

--

-

On the first of three visits to Project aluebook at WPAFB last s~-cr. I asked to sec the full report. of tte Robertson Panel and was g_ven that report by the present. 81 ~book of fleer. MAJ . Ifector .u1ntanilla. lie informed me that he had "rout1ncly dec1a&&1fled" it ear11er on the basis of the "1~-year rule" cover1ng DOD doc nts . I made cxtens1ve notes from it And discussed its content w1~h Ksj. Qul~tanilla. On ay next trip to Bluebook, on J "C 20 , 1 request. d a Xerox copy of the report. The copy was prepared for me, but not 91ven to me because a superior office~ suggested that since "another agency• was h:volved. they'dluve to check before releasing it to m • J rem1nded them that I alread~ had ex~ensive no~ s on it and that I had already "i"'"""sed 1ts contents w.th many scientific colleagu s around tho country. I was~swred ~h~t the1r check waa perfunctory and that I ~ould b s nt the copy 1~ a we k or two . In !act, I n v r rec iv< u. T'> "other a~sncy ,• tho Central Intolliq~ncc Agency, ruled that thl.ll document did not como under thoc "12~·c<>r rill~· and reehasihed it. AlthOJgh " soc .. tled "sanitized versior• was later released t he full document r mo1na undisclosed. A ' mlll'.bor of scc~ions of the "san>t>.,cd var.s 4 on" hove been publ1shcd by John Lear, who asked for full rel as but qot only Lhe porti~l vers~on C!lef. 2J. 1 studi d the full version 1n unclaasoficd statas . M1lit3ry on~ sc1 ntiflc staff at WPAFB have be n fully awor of my possession 0 ~ thl.s 1nfor-nt1on for contbs. 1 have d1seuased 1 t

r~ lt as o~ n Wl tD a y sc1~ nt 1 t • I r lnforma t10n >n no ~oy l a r 1nq on the securt~~ of t e ~n-t ed State , d I ~all now describe 1 • 8 cont er:t h r . I ur qo tl >t press and L~1 q res ' d ~" ~fu ll a nd 1mm la te release of the ent l.r c t xt. of the obertson Report, 1 nclud1.r.g the CIA rcco= ndattons wlac>, ha..-e ba d su ch st!"or. b~a r >n'J on the wa:,• in wh1ch the A1r For ce ~ se~u ntl treated the JFO p r obl , t hat c~ r sc1e n t i sts can ake the,r own , a1Lot1ons of the annor in wh1ch sc1ent1f 1~ pursui t o f t.h UFO proble~ wa s der~- l ed 1n 1953 . Th s e ien t>sts cocpr1s1ng the Robertson Pane~ ( Robertson, L"is 1~. Alvarez., Lloyd V. Berkner, Sar.uel A. Coudsreit, Thornton Page}. on the basis of what 1 must re'jard as a far too brief ex~~1nat1on 01 the evidence already 1n Atr Force fl.l s as of January, 1953, ruled ( !~rs~) that t.here was no v~dence of any hostile act1on in the UFO phen~~ena. In par~ieular they ruled (secondly! that there was no evidence for existence of ~ny "artifacts of' a host1le foreign pa•er• 1n any of the records whtcb were subm~tted to them. And (th:a.rdly) they recommended an cdueat>onal program to acqua1nt the general public with the nature of various natural phenomena seen in the skie$ (meteors, vapor trails, haloes , balloons , etc . ), the object1ve be1ng to "remove the aura of mystery" that the un1dent1fied G>bJects had "unfortunat.,ly" acquired . In v1ew of the rather limited ~ample of UFO eVldence 'Nhleh WIIS laid before this Panel, such conclusions were perhaps warranted . The crucial shortcoming was thJ.s: There 1s no evidence !:hat any of these f>ve men had pre vious extens1ve conto1ct W>th the uro probl<:OM . The pr1nc~pal eases they examined excluded s~e of the most interesting and s1gn1f1cant eases already on record (e . g ., Un1ted A1rlines 1947; Ch1les- Rhitted, 1948: C. B. Moore, 1949;' T~baugh. 1949; Farc:ngton, 1950; ChiCago ' Southern Alrl>ncs, !950; TWA Airllnos , 1950; Ser:"our !less, 1950; l·hd-Continent Airlines . 1951; Nash- Fortenberry, 1952; and many other very s1qn>fic~nt 1952 s:ghtings) . And~ mere tw? days of rcv1cw o£ tho UFO data Cpr1or to go1ng 1nto report draft>ng session) would not be enough for all the ~~wtons of science to sort out. the baffling nature ot t.h1s probl~ . The only sc1ent~st present at these sessions who had ~lready exsrn1r.ed a substant1al number of reports was an associate member of the Panel, Dr . J . Allen Hynek . :;hen 1 asked him last June why he d1d not then speak out , on the basis of his then f1vo years oxper1enea as coief scient1flc consultant to the Air Force on OFO matters , hc; told me that he was "only small potatoes then• and that it would have beer ;unpos:&ltle for hirn to s~·ay that ~.:r!llncnt group . In r fleeting on all t~at 1 have learned •n my past. year • s work or t.hia problem , 1 r<><,J rtJ this four- day s~sslor o! the Robertson P4ncl as d p>votal poirt 1n UFO hlstory . For instead of a recommendation that tho problem be t kvn out of Alr Foree hands (on grounds of on - hostility of the UFOsJ and turn d ov r to sam se1 nt!Cic llger.e~· for >dequato s tudy, t'>ec was a ost regrettable fourth reeomm nd t1on mad , 1n add. hon to tiiC'tliroe cit ., abov , a reeomrnendatlor. made at the s pcc1f1c request of CIA representatives present at the final sessions of this


3

Panel. (CIA rcproscntat1vcs ltsted 1n the repor= g1vcn to me on June 6, 1966, tnclud~ or. H. Marshall Chadwell, Hr. Ralp L. Cl-rk, and ~~ . Phtl-p G. Strong. Top-r nk1n9 USA< representative present was Brig. Gc~eral Garland, ch1ef of the Aic Technical In~ll1 qenee C~and. F. c. Durant and J. A. Hynek wc~c •assoctato ~rs• of ~c Pane~.) Whereas tho first three rec~ndat.or.s were later disclosed l~ough not for about ~lvP vcarsJ, the fourth recommendation has never been fully r ported in a manner ~at pr..,.s, public, Congress, and scien<=e can cvAl uate. However, enough of that fourth recomcendat10n 1s described in Lear's suo=ary of ~e "sarttired version• ~ot even p~rsons who have not seen the ent1re document, as I have, can s-nse that a minor tragedy of sc1enee may have been effected 1n January, 1~53. The fo1.rth rec:ommend4t10I\ mad" bJ' the CIA, asked for a aystemilUC "debunltinq o( the flvlnq saucers,• to use tho actual langu~qe or-t~ document. And the stated ObJeCtlvo of ~e "debunk1ng" was to "reduce public lnterest in flv1n9. ~·· --U~~

I W1Bh to make very cl~ar th~t. on the examination of the tull context of recommendation, I do not regard this as a dark and sinister action-Df a covert body trying to dece1Ve the ci ti:enr:,· of the n~tion. Ril~or, the re~son behind th1s roqrett~blc dec.o1on (that appears to h3ve been acted upon so very faithfully by Project Bluebook e•·.,r since) was entirely underatand~le when ~een fron a sdlely national-sccur1ty V1ewnnTnt~c unprcce entCd wave of UFO reports of 19~2. sone 1500 )USt in offia1al Bluebook files alone, tied Up Air For~ 1ntcll1qence P"rsonnel 3nd intelligence machinery to an ala~ing d..-qree . G1v.,n the scientists' opinion that ~e~e was no evidence th~t the UFOs cace from any terrestrial power hostile to the u.s . , 1t seeccd to security people to be urgently lmpertant to reduce ~is "noise• that might cover up r~al "signals" com1nq into intolligen<=e channels. Hence, v1ewed nllrrowly fro= security v"~~:nts, lt mil~ good sense to get th1s noise suppressed. It has indeed been effect!·.·ely suppressed in t.he ensuing fifteen years . ba~is ot my ~is fourth

AtR FORCE

REGULATIO~

ZOC-2 r the CIA recorntl,c Court'> 1 te~:~ 1 port t A1r

av~!lilble;

book.

but all unknOMns were to 90 to Blue-

This had iln effect that ~s well k~own to a!l who have stud1ed th1s preble~ closely. At Bluebook the most outr4gcous•y unsc1cntifi<= "explnnat1ons" were ass•gned to i~portant sight1ngs. Cases bearing not the slightest rese=blance to feathered creatures wore called "b1r~s.• and so= of the ost 1eprob~le "balloon" phe~~na in all the history of balloon1ng can be found in Blueboo~ f>les . "Astrono:_cal" was tilqged onto cases that are no oore astronom1cal ~an orn>tholoqical: ilnd so it "'ent. Tl"e "percentage of unidentifted" wa,, by the f1at of sc1entif1cally untratn~d Bluebook offic rs, stead1ly •reduced to a min• And sctence be damr 1. -

rn=. •

1 could d>seuss, for tours, spec~f1c details of cases reported stncc 1953 fo~ which Bluebook has q1ven Utterly unreaso~able "explannt1ons," C4ses I have gone over 1n det~1l and many 01 whose k y wHnesses I h.ove personally interv1ewed. The onlr ron-mil>tary person who has had cont1nu1ng opport1Jn1ty to examine these cases was the Bluebook consultant, Or . J . A. llynok, who h'!s held that role cont>nuously for e>ghtecn lonq years. I have discussed some of the famous holders with him and with Air For<=c personnel. 1 can onl~· sa;• here that l am qui~o d1ssatisfted w1th such answers ~a I have been able to secure .

In those Oluebook flles have la1n hundreds of cases that received no adequate schnt1hc review, that have often be<>n explained "'"BY 1n such r>diculous manner that even amateur astronomers or untro1ned cit1zens have publ1cly complained over tho absurd~ty of the offoc!al explanat1ons. rtr.d ~uch more distresslng have been the many <=ases 1n wh1ch rc~pcnsible C-tizcns have, 1n all good fa1th, repor<ed s1gn1!1cant enco~~tcrs w1~ unJdenti f~ed obJects at close range, objects defying explanation in convent10n4l sc1ent1f1c or technologlcal terms, only to have the Pent~gon press desk rele~sc offtc~al explanations 1~ terms of "t-..1nkllng star" and ••1nversion, • "rotrages,• "balloon,• "refuel1ng tanker,• ilnd the like. Such explanat1ons, put out as 1! they resulted frao a careful A1r Force c:hec,; , made the c>ttzens who reported see1ng strange Ob)ects !eel, as one Vlctim put it to me, "like 1d1ots . " I truly doubt that Alr For ce personn<>l at WPAFB and the Pentagon can have any notion of tho b1ttcrncns they have created among persons who h~ve beon made the butt of rid1cule by these "debunk1ng .. policies that trace back so clearly to the 19~3 dccis1ons . The net offect, over the ~oars , of such polic1es and procedures has been cnt>rcly understandable. Newspapet- editors, not having stafr to send out to chccl: even the sighttngs 1n the1r own VlCin> ty ln a m~nn<'r thilt could be rcrmcd scientific, an~ havlnq no ~ood reason to suspect that ~c Air Fore would be supcrf~c>ally inventing oxplnnat1ons with cssen tl.all~· no scient~f1c content , quickly grOJ··· c:onVlncea that there must not be an~·tning to th.z UFO phenC>mena. On<= ~.s com'lCUon was fairly well established, tt natur 1 proponsitie~ or JOUrna)lStS to ~re!or wr tl q ! aturo storleS


h hway pol1~ 1 learr_j by ~re~t

xlaho a and Texas. as WG ~ n calls !rom the nt o! P~ 11c Safety in th he1 qht of ~e xeit nt (Ref. 4). But tt.e f~llow1 r. da~. t press w ~old these were d_c to • 1nvcrstons" and "el •tran1c alf~c­ t1ons,• as had happered befor 1n such =port4nt ens s U: Red Bluff, CaHf ., s·ghti~qs of Aug~st 13, 1960 . or th Re~ond, o;egon. case of Sept. 24, 1959. or S~owheqa~. He .• Febr.ary 11, 1966, etc. In the August , • 196S, Mi~ost ep1sode, 1t was interesting tha. ~1eh1ta Weather Bureau radar, unaffected by AF20 -~. also tracked many o! the unknowns and, like the subsequently denied USA< radar observat1onS, atched ground-visual observations cloi>ely. In a01:1e eases FAA radar obs<'rvatlons ave been va1lable to confirm visual stght1ngs; 1n others , on qet tho imprcss1on that ~•~ rc.eases are comprom1sed in so~e manner not unl~k< those at Alr Force bases. oklah~a oepa=~

ho stnqle effect of AF200-2 has be<'n us disastrous as the compro~sing of t rador doto. Here is on already ovolluble ~lcctro~ qnetic sens1n9 device, deployed in larqe numb<'r throughout the country , wh1ch lS known tO be Capable Of detecting Uf'OS . "fhlS ln~ter as.crt1on is fully juat1fied by the prelq53 d1sclosure of man)' /u.r l'oree radar observat1on& of h1gh-speed ob)octs for which no adequate explanotlons were cv r g1ven . 1ndeed , one of the problems that '•liS repeatedly mcnt!oned 1n the Robertson Panel report (see Ref . 2) w~s the "fost-trac;,• problem, wh1ch clo~rl~ both red both CIA ~nd ~ir Force 1n 1953 . And ~ell 1t should, as one can readily leurn for 1 lf by rcadinq Ruppclt 's book (Ref. • •n • long S"-'nlnory of radar sightinos of ob et tracked at multi-thousand- oph sreeds a& 11 t ~ by NICAP (Ref . 3) . A more recor~ c~so, t~ot I have personally checked on. occurred at Patuxent Riv r Naval Atr Stat10n on December 19, 1964, when two un1de~ ­ ~1f1ed objects vore tracked at speeds of ov~r 7000 ~:~ph . h'hereas the :.avy released a state-ent ~ttest1ng to the experience of the r4darman and whereas the operating personnel stated that the set wus not ~alfunctioninq , Air Force spoke SOlen told Ser•. Harry F . Byrd, who qller1ed the Air Fore~ on the case, that an ~nexpe r ~­ enced operator was on duty end the set w~s not work~nq properly (Re[ . 5) . sc1entlf~colly

Thu

was tt r ex

tin

or l .r ::JOUS Klll1an 1 t he, long wtth • 24, 19S9, GDW ~hrcc NICAP f1les and the ~dcncc" (Ref. 3) have 1 a . The effect . by the late 1950 ' s was cl rly ev1dent in the reluc~ancc of atrllnes ptlota to report sight1ngs, a reluctance stronqly enhanc:t:-d, in some insunces . by management d rect\vea from airl1nca offices instructing their pilots that they were not under any c~reumstancea to publicly report any unidenlJ fLed aerial objects that they might see during flight operot1ons. This further reduced the percentage of unldontifiod in an ~rea of q~e~t pot entia! importance . Another exccod1nqly adverso effect of hF200 - 2 has been that radar slghtinqs o! unident1!ied objects cannot be disclosed to press or publ1c by local a1r bose perGonnel . Radar sigh~inga do leak out in the midst of perlods o! oc~1ve siqhtinqs, but then the next day official disclaimers ua~1lly appear, as 1n ~e case of ~e important Midwest wave of early ~ugust, ~96S. Radars at Tinker APB and Car~nll AYB reportedly had un~~owna at pos1t1ons compatible with reports from many state

And not only have American radars tracked hlqh- speed ObJects execut1ng maneuvers defy~ng explonot1on, but so have radars of othe r countries . To c1te one such case , South Afr1can ~ir rorce radar trac;.od ~n object v~k ­ l.ng repeated p~sses at speeds of lOOQ mph over the Cape on M~y 23, 1953, under condit1ons that led the government to declare it off~cially unknown , a status that they have recently reconiirmed . In addition, thoro ~re on record, botr. in USAF files and elsewhere, m~ny cases of combined v1sual and o1r-borno r~dar 81qhtlngs by rnil1tary and commerc1nl aircraft. The f~ous Rapid City, So . oa;,Qtn , case of August 12, 1953 (Refs. 1, 3) could serve as a good example of un~xpl~ined Air f'orce ~1ght­ After a UFO was spotted by a m mbcr o! ~nqs. the Ground Observer Corps on night duty, two F-8~'o were vectored 1n to the location of the ~hJect, wh1ch showed on GCI ground-radar. Both


pilots got airborne radar lock-ons and also saw the glowing obJeCt v~sually, but could not close on ~ t. ~lany more such cases can be cited , but not after August 1953 "·hen AF200-2 shut down further disclosures of military sJ.ghtings .

cases; and one can surely ask whe~her non hostihty dJ.dn't argue need for getting the whole problem out of the mainstrearr of our m1l1tary 1ntell1gcnce channels and into some primar1ly sci~nti!lC channels where the problem could have been more adequately examJ.ned.

C~tation of foreign radar sightings above leads to the 1nevitable question of why fore~gn governments have not conducted independent studJ.es of the UFO problem. There seems absolutely no question but that the UFO phenomenon is a global phenomenon, so why haven't England or France, or AustralJ.a, dug into this problem? I have no final answers, but I asked a French UFO investigator, Dr . Jacques Vallee, about the French situat~on in particular. He explained that whenever French investigators of the UFO problem made any appeal to their government, thPy "'ere told that the United Stetes Air Force had been carefully studying that problem for years and had shown that there is nothing to it! I am told that the situation in Australia is not dissimilar . Is it conceivable that AF200-2 has succeeded in reducing the percentage of unJ.dentifieds not only here but all over the world? I strongly suspect so, though that is an inference I could not prove, only make plausible by many examples .

The iatter suggestion was, unfortunately, not made by the Panel. Probably these were busy men who thought the whole business had actually been well checked out by Air Force personnel and Air Force consultants . Perhaps they were reluctant to accept as scientifically s1gnificant observations made outside the scientific labor.Itory. Perhaps there •,;e;e other considerations .

Air Force Regulation 200-2 was given a new number a few months ago ; J.t is now called AFS0-17. The only significant change was to permit the University of Colorado to gain access to airbase- level 1nformation on un~den ­ tifieds . Let us hope that this single important alteration will soon pave the way to clarification of radar sightings by military radar systems. But for fifteen years, 20~-2 has been a most effective barrier to free disclosure of precisely that type of observational data that would have gone farthest toward arousing scJ.entific concern for the UFO problem - the radar sightings . Much more can be said about the radar problem, but here the blockage effect of the "debunking order" that leo to 200 - 2 has been the point of principal interest. 1953 REVISIHD

Looked at in retrospect, and viewed against the large volume of unexplainable phenomena reported outside of military channels since 1953, the recommendations made by the five scientists who comprised the Robertson Panel seem most regrettable . Are they to be faulted for their action,s?· I think not . The cases they reviewed were selected by someone else, presumably Air Force intelligence officers , or possibly CIA representatives (though I stress that I doubt this and kna..· of no evidence indicating that the CIA then ma~ntained, or now maintains, any scientific scrutiny of the details of the UFO phenomena) . I feel entirely certain that if I had no prior knowledge of details of UFO cases and were suddenly asked to make a recommendation based on a mere three days' look at UFO cases, I would not end up describing them as the greatest scientJ.fic problem of our times . One might, however, w1sh that the Panel ~embers had a~ked for a better chance to review more

But at any event, January, 1953, brought a marked turn of events . Bluebook ooerations under Capt . E. J. Ruppelt seemed to have been heading in 1952 towards some kind of systematic invest1gation methods that might have hre>unht the whole problem out into full glare of scientific light . But after 200 - 2 cam~ out in August, 1953 , and Ruppelt left the Bluebook staff shortly thereafter, a true period of "dark ages" began at Bluebook . Plenty of good reports kept coming J.n, as one can easily see by going over those files . But contr~ved "explanations" became the order of the dav and debunking to reduce public interest the flying saucers went on apace . Organizations such as NICAP attempted to force the problem out into the open, but their efforts were treated by Air Force personnel as if they amounted to crackpot activities, a vie•Npoint which I found rather well established in Air Porce circles when I began an intensive examination of this problem in April , 1966 . Whether this attitude has since altered appreciably behind scenes, I cannot sar . I might note, however, that I have repeatedly stated to Air Force personnel concerned ~ith the UFO problem that the NICAP investigations since its founding in 1958 are far superior to those of Bluebook, and I wish to repeat ~~at assertion here . It is based on a great deal of first-hand experience and on the basis of careful examination of many cases inves tigated h~ NICAP and Bluebook, respectively . Prior to June, 1966 , I had no first-hand knowledge of either NICAP or Bluebook . By July, 1966, it had become very clear that Bluebook has bee n operated on an almost incredibly non-scientific basis, whereas NICAP's work merits high praise, especially when measured against the shoestring budget on which they have operated .

in,

THE CONSPIRACY HYPOTHESIS I must comment next on one very intriguing aspect of the give-and-take between the Air Force and groups such as NICAP, namely the question of the "conspJ.racy hypothesis . " Among those who have done a substantial amount of checking of UFO reports, there invariably develops great concern over what I term t.he "coverup versus foulup" controversy . Some feel, on the basis of considerable knowledge of UFO history, that there are so many well-documented J.nstances in which Air Force personnel have obfuscated in their


6

handling of UFO cases that there must be a grand conspiracy, a high-level coverup of some sort . NICAP, and espoc~ally 1ts Director, ~ajor Donald E. Keyhoe, have cited dozens of instances that seem to suggest such a highlevel coverup . I have to confess that I am not able to rebut these 1ndiv~dual cases w1th specific 1nformation; I agree that, on the face of 1t, many past actions do seem to suggest a pattern of almost consp~ratorial co•.•erup. But, at present, I cannot subscr~be to the grandcoverup hypothesis. I do not believe, as do some UFO ~nvesti­ gators, that the CIA or still higher security groups "know all about the UFOs," know that they are of extraterrestrial origin, and are concealing this from both the public and science . Rather I have seen a large amount of evidence, much of 1t compelling in its nature, that leads me to reject the grand- coverup hypothesis . I believe it is instead a t~and fo~lup, accomplished by people of very 1m1ted sc1entific competence, confronted by a messy and rather uncomfortable problem . (What air force officer, American, British, Russian , or Chinese , would care to adm~t that in h1s country's airspace there are maneuvering objects of unknown nature far exceeding in performance characteristics anything his friends are fly1ng ! ) I have told Air Force personnel quite directly that I think it's a foulup, not a coverup, and until I see new evidence to the contrary I shall 5ubscribe to th1s 'aew . As a result of close scrut1ny of the operating methoes of ~luebook, after seeino at firsthand ho..- little sc1enhiic expertise has been ut~l1zed at Bluebook, and after finding no one 1n any Air Force office that I have v1s1 ted "'"ho exhibits any apprec~able knowledge of doe f'"'l~ h1.story of the UFO problem, I have slowly formed my own picture of what ~as prob<:bly :1-o.ppen.,d 1.n this long- standing coverup vs foulup CO:ltt"ovcrsy. I sense that grouns l1ke NICAP who have been assiduously inve~ti­ ~at~ng t:!':e UFO problE>m over the years have been ~ncapable of imagining how ~ncom?etently the P';Oblerr ~:as actually be1ng handled within the Ai'; Force . They could only imag1.ne that everythl.ng they knew was surely also known to Bluebook inv:stigators , and that all those spurious explanat1.ons defy1.ng elementary scientific principles could only be the efforts of nottoo- careful officers assigned to put out the coverup propaganda . But aft:er seeing what has gone on at Bluebook , after talking 1d th higher-echelon personnel at .I~Pi<FB "''ho ••ere almost unaware of what was be1ng done l.n the 3-man (major, sergeant ~ecretary) operation , and after be1.ng assure6 l.n the most conv1.ncing manner that Bluebook has been an ex~remely lo"' priority proJeCt (one of about 200 1n_the Foreign Technology D~v 1 sion of HPAFB •··here 1 t has lain . in recent years) I fc;mn a ve:~· different p1cture. ~:y pictu~e of a ~ l th1.s lS no cloak-and-dagger consp1racy, no effort,to prevent publ1c panic ever the "real nature' of the UFOs, no front crgan1.zat 1or. narned_Bluebook concca~1ng a higher- level 1nves ~lgat~on of the UFOs. Instead I see JUst one 1.nco~petently and superficial~y investigated

case after another swept under the rug . Bluebook, without conspiratorial f1nesse, has succeeded in hoodwinking us all . One of their most successful tactics m1.ght be called the "five-day delay." After an important sighting that has somehow made the wire services (many of us wonder how it is that certain cases make the grade '"'hile so many others go unnoticed), Bluebook and the Pentagon press desk just wait . Then, when press interest has gone through its characteristic half - life of about two or three days, they put out some "explanation" and add solemn assurance that the Air Force has 1nvestigated such and such a number of cases in the past ten years and of these such and such a tiny percentage have been regarded as unidentified, and the public and the editors shrug their shoulders once again, forget the sightinqs, and decide there sure must be a lot of nuts in the country to be reporting such outlandish things when the Air Force keeps on dutifully checking them and finding them all due to twinkling stars and meteors . It works . As editors , ask yours elves if it doesn't work : . . And all the time groups like NICAP , hav ing d1.l1.gently dug out the facts , usually in faT more detail than has Bluebook or its consultants , are left wondering how such atrocious official explanations could be palmed off on the public unless . . . and their suspicions that there ~ be a top-level coverup grow and grow. I believe that this , combined with inher:nt tendency for military personnel to play ~t safe and play it classified when in doubt about an uncomfortable situation , ha s generated the susp1.cions of a well- designed conspiracy . l~hen Jets are scrambled to t r y to ~o~lo~ a UFO, and all is later denied , I think ~t s JUSt some colonel playing it safe . I do not, in my reJection of the hypothesis, faul t those who have been dr~ven to it by some faint f~1th ~n the l.mage of scientific expertise s o d7hgent~y shaped by innumerable Press Informatl.On Off1cers at the Pentagon and elsewhere . But 1.n the area of the UFOs, that image appea rs to me to be a completely false image , almost laughably false. The United States Air For ce m~s~ assuredly has a lot of top - notch scient~fl.c talent at 1.ts d~sposal . It just hasn 't u~ed any of it on the UFO problem for at leas t f1fteen years, as far as I can see . I have often wondered ~f perhaps t he PIOs at the ~entagon press desks actually believe that, w1th all the engineering and scientific talent that can be found up at Nr igh tPatterson AFB, Bluebook must have a lot of that ~alent, too . This, at least, might expla1n how the Pentagon desk has dutifully passed on to a somet1.mes howling - mad local citizenry "explanations" of the most patently senseless natu:e in recent years . I miqht add t~at one addit1.onal strong argument against the hlgh-level coverup hypothesis is the very 1nept1. tude of Bluebook "explanations . " If Cli'\ and USAF really wished to conceal the UFO, they could very eas 1ly hav: assigned to the Bluebook off~ce clever, sc1ent~f1cally tra~ned officers who could have contrived sensible rather than absurd "explar.at1ons." Th1s has clearly not been done. -lnally, were there some frantic


7

effort on the part of CIA and USAF to plumb the secret of the UFOs, NICAP and even a person who has done as much checking of strong cases of close-range siqht1ngs as I have done, would surely run into many cases "'here the key witnesses had been carefully 1nterrogated by trained personnel out to get every last shred of evidence from a strong case. Quite the ooposite situat1on prevails: Ayain and again one finds that even w~en lee)' ;..-J.tnesses risked ridicule and reported a case to Air Force channels, no 1nvestigation of any kind was conducted. Let me cite a single example that I checked just last week. A reoort 1n the latest NICAP bulletin (Ref. 7) i.nd1cates that: "A i/FO ~ue2• ti., l:'lited l•o.ti.Q'lll ·,: New Y<Jrlc rity ~o~as reportedly e< n on Nov ...c., r · ~ , l~t:o . ;!i tne,·se:t included at Zea;;t (?ht empl?yoe:.- "·'· the Am-?r.:.:an ll<?.ws par:Jer P:,bli,.:h.;rc Ae.:o.:iation, who w~tched fl•om th:Oir o ···i..,. e or. ti: l?eh )"loot' o:· ?SO Third AuenuP ~~ 4 : :0 P.X. on a bright , runny day . Th •. UFO L'a~ a r • .:ta•teuZr;u• , cl<;;;:ion - shaped otJe·: . . . (which) •amo southward c~or tho Eaet It.

"'a ·

~n~>t ;,ovu•ed ove1·

ti" fJ!, Bu:· 'di»p . . . 'l~ ~+ r<a an..J bobrl"d Uk a sl. 'p on agita~ad

llivar•

Witnesses mentioned were D. R. McVay, assistant general manager of ANPA and Mr . 1'1 . H. Leick, manager of the ANPA's Publications Department . I telephoned the ANPA offices and spoke at some length with Mr. Leick about the sight~ng . He conf1rmed that eight or nine persons were out on the 17th floor terrace watching the object hover over the UN Building for a number of r.inutes as it rocked and reflected the sun's rays with a golden glint before rising and mov~ng off. I asked Leick if they reported 1t to any Air Force channels, and he said that A. A. LaSalle called a New York office of the Air Force and was assured that an officer would be in the next day to intervi~~ the~. But no one ever came. This is indicative of the d! ligence ·..;i th which the Air F'orce is seek1ng out the last bit of e\'idence about UFOs. Over a half dozen respons1ble witnesses see an unconventional ObJeCt hover over midtown Manhattan, they tell the Air Force, and it yawns! Le1ck added that they also phoned a New York newspaper "which shall go unnamed," but "they weren't interested . " It got to NICAP almost by accident , and NICAP sent up their standard ·~i tness-quest~onnaires which Leick ~airl they ~11 filled out as carefully as they could .* If this were an isOlated instance, it might be amusing; it is all too typical , unfortunately. so r don't see the earmarks of a frantic race against time to secretly solve the eniqma of the UFOs. 'InCidentally, my phone call to Leick illustrated another point - it turned up on~ more of the many "hldden UFO reports" I have received . Leick and his Wife, driving at night on the Ohio Turnpike several years ago, had seen a luminous, unconventional object with a c1rcular array of l1ghts . After hovering about 5 m1nutes, it took off in an oblique climb at very high speed. "I've never seen anything that fast," Leick told me. lie had never reported it, having no desire to be ridiculed for his observat1on, he expla1ned.

If my view is ~rong, ~f there 1s a highlevel coverup, then I am going to be-one of a ver)' large number of scient~sts , both "'ithin this country and outs1de it, who are going to want to hear some fast explaining as to how a sc1entific problem of the potential interest of the UPO problem could be regarded as the legitimate domain of deception-operations unparalleled in previous history . But, to repeat, I )USt don't believe there have been such operations:--ITn a recentlr published book [Ref . 7], L. J. Stanton also rejects the "conspiracy hypothesis," but for reasons which seem to me to reflect incomplete knowledge of the facts of the case . Stanton's book can be recommended as a generally sound analysis of th.e history of the UFO problem and the shortcom~ngs of the official investigations .) Thus, it 's not the UFOS but the Air Force investigation that is the big joke, as I now see it . 0n June 7, 1966, at the end of my first visit to Bluebook, and after incredulously pouring over perhaps 150-200 cases selected at random from the Air Force UFO files , I stated to Brig. Gen . Arthur \~ . Cruikshank, Jr . , commander of the Foreign Technology Division at NPAFB,that when the full picture gets out as to how the Air Force has mishandled the UFO problem, "the Air Force will look very, very sad . " I still regard this predict~on as sound, ten months later . Gen . Cru1kshank ' s response •,.;as laudable . He put three officers onto the task of carrying out a quick review of Bluebook . I extended all possible cooperation to that trio of officers last summer, and then I heard no more. I subsequently found that Gen . Cruikshank (who seemed to be qu1te interested to hear a real live scientist in his office savlng that there might be much more to the UFO problem than had ever met the Air Force eye) •,.;as transferred to another command on the ;o~est Coast as part of a routine shift of personnel . Therein one sees one more facet of the Air Force problem. No one has ever stayed ~iL~ this problem long enough to sense its true dimensions. There have been a half dozen blueLook officers since Ruppelt . None se~~s to ha~e had any apprec1able scientific background. Only the chief scientific consultant has been present over the whole eighteen years, and until recent months, Dr . Hynek seems not to have taken very seriously the enormous volume of important reports that one finds packed into the huge files in the Bluebook office . And so years have slipped by and the UFO problem is still with us . Norse yet, credible UFO .ll"epo-rts of close-range sightings are on the increase, and this despite the "ridicule lid " which callous Air Force discrediting has imposed .

SCIENTISTS' VIEWS ON UFOs Having suggested that press and public have been m~slcd by the CIA-requested debunking that Bluebook has carr1ed out in the past dozen years, j t is next in order to ask "'hy scient1sts have not seen through the m1srepresentations . Certainly at th1s writ111g one would be rash to suggest t~at rnore than a few per cent of the country's sc1cnt1sts take the UFO problem seriously . If the trde percentage is


8

larger, then I can only sa~路 that most of the supporters are keeping themselves very well concealed . By contrast, those who scoff at the UFOs as a lot of nonsense or as an expression of the hunan need for miracles or as the mis t .....,,. observations of untrained laymen are both r.umerous .:~nd vocal. In seeking an cxplanat~on of this pattern, one must again lay pr~mary respons~b~l~ty on Air Force Project Bluebook for having left scientists with no reason to doubt that the problem was being very thoroughly ~nvestigated . Scientists are busy people, always have more to do than they have t~me for , and when they read in the papers th.:~t Bluebook has explained away all but a tiny percentage of reports and that, for most of those, explanations could probably have been found had there been more adequate information, they are not likely to pursue the matter farther. Scientists, like Congress and the public, had no reason to suspect that all those Pentagon reassurances were baseless, so most of them ignored the problem. Others, unfortunately, without any firsthand knowledge about the actual UFO evidence and without any personal examination of a substan tial number of UFO reports, have felt free to speak ex cathedra that "people have a need for miracLes, so what's more natural in a scientific age than scientific miracles," a ..<A so on. Hany, seeing the highly visible cultist and crackpot fringe of believers in UFO space messengers have baselessly assumed ~~at this was the entire picture. Others have simply opined from their armchairs with scarcely any knowledge of any sort, just speak~ng fro~ scientific orthodoxy at its worst . In NICAP and in other similar groups such as A~RO (Aerial Phenomena Research Organization), there has been a modest number of scienc~sts who have followed the UFO problem with some interest, though none seems to have pursued the matter as a full-time effort . None could be rated at Nobel prize-winning caliber, none are leaders of American science, I suppose; and most have been reluctant to speak out on the basis of theLr personal knowledge, though they have suspected that scientific values were being ignored in the neglect of the UFO question. I was, myself, in roughly that last category until I decided, a year ago, to try to make an intensive study of the problem and see if there really was anything to all thos~ reports that seemed to keep cropping up . Desp~te almost a decade of intermittent checking of local UFO reports near Tucson , I had se"'n too few instances of strong cases to feel free to extrapolate very far . I was entirely unprepared for "'hat I found almost immediately ~pon making a personal check of NICAP's oper atlng methods and case f~les, and upon doing the same at Bluebook . r feel sure that my reaction W!.~l b':l par~lleled by that of many other sc~ent1sts )USt as soon as they can be persuaded to personally look into the actual nature of the UFO evidence in detail . To get th~~ to eo so, I am finding, is not as easy as one might hope. I rn1ght say that I have never met a scientist who has made what I could regard as an

adequate investigation of the UFO problem who is at all inclined to sneer at the problem . If I did find one, I would be extremely interested to hear his arguments . There is one scientist who has written and lectured a great deal about UFOs, an~ who has certainly looked at a lot of cases w~~hout being convinced that the.u~o ~roblem ~nvolves anything of great sc~ent1f~c ~nterest . That is Dr. Donald Nenzel, former Director of the Harvard College Observatory . Dr . Menzel has published two books on t~e UFOS, both. aimed at explaining UFOS chiefly ~n terms of ffi1Slnterpreted meteorological and astronomical phenomena (Refs 8, 9) . I am deeply puzzled by those books, especially the more recent one . ~ly puzzlement stems from realizing that or . ~lenzel' s background in physics and astronomy is well - attested by his authorship of a number of texts and references in those areas . Despite that background , when he comes to analyzing UFO reports, he seems to calmly cast aside well-known scientific principles almost with abandon, in an all-out effort to be sure that no UFO report survives hLS attack. Refract~on processes are quite well understood in optics, and the refracting properties of the atmosphere are surely as familiar in astronomy as in meteorology, if not more so. Yet in "explanation" after "explanation" in his books, ~lenzel rides roughshod over elementary optical considerations governing such things as mirages and light reflections. For instance, the interesting observation made by Dr. Clyde Tombaugh, in August, 1949, who along with two members of his family saw a puzzling array of pal~ lights move rapidly through their zenith ~ky in Las Cruces, Ne\< Mexico, and disappear ~nto the southeastern sky, is casually attributed by Menzel to "reflections of ground lights against the boundary of an inversion layer in the air . " The d~fficulty that these lights were rapidly moving in orderly fashion across Tombaugh ' s sky Menzel explains (Ref. 9, p . 269) by asserting that it was produced by "a ripple in the thin haze layer . " That is "this ripple, tipping the haze laye r at a ' slight angle, could have reflected the lighted windows of a house; as the ripple progressed in a wavelike motion along the layer, the reflection would have moved as did the rectangles of light. " Now this might go down with a layman, but to anyone who is at all familiar with the physics of reflection and particularly with the properties of the atmosphere through which generations of astronomers have successfully watched a large number of astronomical events the suggestion that there are "haze layers" ' with sufficiently strong refractive index gradients to yield visible reflections of window lights is s~mply absurd . But , in Nenzel's explanations, light reflections off of atmospheric haze layers are indeed a sight tv uehold. This, I say, I simply do not understand, since one is not deal~ng here with some subtle shade of opinion . Such a near- normal reflection process JUSt does not occu r in our atmosphere - and no one should know this better than an exper~enced astronomer.

Refractive distort1ons of stellar images are a familiar source of trouble to astronomer~


, . ,. and the circumstances governing these distortJ.ons are rather well known. Certain!~· the order of magnitude of refractive displacew~nt and osc1llations are extremely well known. Yet Or. Menzel speaks in detail (Ref. 9, p . 61) of a "mirage of Sirius" which he, himself, reportedlr observed '"'hile flying in an Air Force aircraft in the Arctic, in which refraction effects arc supposed to have enlarged Sir1us to an apparent angular ~iameter of about 12 m1nutes or more of arc Cequ~valent, he asserts, to a sphere a foot or two in diameter at a d1.stance of 300 feet) . Just how refr active 1ndcx gradients Wlth the axial symmetry necessary to enlarge a stellar 1mage 1nto a circular disc of such relat1.vely enormo us d1.ameter could ever develop '"'i th1.n our atmosphere, Arctic or otherwise, is not hinted by Menzel , nor does he confront ~he puzzl7 of how, as he flew along , h1.s stead1ly chang1ng optical path always provit;l.ed him wi ~h this J<J.nd of a refractive index pattern of ax1.al symmetry despite looking through steadily changing a i r pat.ns ! But having made his point , he use.s it as the basis of discounting UFO sightings by experi enced pilots who, he indicates , repeatedl y see refraction phenomena of just the same type . This 1.s nonsense . The imoortant Nash - Fortenberry sighting of July 14, 19S2 , in wh1.ch the pilot and co-pile~ of a Pan- AmerJ.can DC- 4 observed six red-glo~:ing dis c - shaped objects maneuver at high speed and in unconventional manner below their plane over Chesapeake Bay , is readi 1:; explained by !·!enzel (Ref . 9 , p . 256 ffl as searchlights hitting an "1nvers1.on layer . " He speaks of what "a thor ough stud~· of the situation shO'...ed," but as .one reads along, it becomes clear that all of his arg=ents apply only to formation of the far.til iar nocturnal inversion la)•ers that hug the earth's surface . Yet the two exper ienced Pan A~e r ican p1.lots distinctly describe (and Henzel's book , p . 258 , reiterates this) <:he '"ay in ..,hich the observed luminous objects "abruptly began a steep climb to an altitude above that of the plane , " an appearance quite out of question for an hypothetical searchlight sh i ning on an h:z•pothetical inversion layer near the ea r th's surface . But mam• other details of the s1ght~ng, clearly stated by Nash and For t e nberry , such as the sharp- edged nature of the glowing d1scs, and their impressive formationholding maneuvers , are glossed over i n Menzel 's inversion- layer explanation . Such easy neglec t of salient features of the cases he treats mar ks many other examples that could be ci t ed . Menzel ' s explanation of the famous ChilesWhitted s1.ght1ng is another excellent illus t ration of his methods of argumentation . An Eastern Airlines OC- 3 , piloted by Capt . C. S . Chiles 'A'ith J , B. ~lhitted as second officer, encountered a h1.gh-speed rocket- like glowing obJect approaching them out of the northeas t in the early morning hours over Montgomery, Al~. • on July 24, 1948 . The object was described as having a length of over 100 ft and thickness twice that of a B- 29 fuselage; it had something resembling blue- glowing ports and a fiery wake stre~~ing from 1.ts aft end; and just as it passed the aircraft , rocking the DC- 3 as it did so, it pulled upwards into a steep climb and passed out of sight through the broken cloud

9

deck overhead. All of these details are on recotd with the A1r force and are recounted in :·Senzel'sbook (Ref. 9, p . 108) . Henzel s ugqests that this was a f1.reball (intensely bright meteor) . He glosses over the reported rocking of the DC-3, and completely ignor es the un-meteor1c pull-up and vertical clirnbout. But what ~s most d1ff1.cult to understand, from an astronom1cnl po1~t of v1.ew, 1s that he goes on for several pages indicattng that since that 1nc1dent occurred near the time of the Delta Aquarid meteor shower, these p1.lots were fooled by a fireball from this shower . Now first of all, few showers have meteorotds large enough to reach the fireball class (brighter than -5 magnitude), and the Delta Aquar1.d stream i s not one of the showers noted for this . But much more surpris.1ng is that t•lenzel clearly failed to check his computations of the position of the shower radiant , for had he done so he would have found that lhe Delta Aquarid r ad i ant t•as at culmination about 40" above the southerr. horizon, whereas tne Eastern Airlines oc-3 was heading towards the northeast . Had Chi l es and l~hitted seen an Aquarid meteor i n the skies ahead of them, it would have given the appear ance-of moving in the same general heading as their plane, whereas all accounts , including ~lenzel's own version , describe the huge glowi ng object as coming directly to1~ards the aircraft ! Thus there l.S a clean- cut error of about 180" in Menzel's Aquarid meteor explanation . But ~lenzel closes his pat discussion of t.nis case (Ref . 9, p . 1121 w1th the statement that " . . . there can be no doubt that ChJ.les and Whitted m1s1.nterpreted t!-,e appearance of an unusually brtlliant meteor ... ·• The phenomenon of anomalous pro~agation of radar Wlthin layers of strong grad~ents of humidity and temperature 1s well understood . To determine whether stgnificant beam- refractton can occur, one consults radtosonde data t o see just what tnd,~x gradients prevailed . ~lenzel d1scusses a nl.ll!lber of UFO reoorts i n which he 1.nvokes anomalous pro~agation , but in no tnstance docs he present evidence that he has examined any quantltative aspects . l~ith qual.1tative arguments , false arguments are easily built up ; quantitative considerat1.ons are what one finds almost non- ex1stent in Menzel ' s disposal of UFO sightings . In some instances , he attributes airborne rada r e choes to phenomena which are unknot~n to militar y pilots and unexplainable in terms of me t eorol ogy and physics . fvr example , in the importan t Port Hur on , ~lichigan, case of July 29 , 1952, ground radar detected a high-speed unknolm and then the radar in the nose of one of the F- 94 's vectored into the unknown picked up an echo and locked- on ; f~nally the pi~ot himse~f s aw a fast - moving glowing object in that l oca tion . Menzel (Ref . 9, p . 160) easily explains the visual effect as the star, Capella , and the ground- radar fix ~nd radar lock- on he e x plains away as "phantom returns caused by weather conditions . " Evtdently he did not examine t he available rad1osonde data for that date and area, as I d1d, for chere was absolutely no chance of anomalous propagation causing false ground-returns on the ground-based radar that originally picked up this fast-moving and oddlr maneuvering target . But still more perplexing is his suqgestion that the ~~rborne lock- on by


10

the F-9~ '"'as due to "weather cond1 t1ons." Index grad1ents adequate to g1ve apprec1able super-refractJ.on or subrcfract1on are unknown in the free a~osohere. St1ll more sign1!~ ­ cant, is that one· cannot qet a return even ·-.ith powerful 1ndex grad1ents unless there is so~e solid radar - rcturn1ng obJeCt in the bent beam . Near the earth's surface, it is ground objects of one sort or another that provide these false targets of sol~d nature; but aloft there are no such solid objects ly1ng around to throw back a spurious echo. The result 1s that "ground returns" are entirely unknown aloft, and one need only ask ar. experienced Air Force p1lot to confirtr. that ~lenze l is here (and 1n other sJ.milar cases such as the outstanding B-2 9 case o\•er the Gulf of ~:ex1co, December 6, 1952, dis cussed on p . 5 of Ref. 9) J.nvoking a phenomenon that just ~ !:..£.!: ~· Hany other such examples of loose reasoning , failure to check the relevant weather data, and casual neglect of key features of the reports could be cited. He speaks (Ref . 9, o . 179) of the "freak weather" and of severe electrical activ1ty near Levelland, Texas, on the night of November 2/3, 19~7, when observations by 10 independent "itnesses 1~ere made "ithin a two-hour period of a large luminous egg- shaped object that hovered over fields or roads and stopped ignitions of engines in eight or n1ne vehJ.cles . Having asserted , without doc\l!:lentation, that there •.ras severe lightning in the area, he goes on to say that the objects, estJ.:nated by various witnesses at from 100 to 200 :eet in length, '"'ere just "ball light.nlng." And wet 1gnitions stopped the cars . fact tr.at the engines could be re started JUSt as soon as the object darted off would, of course, be entirely incons1stent with wet ~gnitions; but that feature of the observations is ignored . 1\orse, the actual weather data for the night and locale in question are ignored . I dug out the weather maps and rain fall data. A large high-pressure area was moving southward over the Texas Panhandle , completely antithetical to convective activity and lightning of any sort - and a check of half a dozen stations in the vicinity revealed that there was not even any rain falling during this period, nor had more than a small amount fallen hours earlier that day when a cold front went through . ~he

The Air Force offers the same absurd explanation of the Levelland UFO reports ~ncioentally, and Dr. J. A. Hynek, who w~s 1nvolved in formulating the Air Force explanation of this one, has stated to me that this explanation was a bit "unfortunate." The Levelland case affords an excellent J.llustration of how the press has been used by the Air Force in J.ts "debunking" efforts. The ~velland case, plus several others else~here 1n the Southwest on the same n1 ght ~er~ headl1ne news all over the country ~n ~ovember 3 and 4, 1957 . No response came fram the Alr Force for another four days, long enough for editor1al interest to wane a b 1 ~ . The~ an ~ssociatedPress dlspatch of Nov . 7, 195., re:terated the usual: "Tne Air Force says its 1nvestigations of 5,700 reported

s 1 ght1ngs of fly1n9 saucers 1n the past 10 years have produced 'no ph}'Slcal or material ev1dencc' that such things exist." In the •· ': , that d1spatch was headed "5700 Duds . " Turning the page from Menzel's disposal of the Levelland case, one finds him re-using the ball l1ghtn1ng explanat1on to account, on the next page, for another case, the Loch Raven Dam case of October 26, 1958. He ignores completely the po~nt that here, too, the car engine \oo"as stopped, but the witnesses' report of a large luminous object, estimated at 100 feet or so in length, hover ing over a bridge structure, he attribute> to more ball l1ghtning . To make the latter seem to fit better, he refers to the object as a "ball," despite the witnesses' remarks that it looked much like "a Navy blimp" {Ref . 10 , p . 192) . Also ball lightning is a luminous mass only a foot or two 1n diameter, so how ~lenzel feels it can atta1.n a size of 100 ft is far from clear . But the real 1rrelevance of the entire "explanation" emerges only when one runs down the weather map for the day in question and finds that a large high - pressure area sat over the East Coast, precluding anything like the kind of atmospheric electrical activity so casually invoked by Menzel . I could easily go on at much greater length with specific objections to Dr . Menzel's methods of explaining UFO cases, but the above should suffice to suggest the nature of my strong objections to hJ.s writings on this subject . I simply do not regard them as substantial scientific analyses of the UFO phenomena . I believe they should be ignored . However, they have not been ignored at all . One can find references in the writings of other scientists who c1te his work as the authoritative analysis of the UFO problem~d I can only presume that those others who have accepted h1s conclus10ns have not examined the actual details of his arguments , for the latter ju~t w1ll not_wJ.thstand close scrutiny . In my 0p1n1on, and 1n the opinion of a number of oth others familiar with the UFO problem , Dr . Menzel has had a baleful influence on scientific progress towards solution of the puzzle of the unidentified flying objects . I bel1eve that Bluebook officers have patterned many of their "twinkling star" and "fireball" explanations after those to be found in Menzel's books - an~ perhaps one can only say that for off1cers w1th very limited scientific background to take his wrJ.tings as r eliabl e was not_u~re~sonable, ~n view of his prestigious af~1l1~t7ons a~d h1s past publications on many scJ.entJ.flC top1cs . But the latter considerations notwithstanding, his writings on the UFO problem are, in my opinion , scientifically unsound . The sooner a large numbe r of other scientists take a close look at the astonishing nature of his analyses, the sooner thev will be put as1de as having no real relevance to the solution of the UFO mystery .


11

Recently another writer has launched an attack on the UFOs 1n a manner bearing many resemblances to Dr. Menzel's approach. Whereas or. Menzel feels that opt1cal effects probably e>~la~n the bulk of the UFO reports, Philip J . ~lass, of the Aviation " <K staff, has attempted to argue that cssent1ally all UFO reports can be accounted for 1n terms of plasma phenomena assoc1ated •a th corona discharges on power lines or ball lightn1ng (Ref. 11). L1ke Menze~ he sidesteps quantitative cons1derations. Also l:!.ke Nenzel, he rather freel)· i g nores many salient features 1n the reports of witnesses wno have seen unidentified objects, or else freel~· tw1sts them to f1 t his O~o.'Tl interpretations. Finally, I bel1eve he has ignored most of what is known about ball lightning. This still leaves open the likelihood that a few UFOs out of the thousands that have been reported were corona phenomena or ball lightnings, but Klass' efforts to explain the whole problem away with plasma-type phenomena cannot ~e taken seriously . I have discussed his approach with several colleagues active in the ~ielc of atmospheric electricity , several of whom have had personal exchanges with Klass, just as I have, and all share my rejection of his main arguments. Ball lightning, to be sure, is a very poorly understood atmospheric phenomenon. But if there are any ...,orkers in atmospheric electricity who hold, as does Klass, that ba~l lightning can be generated without presence of intenselv active thunderstorms, I have failed to ~~cov~r such v1e~~oints in a recent extensive review that I have carried out on the ball lightning problem, thanks to Klass' prodding . Klass has cited a half-dozen cases of clear- air lightning as if this so~ehow proved his contentions, but none of those cases sounded l1ke what is normally termed ball lightning . He ignores the fact that ball l1ghtning reports involve luminous plasmoids of diameter seldom exceedJ.ng a few feet, usually about the size of a basketball or smaller; J.nstead he feels willing to say that objects reported as having diameters ten to a hundred times large r are "ball lightning." cases like the interesting Red Bluff, Calif., sighting of August 13, 1960, where two California Highway Patrolmen stood less than a hundred yards from an object of metallic luster estimated at about a hundred feet in length, with huge lights on it, or the well-reported Exeter case (Ref . 14) of Sept . 3, 1965, could not, by wildest stretch of any reasonable scientist's imagination, be attributed to ball lightning - and the more so when one notes that the weather conditions were so stable that the official Air Force explanation used that circumstance to try to blame each of those cases on inversion-refraction of stars . ~or could dozens of other sightings, many made under daylight condicions WJ.th perfectly clear skies, where the observers reported solid, metalliclooking objects moving rapid!}' 1n the free atmosphere (far from Klass' corona- producing power lines and defying reasonable explanation as "ball lightning") . ! know of no atmospheric scJ.entists who give serious credence to Klass' efforts to

shoehorn all UFO reports 1nto the corona- andball-lightning p1geon-hole; but a large amount of magazine and press coverage has recently been given to hJ.s arguments, which is ~ost regrettable in that this will further confuse the real issues . This readiness of editors to pick up the dubious arguments of engineers or scientists who offer arguments attacking the OFOs as nonsense, contrasts sharply w1th theJ.r general unw1llingness to take seriously the much more solid efforts of groups like NlCAP who are, in a sense, do1ng the very job that the journalists might well be doing - carefully reporting unusual events going on recurrently all over the country. But can one fault the journalists heavily on this score? Probably not, sJ.nce once more one sees,at the bottom of all thJ.s, conv1ct1on that there really cannot be anything to all this talk about unidentified flying objects or else our Air Force would have found it out years back .

THE NATURE OF THE UFO EVIDENCE Like most scientists , I prefer to base scientific conclusions on quantitative observations obtained from controlled experiments in the laboratory . But scient1sts don't always get their problems handed to them in such neat packages. Seismologists frequently have to go out and interview lay witnesses in earthquake • areas in order to fill in details of their isoseismal patterns . Meteorologists can't make tornadoes in their laboratories; they must study them as they randomly occur, and re~y frequently on anecdotal accounts by eye- witnesses . ~!eteori ticists who try to locate the fall points of suspected meteorites often find laymen's reports confused and marked by certain characteristic errors of underestimate of dis tance, etc.; yet meteoriticists do manage to locate strewn-fields and impact- points by putting together large numbers of lay reports and working carefully to sort out the grain from the chaff. S1m1larly, in the case of the UFO problem, it is unfortunately going to be necessary for scientists to begin by listening carefully to the accounts of many untrained observers and to do their best to sort out the grain from the chaff. t~ith experience, one learns to immediately drop off an interview with a poor observer, an inarticulate witness, or one who is over-dramatic about his account . With dili gent searching, one finds that mixed in with the lay observations are some real ~ems of observation made by quite experienced observer~ often with a considerable scientific training . And slowly one develops a body of evidence that indicates an impressive deg ree of general consistency. NICAP, working in just this manner, found some years ago that the evidence for the reality of the UFOs was very weighty - but 30 one in science paid much heed because they were not a scientific body . The danger of rejecting reports that originate predominantly from non-scientists is a danger science has fallen 1nto in the past . The most notorious parallel concerns the history of the "discovery" of meteorites . Prior to about 1800, recurrent reports of peasants who clairned that stones had fallen out of the


l2

sky were scoffed at b)• the llCadeJu.cians. In many parts of Europe, iron objects that had reportedly fallen out of the skies were venerated as church relics, and this bothered the academicians of the Enlightenment who •.:ere trying to break away from the supernatura1ism of the past. Hence for years scarcely any scientists gave credence to these lay claims of witnessed falls . But f~nally, in 1802, at L'Aigle, France, an unusual shower of meteoritic fragments occurred, and not only all the peasants attested to the fall, but many churchmen and local pol1tical officials added their testirr~ny. So the French Academy sent an eminent physicist, Biot , to L' Aigle to investigate . His report, based on many persons' accounts, finally convinced the sc1ent1fic world that stones do fall out of the sky . The Academy's initial reTuctance to believe so odd a contention was heav1ly influenced by their notion of a beautifully simple , Clock- winder theory of the solar sys tem bas ed on the Newtonian synthesis . The idea of rocks and other debris skimming around amongst the orbi ts of the planets whose motions Lapla ce and Lagr ange had so firmly accounted for , was t o t hem distinctly uncomfortable . But Biot ' s analys is carried the day , and in 180~ , the ye ar of his report , the subject of meteoritics was opened as a legitimate scientific s ubject . Similarly today , most of us find it uncomfortable to think that in our atmosphere there may be r eal objects of a most unconventional nature operating and maneuvering in a way that we cannot account for in terms of present- day knowledge . In our discomfort, most of us seem to take the easy way out and say it just can't be , and we even suspect as slightly unbalanced those who cla1m to have seen these things. liilliam James put it painfully well when he said : "By far tl: nost .,6:.aZ way o; handZing pncno:::c>:a .·o na~:cL tr.at the!! :.JouLd ma;<c .fo'!' a ,cri?ue rearrangG~cnt of o:.r preccnceptions ie ·o 'gnorc t~cm aLtogathsr, or +o ab~a• thc1e who ocaz• :.J:tnccn to th""' · " Let me hasten to add that I'm not in any pos1tion to sermoni ~e on th~s theme ; I ' m sure l ' ve been guilty of the same error in my own scientific work . The d i ffe r ence 1S solely that , in the case of the OFOs , I have now seen too much evi dence t o be able to ignore any longer the serious ness of t he probl em of our collective turning - away from all of these reports . The 1803 episode chat led to acceptance of meteor ites is actua l ly only a weak pa r al l el to t he present- day case of the UFOs , for the UFOS do no t appear to constitute just one mor e geophysical or astronomical phenomenon of st i ll obscure nature . Almost everyone who has car e f ully sor ted through the evidence is forced t o consider quite seriously the hypothesis that the UFOs are some form of extraterrestrial probef . That-rs-an-KYpotneS1S very much more ortable, I fear, than anything like "rocks falling out of the sky . " It has so much more far- reaching consequences if true · its ! pr1ori probability seems so much mor~ remote than was that of rocks falling from che sky ; it ~arr1es so mu~h more dynam1te co explode cher1Shed concept1ons of our place 1n the universe .

Nevertheless, trying to put aside al l the preconceptions that I tend to 7hare with o r thodox fellow-scientists, and try1ng to keep my eyes fixed on the astounding na~ure and the astounding volume of the UFO ev1dence that I have examined in the past twelve mo~ths , I am forced to JOin many other7 who see 1n the extraterrestrial hypothes1s the only presently olausible explanation for the now- available facts . I repeat, however, that I treat it only as an hypothesis, subject to rejection if facts so rule . Even to hold this as merely an hypothesi s is to invite the charge of going far beyond t he available evidence, I've found . This is an understandable charge, yet not really a defensible charge . I have noted some of my colleagues making the mistake of judging the "available evidence" by the insignificant fraction of the actually available evidence that ~7Y are aware of . They tend unconscious l y to 1 k that the total existing evidenc e cannot be more conclusive and consequential than t he scraps of information they have thems elves read , mostly in newspapers. Thi s reactio~ pl us the very low a pfAori probabili ty of the extr aterrestrial hypo es1s tend inevit ab l y t o make most scientists balk at taking that hypothesis seriously . I understand this . But the actually availabl e evidence pointing rather strongly in that strange direction is an iceberg of credible reports of closerange sightings by reliable people, an iceberg whose tiny visible portion belies i ts true bulk and significance . The heart of the problem is how to get large numbers of top- notch scientists to dive down and e xamine wi t h great care the enormous bulk below the surf ace , t he large body of evidence that e xists but has not been pasteuri~ed for acceptance by t he body scientific . As long as scientists think t ha t al l this is just a lot of nonsense , they wi l l largely ignore it . This is pr ecise ly where you editors can play an exceedingly important r ole , by doing some checking on your own , reading some of the substantial references o n UFOs (e. g ., Ref . 3 , above all} , and p r ess i ng i n every way you can for an adequate and muchexpanded investigation of the UFO pr oblem.

NEED FOR A CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION Because , as I have now s a i d a lmost ad nau s eam , so much of the misrepr e s entatian-of th is problem mus t be laid a t the door o£ Ai r For ce Project Bluebook , I urge t hat a f ulls cale Congressional investigati on be prepared immediately to examine the actual nature of this problem . Following t he protests of many c i ti zens in the Michigan ar ea (after some moderately interesting sightings i n March , 1966), some Michigan Congressman pressed for and secured a hearing before the Kou se Committ ee on Armed Services last year . But i f ther~ was ever a one-sided hearing , this was i t. The three persons testifying were persons a l ready having an obvious vested interes t in tel ling Conqress that the problem has been in fair ly good hands - Air Force Secretary Brown , Bluebook Officer Major Quintanilla , and Bluebook Chief Consultant, Dr . J . Allen Hynek (see Ref. 12). ~~ereas NICAP has been press ing


13

for a chance to present its (strong) case before a Congressional committee for years (see, for example, the summary of those efforts in REf. 3, p. 173 ff), they were not invited to testify before the April, 1966 hearings befoxe the Armed Serv1ces Committee. Fortunately, a number of NICAP members sub~itted material for the record, somewhat alleviat1ng the otherwise Air- force dominated record of those hearings, but no NICAP representatives were asked to test1fy in person. I would emphasize that,at this very date, NICAP and many serious investigators of this problem have information enough on hand for a half- dozen Congressional investigations . What is needed is some pressure from the press for immediate clarificat1on of the status of this 20- year-old mystery that has been swept under a rug of ridicule and misrepresentation by Proj ect Bluebook. And the fastest way to get clarification will be, I now believe, a Congressional investigation . Clearly this will not solve the problem as a sc1entific problem ; but I fear that the existing scient1fic faith in 20 years of Air Force assurances is so strong that we shall not see anything like adequate scientific attention given to the UFOs until Congress sorts out the incredible his t ory of Bluebook mishandling of the UFO problem and thereby awakens scientists to the fact that they have been misled for two decades about what may well be the greatest scientific problem of our times.

THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO PROGRAM Some will surely object that to urge a Congressional investigation at a time when the ne"' t;n1versity of Colorado program is just getting underway is out of order . I do not think so. First of all, I have repeatedly said and continue to say that the Colorado program is not nearly large enough to cope with the apparent dimensions of this problem . I believe that,once that program gains some momentum, it will move towards the same serious concern for the UFO problem that I now hold . But I am uneasy, frankly, at the very limited manpower resources available to the Colorado group , and they are now about a third of the way through their Lnitial contract-period of 15 months . As I understand it, there are, at present, only four full-time persons on that program, none with training at the Ph . D. level; and the fractional-time of the several others (mainly psychologists) contributing to the program averages, as I understand it, less than 30 or 40 per cent. Several weeks ago I spent several days "'ith three of the full-time members of the Colorado team and made directly to them the same point I am here making, namely, that this problem warrants far more scientific attention than their program is currently able to provide. It is most encouraging that they will soon add two or three more members with considerable scientific training, but even this will scarcely make the Colorado effort at all commensurate with ~he importance of the UFO problem. Even if the Colorado program could quad ruple its scientific staff in the next few weeks, I would still be saying that we must get more good people onto this problem. It is far

too important a problem to leave in its present sta~e, and only a large increase in highcal1ber scientific manpower attacking the UFO enigma will suffice to make real progress on it.

TRANSFER OF RESEARCH RESPONSIBILITY I believe that the primary responsibilLty for UFO investigations ought to be taken from Air Force hands and turned over to some strong science-or1ented agency. NASA would se~~ to be a very log1cal group for this . Curiously, I have said this both in NASA and fairly widely-reported public discussions before scientific colleagues (e . g ., Ref . 13), yet the response from NASA has been essentially nil. Perhaps they, too, are sure that this is just a nonsense problem and has no relation to their space programs, their "seaxch for life in the universe ." NASA i s busy telling us that there is high probability of life in the universe, but it's all fax out ther.e , not here. Frankly , when one looks long and carefully at the UFO evidence , one wonders if perhaps it's not conceivable that some of it has found us, rather than vice versa . But, to date, my own efforts to ge~A to consider that intriguing possibility seem to have been ignored . Even attempting to get a small group within NASA to undertake a study- group approach to the available published effort seems to nave generated no visible response . I realize, of course, that there may be semi-political considerations that make it awkward for NASA to fish in these waters at present - but if this is what is holding up serious scientific atten tion to the UFO problem at NASA, this is all the more reason why Congress had better take a good hard look at the problem and reshuffle the deck . Interestingly, in the course of my months of digging into the UFO problem, I have learned from a number of unquotable sources that the Air Force has long wished to get rid of the burden of the troublesome UFO problem and has tried twice to "peddle" it to NASA, but without success . I regret that I am not free to quote my sources on this, but I regard them as entirely credible . An Air Force "'ish to be rid of the UFOs would be entirely compatible with the firm impression I have formed from many lines of evidence that no one in any position of importance within the Air Force views the UFOs as real or significant . Such a position is compatible, too , with all that I have been able to learn about how the University of Colorado program came into being . Everything points to this: that the Air Force regards their UFO responsibilities as a public relations liability that they would like to have done with, once and for all, and Colo~ado may help them unload it. The request for a group within the Air Force Sc1entific Advisory Board (AFSAB) to meet and review tbe UFO problem did not come from the Systems Command within which Bluebook operates. It came from Gen. E. B. LeBa1lly, Director of Information, Secretary of Air Force Office of Information (SAFOI). Gen. LeBailly's request was made on Sept. 28, 1965 (see Ref . 12,


14

p. 5995), some weeks after a large wave of UFO s.i.ghtings all over t:he Midwest. That wave made headline news throughout the country, and Bluebook's "twinkl1ng star" explanation was held up to ridicule when the Director of the Oklahoma City Planetarium gently po1nted out that ~!aj. Quintanl.lla was (once again) misread1ng his star charts and blaroing the sightings on stars that weren't even in the Midwest skies. This made headlines, too, and many editorials in the :1idwest were critical of USAF's handling of the incident. If the behind-scenes response to this had been Air Force concern to try to do a better JOb of checking a real sc1entific problem, the systems Command could eas1ly have found several dozen men right there at WrightPatterson AFB who could have stepped in and ~nstantaneously upgraded the Bluebook operation by one or two orders of magnitude. No such action followed. Instead, it was the general in charge of USAF public relat1ons who asked AFSAB to review the situation, which they did on February 3, 1966 (Ref . 12, p . 5996). An AFSAB-appointed group, the O'Brien comm1tte~ devoted only a day to their deliberations and did not even invite the testl.mony of Bluebook's chief scientific consultant, both of which points may be some kind of measures of their scientific concern for the seriousness of the UFO question. It was th1s group that recommended establishment of a "university team" approach, whl.ch eventually became the oneuniversi t~¡ approach now centered at Colorado. All that I have seen points to the conclusion that this whole effort was directed chiefly towards getting the Air Force out from under an onerous burden, the public- relations liability of the UFOs . I know of no one on the O'Brien Committee who took the UFOS seriously. (I might add that I got a small chuckle out of the Bluebook scientific consultant's patting himself on the back, Ref. 15, about his "small sense of personal tr1umph and vindication" when USAF announced the Colorado program . I had firsthand contact with some of the thinking that lay behind the search for a university to head up the Air Force's UFO review. I am afraid it warrants vanishingly "small sense of personal triumph and vindication" in the mind of the one person who might have put this problem on the right track soon after he began his 18- year consultantship in 1948:) Lest some of that sound like a charge of "whitewash," let me interject that I do not mean that at all . First of all, I know that Dr . Edward P . Condon and the University of Colorado group would not have touched the problem if it had been brought to them in such a context . But, secondly, l have found nothing to make me suspect that the Air Force views the UFOs as anything but a lot of misinterpreted natural phenomena, balloons, aircraft, and all of the rest of the things they say in the Pentagon press releases. I would not hesitate a moment to say it if I truly thought they were d1ssembling; but I do not think so at all . I believe that today USAF really believes there's nothing to all this talk about unidentified flying objects. I believe that they want to get r~d of the annoying business once

and for all, and that they sincerely wanted to select an unl.mpcachable scientist and a school of good reputation to take on the job of showing once-and-for-all that there's nothing to it, and then forget about it and go back to what they regard their proper business , defend1ng the country against host1le forces . All this is not a po1nt of view that I have formed overnight . I have puzzled over the curious history of the Air Force handling of the UFOs almost as much as I have puzzled over the UFOs themselves in the past year . And I have discussed these matters with many knowledgeable persons in forming the above opinion . I would be quick to agree that much evidence points to a time, back in the early 1950's, when many USAF people, some in high places, suspected that the UFOs might be extraterrestrial, though I cannot begin to lay out that evidence here . But once the turning point of the Robertson Panel and the 1953 C!A debunking order was rounded, and personnel had been rotated and shuffled a few times, l believe that the Air Force fell victim to its own UFO propaganda. 1 think that, as one Bluebook officer was replaced by another and high - level commands changed, no one was left, except the chief scientific consultant, who had any knowledge of how things had gotten switched over to the debunking policy . And, from my discussions with the chief scientif1c consultant, Dr . J. A. Kynek , I gather that even he paid little enough attention to the entire problem that he did not regard the 1953 events as very critical . Pointing further in the same direction is the fact that I found no evidence that anyone at higher levels at WPAFB was, by 1966, even aware of the Robertson Panel report . In my third visit to Bluebook, on July 30, 1966, Haj. Quintanilla informed me that the CIA had reclassified the Report and that consequently I would not be getting my Xerox copy (they sent it down to Washington by courier, since the CIA had no copy, and evidently didn't know what I~PAFB was talking about when a clearance to release the copy to me was requested of CIA!) . So at that point I asked Quintanilla if the then commanding general of the Foreign Technology Division within which Bluebook has operated Brig . Gen. A. 1¡1. Cruikshank, had ever asked him' for the Bluebook file on the Panel . He said Cruikshank had not. Then I asked if the Division's Chief Scientist, Dr . A. J , Cacciopo, h ad ever asked to see it, and Quintanilla said he had not . It is my belief that personnel turnover has occurred so fast that, for a good many years, none of the people having direct responsibility were clearly aware of the role of the CIA decision of 1953, that the task had simply been downgraded to its low present status, and that Bluebook has been run by people who believed what they read in the papers - their own UFO propaganda. If there had been anyone looking at the continuing input of UFO reperts in a competent scientific manner, if anyone had been thoroughly familiar with radar propagation physics, meteorological optics, meteor phenomena, aerodynamics, etc .â&#x20AC;˘ and testing each new report against the broad spectrum of scientif1c considerations that one has to invoke to sort out


15

the plausible from the implausible "explanations" of UFO reports, then I doubt that the downh~ll trend that set in after 1953 could ever have cont"nued. But no such competence appears to have been operat~ng, and ! bel~eve that things just naturally slid down to the point where each new Bluebook officer must have merely followed along in the pattern set by the man before him, talking about "stellar sc~tillation" and "weather ~versions" and "mirages" without any real scientific knowledge of these matters, feeding information to the PIO's at the Pentagon who -sround out the reassurances we've now had so much opportunity to read. So, to summarize, I think the Air Force yawningly views the UFO problem as a PR preble~ not a scientific problem. I think the present Air Force support of the small effort now unde~ way at Colorado is fjne - but far from adequat~ I think that, until the truth about past mishandling of the problem is laid out and stamped with at least Congressional authority, we won't see much escalation of scientific effort to attack this probl~ . And this worries me . For in the UFO oroblem I see the dimensions of an unprecedented challenge to science . I am un comfortable that we s~ientists are, as a whole, blandly ignoring it as if it weren't there, while the reports keep pouring in - pouring in at what seems to some of us to be a markedly increasing rate, and shaping themselves into patterns that give some of us pause . some of us are just a bit uneasy about what we know and what you editors, the Congress, and the nation at large do not know . lie wish that some means could quickl¥ be found to get the world's really outstand~ng scientists to come to grips with this problem - not second- raters such as myself who will never be capable of plumbing the depths of so complex a problem. Thus I ask you to join in urging immediate Congressional hearings if you can agree with me that this is probably the fastest way to force the problem out into full light of scientific investigation, both in the United States and abroad.

THE GLOBAL NATURE OF THE PROBLEM I cannot, of course, vou~~ personally for UFO reports from all parts of the globe, as I can for a sizeable number of U. S . reports that I have personally checked . But after studying a large number of foreign reports, I cannot draw any other conclusion than this: the nature and density and frequency of UFO reports is evidently about the same in other portions of the globe as here in our country. We are not being singled out for any special attention. I have been intrigued by hearing Dr. Jacques Vallee's discussions of the French reports, and will spend this evening at his home in Chicago carrying on still further discussions of the French investigations . French UFO reports are about the same as ours, briefly. I have recently been in rather close communication with the leading non-governmental Australian UFO-investigatory group, centered in Melbourne. They have been sending me press

report~ of Australian sightings, and again they are much like those occurring over and over in this c~untry - discs and cigar-shaped objects , metallic looking structures often with do~es on them, etc . Persons whose reliability I am g~ven to accept describe UFO reports in south America with freq~ency and nature like those in France, Australia, England, and elsewhere .

American newspapers print very little domestic news from foreign countries and virtually no UFO reports from abroad , so most Americans are startled when told that it appears that UFOs are appearing all over the world . I just received a carefully prepared 45-page report from New Gu~nea, written by an Anglican missionary in the Papuan Territory there, summarizing a fascinating series of reports, several at close-range, in New Guinea in 1959. I had heard of these before, but seeing Rev. Cruttwell's lengthy original report increased my readiness to believe that all those sightings· at Boianai, Menapi, and Samarai may actually have occurred! When I get packets full of current Australiaq press clippings on sightings from outback sheep stations and the like, I find it hard to maintain my provincial skepticism.and grow suspicious that perhaps all those reports are every bit as real as the ones I'm continually checking by telephone from Tucson . Before you accuse me of gullibility, take a look at the foreign UFO clippings your selves . They may make you a bit queasy, too . There is a danger here that I'd better confront. You editors probably think that you know what is going on in this country, and that you're aware of an occasional UFO report from here and there, but you may be thinking that my remarks about reports "pouring in" are rather overdone . ~1y reply is simple - ~f you read only what comes over your wires, you'd never guess wha~ is really going on in the world of UFO reports, here or abroad. The only way to get a glimpse of what is actually happening is to subscribe to a clipping service that is cutting local press stories from the Ezcecsio~ Springs Da<Zy Stanaa~d, the ~ag~e VatLey Ente~pri&s, the Marior. ~eckly L~a'er and so on {just to read off the names of a few on the clippings I just received, courtesy of NICAP's clipping-service arrangements. If you read only the .~·eu ·o1•1< ~:,..ea, your own paper, and the wire copy, you won't have even a tiny fraction of the cases - because wire editors long ago came to realize that UFOs are a lot of nonsense and almost never file wire stories on such a lot of nonsense . Once in awhile they will , for reasons that are not al,.·ays clear; but , by and large, I'd estimate that only one or two per cent of the locally- reported UF0 sightings are read about beyond the readership area of the nearest small- town paper . This is part of the reason why ~s problem is being ignored . If each day's paper in each major city carried an adequate account of all of the U. S. UFO reports for the preceding 24ihours, the citizenry would be up in arms in a week demanding that Congress find out what is going on . But the bott~~ of the iceberg floats along unseen because wire editors have long since learned that these reports are just "silly season" stuff; so who cares what some farmer out in Sauk Center sa" just above his barn last


16

night. (I am reminded that Ruppelt rnenti~n~ in his book, Ref. l, that for a brief per~oo in 1952 Bluebook subscribed to a clipping service but they got so many reports they couldn't file them all and were obliged to cancel the subscription.) I talked with an African student on our campus recently and was amused to hear that sightings not dissimilar to those occurr~ng . rather regularly in Iowa and Oregon and Georg~a are reported in Africa. Yes, I believe that when all the facts are in, it will be clear that unconventional objects are hovering lm< over farmhouses and power plants and vehicles in nearly every corner of our globe, and have been doing so with mounting frequency during recent years - while officialdom and journalists and scientists have ignored the "peasants!' Must we wait for a L'Aigle? or will you editors press for action now?

SOME ILLUSTRATIVE UFO REPORTS There is no satisfactory way of presenting a fair picture of the now-available UFO evidence without going into much detail in recounting many cases, discussing credibility of witnesses, and carefully assessing the plausibility of each of a number of alternative hypotheses to account for each given sighting. Space w1ll not permit such an exhaustive presentation here. If you seek a published summary that goes a long way towards that goal, see Ref. 3, ~he IJFO Evids·cc-. , edited by R. H. Hall of NICr~. It describes over 700 cases from the NICAP files, and has the material cross- filed in a number of very useful ways . I have personally checked on a fairly large sample of the cases discussed in that publication and can state on that basis that the accuracy and reliability of the book is impressively high. No single publ1cation on UFOs compares with this one for 1ts level of documentation, completeness, and authenticity though there are a number of other quite good references that are available . I shall discuss, rather briefly below a number of UFO reports, most of which I have personally checked in some manner . \~here I cannot personally vouch for the report, this will be indicated. Because there are now many thousands of UFO reports on record in Air Force, NICAP, and other files, it must be reme~ered that the followin9 comprise a minute fract1on of the full record . The points emphasized will vary from one case to another, since they have been selected for a variety of reasons. Case .i.

Po10tage County, Ohio, Ap1'i Z I?, 1966 .

_Near 0500 on 4/17/66. two Portage County shen.ffs deputies, Dale Spaur and 1~. L. Neff, were rout1nely checking an abandoned car south of Ravenna, Ohio . Suddenly a large luminous a1rborne ObJect advanced from a wooded hill, hovered over them illuminating the pre-dawn darkness, and then moved off a short distance. The deputies radioed the desk and were told by the dispatcher to follow the obJect until a camera car could overtake them. Then began a

peculiar pursuit that eventually took the deputies ent1rely out of Ohio int~ Pennsylvani~ and stretched over more than 70 miles and lasted almost an hour and a half . Two other law enforcement officers, Wayne Ruston of the Palestine, Ohio, police force and Frank Panzanella, Conway, Pa ., police officer became involved in the pursuit before it was over. The object was described by the officers as about 40 feet 1n diameter, brightly l~~inous, and seemed to have something like a fin on its rear upper surface. A diffuse conical luminosity extended from 1ts undersurface . I have personally interviewed Neff, Huston, and Panzanella,and NICAP's Pittsburgh Subcommittee has done a very extensive (125 p . ) report on many aspects of this one 1mportant case . The object varied 1n elevation from a few hundred feet above terrain to an est1mated 2000 ft as it moved along, and it reportedly moved from one side of the highway to the other in motions that match no conventional object . Huston joined the chase when he intercepted the transmissions to the Portage Co . dispatcher's desk, realized Spaur and Neff must be coming his way on Route 14, went out and parked to watch up the highway to the northwest, and s oon saw a luminous object moving along followed by a speeding Ct\r. As the object and car passed, he swung in behind, got into radio communication with the deputies who were in the car ahead, and stayed with them until the end of the chase in Conway, just northwest of Pittsburgh. At Conway, the officers spotted a local policeman, Frank Panzanella, who was observ~ng the object, and they pulled up beside Panzane~la. Shortly thereafter the object s hot up vert1cally at.very high speed and passed out of s~ght, accord1ng to the testimonv of all four officers . • The Bluebook investigation of this case would have been left at no more than an origina~ four-minute phone call from Major Ou1ntan1lla to Spaur (in which Quintanilla sought to convince Spaur he had seen Echo satellite go over and then transferred visual attention to Venus which was then rising in the southeast) except for local press concern over the case . Local and public interest ~enerated by detailed reporting of the in~ident 1n the Ravenna Rccord- Cour•ier , led , through several stages, to a request from Ohio Congressman William Stanton for Bluebook to send someone to Ravenna to make a personal c~eck. NICAP taped that interview, and, having l1stened carefully to it, 1 can summarize it as a rather bulldozing attempt of Maj . Quintanilla to persuade the officers that it was only Echo and Venus that they saw. They were not impressed. Th~ ~cho-Venus explanation still stands as the off1c~al Bluebook explanation of this case desp1te the eff~rts of NICAP, Dr. J. A. Hynek,' ~e Re~o10d-Cou10~er and myself to secure reviS10n. The fact that Officer Huston saw the object coming in out of the northwest clearl rules out his seeing Venus, yet at that time¥ the first two officers had been following the ObJeCt for a much longer tirne than Echo re quires_to transit the full sky. This, plus the four-w1tness descript1on of vertical ascenc at


17

the termination of the sighting are calmly s"·ept aside by Bluebook with its Echo-Venus "explanation."

On September 30, Col. Hayden P. Mims, Congressional Inquiry Division, sent a letter to Congressman Stanton telling Stanton that a further review of the reports confirmed the original Echo-Venus explanation . My own interviews with three of the principal w1.tnesses were made subsequent to Hims' letter and I carefully quer1ed each man as to whether' the Air Force had ever gone back to them to check further on their accounts . Not one of the three had been interrogated since the original interviews in May . In late July, 1966, I asked Quintanilla to let me see Huston's crucial testimony, but was not permitted to examine 1t in full . Huston told me in October t hat he had been interviewed by an investiga tor sent by USAF who took full notes on the crucial point that Huston saw the object comi ng down Route 14 from the northwest . Yet thi s po i nt is blandly ignored in the Bluebook Ec ho- Ven us e xplanation . Despite the absurdity of the Echo- Ven us explanati on a nd despite open criticism o f i t from t he cited sources, that e xplanation s t i l l stan ds in the official Bluebook records . Congressman Stanton was forced to accept the as sur~nces tendered him that the Air Force ha d c a r efully evaluated this case, and the lawe nfo r cement officers had to take the brunt of s uc h r idicule and pressures as all this brought t o them . There are many more details pertinent t o this ca se that are fully documented in the 125- page report prepared by William B. Weitzel, a Uni ve r s ity of Pittsburgh instructor who headed the Pittsburgh NICAP Subcommittee's thorough investigations of this case . Few ca ses better illustrate the unreasonableness of Bluebook's approach to the UFO problem and the ir incompetent and superfic1.al investigations. My memorandum and my correspondence to 11PAFB asking for rectification of this case have ne ver been answered . It was my dismay ove r the Mims letter and Bluebook ' s refus a l t o al ce r their stand on this case that led me t o begin open and pointed criticisms of the Ai r Fo r ce investigations in October 1966 (Ref . 1 3) .

this was "twinkling stars . '' Nhen the officers w7ote t~ Bluebook, protesting such an explanatl.on whlch would hold them up to ridicule and place in jeopardy their reputations as reliable officers, the explanation was sw1.tched t o involve a night- advertising aircraft . When i t w~s next determined that the aircraft in questlon wa~ not even ope7ating that night , Maj . Qu1.ntan1.lla altered h1.s explanation to one involving a B-47 refueling operation near Pease AFB . lo;hen, finally, the policemen secured the actual.tlme of that operation and thereby establ1.shed that the refueling operation wa s ov7r by. the 0~00 time of the main sighting , Qu1.ntan1.lla f1.nally classified it as Unknown . A revealing history . ~·

Many more cases are on record in whi c h the witnesses did not so assiduously press for correction of Bluebook ' s unreasonable explanation~ One witness in an ~kron sighting , owner of a local air service company , Ernest S tadvec (Ref . 17) , told me in an interview concerning his sighting that once Bluebook came out with a pres s release that he had been look i ng at the star Capella and that this was the corr~ct e xplanation of two fast- moving luminous object s he s ighted from the air in his private plane, he wanted to forget the whole thing and s ave himself further embarrassment . His descri ption would not remotely fit "Capella, " s i nce one object descended rapidly from a high elevation angle , the other climbed out under his plane and shot off in directions not even close to Capella ' s location at the time . Stadvec s aid the Air Force explanation "made me look like an idiot , " and he went on to tell me of othe r s ubsequent pilot sightings in that area that were not reported publicly because of the way the Air Force had handled hl.S sighting. After the second object sped off at very high speed, Stadvec states that he contacted FAA Cleveland and the control tower o perator told him by radio that a fast luminous object had been sighted visually and on FAA r adar; but the latter was denied to the press t he next day . Case 4 .

Th i s case has been rather fully r eported i n many pl aces , notably in a book by J . G. Ful l e r (Ref . 16) ; and a number of o the r goo d r epo rts and discussions of it can be found in House Document 55 (Ref . 12) . After sever a l preliminary sightings that I shall omit to save s pace her e , the principal sighting by Exeter po l i cemen Eugene F . Bertrand and David R. Hunt and by an 18- year- old boy , Norman J . Muscarel l~ took place at about 0200 on Sept . 3rd . I ha ve personally interviewed Bertrand and Hunt and ha ve di s cussed their reliability with Exeter Chief of Police R. D. Irvine . Omitting many details , the men saw an object, estimated at almost 100 feet long, carrying a number of bright blinking red lights, maneuvering and hovering silently over a farmhouse until it soundlessly went away. Maj . Quintanilla's first explanation for

Ezm e ct Stadvec, Akron , Ohio, JuZy ~/5, 196l.

R~d

BZuff, CaZif . , August 13, 1960 .

A rather detailed account of th i s sighting can be found in Ref . 3 (see p . 61, 112 , and 17~. I have intervieW'ed one of the two Califo~nia Highway Patrolmen who were the principal wi t nesses and have spoken with two other persons i n that area who were involved in t he incident . CHP officers C. A. Carson and s . Scott, drivi ng east at 2300 on a back road south of Red Bluff suddenly sighted what they first took to be a n aircraft about to crash just ahead of t hem . Pulling their patrol car to a rapid s top and jumping out to be ready to render whateve r assistance they could , they were astonis hed to see the long metallic- looking object abruptly reverse its initial steep descent , climb back up to several hundred feet altitude and then hover motionless . Next it came silently towards them until, as Officer Carson put it to me, "it was within easy pistol range. • They


18

had their p1stols ready and were debating whether to fire when it stopped. Attempts to radio bac~ to the nearest dispatcher failed due to strong radio interference, an occurrence that recurred each time the object came close to them during the remainder of this 2- hour-long sighting. Huge bright lights at either end of the object swept the area. Carson stated to me that one light was about six feet in diameter; other smaller lights were also discernible on the object. After some initial Minutes of hovering only 100 to 200 feet away from them and about that same dis tance above the ground, the object started moving eastward away from them. They then contacted the Tehama County Sheriff's office that handled their night-dispatching work, and asked for additional cars and for a check with Red Bluff Air Force Radar Station. Then they began to follo•: the object. The full account is too involved to relate here (see Ref. 3), but it is important to point out that a number of witnesses confirmed the object from various viewing points in the county , and a call to the AF Radar unit brought confirmation that they were tracking an unknown moving in the manner reported by Carson and Scott . When, however, Carson and Scott went next day to talk with personnel at the Red Bluff radar base, they were informed that no such radar sighting had been made. Their request to the officer in charge to talk with the radarman on duty at the time of the incident was denied. The Bluebook explanation that came out after a few days attributed this very detailed, closerange sighting of a large object, seen by two exoerienced officers, to "refraction of the planet Mars and the two bright stars Aldebaran and Betelgeux . " NICAP referred the question to one of their astronomical advisers, who found that ~ of the three celestial objects were even in the California skies at that time. Bluebook then changed the explanation to read Mars and Capella! Capella, the only one of those celestial bodies that was even in the California skies at 2300, was nowhere near the location of the sighted object, and could not, of course, give the impression of the various maneuvers clearly described by the officers . Carson subsequently stated, " .• . no one will ever convince us that we were witnessing a refraction of light." And to me, he wryly remarked on the Bluebook explanations that ''! 'd sure hate to take one of my cases into court with such weak arguments . " Dr . MenzeL (Ref. 9, p . 254) concurs •11ith the Air Force explanations and speaks of this being a night of "fantastic multiple inversions of temperature and humid1ty," such that he would have eY.pected many more reports of UFOs . I should l1ke to know ~hat radiosonde data Dr . Menzel is citing, since the data I obtained does not fit that description. And any such casual putting-aside of the details of the basic report has no scient1fic justification in the first place. If Menzel and Bluebook think California H1ghway Patrolmen draw their .~ 4's 1n uneasiness over looking at a refracted image of Capella, and misinterpret it as a ~00-ft object w1th huge bright lights hover1ng over the road nearby, I am afraid I cannot share their readiness to so easily discred1t

and discount reliable witnesses . When 1 spoke with Carson a few months ago, I found him still deeply impressed by this incident , oveY six years after it occurred. "I've never see-n anything like it, before or since," he emphasized. The northern California va~ley area was the scene of a number of other very interesting sightings in the period August 13- 18, many of which NICAP has documented and cited . In my own checking of the Carson-Scott sighting, I ran onto one additional interesting "hidden UFO report" involving a sighting of a low- altitude hovering disc with red lights , seen ~y a Red Bluff physician during that same per1od, but will omit details here.

BeverLy. Mass., ApriL 22, 1966

Just one year ago today, an exceedingly interesting sighting occurred at about 210~2130, well within a populous urban area, near the intersection of Salem Road and Sohi~r Road, Beverly, Mass . one of NICAP's most thorough investigators, R<t-ymond E. Fowler of Nenhal'l\, ~lass ., checked this case carefully , and it was from his detailed report to NICAP headquarter s that I obtained the supporting information to back up my o~n interview with one of the key witnesses, Mrs. Claire Modugno . As in all cases worth citing, the full detail is so great that it is impossible to do justice to it in a brief summary such as this . The incident began when Nancy Modugno, age 11, was frightened by a hovering red light outside her bedroom window. Just as she called to her father, ne happened to note tnat the TV picture he was viewing became scramb~ed. To quiet the girl's near-hysteria at whatever she had seen, !>Irs . Claire ~lodugno and her two neighbor-women went outside to establish that it was only an airplane light . However they found instead that about 200 yards from'tne adjoining ~ntersection, viewed directly across the athlet1c f1eld of Beverly High School, three br1ghtly l1t oval-shaped objects, estimated to be perhaps 20 feet in diameter were circling in an oddly pulsatory motion directly above the high school building . Mrs. ~odugno estimated they were only about 20 feet above the roof, when I queried her on this point . 0n7 o~ the women, Miss Brenda Maria, age 22, wh1ms1cally waved her hands as if to beckon them toward the group; one object immediately ~eft the circle and moved towards them, hover1ng only about 20 feet above one of them. Fowler ' s full report conveys some of the fright these women evidently felt , and Mrs . Modugno emphatically confirmed this to me. The women ran back to the Modugno home and phoned the Beverly police, who sent a patrol car with two policemen (Officers Boss 1e and Mahan) . Then the two policemen and several neighborhood adults all observed the three unidentified objects, whose movements and locat1on had changed somewhat . The officers got on their radio and called for Air Force jets, but the UFOs moved away before any jets could get there . No Air Force check has ever been made of this case, to Nrs. Modugno's knowledge . This is an example of a case that was not even reported 1n local newspapers, yet is clearly an 1ncident of great interest. I call attention


19

to the fact that this case contains actions that. might be loosely d~scribed as "con tact" i拢 one ~nterprets t~e seem~ngly imme~iate response of on7 of the Ob)ects to MJ.ss Nar~a's waving as anyth:~.ng more than adventitious. Other such 1nstances, involving seeming "response" can be c~ted, thQUgh they are too few in number to )USt~fy any strong generalizations. ~路

GoodLand, kans., March 8, l967

I have interviewed both Editor Tom Dreiling of the Goodland Eai~y 1/s<.Js and Goodland patrolman Curl Rouse concerning their joint s~ght1ng of a torpedo-shaped object that maneuvered over that western Kansas tQwn not many weeks ago. Rouse had been observing the object (or possibly more than a single object) for some time before contacting Dreiling about 0200 . It had multicolored flashing lights and an intensely bright beam fore and aft on its 50-60 foot main body. This object is in the category of the non- silent UFOS: it made a noise that Dreiling described as like a "huge vacuum cleaner," adding that he'd never heard any aircraft or helicopter making a noise remotely res embling this. The object passed over the Dreiling residence at an estimated altitude of 1500 ft. Rouse, using field glasses , saw structural details including a central shaft with a red light on top and an odd color-banding. I am unaware of any official explanation of this sighting ; Bluebook investigates only cases reported directly to the Air Force . Case 7 .

Davis,

Ca~if .,

February 13, 1967

At about 1915, two young women driving back to their homes in Woodland, Calif., after a Sacramento shopping trip, noted a bright light which both took to be an aircraft landing light at first, before they even exchanged comments on it. As they left the Sacramento Freeway (Hwy . 80) to turn off on Mace Blvd . to head north to Woodland, the object seemed to head for their location, and continued to close with their car until it came to within a (very roughly) estimated 100 yards. By this time, the driver, ~liss Karen Prather, and her passenger, Miss Carol Richied, both of whom I interviewed, had become somewhat frightened, and Miss Prather had accelerated to over 80 mph in a futi1e effort to move out of what had seemed like the diving approach of an aircraft. But as the object approached, both knew it could not be an aircraft, for the "big light" beca111e resolvable into three, separate lights in triangular array. Both described these lights as "huge." Just as it appeared that it might move right into their car, the object tipped up, displaying a disc-like base with one central red light and five or six dimmer white lights . As the disc tipped its nearer edge up, it simultaneously executed a quick turn tothe southwest qnd sped off towards Davis, eventually passing out of sight in the lights and haze over that city. No sound was audible over the noise of Miss Prather's speeding Mustang, they stated. The girls reported the incident immediately to the Woodland office of the California High-.ay Patrol, and from the latte1: office it

got to. the Woodland Dai~y Democrat. The follow1ng day a California Highway Patrolman contacted them and stated to them that they should not take seriously the kidding they were probably receiving, for he had seen an object answer1ng to the same description at about 1945 only about 30 minutes after the girls' sightin~ To date I have been unable to secure the name of.that officer . A Davis NICAP member is pursulng the case, I understand, and hopes to get an open conhrmation of his sighting. Reports that other motorists in the same area saw this o~ject are being investigated, but no other w1tnesses have been located to date .

fE!!.!.....!.

!lear Cincinatti, Ohio, Februal'Y 11 , 196?

.A number of independent sightings on the even~ng of February 10/ll, 1967, in suburban areas north and east of Cincinatti were checked by L: ~路 St~ingfield of that city. After rece~vJ.ng h1s report, I personally interviewed three witnesses , confirming the highlights of Stringfield's more complete report. At several localities that night, a glowing, reddish, c1gar- or football-shaped object was described as moving overhead or hovering . But most interesting were the accounts given to me in telephone interviews with Michael McKee, age 21, and ~!iss Sharon Hildebran-d, age 19. They had seen what appeared to them as a domed or disc-shaped object hovering over a creek-bed in a wooded area near Milford at about 0145 on the 11th. McKee, using a railroad searchlight he had in his car, illuminated the weakly-glowing object and found it to be highly reflective . No sound came from it as it hovered only an estimated 100 feet away. He started to walk toward it to examine it more closely, but Miss Hildebrand became very frightened and ~ried to him not to go, so he returned to the car. (McKee felt willing to say to me that he did not need very much persuading to return to the car. ) Miss Hildebrand 's father mentioned to Stringfield that his daughter was still in a state of shock when the two returned to her home . Police were notified and investigated about an hour later, finding no object, but noting that tree branches were broken off in a roughly circular area matching the 30-ft diameter estimated by the two witnesses . One of the other witnesses who reported seeing only airborne objects, Mr. George Oovoer, of Nyoming, Ohio , told me by telephone that he had seen a red-glowing object pass near his house, heading towards the general location of ~!ilford just before 0100 that same night. Other accounts will not be cited here, since I have not personally checked them. Case 9.

Richmond, Va., June 24, l96G

This is another sighting by a law-enforcement officer. In general, one notices the pattern that UFO reports tend to come primarily from persons whose vocation takes them out of doors a great deal or who are engaged in some form of observational work . There are more nighttime UFO observations than daytime observations (reasons unknown), and a substantial


20 number of nighttime cases involve sheriff's deputies, police officers, and watchmen . There ~s nothing surprising in this. At about 0330, Richmond patrolman William L. Stevens was cruising on the edge of Richmond when he spotted some yellow and green lights a few hundred feet in the air . Driv~ng closer in his patrol car to secure a better look, he found that the lights appeared to surround the edge of a "dirigible-shaped" object, which he estimated at perhaps 100-125 feet long and over 30 feet in diameter. The lights were alternately green and yellow, in a string around the object, and the entire object seemed to be enveloped in a haze or m~st of some unusual nature. As he neared it, the object moved off ahead of him. He continued following and stayed with it for over six miles before it acceleratee and sped away. When I interviewed stevens by phone, he stated that it moved as if it "were playing a game" with him, always maintaining about the same lead-distance ahead of him, despite his altering speed several times. At one point he was driving at 110 mph . Two other officers in Henrico County also reported seeing moving lights in that area at that general time, but no other witnesses reported seeing the object at as close a range as did Stevens. A young couple reported a somewhat similar object north of Newport News that night. This case was reported in the Richmond !t'e:.Je ~eader some weeks later (July 21); Stevens feared ridicule and had not volunteered a report earlier. As a postscript to this latter point, and

further commentary on the widely encountered sensitivity to ridicule that has evolved from years of "explanations" by Bluebook, plus hometown newspaper ridicule growing out of the mismatch between original citizens' reports and subsequent Air Force statements, I might quote from a clipping that happens just to have come across my desk. Capt. Jack Brown, of the Shasta, Calif. police force, is quoted in the Redding, Calif., Record Sâ&#x20AC;˘archHght for Feb. 17, 1967, concerning some unusual sightings he and other local police officers have made recently in the Shasta area. I omit the sightings, since I have not checked them, but note that Brown is quoted, in a purely matter-of-fact way as saying "he knows what has happened to other law officers who reported seeing flying saucers : They were ruined by the publicity . " That may be a bit too strong; but I know from much personal experience in interviewing witnesses that witness after witness has been embittered by callous ~ir Force discrediting of their accounts. It's high time that this pattern was terminated. It will be terminated only when some truly competent personnel not committed to UFO-debunking are made responsible for investigations. Case 1v.

Ra>;doZph, Vt., January 4, 1965

This was another case originally checked out by NICAP investigator R. E . Fowler. ~t about 1715, Dr. Richard S . Woodruff, Vermont State Pathologist and Professor, College of Medicine, University of Vermont, was returning

to Burlington from grand jury testimony in Brattleboro. His driver was a Vermont State Trooper whose name has been re~eased to NrCJU> but not released publ~cly. Or~v~ng north between Bethel and Randolph, on Hw~. 12, the two suddenly noticed a sha~ly-def~ned ~ound object glowing with a redd~sh-orange l~ght, streaking across their path at perhaps 200 feet above terrain. It passed from west ~o east in a matter of seconds, mak~ng no no~se aud~ble over their own engine noise. No sooner had it passed out of sight to their east than a second similar glowing object streaked past, and finally a third, the total duration of the sighting being only about 30 seconds. They estimated the distance to the objects at one-half to one mile; but in the twilight, their estimates, according to or . Woodruff, with whom I have discussed the incident, were probably not too reliable . Both were entirely certain these were not aircraft or astronomical objects, and they noted that the objects climbed slightl y a s they moved eastward . The angular diamete r corresponded to a baseball at arm ' s length or perhaps a bit larger, according to these witnesses; i.e., many times the angular diame t e r of the moon. The skies were clear and s t ars were visible. Four men driving in another car on the same highway reported seeing th r ee similar objects at about the same th~e and place, and gave generally similar des criptions, as did also H. E. Wheatley, Chairman of the Randolph Board of Selectmen, who saw the phenomenon while driving about a mile north of Bethel. NICAP obtained from Maj. Marston M. Jacks , of the Pentagon Office of Information, on January 27, 1965, the Bluebook evaluation : meteors of the Quadrantid meteor stream. Actually the radiant-point of this stream wa s at that time, about on the NNW point of these' ~bservers' horizon, so any Quadrantids moving ~~ the east-to-west manner described by aLl w~tnesses would have been invisible due to the very trees above whose tops these three glowing objects were obser~ed moving . Secondly, the reported angular d~ameters are completely ou t of accord with that of stream meteors , and the ~assa?e of three such objects along essentially 1den~1cal trajectories within 30 seconds or so stra~ns the meteor hypothesis still furthe~ . Dr . l~oodruff, emphasizing that he is quite familiar with meteor phenomena stated , in comment on the Bluebook. evaluation , " If r h ad thought that there was any possibilit y that the three objects we saw were meteors I never would have mentioned the matter ."' Case 11 .

Cherry Creek,

~.

Y., August 19, 1965

This is a ca~e where I_have not been able to make contact Wlth the pr1ncipal witnesses b phone, but a rather thorough NICAP report is Y ava~lable, and even more ~nteresting this is one of the small fraction of all cas~s which Bluebook has put in its officially unexplained catego~y. Finally, it illustrates a phenomenon found 1n so many UFO cases that it cannot be ignored: panic reactions among animals in the vicinity of a close-range UFO . I have a special file of such animal-reaction cases wbich I am assembling because these cases ~eem


21

to have strong bearing on the question of whether the UFO observations are some quirk of human psychology, or as Jung once suggested "psychic projections of archetypal images . "' If cows, horses, dogs, pigs, cats, and birds sha:e our archetypal images and psychically prOJ~Ct therr., then perhaps I'm wrong in suggest~ng these cases rule out purely psychological explanations of the UFO phenomena . To date, however, I have found no psychologists who are willing to go so far as to suggest that bovine, canine, and equine archetypal images are identical with ours . At about 2020, on August 19th, Harold Butcher, age 16, was milking on his parentsâ&#x20AC;˘ farm. He had a transistor radio tuned to a news ~r~ram, an~ was using a tractor to power the m1lk1ng mach1ne. Suddenly, several things happened almost simultaneously: Static-like interference rose in his radio, the tractor motor stopped, and a bull tethered outside in the barnyard began stamping and bellowing (making a noise "like I have never heard come from an animal before," as the boy said it) . Looking out the barn window, Butcher saw a large elliptical object descending to the ground, about a quarter-mile away, making an audible beep-beep sound. The object, which he said was about 50 ft long and football shaped, remained on the ground for only a few seconds before shooting straight up into the clouds overhead. !~hen he yelled for members of his fam~ly to come out, they noted a strange odor, a peculiar greenish glow in the clouds into which the boy stated that the object had disappeared, and they found that the bull which had been tethered to a steel bar had bent the steel bar in his efforts to get loose. Mrs. Butcher phoned state police, and before they arrived the object had been bri~fly sighted again by four persons. USAF officers from nearby Niagara Falls AFB investigated the case. A purplish liquid of unknown nature was found at the spot Harold indicated he had seen the object first touch down (or seem to touch down). The tall grass was disturbed in that area and singed in some places. Two track- like soil depressions were found . On the next night, state Trooper Richard Ward saw an object with eight circular lights, flying at a speed which he put at double that of typical jets yet emitting only a faint purring sound . His sighting was made only a few miles from the Butcher farm. The Air Force report notes that milk production from the Butcher dairy herd fell to less than half its previous value after this sighting and stayed low for some days . It might be mentioned that there are three cases on record of cattle being stampeded by nearby UFOs, and a Clarinda, Iowa, farmer whom I have interviewed about an object which was reported as landing on his farm , said that his cows fled to the farthest available area within his fenced pasture and would not return for several days to the corner in which the object had landed. There are many cases of extreme reactions in dogs that were present when UFOs were cited. In the Sept . 3, 1965, Exeter, N.H., incident, horses started stamping and

~icking

their stalls at almost exactly the same as Officer Bertrand and young Muscarello spotted the object coming in over trees at the Dining farm . Bertrand, when I asked him, was unsure whose reaction was first, his or the horses . ~nstant

CasB 12.

Dc:rtcr, .IJi.cl: ., .Varch 20 ,

,966

It was Frank â&#x20AC;˘lannor's dogs who first reacted to the glowing object that became the center of the famous "swamp gas" controversy of last spr~ng . Manner, on going outdoors to see why his dogs were barking so unusually at 2000, spotted a luminous object "coming down at a forty-five," towards a nearly wooded swamp. The object reportedly hovered momen tarily and then descended below his line of vision . With his son, he walked out towards the spot, and spotted it again , glowing in the swamp, several hundreds of yards ahead. He stat7d that it seemed to be sitting in a patch of m~st, about 10 feet off terrain , was domed in shape, and had a coral-like or quilted structure to its surface. Suddenly the li9ht turned blood-red and then blinked out according to the accounts of Manner and his'son . In the meantime, others had been summoned, inciuding police, some of whom reported seeing the glowing object in the swampy wooded area . (I have tried twice to reach Manner by phone to confirm details of his s~ghting. The first time his wife informed me he was not talking to anyone as a result of all the ridicule he had received . The second time, their phone was unlisted or disconnected . I have heard a NICAP taped interview with Manner in which he confirms the main features as reoorted in the press and corrects Li;eâ&#x20AC;˘s erroneous drawings of the shape of the object that he saw . It had a flat bottom, he stressed. ) At a large press conference, Bluebook scientific consultant Or. J . A. Hynek, proposed that all this was due to swamp gas . The source he cited for his authority was Minnaert, a Dutch astronomer, whose book mentions will - ofthe-wisp but goes way back to an early 19th century scientist to find a corroborating witness. Swamp gas is methane, and it remains a chemical mystery how it sometimes ignites by natural processes, giving evanescent flickering flames a few inches high over marshy areas , mainly in summer when chemical reaction rates are high . A colleague who earned his Ph.D. collecting salamanders in that very area said he'd never once seen swamp gas burning , even in the summer when product~on rates are maximal. The Dexter case involved a luminous obje~t "the size of an automobile" described as descending into the swamps and then glowing so brightly it was visible for hundreds of yards away through the brush and trees, scarcely a close fit to swamp gas. Furthermore, low temperatures at that time of year could support only extremely low methane production rates, and the winds that night were about 5 mph, which would have precluded accumulations of more than trace amounts under any conditions . Probably no one UFO "explanation" has brought the Air Force more ridicule than this swamp gas case. "Swamp gas" has become almost


22 Ca $ ~ 14 .

a symbol of public r1dicule of the Bluebook contribed explanations . I attempted many months ago to persuade Bluebook to change that to an Unidentified, but was emphatically told by Maj. Qu1ntanilla that any changes would have to come from Dr . Hynek, not him, since the Air Force had absolutely nothing to do with that one . Dr . Hynek, when I then pressed him to consider retracting it on his o...路n, indicated that perhaps that might be a good 1dea, but has not done so to date . Case ! 3.

Damo n, T.ra~, SepteMbe r 3, 19GS

Less than 24 hours after the Exeter incident, two Brazoria County deputy sheriffs were cru1sing near Damon, Texas, when they spotted what they first took to be a gas-well fire in the distance. But as the lights separated and then floated up into the air, Deputies Billy E. McCoy and Robert w. Goode took increased interest . They decided to drive via back roads to investigate, and had pulled over to the side to check again with binoculars when suddenly the lights seemed almost instantaneously to shoot towards them and stop over a field only about 150 feet from them at an altitude of perhaps 100 feet above the field. I have interviewed both men, and despite their being experienced law enforcement officers, they did not conceal the fact that this sudden approach and the astonishing size of the object frightened both of them. The object was extremely large; one compared it to the size of a football field, the other put its length as 200 feet or more. Its vertical thickness at its domed center section they thought to be 40 to 50 feet. A very bright purple light on the object illuminated not only the ground near the object, but even the inside of the patrol car. Goode was driving, and his left arm was on the outside of the car. Despite the covering of a shirt and coat, he sensed heating of the exposed arm in the moment before they darted off as fast as the patrol car could go. McCoy looked back as Goode drove off, and the object was seen to shoot off at high speed back in the direction from which it came, and then veer upwards and disappear aloft. The Bluebook office assembled data on the location of the star Antares and on local inversions, and at one stage this was their tentative explanation for this highly un-astronomical sighting. But the final evaluation that now stands for this one is Unidentified . Yearly, and sometimes in between, Bluebook puts out assurances that in the (tiny fraction of cases in their) Unidentified cases are none that "defy explanation in present-day scientific and technological terms . " When one examines some of the officially Unidentified cases like the Damon Case, or the Exeter or Cherry Creek, or the famous Socorro case, or any of a number of other officially Unknown cases that are not remotely like anything in our presentday technological or scientific knowledge, one wo~ders just what Bluebook's frequentlyre1terated phraseology is supposed to mean.

saZt La k ~ Ci ty, Utah, Octobe~

2,

z 981

A multiple-witness daytime sighti~g of a l"d etallic-looking disc was headl1ne news ~~ ~h~ ~alt Lake Tribune of October 3, . 1961, though wire editors didn't take 1t ser1o~sly . A Salt Lake insurance man, l路laldo J. Harr1s, flying his private plane, took off from Utah_ central Airport at almost exactly noon . Dur1ng his engine run-up on Runway 160,he casually noticed what he thought to be a plane a number of miles off to the s~uth-s~ut~east. After lift-off, he noticed 1t aga1n 1n the same . apparent spot. After climb1ng out and_tu~1ng out of the pattern, he happened to not1ce 1t a third time, and this time became puzz~ed that it had not altered its apparent locat1on appreciably . He thought perhaps it was doing tight s-turns he told me in an interview with him some mo~ths ago, and he m1ght not have paid further attention to it except for the fact that suddenly it executed the first of several "wobbling" maneuvers and glinted brightly in the noon sun, giving him a sharper impression of shape. It looked disc-like, he thought . But still being unsure, he flew towards it and climbed to 6000 ft. When he got within an estimated 2-3 miles of it, at the same altitude as the object, he confirmed hi s impress ion that it was like two saucers, in lenticular over-all outline . It appeared motionless in midair at his flight altitude, and at one important point it lay between him and distant Mt. Nebo, so that he was viewing it against the distant mountain background. R~ tried to close further, but suddenly the obJect abruptly shot upwards, by an estimated 1000 ft, and as he closed still further it began moving southwards at a considerably ' faster speed than his, and then again seemed to hover perhaps 8-10 miles away from him. When he continued towards it, but long before he came close again, the object suddenly shot upwards at extremely high speed towards the southwest and climbed out of sight .

At the time that he first discerned its non-conventional shape, Harris had radioed back to the Utah Central Airport and requested that personnel there get binoculars and examine the object from the ground. A total of seven ground ~bse~ver7 confirmed the general features of h1s s1ght1ngs . These included Mr. and ~Irs. Jay Galbraith, who operate the airport, Robert Butler , a mechanic, Virgil Red~ond, and several others . The rocking mot1on as the object hovered was confirmed by the ground observers. A number of otherobserved details will be omitted here. The original Bluebook explanation, released by the Pentagon press desk was that H~rris had seen eith~r a balloon or'venus. 1 d1scussed balloons w1th Harris at some length路 he obviously had seen a lot of them, large and small, 1n his flying experience . He was quit positive that a balloon was out of question. e Be sa1d that when he was first told that a Pentagon Air Force.s~kesman had suggested it was.venus he_was v1ew1ng, he had pointed out aga1n that h1s account emphasized that at one stage of the sighting the object clearly lay at his 6000-ft altitude, between him and


23 d~stant

terrain . He said that, at the time of ~hat ~l.r Force announcement, he had made some ]a~ndJ.ce~ publi7 statement to the effect that he ~ a ~1t worr1ed about the safety of our nat1on 1f there.are people down there in the Pentagon who th1nk you can fit Venus int th Salt Lake Valley, between him and Mt. Ne~. e _1 had checked the present status of the HarrJ.s report, at Bluebook in June 1966 d proceeded to tell him that it is n~w offi- an c1ally c~assed as a "sundog." I shall not repeat h1s comments. One can easily take this sighting and ~how ho~ unreasonable both the "Venus" and s undog explanatJ.ons are. Venus lay in the s ou t hwest sky at an angular altitude well ~ove Harris ' horizon, and would be quite d J.ffJ. cul~ to spot without diligent searching . But Rar r1s saw the object towards the souths outhe ast , "right down Runway 160" and it was on his horizon when he had cli~ed to 6QOO ft . Similarly the sundog explanat ion is nonsensical. The altitude of the noon s un at Salt L~ke Ci ty that day was about 40掳 , and sundogs, 1 f there had been any , would have occurred to right and left at essentially t hat s ame angu l ar altitude, far above the positi o n in the sky where Harris and others saw the object hovering . Furthermore, the skies wer e almost cloudless, the observers emphas ized . This case is just one more o f hundreds of glaring examples of casually erro neous Bluebook e xplanations put out by untrained men and passed on to the press and publ ic by PIO's who are equally untrained and cannot r ecognize elementary scientific abs urdit i es when they see them . Yet just this ki nd of balderdash has left the bulk of the public wi th the impression that UFOs can't exist s i nce the Air Force has disproved virtually all the r epor ts they've ever received . Case 1S .

c~r.t~a"

I~diana,

vctobe~

3, 1958

In the records are many (probably well over two hundred) cases where UFOs "buzzed" cars, and there are also several instances , from var ious parts of the world , where uniden~ified objects have passed over railroad train s in a manner suggesting something more than random coincidence . One interesting example i nvolves a Monon Railroad freight train that was repeatedly overflown by four glowing, d isc s d uring a pro t racted episode early on Octobe r 3 , 1958 . I have interviewed three of the five trai n c rewmen , con f irming details to be found in th e NICAP report and in a more complete accoun t by Frank Edwards , who originally invest i gat ed the sighting . It is a very involved sighting , since the objects followed the train , maneuvering back and forth near it for an.hour and ten minutes ; hence only a sparse outl1ne WIT1-se given here . The objects were first sighted a bit after 0300 , well ahead of the train, crossing the path of the southbound freight as it was near Wasco, Indiana . Cecil Bridge, fireman, sighted them first, and quickly pointed them out to che engineer , Harry Eckman, and another crewman in the cab , Morris Ott. Shortly thereafter, the objects executed a turn and came in towards the

train obliquely 路 . height . ' pass1ng r1ght overhead a t a so Thestlmated at something like 100 feet or cr~~oe d men J.n the cab had radioed the caboose cu ' an conductor Ed Robinson in the caboose thpoia told me that he was looking r ight down e 1ne of cars as the four dis~-like things ~wept over the train. He estimated their E~ameters as 30-40 feet . My interviews with kman! BrJ.dge, and Robinson cannot be fully sumrnar1zed because all of the maneuvers tha t then unfolded would take too much space to recount . At one time the train was sw1 tching c~rs at Frankfort, Ind . , and during the 10- 15 m~utes operation, Robinson said that the ObJects seemed to have "landed" a mile or s o back_up the line . He could make out sparks or glo~~ng l1ghts, but not much detail . After the traJ.n resumed motion, the objects followed t hem aga1n, and did not break off and leave un til the tra1n reached the vicinity of Kirklin , I nd. ~ checked carefully whether there was s ubstance ln.reports that they had been told t o keep 9u1et abou t this sighting ; all three emphatlcally den1ed this . They had not be en i nt er:ogated by ~ny USAF personnel abou t this sigh t l.~g . I bel1eve I am correct in saying that no WJ.re-story coverage on this importan t case was ever f iled . Case 16 .

Waol;ington Nationa~ Airport , JuLy 19" and 26, 1952

One does not have the full picture on UFOs and their official investigation until he has studied carefully many of the cases i n the later 1949's and early 1950 ' s , pr ior t o t h e 1953 turning- point of the Rober t s on Panel and CIA debunking order. In the past year, I have rather carefully gone ove r s eve r al dozen impor tant cases from that per iod , and have run down witnesses in many of them. In the case of the Washington Airport incidents , I have never located any witnesses for perso na l interviews , but the basic facts of this most f amous of all UFO episodes are well att~sted i n press recor ds which I have gone over , so personal interviews are not so crucial her e . I shall not attempt a full r e count ing, since so much went on that even a chapter in Ruppelt ' s book (Ref . 1) does not do j us t ice to it . The principal points deservi ng emphasis are these : Unknown returns were picked up on as many as three separate rada rs i n the Wash i ngton area , at times all t hr ee sets having compat ibl e echoes . Vis ual observati ons of these fast - moving objects were made from g round and ai r , especially the latter. Despite frantic confusion on both of these two occasions, the record is moderately clear as to who saw what and where . The CAA radar controllers, to this day, insist that the echoes we r e good ha r d echoes, quite unlike familiar ground-returns caused by anomalous propagation under inversions . The official explanation put oue a t the time was that the radar returns were due to anomalous propagation, and the visual sigh t ings were caused by refraction effects due to the same inversions responsible for the radar anomalies. I have examined the radiosonde data for both nights, have computed the refractive inda~ gradients, and find that, after mak1ng allowance


24

for lag effects in the radiosonde, radar d u c tin g could not h.ave occurred. The suggestion that an inversion of the sort exhibited by the radiosonde data for that night at Nashington caused the reported visual effects is absolutely absurd. First of all, the inversion was a very weak one by mirage standards, so that even the ground observers could not have seen mirages. But worse, the optics of mirages and the "optics'' of radar ground returns are significantly different in several respects, so that false targets would not seem to lie in the same place in the sky to a visual observer and a radar observer. Furthermore, the most important visual observations were not on the ground but in the air by several commercial pil~ts (and even by one jet pilot who was vectored close to one of the radar targets moving over the cap1tol) . Finally the temperature data aloft at aircraft altitude were not even remotely capable of producing anything like what was described by the pilots . These 1952 "explanations" have never since been challenged, and the summary analysis of this case that Bluebook still sends out when queried on the case is a verbatim assemblage of the hasty remarks made by frantic officers trying to get the Air Force off the hook in that tight squeeze of July, 1952. I even found a passage in the currently distributed case summary which asserts that •unfortunately the only day for which weather data was obtained was for 26 July 1952," precisely the assertion I found appearing on a memo dated 29 August 1952 from Capt . James (a radar officer) to Capt. Ruppelt (copy of memo in Bluebook file on this case) . But, amusingly, a dozen sheets of dog- eared paper further on in this very same file· that Maj. Quintanilla gave me, I found the allegedly missing weather Bureau radiosonde data for July 19! 1-lhen l plotted it, it became quite clear that no anomalous propagation could have produced the solid radar returns so emphatically described to the press by the experienced CAA radarmen on duty that night . Donald Keyhoe, in one of his books, vividly describes the press conference at which all this m1sinformation was put out to press, Congress, and public . several reporters had asked a few questions of knowledgeable radarmen and tried to object that the weather data simply did not support the Air Force claim of ground-returns; but their objecting questions were cut off. Caae 1?.

11ount Rainie:zo, June 24 , 294?

. On_the b~sis of several extended telephone d~scuss1ons w~th Kenneth Arnold, the private ~ilot who reported this era- opening UFO sight-

1ng, and on the basis of examination of weather data for that day, I must categorically reject the long-standing Air Force explanation that this was a "mirage . " Dr. Menzel, in his second book, also subscribes to this hypothesis. The radiosonde data for that date show no strong inversion aloft of the type that would be required to produce even a mild mirage; but there's no indication that either Bluebook or Menzel used any quantitative considerations in

arriv1ng at their explanat1on. Furthermore, Arnold descr1bed the objects as slowly climbing as they fluttered along at high speed from the ~It. Rainier area to near Mt. Adams, a roughly 45-mile distance which he timed them covering at a speed of about 1500 miles per hour. (Scientists will be amused to be told that in the ofhcial Bluebook summary analysis, this speed is quoted as "1656.7J. miles per hour ." At firclthe objects were viewed by Arnold against outlier peaks on Mt. Rainer; that put their altitude at roughly the same as his flight altitude ~f about 9500 feet. But by the time the discs reached the Mt. Adams area, Arnold stated that the lead objects in the string of nine had ascended to perhaps 13,000 to 14,000 feet near Adams . That much alti tude increase implies so large an increase of angular altitude that the possibility of ~ naturally occurring inversion accounting IOr these apparitions on a mirage basis is wholly out of the question. And beyond all this , one has to ask just what Bluebook and Henzel would like to suggest as the real objects whose images were refractively distorted into these moving discs? Their azimuth changed position by almost ninety degrees in the roughly minute and a half that Arnold watched them skim past him. To suggest that he was watching an azimuthally moving mirage through such a sector is patently absurd. Yet this is only more of the sarr~ type of absurdity that marks many more "explanations" in Bluebook files and in Menzel's books. Case 18 .

ilr.ite Sands , ApriZ

~4,

1949

Charles B. Moore, Jr., working with several assistants, was taking pilot balloon observations of upper winds, as a part of a high-altitude balloon flight that day. Through a series of steps that will not be fully recounted here, they spotted and began tracking with their theodolite a whitish ellipticalshaped object that was moving at high angular velocity from southwest to northeast . In about 60 seconds this object moved o~f to the northeast, and just before passing out of sight in the 25-power telescope, its altitude angle began to slowly increase! Another balloon was immediately released to doublecheck the winds, but no high-speed upper jet was present to blow anything along at anything like this object's speed. I have discussed this early sighting with ~toore several times. Dr . Menzel easily accounts for the whole thing on p. 33 of Ref . 8 : "What Moore saw was an out-of-focus and badly astigmatic image of the balloon above," caused, he seems to tell his reader, by "lenses of air" aloft. Nonsense . Space does not permit touch1ng here on even a fraction of the signif1cant early sightings that should have turned Air Force scientists toward serious attention to the UFO problem as early as 1950. Those cases can be found, in quantity, in Ref. 3, and many are fairly well treated in Ref. 1 . The evidence, viewed in retrospect, is strong that unconventional objects have been around for 20 neglected years, their general nature not altering significantly in that period . I cannot begin now to pursue that extremely important related question: What about prior


, to 1947? But, in brief, the answer to that appears to be that there are observations extending back to before the turn of th century that seem so similar to 1967 UFg observations that it is probable that th have ~een ~re~ent for decades . Needlesset~FOs say, ~f th~s ~s proved true (or highly probable ) by ~re complete analysis of the old records, ~t has exceedingly important cons quences. e-

EDITORIAL COMMENTS

"T.11 1

11 b . ' !1 ';" s t:op ki.ddi>lg uc •:o~ about there lang no DU<:•l th~ngs ao 'fl•ling oa:.ce>•s . "'

- Ft. l~orth Star- Telegram·. ·

.

I:""S.p

,,

-·r.K that tire time hae cor.e .,;hen the

A~r .o~ce's ~~o~ledge

As re~orts such as the examples just cited have come ~n ~ver the.years, editorial criticisms of offlc~al UFO ~nvestigations have not been absent . There has been a small but steady, flow of ed~torial questioning as to wh7ther the Air Force is really looking into th1s problem adequately. Occasionally these ~omme~ts have carried real barbs . NICAP, in ~ts b~ -monthly bulletin, 1'iJe UFO Investigator r~prints editorial remarks from time to time: SJ.nce ASNE members will find these of interes.t, I insert a number extracted from t he NICAP publication and other sources at this point: ''If I had any doubts about the pubZic 's interest in Unidentified Flying Objects I'v~ put them aside .. . What it boils do~n to that many, many pel'sons agl'ee ~ith NICAP's hypoth esis that the UFOs ar ' real objects ' ... 'under the control of living bei•:gs . 111 - Charles H.

is

Ball, Aviation Editor, Boston Traveler.

"Do yo:. ever get the feeling that ~hen it comes to ."lying eaucel'e , the Air Force makes its denials si:z: mont1:s i>: aduance~" - Seattle

" . .. the p:.blic is entitled :o the best an~~ers availabZe . PoseibZ~ a national hearing on the ~atter, 1 ong so:.ght by dedicated eaucel' - ~a!cheN: , uo:.ldr. 't be too bad an idea ."

- Springfield, Ohio,

25

~-

"~he

Air :ore• sayo aiZ eightings can be e:pZained in tcr~s of kno~n phenomena ar.d then adds that it can't ~:z:pZain 63J o: the repo~ts it has had . o'hich reminds us o.f the English Astronomer Roya:, who spoke up in Z9S7 just before the Soviet Union sta:•tL"d the world r.~ith its first Sputn-ik launching : 'Space tl'aveZ is utter bilge . 1 " - Dallas Morning ~.

"If ~e car. whiiS things at the moon and other planets , it is possible that other planets are wl1i:;~ing thing a by 6artb . . . Phere are many reports in USAF files made by quali fied pilots t.>ho, in .fZight, have encounte1•ed UFOe r.~ith fantastic flight patterns . These officers are not quacks , nor are rnany of the intelligent people' ~ho have spotted phenomenaL objects in ti:e cky ." - Meriden, Conn ., Journal.. "If some of theae _rtyinp ob,;~ctt; are indeed planetary spacecraft, it ie Logical to aseum.; that govern"1enta1. of'f'icials ~ assuming they do l!ave a:.ch evidcnoe, may be l<eeping the ne:.;s q:.iet for faar that a euddsn diac i.osul'e .~ioht 1Ja:;c d-ralJti.c smotior.aZ. ar..ci ccono~ic

e{';eete . " - r~edford, Oregon, Mail Tribune .

o:

these objects and the

res:.~ts of tne tnvestigatione uhich haue been oar>'-:.ed o:. t ol:o" ld be madt:~ pub Zic . " - Coos Bay Oregon , ~ ' . " ... but whatever the reason ~ay be uh1 the A'l.r F~rce.spol<ec~en are becoming lese vocal .. . t~e t&me ~B ~ong overduo for tha Government to dtscZoso to the public all that it kno~e about UFOs . " - Alameda, Calif ., Times-Star . . "Attempts to dismiss the 2'Dported sioht ~ngs under tJ;e ratio>lalc exhibited by Proj~ct Bluebook won't solve the myeteJ<y ho1.1eve10 <rnd ee1•ve ,onZy to hoighten the ouap·i~ion that' the:•e s something out tile·re the Air Foreg does.n ' t want us to know about . If Pro:~ect Bluebook officials ~ant the UPOs to go a~ay they ' d be ~ell advised to ~ish on another star . " - Richmond, Virginia, News -

--

~-

"TI:el'c is a .1tro>1g belief that the mili ta::y chiefs k>:ou morr1 about :.>:identified !·t-ying ~bJec;ts tha>: th~J ~re Letti•:g on, but are keep~~g ~t a.uell - g:.araed s~cr~t co as not to oar.ic tne pubZ...c . " - Shawville, Quebec, Entity. · ''It's about time for .:'ongrt.as co hoLd a pubZic_i.,:~e~tigati.o o_;· :i:i<~ ''"]!Stery ... . The Ail' F?r:ce u ettZZ ada-a>, t: ~<J~rybody is i.:-:agi.ni.ng ~n~r.gs . " -

Houston Chronicle .

"'I'he tin:e io zo,.g v~rdu€ .•..or a candid disclosure o•' "indino~:> . " -Aurora, Illinois,

Beacon-News.· ·

-

"· . . ~eZZ - condt<-•t. d c"ngrese•ona::. inouiry can heZp establish th~ facts and q · iet need!es~ public alarm ." - Indianapolis News .

"If" ther-e ia any substantial e-vide11ce "that any of the eigiJCin~s can be att:•ibutcd to obJects either intra - or eztra- olanetaru che Ail' Force should reveal it to ue . " - Ci;;~inatti

Enquirer .

In those sample quotes one notes an undercurrent of concern that perhaps UFOs a~e not being investigated adequately . IVithin just the past month or so a large number of UFO sightings of very unusual nature near Houston, Texas, have evoked similar comments, brought out in a good series on the problem that has run in the Houston Tribune . People down there are beginning to ask whether anyole is reallv checking into all these phenomena sightings: I base my comment on a year's detailed inquiry when I say that the answer is that no one in our Government has been taking the prob~em se:iously enough to carry out an adequate ~nvest~gat~on . An uneasy citizenry will find, when the facts are out, that their reports were


ignored and r1d1culed and forgotten. Note in the quoted edttorials a recurrence of the hypothesis that officials at high levels do know about the UFOs and are guarding the public from some panic-triggering news. This is so far from the true situation that I find the suggestion laughable. Nobody in Washington is protecting anyone from pan1c. The Air Force, NASA, august scientific bodies, and all the rest, ~ the UFOs are a lot of nonsense. There is no hidden truth to be disclosed because the agency assigned the responsibility to check the problem of the unidentified flying objects has incompetently done its job, has fallen victim to its own propaganda in the past dozen years, and has misled us all, since 1953 . The quotes above contain a number of p~eas for a truly thorough Congressional investigat i on . This , I now believe, is the only approach at all capable of quickly escalating scientific study of the UFO problem to the top- level status I believe it warrants . And no stimulus for Congressional inquiry would be as potent as some firm editorial pressure from all s ides of the country .

IS IT POSSIBLE THAT THE UFOS ARE EXTRATERRESTRIAL PROBES? Scattered through the comments just cited, one finds remarks indicating that there may be a few editors who are speculating on whether the UFOs are extraterrestrial in origin . I believe, on the basis of my intensive s tudy of the UFO problem, that this hypothes is must, in fact, now be given extremely serious scientific attention. Let me hasten to interject that I am quite familiar with all of the standard reasons as to why this hypothesis seems very remote . The solar system seems to harbor no good niches for evolution of sentient life . Recent disc losures of the lack of magnetic fields near Mars and Venus, demonstrations of the extreme tenuity of the Hartian atmosphere and of the high temperatures of the Venusian atmospher e, and all else that we know of our neighborplanets seems to argue cogently that the solar system is a most unlikely place to generate a s econd life- system in addition to ours - certainly unlikely to have a life- system that has gone far past us . Nithin the past half-dozen years it has , somewhat amusingly, become scientifically respectable to take as axiomatic that in the billions of stellar systems within just our Galaxy alone, life must have evolved again and again, taking routes that may have gone far beyond our present civilization, culture, and technology . One can now say L~at safely in a scientific assembTage. But all that sentient life must be said to be way out there - not here! The principle scientific objection to thinking that we m~ght (ever) be visited by beings from other stellar systems is tied up with the energetics of propulsion. Edward

Purcell of Harvard, has presented a delightfully d~vastating analysis of the difficulties of interstellar travel (Ref . 18, p. 121 ff) . I certainly am not one to give substantial rebuttal to his arguments except ~n one l~e (but conceivably relevant) way . All of h~s and many others' arguments against feasibility of interstellar travel are necessarily couched in terms of present-day scientific knowledge and technology. To be sure, Purcell's type of argument seems to grant e~ery ben~fit of doubt to the other side by look~ng far ~nto the foreseeable future and still demolishes the idea of interstellar travel . But that adjec tive, "foreseeable," may be JUSt the rub . Perhaps there are levels of technology so vastly superior to any we can now imagine that things can be done which we now regard a s quit e out of the question. Clearly, that is an e asy argument, by which one could soon be saying that everything and anything is poss~ble . I certainly do not resort to such arguments in my everyday work, and I should like to add that I don't care for science-fictioneering i n general. But after a year of scrutiny of highly unconventional phenomena credtbly reported from all parts of this country and (I believe ) from most of the entire world, I have been driven to consider possibilit~es that I'd ordinarily not give a moment's thought to in my own personal brand of orthodoxy . It is the UFO evidence that slow~y forces the dili~ gent UFO student to seriously consider the ~xtraterrestr1al hypothesis - evidence that I can only describe as extraordinary in its total nature. (I must confess that my chosen examples exclude a large amount of UFO phenomena that experience teaches me to omit fron any brief discussion . It is simply too baffling to lay before unprepared audiences . ) All over the globe persons in all walks of life, representing a wide range of educational.and cultural backgrounds are reporting , often 1n the face of unpleasant ridicule sightings of objects that appear to be c~m足 pletely real objects yet have characteristics that match nothing about which we have present knowledge . There are still a few persons who suspect these things must be secret Air Forc e test vehicles. They can forget that: no test pilot would ever dream of doing the th i ngs that these objects are repeatedly doing hovering over speeding trucks loaded with gasoline, maneuvering low over populated a r e as , speeding alongside Texas sheriff's cars or diving down on top of trucks and tractor s and motorbikes and trains . No American test vehicles would be checked out in Australia and Poland; no Russian test vehicles would be flight-tested in Canada or Brazil . The UFOS are most definitely not secret test vehicles of superlative nature. Arnold's June, 1947 sighting involved phenomena not dissimilar from 1967 sightings. No nation came out of lo/or ld l~ar II with a secret aerodynamic technology that could have produced the craft that ~rnold and hundreds of others were looking at 1n the summer of 1947 . And then there is the whole chapter that I am here omitting concerning the pre-1947 sightings that go back to before the Wright Brothers.


, And I cannot accept the psychological to which I have felt obliged to return ag~in an~ aga~n for further checking and further dl.scussl.o~ 'n'l.th colleagues in psychol09)' and related f J.e lds. My conclusion: Objects that rock aircraft at times, that ~eave dents in soil and railroad ties, and splash when they dive into bodies of water are not likely to be projection phenomena. And al~ of the animal reactions argue rather stronglv against human illusoey or hallucinatory exolanations. Multiple-witness cases rule out • hallucinations, essentially by definl.tion . ~!uch more could be saJ.d, but armchair speculations about psychological interpretations don't hold much weight when one goes over the whole picture very carefully. ~xplanations,

Other alternative hypotheses of hoax , fraud and fabrication account for a few, but a percentually negligible number of UFO cases . Misinterpreted meteorological and astronomical observations and the like do account for lots of poor UFO reports, but experienced investigators learn to recognize these almost at a glance and dismiss them from further attention. It is the detailed, close-range sightings by persons whose reliability cannot be brought into serious question that carry the great weight . These are on the increase, it appears. And it seems that sightings in urban areas are on the increase. Almost no urban sightings can be found in the records for sightings of the late 1940's . In the past year there have been dozens of them . \~hat does this all mean? \~hat is happening? If you wish to know, do not ask Project Blueboo)(. Pacing of aircraft and buzz1.ng of cars goes on rather steadily. These cases so strongly suggest something vaguely resembling surveillance or reconnaissance that the studen~ of the problem is forced to weigh the possibility that the UFOs are probes of some type that are engaged in something that we would loosely call "observation." There are many other categories of sightings suggesting the same tentative hypothesis . How can this be? There is, in my present opinion, no sensible alternative to the utterly shocking hypothesis that the UFOs are extraterrestrial probes from somewhere else .

. 27 You members of the American Society of Newspaper Editors are in an ideal position to generate the pressures necessary to force Congressional investigation that will awaken SCl.entJ.sts here and abroad to the real state of the UFO problem. And then, but onl~· then, wJ.ll the problem receive the attentJ.on of the outstanding scientists of the world - who should have been devoting their efforts to unraveling this extraordinary problem for all of those twenty years that we have been ignoring this problem . It has become my conviction that the problem of the unidentified flying objects is, indeed, the greatest scientific problem of our time.

REFERENCES l.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6. 7. 8.

9.

WHAT'S TO BE DONE NEXT

10.

we are 20 years behind in scientific study of thl.S question .

11 .

Science has been assured so long that the Air Force has been studying the prob~em that scientists are not likely to suddenly start studying the UFO problem without new pressures to do so. Probably nothing short of a full-scale Congressional investigation can put on record the abysmal shortcomings of the program that lay behind those 20 years of assurances. An adequate Congressional investigation can came only from outside pressures - which will not soon emanate from science.

12 .

13 .

Ruppelt, E. J ., "Report on the Unidentified Flying Objects," Doubleday & Co . , New York, 1956. (Hardcover edition out of print . Paperback edition in print, Ace Books . ) Lear, John, "The. Disputed CIA Document on UFOs ," Sat . Rev . Lit ., Sept . 3, 1966, p . 45 f f . Hall, R. H., ed . , "TheUFOEvidence," National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena , \;ashington, D.C., 1964 . Oklahoma Dept. of Public Safety, "Unidentified Flying Objects," mul tigr4phed 9-page summary of teletype traffic on OOPS system during August, 1965 wave of UFO reports. Prepared by Mr. P . D. Naller, Asst. Dir., Div . of Public Inf., OPDS. "The UFO Investigator," Vol. III, No . 1, NICAP. Ibid ., Vol. III, No. 11, NICAP . Stanton, L. J., "FlyJ.ng Saucers: H~ax or Reality?" Belmont Books, New York, 1967 . ~!enzel, Donald H., "Flying Saucers," Harvard Univ. Press, Cambridge, 1953 . Menzel, Donald H. , and Lyle G. Boyd, "The World of Flying Saucers," Doubleday f, co., Garden City, N.Y., 1963 . Vallee , Jacques, and Janine Vallee , "Challenge to Science, ·• Henry Regneey C¢ ., Chicago, 1966 . Klass , Philip J . , "Plasma Theory May Explain Hany UFOs " in ~ · Week , Aug';lst 22, 1966; also "Many UFOS Are Identl.fied as Plasmas," Av . \;eek, Oct. 3, 196·6 . Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives, "Unidentified Flying Objects," hearings, April 5, 1966; House Document 55. McDonald, J.E., "The Problem of the Uniden tified Flying Objects," talk given to the Dept . of Physics, Univ . of Arizona, Oct. 5, 1966, and to liashington, D.C., chapter American Neteorological Society, Oct. 19, 1966. Digest of latter available to ASNE members on request.


28

14 . 15 .

Fuller, J . G. , "Incident at Exeter," Putnam's Sons, New York, 1966 . Hynek, J . A., "Are Flying Saucers Real? " ~ - Evening Post, Dec . 17, 1966.

16 .

See ref . 14 .

17 .

"The UFO Investigator," Vol . II, No . 1.

18 .

Cameron, A. G. W. , "Interstellar Commu~ nications , " W. A. Benjamin, New York, 1963 .

Dt' . James E. McDonald is senior physicist in the Institute of Atmospheri c Physics ~ and professor in the Department of MeteoroLogy~ University of Arizona . Tucson .

\

â&#x20AC;˘

"\


~/

e ~1 EMORANDUM -

A o l.. t'-

For use Within the RAN only

Write or pt~nt cleorly

IAAF FORM A27l MAR 63

PRI~M :t -r

QJ. ~" A..ef{Cff

R~ AND APPOINTM~

PHO NE EXTN

~,..;k~/l~ ~

-

c .o .o.

9 777


RESTRICTED INTELLIGENCE - REPORT OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED (Operational Command ASI 3/A/5)

PART 1 - REPORT BY OBSERVER

If.!/: /c ... ~~~!~....... . . . . . . . .AGE . ..v<'-3.. ' .. .

1.

Name of observer ••

2.

Address of observer ••• .C?••

,/t(/.1/~(1. ... 4r. ...~{.(P.1.'? . .... . .

' • • • • • • · • • · • · · · · • • · · · · · · · · · · • · · · · .....•••. PHONE

................. f!;/4?_oR

~~~~f.~~ .. .............. ..... .... .

).

Occupati on of observer .•••••

4.

Date and time of observation

5.

Duration of observation

6.

Observers location at

7.

Weather conditions at t i me of observation •••~~~~~4

~ Of'~$ .Z .................................... .

~ .~"(~ .1?'t'f"(l!. 1:~.. j, ~~!.l!.~~t!~.#~ t i me of sighting • • •• 1:~ ..~~(~ .... .... .

..... .... ............................................. ...... ..... •••••••••• •

.~ :~~ .s. ........~.'f!?!.... -~'ff-7.?. ~ ~.Y. ....... ......... .. ... . 8.

Describe any aids or equipment used in the observation ••• • ..• • ••

9.

Where was object first observed? hind a hill, over the horizon) •

&/.~Voe.u~ /ox $"0 ..... ..... .. ......4~5 ........................ .... ... ...... .. ... .. ... . ................ ............................ ............ .... .... (eg, overhead, coming from be-

...r(~~r:~.~~- .... .-1.-:\<. ........ !~ .o_ ••~rr. ... ~1(?."~ . .

10. What first attracted observer's attention?

(eg, light or noise) .

/,(/.(.-'V/~;- ....... .-</~#/ .. .. .................... .... ....... .......... .. ...... .... ... ................... ..... .. ...... ........ .... .. .... ...... ..... nppenr ne a light or ~sa defini+,e objeo~? .••• •.••. . • 14/N// E 9 fEt> .</~#-;IV//;~~.,t #~o o,r:.•• • ••••• l ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••• •• • • • ••••

11. Did •

obj~ct

~F .......... ""' ................................................... . 12. If there was mor e than one object: -

O""""""E ••••••• how marly were t h ere.? • ••••••••..•••••••••••.•••••••. (b) in what formation were they? •••••••••••• ~ •••••••••.••• . W#/1""€ 9 ~e b 13. What was the colour of tne l1ght or object? •••••••.•••••.•..•.• ... /..VVE.er~ b ~"""c c;:r,-6" km.. 14. What was its apparent shape t • • • • • • • • • r . • • • . • • • • • . • • . • . • • • • • . . • . • (a)

15. Was any detail of structure observable? RESTRICTED

Nb ... ..................... . . . /2


RESTRICTED - 2-

.............. ....... ..... ~0 ............................ ....... .. .... .

16.

Was any method of propulsion obvious?

17.

Was there any sound?

18.

What was its height? (or angle of elevation} •••••~.~ •••.•••••••

19.

What was its speed? (or angular velocity) ••

20.

Was the object stationary?

21 .

What was the direction of flight with reference to landmarks or pointe of the compass?

'

#.r:.. .!:~~1~t_ '(.-r:_ ••

..................................... Y~s

.... ...... ......................................................

22.

Did th~ object remain on a straight path, deviate , or manoeuvre nt a.ll?

.................. .. . ......... ................................ . h.

23. 24 .

Was any trail of exhaust, vapour, or light seen? •• ~?.

·...... . .

...............................................................

Where did object disappear? (eg, in mid- air, behind a hill, over the horizon)

.I?~~~ .fff.e:#.E/J. ... "}(~1~f. .... 4:e:'Y.~1.. ...~F.~P.~C....... .

25 .

Do you know of any physical evidence? (such as fragments, photographs, or other supporting evidence)

Yo ... ..... ........ .................... ....... ..... ................

~ ••••••

26.

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously? ••

27.

If so , give brief details of incident(s)

28.

State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain nbout the answers given to 18 and 19 .

........ .............. . ................................................................ .................................-.. ................... .... ... .. Mc-4--r /N/E,e~$'1 AJt'~lt'A~-r/- ~,~...~A:~ ................................................................ //V

29 .

Are ycu a member of any organization interested in aerial phen-

¥.:.::; .... .................. ................ .

omena? ••••••.••• ••• • 30.

31.

-

Name and address of organisation ••••••••••• ••• •.•••••••••••••••

.................... ..... .... ...... ..................... ........ Any additional information which relates to the sighting.

.t!tfot. ..~~( k·A~.z.J .A~.4:· :4.::. ~-u t1 ~# -~r /J/~ , ~ - ..... ........ . . . ·~ ••.•...•.•....... "t;!' . ~ ..~ .... ·... : . . . . . . . . . .

'

. @.~k'H-l-.~ .. ~#.. ;--1/.... :4~.~~4.~ -~~ .-~# .. . RESTRICTED

. . . /3


RESTRICTED - 3 -

PART 2 - UNIT EVALUATION 32.

The following military aircraft were in the vicinity of the reported UFO position at the time :Aircraft type •••••••• •

!'!:(-:-:. :................................ .

Headirlt • •...•..••.•. • ..•••.•• T

Height ••••••••••••••• . ,000 ft

•••• • •••••••• T •• •••••••••.•••••• T

•....••..•••• ,ooo

ft ......... .. ,ooo ft

Speed • •••••••••••••••••• • K •• •••••••• •• ••••••• • K • •••• , , •••••••.••• •K

33.

The following civil aircraft were in the vicinity of the reported UFO position at the time :-

. &w.£. 7~ /1-/'Hc. 1-Vt:Ju~ IJ ...vo I ,f'c/J?A/"' A1/~t ~;(;:;;, •••• "J:b')l' .. ~ ..•:i ~;;,~ .. ;;;; .. t:

7in

Headillg • •••••••••••••• T • .•••••••••••••••••••• T • ••••.••• , ••••••• •• T

Height ••••••••••••••• ,ooo ft •••••••••••• •• • ,ooo ft •••••••••••• ,ooo ft Speed ••• • •• • • •••••••••••• • K ........ •••••••••••• • K •• , •••••••••••• •K

34.

Calculations show that the following planets o~ - ~or stare were in that portion of the sky at the time:- •••• • •~~••·•••••••••• •

.......................................................... ....

A meteorological balloon was released from ••••

OAV~-tJ~

~~~•~• • ••

at ••• ~ •• z and could have been in the reported UFO position at the time.

36.

The State Observatory in the nearest capital city affirms that aerial phenomena in that portion of the sky at the time were

JV/L( comet, meteor1te . eh ower, etc) . ••••••••••••••••••••• 37.

Any other relevant remarks (eg~~t eatelitee , rockets, research 'ba.llontlS) .......... . ............ ... .... • . • • • . · • • • • • • • • • • • • •

................................................................... 38 .

There is conclusive evidence that the object reported was ••••••••••

39.

................................................................... ................................................................... The object reported could have been •• •{~.V.~ .. ...1!E!JfP.-f.<?1-.~1

40.

The cause (or likely cause) of thu sighting cannot be determined •

ti.l'!¥...~ ~ ~- ................................................. .

.....1.t( .. ~Lt. ......(tJnit) .......Y. ...~4:~Name) ...../.f....&.i:...4.J. ..... (Date) ......£C..1~.......... (Rank) RE:3TRICTED


JL!:STRICTED INTELLIGENCE - REPORT OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED (Operational Co~~and ASI 3/A/5)

PART 1 - REPORT BY OBSERVER

#.~11. .. f4 !.. !1A:1'£f.J!!l ..........AG~ lfP.~~ 1

1•

Name of observer • •

2.

Address of observer

~~• • ~:~~~~-~~~ •••• ~~11.~~~~.~ ....... .

• • •• • •• . •• • • ' • •• •• •• •• • ••• •• • ••• •• • ••• •

3.

Occupation of observer ••

6.

7. 8.

9.d:..:?o/ :<;.

~~!?~f"'-... ~;;~7. .. ~. q~:~i. ~~·~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Date and time of ob servation .(~. t?t~f:

5.

PHONE

-6'. ... ~t? ... (?.P.f.'c?-:C?.?;.

Duration of observation ..... ~ . •~"":'~ ••• •• :11.A(f? .••. ~fi>•.

:?~~"':<~ .

Obs~rvers location at time of sighting •• ~~.~~~t: .... ~~~ ... . .f":Y. .. !:'?!{!?: .... ?J?...(f-:vR..f:'!.Mtf:. f.r. ... :'Y~-{(.'~. -~~~-<7.:

~::;conditions

~~i'.~.: ..... .... . W/NO WnvtJS . . . ..................... ......................................... at time of observation ••• ~ 04/7'# E+.s/E..r.( y'

Describe any aids or equipment used in the observation ••••..•.•• #Noet./.V .4,e.s /oy~ OA./ _,.-;~sr o~t'~..S"/orv

.............................................................. .. \

#4-KEO ~!">/ ~ ~Ee~A/£J t)et'~/0-"'V· ................................................................. 9.

Where was object first observed? hind a hiJl, o~he horizon) .

(eg , overhead, coming from be-

• • •f.o:-.7.. • • •• • • • • • •~.f: • • • -~~~r:r:~~ ••••.~!::?.~~; • • • • • • •• •

10. What first attracted observer's attention?

(eg, light or noise) •

. . . . . . . .#.~f.<~~ ..... .-f.~'!-~!:. ........................... . ... ....... ....... .... ... . ... ... .. .. ...... ..... ... .... ... ... ..... 11 . Did objnct nppear as n light or aa a defini+.e objeo~? .••• ••.•.•• #~ . M 1(, . ~0 w /.IV' .(J,Y ,r/~$'/ . .041' . ;lf1;;J'/O/V . •

. .... ........4.. . ...... ....... . .............. .. . ..... .....

12. If there was more than one object: -

tJ/\/£. how marty were there ?. . ......•....••..••.•.........•.• · ••· · · (b) in what fortlation were they? •••• • •••.•• ::7..•....•.. • · · · • • . Y&,L.<.ow sz. t'Et>. 13. Vlhat was the colour of the l1ght or objec t? •••••••.••••.. . ·· •· • ,., PvvE#IJ ~NE c¥c ~G"-r~N-. 14. What was its appar ent shapt.~ •.••.•••••••••.•••••.••.•.••.....•.• (a)

4{:,

15. Was any dota1l of structure observable? ••••.••...••.•..•.•..••• RESTRICTED

. . . /2


RESTRICTED -2-

. ........ : . .... . ko ......................... . ... ..........·..· .· .· .· .· .·

16.

Was any method of propulsion obvious?

17.

Was there any sound?

18.

What was its height? (or angle of elevation).4.~f~~:1':~.(z,D••._..,

19.

What was its speed? (or angular velocity) ••~.~~(. •.•~f."~!.": ...

20 .

Was the object stationary?

21.

What was the direction of flight wi th referenc e to landmarks or points of the compass? "tt c~-re-~" v

IY'o ................................... ..

...............................................................

22.

23 .

Did the object remain on a straight path, deviate, or manoeuvre at all?

..................YES ............ ..........................& ....... .

Was any trail of exhaust, vapour, or light seen? ••• t1.i?.....•.

................................................. ...... ....... .

24.

Where did object disappear? (eg, in mid-air, behind a hill, over the horizon) 0Vc~ Wc~IERN #o,<'/.Z O-"V . . . . ..

.. ................................ ...... .... ... ..... . ... ..

25 .

Do you know of Any physical evidence? (such as fragments, photographs, or other supporting evidence)

........ ..... ............ .../1/o ............. ............. .... ..... . 26.

27 .

Hav~

you obs erved any unusual phenomena previounly? • •~~ . •• • • •

I f so , give brief deta ils of incident(s) • ••• • •• •~-"J.-

... .... .. .

................................................................ f

28.

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State any experi ence w.1ich enables observer to be reasonably c erta in about th~ answers given to 18 and 19 .

.!'?.«<f ~ ... !k..11.z!. .... /(~(/.L..~ ~.f. Y. ..... ~.~~~~of:~ . •. . . . 29 .

Arc you o member of c.ny organization interested in aerial phenomena.?

30 .

/Vb

• •••••.•••••••••.• • .•.•••••.•••••••••••..•••.•••••••.••••

name and address of organisati on •••••••

#..4. ·................. .

. ................................................ .............. . 31 .

hnY aduitionnl

inform~tion

which relates to the sighting .

. ((f.-1ft•.....tt: /??!. .... !f..~t!~. ~<~ .... P.'X'. ... ~~ ~- r:.. . .7!.#.~(!('1.~.... :f(. ~1'.~ .... .~'Y.~ ... ..~~Af.~F.~.... . .. . .. . RESTRICTED

. . . /3


IU!i:l'l'ltili'l'J!iJJ

- 3PART 2 - UNIT EVALUATION

32.

The following military aircraft were in the vi cinity of the reported UFO positi on at the time aAircraf t type ••••••• Head.i~ •.

(!?.-!-:'.; ..•......•....•..... ...•... ........

.•. . .• • . . . . ... . ••• • • T

Height ••••••••••••• •• • ,ooo f t

•• •• ••• • •• • •• T • . • •••••••

•. •...•.•.••• ,ooo

I

•••••••

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ft ... . . • •.... ,ooo ,t

Speed • •••••••••••••••••• •K • •••••• • ••••••••••• • K • •••••••••••••••••• K

33.

The following civil aircraft were in t he vicinity of the reported UFO pos i t i on at the time s-

6~-<. ~ ~~/~ WtJt../.<.L> ~ ;~;~~ ~ ..; :V .... #.;;e-;q ..•• ~~•.. "iX ~~· .. ~~. ·~;:. -;-;"'t: Read.il'lg' • •••••••••••••• T ••• • •••••••••••••••••• T• •••• • ••••••••••••• T

Beight ••••••••••••••• ,ooo ft ••••••••••••••• ,ooo ft •••••••••••• ,ooo ft SJ>eed ••••••••••• ••••••••• • K ............ •••••••• •K ••••••••••••••••K

Calculations show that the following planets or ma~or stare were in that portion of the sky at the times- ••••••• ~~'•••••••••••

......................................................... . ....

35.

4~~/. A met eorological balloon was released from ••••••••••••••••••••••• /Kb.A niJ:ln Otv ~..,.;., oe Vl$1 o,..; s at~r.:".-. -;~:;z and could have been in the reported uro position at the time,

36.

The State Observatory in the nearest capital city affirms that aerial phenomena in that portion of the sky at the time were

~~ ••••••••• (comet,

•••••••

meteorite shower, etc) •

• • • • • • • • • • • • fll • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

38,

There is conclusive evidence that t he object reported was ••••••••••

·•·•····•·•••··•·· •········ •··••·• ·•······ ·•·•·••••·•·•·•·····•·••• ····•···•·••·•···•······ •·······•···············•···········•·····•

been.~~~~• • •••••• ••• • •••••••• ......d<r.ffP.&. ~ 1: {? & /.~~~.....•.• tlt0. Rf?~: ....... .

39.

The ob ject r eported could have

40.

The

caus e ( or likel y cause) of tho s i&bt i ng cannot be

de ten~inod.

~/ ~/1,.<{/ ~(..f~~N&me) ...... ,(t{.. :(f(.~..~,7...... (Date) .•••. •.•~~ •.• :{T.:·•••••. (Rank)

••.•• . •• • .••••••••••••••• ••. • ( t.Jni:t)

R83TRICTED

....,,,.7-3.


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-?

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2.

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(eg, ovcr~ea~ , coming f r om .c'

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•••••••

f.?(.ft'tf. F·tf-l~t!'.... .. .......... .... 'b~~ · ;4. "h(; 60 ..ZJ.·,6-tJ 01~ ob serva t · . •• .•.•...• '.•1..•...2•./T .. . ..~--..•...•. ... ·.... t :Lme 1 . "' t 1on . . _L....., ~ 01~ ooo:»erva , ,,•ff--•• •.•.••• , , , , • •. • , ••. ,, .•• . • , .• , ,

Occupation of observer .•••.. Da. t e and

Duration

6.

-:':> -!

obae.rver •• ~. 'f!f~Y: . .':". ': . .S,.~ .... ,. ·'· .. /

1.

~on

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~,.,, . , . , ,.,

.,.

.

..

.

. . . .~-' ~

.,

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Coservers locnt1on a. tlQe of ~gutlng ••••••••• • •• ~ ············ · ·

~b.'..~: 1·~-:-. · · ,·aa't· ~:.er cou d l.· t 1ons a t t l.me

... o~

... '.................. ·: ..~ .... ,. . ........ .

· .: ......... --=--,c.,<, ob serva t l.on , . , , ~,A./-• . , '/ ' ...... ... ,,

L

:.~~~:·7:-·:~ ... ~:: ..~ .... .• .....• ·: ............ .

8.

Desj'ibo

a~y aids

obs~rvation .• ~ ••••• • ••••

or oqu i prnant usod i n the

. .~ f~l, :ffw. .......................................................... .

...................... .. .. ......... .. ... .... ... ..... .. ................ '

9.

··~ere wo.s object first obserred?

bohi nd a.,;_nl,

(eg, overhead , comin~ f r om

ova~••:x:J::::}.~o.-1

.... ~~· ········ · ········ · ·· ·· ······ · ·········· ·· · · · ··· · ··

10 .

"/hat fir st attr act.ed observ~r ' s a ttenti on? ( og, light or noise) •

~~~~~~- ~~~~: ... ... ........ ........... .. .................... ..... ... .... ... .........

11.

12.

•••

15 .

••

••• •

••• •

0

••••••••••

•••

•••

Di d objoot am>oar a s a light or a s a definite objoot? • .·••..•••... · · · • · ·

..~~~ ·~·4c.-:~·l·~''' " ': " ...f~f:.-!.'~:.~. ~,;,~~ .. ....~1~~d.· 'f;L;L; ~.....t-.._..,.Lc/~ J

:i:f ' thero •:r.::.s more than one objec t ':-. • . •

-;,~;!;;f.~~. .~- ••·•

< ~>

ho\": m:J.ny >7Sr& tt.cra? . .•..•• • • •• . . •

(o)

ir, "'lhat iorue.tion 'i"tar e tl:.ey? ..• ,., , ~. . .•.....• . • • • · • • · • · • • • • • •

13 . '/hat 1~ .

\lho.t

'·~s

t'ne colour of *h ·t . ., 'l 1':...g!:

\'ICS

its appo.ront shcpe? . •••

~~

.r-tfr ,;._

~~~4"-::;: r.{_.L 't/ ..... •.·/••. •••·

r o-...J·oct? ~ . .•.. , . . .. , .

..rtt:f'f./~ /..."-7':~c::. '.; ·..... / ·;'· ~· •··•

.

~C./~""/(_, . ?../'~

iaa :J.ny detail of stxu;::-urc observable? .,: •.••••••• .,,.,.•• •· • • · • • · · · • · •

~~

../2


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4

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.~oro u~d object disappear? (eg , in mid-air, behind a hill , over ,;ho :torizon) · '

~~~ ·············· .. ... .......... ... ....,... .......................... . $- '-<.- /

.._

• lo you .:::o,:: o: cny :;;h;r:;ica:. eV:.1enco? (such as ir::.gmonts , puo.o7IO. pl:.o, or otter s•..;'j)porting ev;:ence)

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~~v·o.. -~o· ..l . o. o.s. o.~·-c· o.~ •~ . .... us • • • •_· . •·• • • ••• • ••• • • • ·• .us • •1. y. ~ • • •

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f't.'l.to any ox;:>oricncc 17hich ono.blos obscrvar to bo ruasonably O\lJ t ...in r.bout titc cnG'.1\lrG given to 18 and 19 . I

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A~· -;;I(j. ..... ................... . .. ................ ·.....................

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ra au.u.::c.cu o. or&.~r.:;.s<l t1.or. ••••••.•••( • • • ••.•• • • • • · • • • • • • · • • • · • • · •

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............ ........... .................... ............... ......... .. ............. ... ............. ........ ... ...... ...................... . '

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••

2 Tho follor.~nb c~!~~~Y ~~r~:~:~ •c~c in tho vic~~i•y o~ ~he rcpor~cd L?V position ~t the ~~~a .-

}2.

.:n.rcr::.ft t:· c •.....•..•••.. • •.•.•••.•.•.•. .. ..•••.•.•.•• . •• • •••.•. F.o-.din, •........•........ •: Hoi.<'

• •• •••• • ••••••••• ,

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:n.

':':1o fono•.nnt; civil &ircraft were in tho viclnity of •no I'<lported u~ pooition at t~o timo :.\i~·cr-:r""t

t;rp."' • •••• • • , ••••• , •••.••••••• ,.,., •••••••• , •••••.•.••..•

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/

lioit:;ht .... . .............. ~o ft ••.•...•..•••. • ,coo ft •. , •... . .... ,ceo 3poud •• ,.., •••••••• • •••••• , .K ••• , ••••••••••• , •••• K ••••••••••••• , • • , , ,1"' J

C::.lcu:::.tiona show •h....t the :fol:owing pl.:r.ots or ICa.)or ste.:-s were in ~.at po=tion of tho sky a~ tho time:- •••••.••••••••••.• . ........

·························#···· ···· ·································· 35 .

J\ tioteorological b.:.lloon ·.as :-e:eased from ••••.•••.• • •.••••. • •. •• •••

c.t ........... z .-.n:i could :mve been in the reported t~-;.e .

<'.t the

36 .

posi1;ion

1;1'\j

?ho Sto.t•J Oi:sor-;.:.tory in -.;!:o nearest capitcl chy af.fi=ms tho.t aori ~1 p:: ... nort.cr.a in tl:a t ::;>o:t"l;ion of tho sky at tho time ~;oro

, . .•...•••.••...•.••...••• (comet , meteorite showor 1 'to) . r'lt.:~rks (og abou• satolitoa 1 rookcns,

37 . ..n;,· ot1:ar l'•Jlov::.nt

rortonrclL bhlloons) , , ... • .•. . .. , • , . , • , , , .. , , • , •••.•...•• , . , , , . , . , • , , , , . I

t

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coilclu::;ivo cvidcnco tha-t the obj.::ct reported wes ••••••.•.• • ..

1::;

•l······ · ~····· · ····················•ltt•t••··········l·············l·

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• •• ••••• •••••••• •• •• \"-1-0..,)

... •:.. ?-:--: :7', f.J?-:!.'. •.... •.\r.:: n:~)


.'

ROYAL AU STRALIAN AI R

TELEPHONE: 690SSO HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND

RMF TUEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: "AIRCOMMAND, MELBOU RNE""

IN

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

~EPlY QUOTE 5/f/Air( 80)

2 2 JUL 1967

Secret ary Depart nt of Air Rus s l Off i ~es ~ , ERRA ACT 2600 UN- IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS Forwarded are two reports of a UFO, together with I nvest i gationg Offi cer ' s report of the sighting at LINDENOIV SOUTF, Gi p~sland Victoria on 8th July 1967 .

( L. ..... .

.dR(;

Y'

Wing Commander For Air Officer Commanding Encl

/

_Rt......, -- -1

j

~~.~TED .


!

I

• 1. .he object ·r :first re cr";ed tc the Order!.; Cfficcr "o RM. Dase 'EA.,; .: .!..... on the evening of 8th July • ;s; tl::-oUt b the cr.;!>ALE Police.

z.

!t .s c-..1 c uently esta lished ... ~t tbree • ersontJ • d obaervc.i t e ct on the ni t in uac ..ion; .r. Grcwcot"t, I..:. a _fe: c.n t oir oldc:- on. :Jurin the courso f •he invest:!. ticn it ·ro.a rovc:lled th<>t the object ha.d bcm si.Jhted t f:Urly r 'lllar interv !.ls eve c • aiod of :from 6 to 12 ontha d h d, in fact , b n saon :J8ail1 on ... he ni l;.t of 10th July 1967 by '!rc. ,rowcott .:m • hor :,'Ount;Jr :m . 0

j

3.

The thor conditions on bot the bt -m:l 10th of J ly 1967 uero of t i ti a of yor.x i~ Cll'PSLJJT.D: one to t 10 oi hths of cloud clo.:trir. between 1600 - 1S')O hour:::, fog • ~tches in the r:cn, c.nd an invercion :n be LJU,lO V ~EY ,;h.ich ·~rs not appa-ent on the intorvcning niE;ht of ?th July 1967. On tl:.c ni :hts in questior., the locol !!oteorolocio l •(' ·ion h~d rcle oed illumin t ·~c ther b'lllcona bctiiCCD 2000 ";..nd 2030 bot~ ~ • Bee uoo of ""he tin. c!iffor cc ".n tho ~:el'ltive lack of mcvener-t of the ro ~rt. object , it is con i or d h t theec ~ere not the object cbo~·v~d . t~'Iic 1

Cne ire ircr 't cili ch landed t EL"T SAL. t 1730 houro on h J ly 1967 ia the only ro orta ... llir mov~ent ne:= tho ri.J.ovant times co thi:; os;:.ibili ty h s boo exclude •

tc he . lir .Aloanec revealed thct the only 't-ody lik-:!ly to ticc u. e .:.ndic.,ted sectior. of EJk¥ oul e tho pl :net , ho··eve:- . ea :rlte .nd uld not, .:...... Jl c .,e, be o I.' ei •!.r.., as re_a'ted.

6.

...

.....:.o older son were not Y:dl blo 4.;. interview .:nterv!.Er.f inforced tt.. t her younger eon w d ut ~as "fcirl y e:cci t bl"' ".llJ ten ea. to ex or t c".

7.

In view f o 'll' tly large ntll''Jer of ":i ;re consi erec.. th t thic object iz some";~!.~'l or • 3da :t eno r ation _ v • frc:.. LL. ..:...·o ..c...'l'H, 10.d t~oa • r v .ili.n invorcicn ~ · t o both rec~t ci. hting~ , it i ccn"i ored th t thin ly ~ r .lection of' the ~ :.rn cea t the zohrcod pOif~ st· tion, :here •. ov ent of crno.~e clouJ.n could c:J.use the " .... shes" ...nl colour ell lltiOO ascribed. as .ell no a ~1 &. atial movEtllents.

~k ( • D. HIJ

u .. )

Pilot Officer InveotiG tine Off1cer

I.

l:.iED


RES f 1.iC..l t:.D REPORT OF AERIAL OBJBCT OBSJ!:RVED

1•

Mt1rx.c: u. ta.o ~ c..o .,.Name of Observ-er ••..••••••••••••• • •••••••••• • ••••• . . .••• Age of

L.l~oe-~vo...

... ..... .

'OOVT"ti

Obse1.~er . ...... . . ..... .. .. . .................. • • •••• • ••.•• J ••

2.

J\ddress

3.

Occupation of

Dato and Time of Observation (Time to be given in local time)

1Jo:S:.~t1 -H-FriA)I ~o'"''" ro:a.,._tz AP~ . . S"n. Duration of Obsorvation (a) • •••• ¥••••• • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ~

6.

floo;ao...uF.£ Obsei"Ver •••••••••••••••••••••• • •••• • ••••• • ••••••••••••••

Observers Location at Time of Sighting (Givo details of own position by map reference if possible, or by known landmarks)

.............................................. ~~~

:£.,_

~

;i?~t.blE~>~lt.

rf-r

.t./.c."l>!;!u

SOLfiH

()v

··•·········••••·•·•··· ··•·•················•··•·•·•••••••···•·•·········•······ -p 1-(' E?s. C-4-e;:.,.//l... WeatheT Conditions at time(s) of observation(a) ••....•...•••.•.....•••

................................................................................ ()IV

8.

{krr.{

t'cc-lfti~S

Aids to Obser vation(s) .

(Describe any equipment used in the observation)

PI( ................................................................................ ..-('ez_Es:.ur.e. ~b

R,Ft..~

J./8:J.IGtoLE

s,~!f-r

~c.:!i'St'iSE

()I»"'--.:>

I~

IJO

i"e.-?"E<

~c; tA·o.v<.

>~~

···················· ·······•·•······ ··•·······••• ··•• ··•··••········•••··•·•·•· Wher e was object first observed, eg, overhead, coming from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc.

................................................................................ ;.ov

'"' ~.fiT" .fCtrrlf ~ ~N

(./o~~zc,. - otv SCto»b txutfiO•'-' AI~~?'~! -ro L!"Pk-r

10 .

What first attr acted observer' s attention, eg, light or noise •

11 .

Did object appear as a light or as a definite object .

.. ............................-................................................. . •

d .............................................................................. . j)i?f!y A/ 1T'7:

12.

0~

ec,.r:-

If there was more than one object , how many were ther e, and what was their format i on .

OIJ;;;! 0/.,'~o-l..f ..........•.......••••.........•...........••...••...•. .•.....•••. .... •... ...•.• oiC~~e

ti~~J>vfhLv

c tf47V41>-J.:..

•·••····· ~ ~ ~ :..·o.l~~r-'

13 .

What was the colour of the light or object

14 .

What was its apparent shape ·····•••••••·•·••• ••••• ••··•• •·•·· · •••••··•

&TONi:

Was any detail of structure observable 16 .

II ;>Pili!~

ilf?~t+Vce

t9F~-?7h~' ~c-.. ~

•••••••••••• •• ·•·••••••••••·• · ·· ~Y

,._ D . b . Was any me thod o f propu1e1on o ~ous ••·•••••••••••••••••·•·•·•·• · ·• ·•• Was ther e any sound

IJO

····· ·············•···•·•·••··•···•················ .

w; C?

#t;cve

If.,. I{, ::z.o,v

18.

Height , or engle of elevat1on •••••••••• y •••••••••·•·••••••••••••··••••

19.

Speed, or angular valocity • • •• • •••••••••••••••• • · •·· •• ••••·• · ·••••··••

20.

Was the object sta.tiona..r y·· . •... .•• •• ••• • Y.f!.~

21.

Nil-

................ •••••••·••

What was the diraction of flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compass.

··•·••••••••·••·•··•··•·•···••·•·············•····•·••·•·····•···············•·· . ../? RF · f.·ICTE D


RL ,,d 2-

22.

Did tho object remain on n

str~igrt

doviu~~

path,

or

m~noouvro

nt all?

<;"f'"lh"l C' /OJ~ '(

·· ················ ·············- ········ ········· ··········, ············ ····· ··· 23.

\Vss arw trail of exhaust, vapour or .ight aeon ••••.•• ~~ ...... .... . ..

24 .

Where did objoct disappear, og, in mid- air, bobind a hill, horizon•

.. •

'

...

...... .

ov~r th~

.... .. ........

0

••••••

Exi st~ncu of any physical ovidonce such as fraaments , photographs , or other supporting ev:Ld(•nco .

25.

....................................................... .......... ........ ..... . tJ O

Stft'tt!

cllr-....c-r

• •• •• • 26 •

Bave you observe d any unusua1 ph onomena

27 .

If so, givo details of incid~nt(s) •••• ••••••••••••••·•··•••• • •••••···•

28 .

State any experience which enables obsorvlr to be r easonably certain about the answer s given to 1Q and 19.

Jl!'l.lVi

rl4s

~C..,• wE-..-~ Y ous1y' • &trw • b~.t''t:CIJ · L!MY ' '-~ >0: ·~.vr lf"S

..................................... . ......................................... . 29.

Are you a member of any organisation inter.stod in aerial ph9nomens?

wo ................................................................................ 30.

Name and Address of orgsnisation ••• •.• •••• ~{ ~•• ••••• •• •••••••••• . •• • •

•··· ······•·•·•·••·•· ••·•···•···•··• ·•·•· ··•····· ······•··········· ·· ·•··· ···· •·· 31 .

Any additional information • • •••••••.••••••.• •••.••. •••••...•••••••••••

············ ~ · · · · · · · ············· · ··· ·· · · ···· ·· ························· ·· · · ····

•·•····•••••· •••••••••·• ·•·••· ·••··••·•••·····•·• ··•••••·•· ··········· ··· ···· ·· · Signature of Obsorver I( •• ,~""'~~·/;1 ••••••• • •••••••• ••

32 .

Location of any air traffic in the vicinit;r at the time of sighting .

..._ 4·11. '1ii.JP1t. ~ -r ~l'ltif -:, ·~u"fEb OIJ r..... . ' 1 /C s-~- 'I •·•··•·we···•··•·•• ··•· ·•• ·• ·•·•·· ··· ··· ··• •·•· ··•·••·OS•·••• •····•· ·········· ······ •.~••• •c.c~ ;11~!'~:•• 1:et;••?; ~~'!'!~••• f!'F. ••': 7~~.'!'~ . }?~-!~~ •.• •• . .• • · · · · · · · • "' I

33 .

QA.t(

Location of any meteorological stations in the ganeral

ar~a .

'*""'>

I?.~ ~Me ~-r > .J4E- - ...,Enr WEI2 &lJ.Let!H.·, .?t:c.C~re ~~ u~., ~ ,·c • u • • • • • • • • • v • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • · • • • • • • • • • • · • • • • • • • · • · • • • • • • • • ,:..,:,:,;.;...; • :,j •~t·ttr1t: J

-rc At: SCl?rJ 11-r .,..,,.,c;s ,,., s ,.. .., ................................................................................ .................................................................................... &T>t

PJ..tf..?r

-r"rlr:-S i!!

' 'C.V<..S

W >f •Cof

t;~ v.._ o

7f'l•!

,q o>~il fi{

~·ce. n~-v t).:

•S

..,.-t<~C

\Jiolt "T'C. •

Int.~,.;rrogator •••&~b.':~. ft."';!'.:P

~UESTIONS

Signature of 32, 33 and 34 to be answered by interrogntor .

Since 1 t is normally impossible to aetimatG thG height , and speed of n strange objoct, it will usually bo better to ondoavour to determine tho anglo of elevation of thb obj~ct, the ~nglo through which it moved, and tho time taken to do th1s .

IC1EO


/

REPORT OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED c.;~o .... c..C!I'7"1"'

<:4 t..EtUw

Name of Observer

•·······•·•··••············•··••••······

Age

......... (C)

:>:"'-' (('(

LtWl>IWVC•"'

2.

Address of Observer •·· •••• •••••••··· · ••••••• • •••••••••• •• ••••••···• J ••

J.

~ov01:at. c:A<fo~c~ Occupation of Observer ••••.••••••••••••••• • •••••••• •. •••.••••••••••. • •

4.

Dato and Timo of Observation (Time to be given in local time)

IJA.''-•"-'t E\;Co!., ;ri'<Cuu... ~ ~.~ 4t#tr /,o:s-"... '7 • •74'!:" #oo'lh-r ">•<,...,-,""•·\ ....................... . ...... . . , •••••• ~·•••••••••• · ••••••••• •.••••••• •••••71 • • •• • •

6.

11--f" ~L·•-r-

, . r. •..,......

tq.so- 1.0<"~

JSI)It'-4-"f

,

(

Duration of Obeorvat~on s

t;"eo-6{.Nu,y Ill$~

)

~

tc :.r; ' I II\Sr;.:-~ - ' t

l<'li~PY- 10n,.,.,

••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••••••••·••••••• • • ••· ~ .... ~ ....•...s Obsarvera Location at Time of Sighting (Givo dotails of own position by map reference if possible , or by known landmarks )

•······•••··••·•••·•·•• ·•••••••···•··········• rto.., 8/Jc•. v,;..:.o ,~ ~cr.~u:: fl..""""'~o., s=cw;-,. ·· ···· ·•·•····••·•·•·•···•·•••••···•·········•·•··•·••••••••··••·····•···•·•···· 7.

Weather Conditions at ti'me(s) of observation(s) •• /!:-.": 1."'.~••• ~~ ••••••• C'-~ "''r4,-r

I'Vt'TH

S'-r~l,

i/tSI8Li!::

~~tiJl>

OB'";T'€-<--;-

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • •••••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••••••••••• • •••••

8.

Ai da to Observation(s) .

(Describe any equipment used in the observation)

................................................................................ .-,'6£,~.:-cr'C

('Je:-b

t>-1 '?~tO<IS

~~~'rl-'rttV~

:(>,:...'~~

~1:::'1:>

~t <._.

."$ ;ze ••···•··•···•········•·•·•·•·•·•·· ·· .•.•...•.••. ...• ..•.••....... .•••.•.•. •.•. lo/lf)

,fi>p~.:--,-

t

114# l £~iS. ~

Where was object first observed, eg, overhead, coming from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc . A h ~I • R~r ~ tGre ~.. 1/t'l/t::Lc.v q. 'ff<lvifll.. 1:.> ~> i>oco-.J .... ~L·<~'Y

· · · · · •· · · · · •· · •· · •••· · · · ·~ · ·:4·;,. ~:.;. . •· · 3~~··ria·.:>:·e· ·.u;:;;.,·zo:..,- ·,~· ·Sii · ·.s ;...~~ · · · 10.

What first attracted ohserver's rLrlf/ltA.

a~tention,

~

eg, light or noise .

CC..sc , ._ S.-<'Y •.... ••• .. ••.•.•.•••••..•• .•.•..........•..........•..••.. ....•.....•...........

11 .

e

,t.l(11 (f - r

()l)ut llli<H7'Etl.

Hi4-rrlfti.J4

Did object appear as a light or as a definite object .

··· ··•·••··•··•••••·•••••··••··•···•······•••·••·• ·•·•····· ··••••··•···• ....... . 12.

If ther e was more than one object, how many were ther e , and what was their formation .

'- "f .......•..•.•... ..••...........•...•. ....•.•........ ON

-.Jis;;~·.;. ~o·. -~~~,~~·

C:~c:i::'<v

~

Y~r:-oJ

.. ..

Cl:MT.-1..,.-L. y

13.

What was the colour of the light or object •·•••••••••••••••••• • •••••••

14.

What was ita apparent shape

15.

Was any detail of structure observable ••••• •~r;'••.••.••.••••••••••••..•

16 .

. . AJO Was aey me tb od o f propu1 s1.on o bv1ous •. . • . •••••..••••.•••...•.• ·• · .• · • •

n.

Was there any sound

···· ··············· ·····•··•········••·········· ···

18.

Height, or angle of

alevat~on

19.

Speed, or angular velocity ••··••••••••••••• · ••••·•· · • ••••••• · ·•••••·••

20.

Was the objoct stationacy· · •••. . .•••••••• • •• • • ••••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • · • •

21 .

What was the dir ection of flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compass.

IUbiEPt t.J 'TO:

··········· ··•··•·••••·· ···• ••·•·· ····• ····

~0

.

\-tO'" z:'r..So,-~,ot.J 0 ,... L.r!f"r !(;,<lfr,AK. •. . ••.•. •• •• • •• • ••••.•.••. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

~~'CtZ'i

~<..t:' ...~'t

SSE

~

":>

~t>

';>c ... "'

19

N/1/-

•••••••••••••••••••••·•••••••••••••••••••·••••••••••••••·•••••••••••••••••••••••

HESTqiCTED.

.. ./2


t

....

.

__

..,...

dCTE&

- 2 -

Did the ebject remain on a str a1ght path, ievia~c or manoeuvre at all~ ne• Et'tfEN.- 1.? 1/...>o -;,c-..,.. /1-..~~ .,.., ';?, .. , .,. 4.... /1..~:; ~~-r- l>c,~-

22 .

··········••••••••••••••··•···•••••••••••••••••••••••••••, · ••·•·•· · ··· · · · ··· ·~

23.

Was any trail of exhaust , vapour or light s eon •• , •.• ':'.C:., ••. ........••

24 .

Where did object disappear, eg, in mid- air, horizon .

be~ind

a hill , over tho

t.:"" ''c ,"> ................................................................................ o~ :..=~

Existence of any physical evide nce or othe r supporting evidence .

25 .

s~ch

as fragments, photographs ,

AIC ..............• .•.•...••......•.••...•• .....•.......... . .... ................... . Have you observed any unusual phenomena pruviously •• • !~ ....... ..... . 26 .

t:•6itt

Pt#~-r

12"'"~

~-E.t.,, w ~

Stlf~"-"'S cF A~ ~ ~ co~.- •'"i:.:~~ If so, give details of incid ~nt ( s ) ••••••••••• • ••••••·••• -n> s ... TO( ..JE-8• ,• -· •·•••••·•••

27 . 28.

State any experience which enables obsorvor to be reasonably cer tain about the ans·~ers given to 1q and 19,

uo •

29 .

................... .

.. .

............ t

•••••••

Are you a member of any organisation inter sted in aerial phenomena?

••••••••••••••• ••• •• • •••••••••••• t

30 .

At:: ...................................... .

•• ••

Name aod Address of orsenisation ••• · · · · •••••••••••••••••••••••••······

··············································································· ~ ·

31.

Any additional information . ~-~ •••••.•••••• . ••••.••. ••• , ... ..• •. . ... •. .

................................................................................ •······•••••·•·•·•··••···•·•••·••·•••··••·•··••·••·••••·••······················ Signature of Obaorver '!..tj..,.l, 'J.~~ ..... 32 .

Location of any air traffic in the vicinitJ at the time of sighting •

.~-~ ..~':'~:"... .4!~ .~:!r::~... 9r: ..T.' t!~. ..7."~ ~! ~1.~.~ .•~':'•. ·.~ .~-:~.~ :7.. .......• O"'("tt6'! OC< M .••••••••.•... t CN \ <C ::I'"IJb i!F'•U•T"e FOe t~• ><'• ••"· ~..,il.- ccC:S •...•.••••..•• .. .... .... .. ...•..•......•.••......... , •.. •• .... ...•

33 .

Location of any meteorological stations in the ~~~

~T

g .~ncral

area .

~ AL C:..

•··•••··•••···•·••·••••·•···•···••••••····•·••·····•·•·•····•·•••·•··•·······•·· 34.

COI!lnents •..••••••••••••• • ••• • ••••••• • • •• •• • ••• • •••• • •• • • • •••• . •••• . •••

......... ....................................................................... ........................... ........................................................ Interrogator -~~ ••~~.~~.

~UESTIONS

Signature of 32, 33 aDd 34 to bo answered by interrogator .

s~nce it is normally impossible to estimate tho h&igbt , and speed or a strange object, it will usually be better to endeavour to de"er~ne the angla of elevation of the objuct, the angle througa which it moved, and the ~ime taken to do this .

P,.. ... T " ICTED


.· ou"

ALE

if. yf~l !til\ "EFE"ENCES

; ........ 7

PI\INTEO N AME

~ 1.--:'t_

JRf:N'If.,t NO APPOINTMENT

PHONE EXTN

~lJIA{l./ 5()!tfil:~ I . . I

c.o.o . • ,,,


0? ..-.E:tH...!..

3/A/5) l -

P-~~

R~C;:,:

:)~SER'/ER

·;:p

observ;;:r .~./1o; . ~- ~·".':-'~ ':"'! •• ~1.':-~-~- ...... .....G'E . ~! ..... .

1•

!iame cf

2.

Adrlress of observer

~T.

f !\.u,L... • .L.cJ.L. .

A-..J~- ~.'t~ .'-: .. . , . . . ......... .

P.\A~J•.-4!'!~~- /<.o.A.• ... ~;t~ .l;(L;7'! . ... ~':~ ..•.. PHONE

.•

-~ . ...~-!~

. • , •.•

3.

Occupation of obst:rver . •.. . ~.<-.·~-:v:-f!.. ":'~~-;-~~ .....

4,

Da-:;e anti time of observation . ..Q.~.C?r.L.."'?-

5.

Dura~ion

6.

Observern loc'ltion at time of sighting • . ~"! . ~~~-!"-~-. .'-Ji!cr:':".r..., . ._ •••• •

. .... . ....... . . .

.+.. ..-·.~ .. Y~ .C:::-; . ? . f...... .

3c rl'lnc..~ ....... .... ... ... .. . .... ..... .. ........

of observation

. . . .... . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . ... . . . . ..... ... . 7.

-

.1-::e:tnt::r co!lc.itior.s at time of ob s e rvation . C'!'~.. ~!-~~ . ... . . . .. . .

. . .. . . . . . . . . . . ,. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ... .. . . . . . . . ... . . . ..... . c.

Descr~be any :.1ds or equ.ipmen~ .;sed in tha observation •. . -i~ ';-; ... •

0

•••••

0

••

0

•••••

••

••

0

0

0

0

. .. ..... . . . . .. ... . . . . . ... . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . " 9.

.mere \'Ia..; ooJl.C\0 I irst obs~rved? <> ~ill , nver th ;- .....:>ri Z?n) •

( eg , overhead , comir.g from bt:-

hil"r1

. ~-:'\,: ': ~~~-~y. . : t ~ .tt.f. r. "-"· i.r )£? .-H~ . ~~-:'1-. ~ ; -~~~·~·~ . $!='P.c.'!\.·...... . .

10 . Ylh:J.-;; !irs-. a tr-:.ctea obs~::rver ' s attention? /.!_ _ 0

••

~";':":c::c.; ~&;"·~ •

11. Di n r. b jor.+,

0

Lc:."! r: ' ... .. ... •

••

~ppc ·.:r ~'.:'1

0

0

••

(eg , light or no i se) .

0

••

0

•••

0

0

0

•••

0

0

•••••••••••

••

••

••

'

0

••

•••

J.igh~ o:r us a cl e fini+a obj a C'"i? . ~~o?'Y':'~ ....

r 1"4 . ,. • ••lc ... ., 0..,,,.,,.._.. p... (..•' .•••.. th ,. I• •?. tlr ro~XJ. .\ •••.• • • .:L • • • • ',.. .••.•.•• . .•.. •• '" • ••.. . •.• . • .•• . .•. • .••• •

(~)

(b)

--

. . . . . . . . . . .. . . .

"there? ••. ... . ... . ....... . . .. 1.n .·1hat fo~atior: v:e-rc t ...... <:y? •... ,........•••••••.• · · · · · · · · •

how man;:;

we:::-~

13 . \lh~t ,.,as th_ colou: of tho light o.r' object? 5-l'~)' -~ . . :-.. -; . . · · · · · 14 . 'lhat was ~t:l appar.:!nt s!lap.;? ...... ~.::!.C: .. ~I.. ..... .............. ..

15 . Was o.ny d~ taE of s~ruc-mre vOs-rvable? .. .. . . ~lp... .. .... · · · · · ·

.. ./2


RES'!'RICT::m

- 2-

16.

Was any method of prcpu:_sion obvious?

17 . 18 .

','/as there a~y sound? ....•.• . .. . . .. .. . .. . ...o... . . . , ......... . .. . 'II"'~+ \"as '+s he.; ;;;h...?. o.,.. ar:g_e .,. 1 o.:- e_evat~on , · .. , Ui.A. ~ ' ~ ~ :-•• .• ,"'; . . -:.c;. .: :-?~ • . • • • ¥

1 9. 20 .

......

...

\

{(,.. ......... .... .... ... ...... .

-

was its speed? (cr m:gul2!' veloci"t~t) •... . . . . . ': . . '.. ~ .-;. ~ . .. Was th" o'oJ'ect s~"-.;O"'"'rv? ')..... ,. .-.............. 0 c..<-~a-_ ""'"'"'• ~ "' . ..... .......... ..... .. . '.'lha:t

\,;:

21 .

What '"as the direc-;;ion of f :!. igb.t with reference to landmarks or points of the compess?

.............................. ....(L... ... .. .. ..... ..... ... .. ...... 22 .

Did th~ uoject romein on a straight path , deviate , or manoeuvre nt all?

23 .

Nas any trail of exhaust , vapour , or light seen? .• , •

R.<:--•• • •••

. ..... .. .. .. ....... .. .... .......... .. ........ ....... ...... .... . 24 .

~nere did object disappear? (eg , in mid- air, behind a hill , over the horizon) IN 't" fe-r.......... ~,<> J ...... .... ................ ... ............... .... .. .. ' .E

25 .

.;;o you tt:'low of any physical evidence? (such as fragnents , photographs , or other supporting evidence)

f~ ..... ~ · " .... -rr. £1-o... .. ........... ...... ......... .. ... ............... .....

26 .

:-tav~ you observed any unusual phenomena previou..;ly? , , t( c.....•••

27 .

If so , give bri~f detRils of incident(s) .•.••.• ~(~.•.. • .... . .• .

.. . . ......' .................. ... ..... ........... ........ .. ... . . .. . .... . ..' ..... .. ............ ....... ...... ..... ....... ........ . '

28 .

State ony experience w.ich enables observer to be reasonabl y cortain about tt~ answers given to 18 and 19 .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :JJ:-: ..... ~. ~~'/.~1'? . . ~;1. . ~#V,".Y>"7.'~~ ·.~••~•••••••• •• 29 .

Are you o mcmocr of any organization interested in aerial phenomer.a? • . . .•. ... .... .. . . . . ..~ ':". ..... . . .. . . . ................... .

30 .

:lame ~uJ. addrt:ss of organisation . ...••• . . ~ ........•••• · · · · · · · · ·

........... .... ........... .. ... ... ... ........ .......... ......... 31.

"..ny e.dditionw.. infortlr:.tion which rela'tes to th~:: sie;ro.ting .

. . . .. . . ..... .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ... . .. ... . . . . . . . ..... . ........ .. . . .. . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ..... ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ... .. .. . RESTRICTED

. . ./3


JllSTRICTED

- 3 -

32 .

The follo~~ military aircraft were in ~he vicinity of the r eported LTO pos~tion a~ +~e time :Aircraft type • ••....•• . . . ... . . , . •. •.......• • ••.•. . . • • .. • . . . Headiru . . . . .. ••.• . . • . . . . • . . . T Height . .• . . • •• • .• . • . . • , 000 ft

••• • • :..,...(· •• • • T • •• • • ••••• •• • • •• • • T

•.•..••.. • .•• , 000 ft •...••• • ..• , 000 ft

Speed . • . ..•• . • .•..•..... •K /• .. . ... .. .. , • , ..... , . K , ...•....• . ...• , . . •K

33 .

The following ci vil aircraft wer e in the vicinity of the r epor"ed UFO position at t he "irr~ :Aircraft type .............. ... .. , . . , . . .. ...~ ., . . . . , .. . ....... ,, . . Heading •.• . •.... , . . •.. T • ... • ••• • .. • •. ••. • . . • . T •.. , . . , ... , ,,,, .... T

Heie:h t •... . ••• ..••.•• , 000 ft •. •••• • •••• • ••• , 000 ft •••••••.. • •. , 000 :ft Speed •. •• , • , , , , .•. • .•. • • • • K ~ .. • • ••• , •• , •• , , , , • •K •• , , .. , , , , , , , , . •K

34 .

Calculations sno·, that the following planets or major stars were in that portion of the sky ~t the "ime:- •••• • . . .•.• . .•.• • ••• . • • •

.. ......................................., .......... ..... . .... 35 .

-

A meteorological balloon was released f r om ••• • ••.••••••.•••.••. • • t •... •••• ..

36 .

z 3nd

could have been in the reported UFO

The Stato Observa~ory in the nearest capital city affirms that aerial phonomena i~,~ha-; portion of the sky at the time were ............. .. ...... (comet , meteorite shower, etc ) .

37 .

Any other relevant remarks ( e8 about sateh tee , rockets..., ,. <' I]TE.W..J A-rc.·r.. . , ")1' •• • P• 7!l. <..\Ct> o-.,.z? •(.C•••<JI>Y'~·~ lloo..,rasearch •oa 11 cons ) ;-~ , .••• r •~ ••••••• r~ . , ••••••. , ••••••••

~·v.'!i:"!~ !':1• ~?.c.~~~.~fi~tf':-. ~A!~~;~.;~.,..<:-; . ~·~·':!. f!~"! .If.'~. !!~-;-; .~ . .,

., il..:~...'f ,.... f

.• ") <I , l. •twU S..,.J is'! s~cn • <:: .. ~;) ,,, - c l'f• ::> , ~ Tbore iG conclusive evidence that the object reported was •• • .•.••• •

......... .. ........................ .. ................. . ...................... .... ..... .......... .. ... ........ ......... .... . ..........

39 .

The

ObJeClO

"

reported could

r.ave

beer .... If ;: .. /.,... ..... .. ..........

...................... .... ........ ......... .......... .......... .... 40 .

Tho Cll4t)u \Or

l~kely cause, of

-;!1;

: -:'".~. ~ .. !f.~... .. .. ..('lni:t;) •••••• •••f? ..-:f. ~ . ~. !....... JDate) R.EST!UCTED

sitl'.hting

.

cannot De

deteraanc..1:: •

r4/~..... .... .................... .. .

r -"" ,_

........ .

.. t

••••• •

•• •

'arno) rtank)

1<4A.:.T•...j


Headquarte'l'a R..AF Bn.t• A....BERLE'f 9lJ> 11th July 1967

82fl/5/9/Air( 12) Headquarters Operat~onal Command RAAF PENRI'l'H 1W NSW REPORr OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED HQPFCOM AS! 3/A/5

1• Further to this Headquarters signal A154 04JUL67 , herewith are two copies of a report compiled as a result of a reported aerial sighting.

The sighting was made initially by a student of St Pauls School, BaLD HILLS, Uaster PARTRIDGE, and was then seen b,y the Headmaster, Science Master, at least four other master s, and numerous students of the school. The writer visited the school and interviewed a number of observers , notably t.r J .T.C . TAYLOR, Science Master, and Master PARTRIDGE, who were at the opposite ends of a credulity acale. What each observer saw remained basically the same but Vlith individual variations as to shape. Relative size varied from pinpoint to one eighth of one inch which largely negatives most of the variables in shape. Position and movement were agreed upon by all observers . 2.

3.

One student, a llaster JOSLING, used a camera but results obtained are inconclusive, for the quality of the film and CSQera lens used do not lend themselves to accurate definition at high enlargements.

4• The original observer, Master PARTRIDGE, has made several previous s i ghtings and is a confii':led believer in the existence of extra terrestrial activities. He is not a member of a UFO society but wishes to join one. He uses a 9" reflecting telescope to aid his sky watching activities, and is a brilliant scholar, topping his class in~ all subjeotso

5· The planet Venus has been visible during daylight hours of the past week but was in the Northeastern sector at an elevation of approximately 40° during the time of the reported sighting. No other stars or planets in the reported position were of sufficient magnitudg to have been visible during daylight hours . The original estimate of 3g elev~tion in the Northwest was checked by the w:t,ter and confirmed as 20 to 25 elevation on a bearing from the school of 300 ~. using a wrist compass. 6. Mr Ron CUSTARD of COOBY CREEK Tracking Station was contacted. He stated that shortly before the time of the observation a satellite - ATS 2 passed over COOBY CREEK at ita closest to Earth in orbit from South to North , increasing its range from Earth as it travelled northwards . Whil at he would not commit himself unequivocally because of t ne great range of the satellite , he thought that it was conceivable that reflected light from the Sun could be seen possibly for some considerable time because of the very slow change of angle between the Sun and the satellite in their relation to the observers at ":.hat time.

. ./2


~ b&re were no reported ceteorological phenocena or aircraft T,hich would have accounted f or the sighting over such a long Hydrogen filled balloons from ILeteoro!ogical sources High Schools were ruled out because of tb lack of apparent ::vement in a south westerly breeze at the lower levels and a westerly jetstr eam above 30, 000 feet , unless the balloon was tethered. 'fb.is however, is unliKely as the area over -.vbich the sighting was =:~ade is sparsely populated. Kite flying has not been considered because of the elevation. The school is situated on high ground overlooking a wide valley. •

11

_.,.,4::n:r time .

p•·~jacent

.-

It is probable, although by no oea.na certain, that the observations 8. were of reflected light from the ATS 2 satellite. The discrepancies between this report and our original signal can only be explained by the verbal repetition of reports by telephone until they reach the writer•

............

~~

Flight Lieutenant For Officer Commanding


,...• (

v --

~~

RO YAl A U STR ALI AN A IR FORC E TElEPHONE: 69 0550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMM.-.N D RAAF VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS ' 'A IRCOMMAND, MELBOURN E

IN AUI.Y QUOTE

5/6/.Mr( 7 8)

Seer eLy Denartme of Air Ruese Offices CAk~RRA ACT 2600 UN- IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS

1. Herewith are reports of UFO ' s received from RAAF Base EDINBURGH FIELD SA. 2. The reports comprise copies of a collection of s:!.ghtings forwarded by • .r C. 0 . NOBRIS of the Flying Saucer Research Soci~ty in ADELHDE . :.:r U<1l:lRIS H.e.s stated that he will forward on a monthly basis , any future reports . This Headquarters has no cooment to add regarding 3. these s i ghtings which appear to hava been collected over a considerable period .

"2ncl

I

~~ (L . B• .BRO'TN)

Ning Commander For .l.i r Officer Commanding


â&#x20AC;˘

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

TELEPHONE: 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND

RMF

TELEGRAPHIC ADORE5S: " AIRCOMMANO. MELBOUI\NE"

IN Wi.Y QUOTE

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

5/61Air( 76)

1 4 JUL 19?7

~I

UN-IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS

1. Enclosed herewith is detailed report from RAAF EAST SALE on UFO sightings reported on the evening of 27th

June 1967 .

2. Earlier , these UFO sightings were given fairly wide publicity by the ABC and melbourne press, but no information concerning the findings of the Investigating Officer has been released . 3.

This Headquarters has nothing to add to the very

(L.B. BROWN) Wing Commander For Air Officer Commanding Encl


]_l!t!:,.oduction 1. "ide spread u"l!city 'by •he ::-ass -nd radio or flic_:htings of unustnl li hts in the cky o~ the evezri!'lg of 27 Jll:l 67 caused r.w.erous people to ::.r.itia.te official repcr";e of these obsC'v tions to the RAIJ". 2. The Invest' ting C:t.'ficer received a totcl. of 24 repcrtu, .21 ot hich occurred b~ cen 2100 md 2230 hours on 27 JW1 67. Tho other 3 ocetL-red on f.if!'erent nights ~d are not co::sidared in this repo1·t.

3. It w_ould • o"r that three C5..ff'erent typoa of light aources vero eoen; aixteen repor~s uere in resr.ect oi' one tyy..o of light source, three uc:re in rc:::;poct of a second light source, md t,ro wc::o in l'espect of e t~d source. !gE_!JJJl__'li. ...

0~

...IGTIT SCURCE

4. .1. .. <! object first a} eared as a "large star li:te li£;ht 11 lo"hich rapidly increased~ size to where it wn::: described e.o l:eing relc.tively about h3lf the size of a full coon. It o._ !\Oal'ed to JtOst observers e.s e bcll of :1 ;ht which tr .velled ne<:rly hcri z.onto.lly across t!!G S.:y, slo;rly curving tousrd::: the ea:rtb at a shallolT angle.

The colotl!." o~ pronounced ::l.lld lasting for abcut three quarters of its ~ata:tco of travel 1ras a brilli :.nt cree.n or blue.isbgreen . It then seo.'lled to Char.ge colour to a "hot-or~e" or "reddi:::h-pink" fa: ita l<:.st one ~u3X'ter of travel. Then it finally ppeared to grou extrcrnell· bright and "burst" ir.to a \Jhi tinb-yello r.i..aborange colour after l!hicb it disappeared. Trai::. RGII!llining 6. A truil of "vapour" persisted over its finol path ~:.nd around the l 1i1 • where it dis~pecrec.. This slowly moved into a "boomerang" sh" •, until it he.d graduclly dispersed after fif'toon minutea. Loc!ltion of q,bsat"lers

'7 . The oboo."'Vars •;ere listed in the nur.:eric=U order of their rer.orte, and their !oco.ticns at the time of obccvo.tion e.re plotted on the attached RJ.!S' ·.}.. C. (3470} l.ELl'Otl'Rl1E. Deacrilltion by

Ob.§:..~

Probably -:. .• e ..:est accurate repcrts •:ere described by observers From all the descriptione, ~t is deduced thnt the various observers re,orted one or ore phases of the objec~& flight path as seen 'fran their ;osition. Details o=e :-

B.

51 6, 8, 15, end 18.

•.•/2

~::sr

·cr-:::o


y

REST ,_.TED -

2

-

(a)

Observer3 1, 2 , and 21 -prob;;.~ly sa;r the Green sec-:ion .

(b)

Obac:vers 3 !!.nd 4 proba-'"1:- sav the section where it ch:nged '!'!'om blueish-green to p-::...'lir....rcd.

(c)

Obscrvere 5, 6 , 7, 8 , 15 , and 20 probably cav nll or n~ly ell of the event.

(n)

Cbserver3 9 and 1::> probably sav o~ly the reddish portion j~U:t before t.he end.

(e)

Observers 14 a.'1d 18 !\l'Obably sev the brilliant end flacll end subsequent trail.

(f)

Obccrver 19 probably saw the vapour trail only.

9.

Nc!lrly all ob:::ervers agreed that the nenrlyborbontnl path G.nd colour of tho object, uns r.:ost unusual and not like tho normo.l 11 3hooting" or "falling " str.r type of object. •hich they had all seen nt come ti::-e. ~

of Occunencc

10. Tt:e time of the "finish" ~:as logged at 2155 hours EST by observer 18. Another accurate time uas tcken by observer 6 as 2152 hours. All the other times were only " ....roxima.te, but generally ::13 tbey ;rere bet cen 2 145 and 2200 hours it is considered that only one such event occurred at about 2155 hours. !To eXpla.n:;tion c:n be offered o.s to wb,y observer 7, ~:bo ePf.arEntly sari the ~e event, gave the time as 21C5 hours.

11• w..,..:rings noted by the observers on tb.e lar.d uere apfl'Oxitntions only and ind!. -:ated tb t he o'bj ect .first ~ppe:;red to the couth east end t r velled to the north, north east , or north ~Test . Until a report w:1s recaived from the observer 18, at sea en the ~!V "COR! TALL", no indication of the object ' s position w::s ::.-pp.,.root . liot;ever , the accurate bearings and timeo reported by observer 16 en::!bled a fairly a ccurate tr ::~ck of the object to be plotted a:J cho m on the attached . / .• c. Direction of Travel 12. FL·om tho bearings plntted i'rom observer ' o reports, the general ircction of travel t~ould a _ e::~r to be about 350'1'· Thin ;ould satisfy the majority of descriptions of the object ' s path. tiistmco Tr :velled

13· Aomu::inc the bea.""inga plotted. ere fairly ace x to, tho initial point where the object bec::.~e viFible l."Ould be nbout 200. couth of CA! E HOi!E. lth a direction o:f tr vel about 3~ its final posit!on wen it diaap e!lred o.C.d have 'been about 50UM south of CA:E :JO 1E. '?hue the totol diet'Ulce tr velled t.J:rine observation would be at.out 15()lll .. E-:-tim ted S ('.Cd 1(. Estimations of speed vari e:!, but prob bly the best icprcs:1ion was gained bJ a descr~:pt:!.tm o!' "slower th"n a shooting Gts:r , but faster then o. satolli te11 • .Ilur(!.tion o:f the clgb-!;inga vl!l'icd f'rCCl i to 35 ecoonda but rob bly tho mole evcnt f'.rom "start" to "f'l_ni r• too bot oen 10 nnd 30 seconds. • ~, ever ..ri.shhce of 150m the rpeod ! the object 'WOUld be betucen ,4,000 end 18, 000 blots.

. .. /3 RESf ICTED


RESTfi;CTED -

~stim·ted

3 -

Altitude

15 · Froo tho _o..ition c.f observer IE, c.nd acc·..=cto n ·le of elavation of the cbjcct t he _oint o! Ci~. e~"'.!lce s est 1 ad ~c 28° above Ac:u:nin.., this point -.;o be a"bo·;e l:ltituic 3 °25 ' S, a triant;le ac=. level. c:.n be ost bl .. e od ·.:. h o. base ide c-:! :!.ent;th 75!:!.. .a.'ho vert.:.c~ side woul then be 39. ~ ; ie, the altitude o! the object · m it cliarrp ..e!ll'cd uould be .,bout 239,00l: .fee":; . Conclu ionn 16 . The unusULlly brig~t moving li ' t re~rted b~ the ~jority of ob crvers was J<=Ob 1:: c :leo. y a large tbject entorin: the e Tth • :1 at oorhere ot high c:Poed and rel ~tivelJ" sballo • nglc. !!cat e;e: er.:1ted by friction w1 th t o :tooGJ ~ere probably c:.used the bri~_;ht glo·1 end c 'Jl e of colour~ . i'hio object cou..d possibly h~o b - a largo motcor or aoce •.n mr!dc catellit~ or r e 01:ot casing yh:;.ch on r&-a."ltering the e~th'a atmosphere subco_nently burned up. Tbe path t ·en b tbe o'.::ject is es•iml:.ted to bnve been from a 11 . pod tion about 20v-..... .Gouti! o... c,J>l!i !IDh'E tr vel ling on a h03ding of about 350T to where it disapi'et.re<J. about 50Nf.. south of CAPE nm?E. ItJ speed would bavo probably been l otm1en 1e,ooo and 54,000 knots und its .Utitude at the time of disap!)earance .;ould be <>bout 239, 000 feet . 18. The v apour trail left behind aftQl: the objects' dis!lppe.?..rP.nce was ~ oesibly caused by "snoke" generated in tb{; process of its bur.1ing up and hip;bli@lted by the liE"=.t of the moon, which uas belolz the horizon

to the east .

· ' Vet"Y

19 · ':hie second t;ne of li ht was described by observer!'.!, 11, 13, an:i 16, h:o of Yltoz::. stc..te.l th-t i~ seeoed to ori ir.f.te :f'rcm a very brieht centre spot tri+h the r 1 cl:.ll-:-e o~ a tuil cr sotlc object behind it . The d.n f~ture t.ich distinguished it from the 1ir.::t type tras th.:!.t _t seE~". o o clo~er tc the ~·tll end ILoved as if under acme type of cont_c . Observers 13 !!Jld 16 we1.·e travelline in a c:.x· et tbie tilto an d that the liFht seemed to r.cvo ovcir or noc.r the vehicle before nl.tt.lt":Lnu course t.."ld sreed end disappe xin • 20 . Tho tirJee of these events were given ac 2105 , 21:?C- '2145 and a.tout 2145 houro, occu=.·ing in o:rcier from I:OR. i;!lJ.. to Ea!AC}.!.Oi:v end tbon ne x 0:1Jl031'. Their r ion ttas described as from 10 - 15 eecondo to 40 ~.>econde !:ID nbotn 5 ri.nutes .

m1e "ascribed by obse..."'Vers 12 <.:lei 17 a a very .bi type of li " ~:::. vas reported to be in a hori :.::ont:ll pbne ovine Ugilt. !to lov in elovnt~on by 12 ..;n a~ . ser:.as of ho:ri:.;ontal nd vertioal cov6"Jents by oberver

21 .

fuu'"t.

n.

22 . IAl.ration on both occao::.o:tc was ver;.• ebort, !ra: 2 second a; .

econils to

- 10

.he oC:.ticoa of bot!::. obacvers va w.i.thin about four Has on t!lo ·i:i noel· t~e 1 e~bank tt.:rr.- off whc:l they ec.e the:!.:- ob::~e......Yat~ono. Al thoU£;~ observer 12 o t:.ncerLi!!. &.:> to the tir.e, he thou.: ht that it may b:we been just tl1't er oor.!:'i se. If eo, the ti.J::e 10ul :;reo wi tll obaer-vcc 17 uho ve a t-l!::e et· e...n 2220 lind 2230 :tours.

23 . t

,:m._....,.

iii..

. . -/4 t~ESTRICTED


)

24 .

Observer 12 took c.n ..ccurate o;crpass bearin; of he point :!:ere . eared. Th:.s 1;eg:-:..n ;ro.s 110' en confi:ced by t~a tin~ Office:.

tho l i ht first

Invest-

25 · ':(hare s in...'"llf'l:icie:1t evideoce to rov!de a~.y oto.isf' ctory ex l.:.n!'ltio far thc:::e oth6!" types cf light sDIZ.'ceo. It is o ibl~ th t they CGY be cc-oci t~ _th ~:!:.e first t:11-e de cribod. It y '-1'/Cl be th .t t':. :rere ctu...lly the s.;:,oe Egl:.t; l:ut tc tho obaorvers, they c:Jred Jifferent .

26. There wore no d.rc:-nft r..cve~nts repcrteii in tho vicinity or du..-in.. the tilueo of tbe sigbtings cf t~e lijjb.ts.

27. The attached mcteorolo6).cal re!ort indic ted th t , despite ao::.e pround r d.1 tion :fo eound SAL!:, the aerial visibility over GIPPSLAUD thro~ bout the eiod of the ci 'htings was Vfi!J:y good. 2 • All obtervora oto.ted th.o.t of the Slcy was excellent .

~he

night

~as V6l'

cle::r and visibility

29. Froc the Jdr !.l..t!wnac, it ;;as l!et~"'Cined that , tbrouehout t e a.ren covered in t e r • ort, c:oonrise oc 27 Jun 67 occurred at the following times :-

30 .

(a)

OROO.:t.

2226 hours

(b)

s 1,

2232 hours

(c)

SA! REI:C. -

2238 tours

The rtoon rosa from the east and was 18. 4 deyo old at ttmt time.

dl£~

(R . ~-- ••••) Fli ht Lieutenant UFO Investi ~tin Officer

I< STRICTED


-ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE TELEPHONE : 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND RAAF VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SCt VIC

TELEGRAI'HIC ADDRESS ; "AIRCOHMAND, 11El80URN£"

••-• -n

5~/J.ir(75)

l

Secretary Department _ Air Russell fices

CANE

2600 ACT

A

UN-IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS 1. Herewith reports from L:r 1..H. ATKINSON and Mr and Mrs A. SOt1rA..~ concerning the sighting from MORWELL of an un-identified flying object. 2. This Headquarters has no further comments to add to the Investigator's report.

(L.B.

Encl

/

BROWN)

Wing Commander For Air Officer Commanding


IH:.Sl h iCTED

l...YES J.fl..A.'I !.9~C2_~~

1· .o;bia r .crt de;J.c ith an uriA,..ntifiod arbl object o1 hted in the l 0 .~L croa t 1$00 hours on 30th Juno 1967. J.ttac!Jod xo statements l:lOdo b ,_r. .n.i rs. ... _~,u: , :.md .r. , Ja ::L 50 r. 2. Oc 30th June the three observers ~lel'e stc.ndin on the f'ront porch of ;r . and . .rs. SO 'TJ~<t 'S residmce which iu loc ted on t'be 1aatern siJo of the city of CR~ (see attached m p) . At n1 ~roxi 1900 hours ra. SO?.u..' ... !llld . ..r . A':JG.TW ' S atto."ltion ruo attracted ly ':!. noise, :hich '" s .:.es<:l'ibed by !-..rs . :XlL"?/.R o.s cimilar to tho noise m:1do by bursting tcy balloon, .nd by Ol: . N!!lC_ ;;.o,~, cs the came ~s the noise produced <~hen a bullet 1 asses throUoh r. motal cheat . Looking up, a stationary light w s observed on a roW'h beari!! of 18oT. :'he li~ht, accordin.r o !.r. A'..'KI ':.:0 , clvmged f'rom u thin. ;revering, \'ertic:ti light to a circular shape ond moved off in M easterly direction, emitting vertical puffs of smoke till it disaNeared. The object l·ros then roughly on a bearing of 135T from the point of observ<>tion. . Lr . and hl-s. ~OUTAR ' S evidence te.'lds to coroborate L.!.' · ATY.Il'SO.~ · s state-nent .

3. .By reference to t e attached maJ. , it can be seen that , the HAZEL "<X'D po1-1er station bears a ~roxia.ately 180'1' from the observers' pcsi tion , and, subtandi.ni; the angular ell .nt;e of bearin;; of the object is a lor •e industrial complex .rbich operatee bn a t~;anty- four hour basis. '.:.'he •:ind velocity or.. t"e night in uestion <ras 295/10, this wind 1.ouJ.d te.·Hi to blow the Sll'.oKe ~rom the SEC area cirectly away from the observers a.'ld give the imr.reasion it uas risi:lg vertically. At the same time any burni.'lg m:..ss originatict; from the ID.ZEL 'COD pcwer station •ou!d c.p_ car to r::cr e roughly eastwe.rd 1;ith a sli ht downrrerd trajectory.

4. The Gll£ineer et E.t.z!:L :UCD reported thP.t no major circuit disturbances, 1:bich m:: have ri ve.'l rise to ,;=.e nc::.ae or light de sed bed by the •ri. tness, t:as legged at 7-he time cf sil?hti.-:&• Ho;:eve;, only rna.jor Cisturbancos o.nd brea.cdc11ns are logged so tl.Jis does not preclude the poseibili ty of the phenomena originatin~ at '!A~'!l:ro .

Spotli ht shooting is prevalent in the CR" - ea, and a combin:1tion of low brokm cloud and a strong ar.ctligbt Jir..,cted at the cloud base, toeether Hi tl:. the industrial srooke from the S::C area could produce the effects d.eecribed b·· tbe observers. Conclusio'! Incu.f "icient evidence is 'lvailable to dra1~ a satisfactory conclusion but it is hi~y probable that this 11aeri 1 object" was ca.used by a co bination of disassociated, man- made, occurrences.

6.

(~;;.,..:: .L.u " •

_,

•J

.~ight -icuten~~t

6 Jul 67

!r.vest:!.

HC~T.dCTt:D

tint': Officer


J...,u:. ol

gl!~N6

~ /r~mAI.. S1Gt1n.Jt;

J..,rJc ,. 8c.llft•"'G oF

OlC'Sl dVW

HNA&.

Sr'-itnoJC:


tt @

~

EPOHT OF AERIAl. OBJECT OBSERVED

(

,..fAw R \C~

H ATKIN ~c>"N q I Ce~t-J 1&~ f:.. \) ~RW~I..L Observer ... . .... . ........ . .. , . . ... , ..•... . ......

Obse1"'ve1~ • • ••••••...•••.•••••• • ••• • •• , •.••• Age ~ •• • ••

.Address of ).

Occupation of Observer ...~~.. ~~• .. ~+~~

.....~~--:: ... ,...

4.

Date and Time of Observation (Time to be given in local time)

.............. .l .~ ~ ........ . ~0

.. ?:'~. t:J..6.7 ... . .. .. . . .. .............. .

Duration of Ob::;ervation(s) . •... .?>.<=! . .~~::=-.~

5.

6.

............... .

Observers Location at Time of Sighting (Give details of own lu..b.2~-t- G :rosi tiol! by map reference •••• -T~ •••••••• •-... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~f possl.ble, or by known -:!<:>II+ S

••••• ,

. ... .. . ~~:r:zfff~... ~ .L!>.~ ...<!-f .. :r!!t? ... y! f'{ • .. ~¥.~~~rfc.M-~.~

........ .

7.

Weather Conditions at t i me( s) of observation( s) ... • .... . . . .

8.

Ai ds to Obserwation(s) . (Describe any equipment used in the {\]' 1 L observation)

. . . . ~~- ~}). .~:lf>. lf..11.'./Jt.H.r!~ ... Y'.~..r:·.~ ....""!If. ..~~o/.'!J..... f!~.'-!..

1

t

e

...

9.

t

t

t

f

t

t

t

.......

t

t

t

.

.

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Where was ObJect first observed, eg, overhead , comins from behi nd a hill, over the horizon, etc .

. . . . . . . . ~~P. . . .1."! . ~.'~. !+.•.~ . ~~ .~~ ..~~ ~ .. i£.~""/~!:' .~......... . 10 .

What first attracted observer '.s attention , eg light or noise .

. . . . . . . . • . . . • . . ~l'j ~f ... ~.'?~. ~ 11 .

·-----._

0

...

Di d obj e ct appear as a light or as a definite object .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

, 2.

.... . ..... . .... . . . ... ' ... .. .. . ..... .

t. 14-11 r

. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

-

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

.

,

•••

••••••

I f there was more than one object , how many wer e there, and what was their formation .

Or.Jl3:

. 3...•.•• . • w. h•• t. . .... t. h••••. 1...... ~ . t. h••. 1. : • h. t. ..... b. ~ .. t.. A~~;;_ ·~ ,i~u~,;~ 1 . a was e co our OL e ~g oro Jec .. . . . . .. .......••

shapeV~~~~ h~: .. .19.0/f7-:»:!~ .. . .. .

14 .

What was its apparent

15 .

VIas any detail of structure observable . . ..

16 .

VIas

. 7.

Was there any sound ..

i8.

Height, or angle of elevation .. ~~ ·

i

9.

r!?. ........ ... .. any method of propulSion obvious ..... . ."!f?............. .

Speed, or angular

t.fe: .. {1!:~:... ~~ ... t;5? ~.~: • !~ · .. .. ·· · ·· · · · · · •· · ···········

.... t ~ D~'14~ PeR. s...~u veloc::. ... y ..•. • ..•.••. . . • ..•.•• • • • • • · · • • · • •

.Y0. .{~ "!.''!.'.'!~j.) ·. · · · · · · · ·

20.

Was the object stationary? ...

2' .

What was the direction of flight with reference to or points of t~e compass . . .

landmar~s

... ............. ........ .R~.~· ·· · ····· ·· · · ·· · ···· · ······ · ·· ····· ·· · ... ;~ .

.-&


-2Did the object remain on a straight path, deviate or :n~nocuvro at nll? S'7RIIt<i-UT' n-1

22 .

. . . . .. .

.PA ........................ .. ... .

.............................. I

trail of exhaust , vapour or light aeen.Y,~ .... :~P~I.:!'

23 .

\'.'As any

24 .

','.'here did ob~cct disappear, eg in mid- air 1 behinda hill 1 over the hor1zon .

MtD AIR. ... ' ....... ... ....................... ... ... ......................... . 25 .

Existence of any physical evidence such as fragments photographs, or other supporting evidence . ' NIL

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26 .

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously .•.~.Cl . •••

27 .

I f so, giv e details of

28.

State

incid~nt(s) ........... r:J. /~........... .

~ny experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to 19 and

19.

. • . . • . . . . . • • . • . . • • . . . . . • . • . • . . . . ~.Q .• :-.•...••.•....• . ••••••......•.•

Are you a member of any organisation int erested in aerial phenomena?

29 . t

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Name and Address of orga1usation ............... • ...•........

................................N}fJ ..................... ... ....... . 31 .

Any additional

~1#..! "'HICH

c-Hit-NG.rf>

. +..t f-fl.~ .. trff'J..~if P. •

in:formatio~ . q{f~-g'Jj!~r. !Jt:t;.1!'ftp~ ~~ . ~ .~~~....~·~!'- I/IZ'R11C.At..

S;MP.!' IH 1r "fovt--t> -rc.wlhCW '/Jrlf .c..~r. .S.M~ ~ /tr .. 1'0 ... [7~:-7?. 1 /~.~y :1 ~P• . ~ '('. • /I"?P.&.;~<r7>• • T!=!

. ..

..

....

.':~':. . (~~f~ ..P;I.Ff?.. ?.~: ~.~() ~~ "'!'.~~"!J.U:. . ~ '0. ;:;;:1\~;;;;_

Sl.gnature of Observer . /?: ....... •. ..... . .. . .• 32.

Location of any air traffic in the vicinity at the time of sighting . _, ./_, --"'"L'. 1'10 K.roowrJ , ,..,,.r-tc 11'1" '/JIC:! ~ rlt1RN~L.<-

·· ·········•··•••··········· ·· ·······•··············•·'' ' ~······ · ···

;;:· ···~~~:~:~·~~·~~·~~~~~~:~:~~~~~·:~:~~:~:·~~·:~~·~~~·~~·~~~~: ~It"!. ne~

RftM-...... S t)Sc£ 7' S rtU:: ............ .... ' ........... .. ... .................. ... ...... . 34 . Col!D1lents . .f"~ . ~ . f.cr..f~":'.~ . 'rf. . fl!!=: • . $!4-~t!!t!C: .. ~ ... . . .~~~ (~... #.l? ..A. :l.~t.. f/tf.'.':<?;>. .. ~.'"!:~ ..i?~t!. 7P. . 7.'!~ . . . )

rtf Interrogator~~\~ :Jt.

. , ~~'! ...f¥.. 1 :'!~":1, ..a!:...<!f1.L~.. ,, f/!1:':1~~.. , .. ,,, .. ,., ...... •. Signature of Ql.r'"ZST:ONS 32 1 33 and 34 to be answered by interrogator .

Since it is normally impossibld to estimate tne height . and speed of a strar~e object it \vill usually be better to endeavour to determine the'angle of elevation of the obje~t 1 the angle through which it moved, anp the time taken to do this .


~R. ... .. ~.~':."..;-?'\~

Age. ~

.... ..... Observer .. .1~!. ff.c..:~~ $T. . .. ~~~~ .. f'.<; .: of Observer .. $.~~.~":-~. .. ~~· r1,t..L\ .. ..{)M.:rit ... . ..... A; ...

Name of Observer ...•

2.

J.ddress of

.3·

Occupation

4.

Date and ?ime of Observation (Time to be given in local time)

5.

Duration of Observation( s) .....

....... . .... ~~ .. ~~ - .6. 7. ................. ~~<r-9................. .

6.

~~ .•.S~.~ ............ . ... .

Observers Location at Time of Sighting (Give details of own s l4-6;t4-lt positio~ by map reference .• . , . , . , •....... , . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • . ~f poss~ble , or by known ~~I'+-

•... ~~~.1'}-;.-fl._~ . . ~ .•j),~ .• Qf.. 1:'!'! .. ~'!'1.. p.f. .• !1<?~~~r.~~~ ~ ............ . 1.

Weather Conditions at time(s) of observation(s) ......... . . .

. . . . . . (.'.~.{. -:. ,q~~~.. !:::~~ . ~~~ :~ .~~... ~'.s. t.~ !? ... 'v:'J.! .. ~Cf.0./. 1.9 ... . 8.

Aids to Observ.ation(s) . (Describe any equipment used in the N\L. observation)

.......... .

APP·~~~9·

.. ·. .. ;t· ~

,·~ . ~~~1·

........................... .

.. . .. . . ..... ... . . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. . . 9. t

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Where was object first observed, eg, overhead , coming from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc. JWP<:;~I) '"' ~ •\) Jhtt I

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·.vhat firSt attracted observer's attention, eg light or noise .

.. . . .. .. . .. ... . . . . . . .~.~.~~~.~.. ....... ... ... ... ...................... . 11 .

Did object appear as a light or as a definite object . J..,..t 1:r It I ~

---...__ • -

12.

f

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.

.

..... ..

............ .............................................. .

If there was more than one object , how many were there, and what was their formation .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.~~ . .... ~'t--:'f.......................... ... . , 3.

What was the colour of the light or object ... .~. <r~

14.

Vihat was its apparent shape ....

15.

Was any detail of

16 .

Was any method of propulsion obvi ous .......•. ~ 0 . ..

17.

Was there any sound .. .. ....................~?

~tructure

.. .

Cf~~~~.~ .... . .......... .

observable ..... . ...

~.J /!1. ...... . ....... .

.. · ... ·.······

0

18.

Height , or angle of elevation ........ .~9.

i9 .

Speed , or angular velocity ..

20 .

Was the object stationary? ..... . . . .

21 .

What was the direction of flight with reference to la11dmarks or points of the compass .. .

• •••••••• •

,·r ·····

~~~":',~~1:-/. ~. ':-~ f!.f;.S.t.:':-.).

..-. ."!'.'.'.1}_1.!':/. ..... .

y~

1

....... ..... ........... t;f~~Y, ............ ..................... . . .. /2 .


- 2-

Did the ob,1oct remain on a struight path , deviate or

. . . . . .. ~~:~~~:l~~-~ . ~ ~. ~~~ :s~!l!q!•.~ . -:-:.S.k.~ .rr:~r!h'f ... J>.C!~.~ :~ !':~~ . ... Was any

23·

trail

of

exhnust , vapour or light seen ...$~?. ~ .. .

li'here did obJect disappear , eg in mid- air , behinda hill over the hor~zon . · ' ......-:

24 •

......... f!tP~ .. .~r: ...'.r:-! ....1"!.1 .~ .-.1.'.~.. ...... . .... ' .. '. ... '

25 .

Existence of '-\ny physical evidence such as fragments photographs, or other supporting evidence . '

Ne> ......... ................. .... ' .... . ... ........ ...... ' ... .. ......... '

'

26 .

Have y ou observed any unusual phenomena previously ., .. .~~ •. •

27 .

I f so, giv e details of

28.

State ~ny experience which enables observer to b(' reasonably cert ain o.bout the answers given to 1<} and

inc id~nt(s) ..... . .• . ~~~. ........... .

19.

N\L ......... ... .. ..... .... ........ . .. ... ......... . ' ......... ......... '

'

29 .

Ar e you a member of any organi sat ion i nterested in aerial phenomena?

No .............. ............. .. .................. ..................... N../A .............. .. . . . . . .. . ..... .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . ..

30 .

Hame and Address of organisati on ........

. . . . ....... ~.SJ'. .. .PRtoR Any a dd ~. t ~. onal ~nformat~on ..... . . 10 . ... .l-.16-d ... .. I... . (-1}()~~~ C.0JJ.JMN CJF St-101<~ wf\-A.,. O~S~...r-R.Jt.:.~

31 .

• • , • • • • • • I • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ' • • ' ' • • • • • • ' • ' • ' • • • • ' ' • • • • • • • ' • ' • ' • • • ' • • ' • •

./?! ~~.~ .6: .. /t-;~i!_Cf':~L:Y.. j . .f.~t.S, . .fti:f!fJ'JJ7:? ..!.~ . .J:=:'. ~. ~ .. ..~ 7111.: sA-MI.! pos ' n c.oN ll-~ •J'H-t.r r A .,. . ~ I Signature of Obser ver ... ·/.fk"':'· 'r~·~'/·;"; ~ .. . .

32.

Location of any air t r aff i c in the vici ni ty at the t i me of

... . .... ~~~~~~~~: . t'.<? ... K1C!"f7•. ~~'= .. ~'f. .:~ .. . 11~;Y'f':--?--.t... .... . A-J'J~

'

;~~ .... ·~~:~~~::~~·~~~·~~~~~~~~~~~~~~· :~~~~~~~·~~·~~~·~~~~·~~·~~~~: /ltMr- 6.......... Jk ~ ~-n-s r S/f;.,Lr - ................ .......... ... ....

34 .

Comme11te ..

~

....... ' ....... •, ...... . \

~. . .:!f.t1 .. flrf.'t?.c:!.(/J!-::. ~ ..ft.~rlf'.'?~V.'r .. ??.ltf'. .

. . . 7!f.t.f. . .~f'~~(.'"-~ . . ~~~ !! (~ .. f:;t_ '.~~ ....~ .~ .. .i)H'f. .... ...l!r. rlff . . .~!!f . .. /~:'.'~~ !7: · · or,".~"!. · · !f.>~~':"~ · · · · if-f ,

.en: ···

Sig~ature

Qi.IES?:O~S

Note

o:

'1/.r Interrogato~~~ ~

32, 33 and 34 tc be a~swered by interrogator .

Since it is n9rQa~ly impossible to estimate the height , and speed of a. strange object 1 it will usually be batter to end~a.vour to determine the ansle of elevation of tha ohJ• tHl , bhn •nul a 'llhrouuh' Whioh it moved. , nn,d the time taken to do this .


7U~J,•!:_~

Alvl!XAr-llk~

Mt2S

-

CJVr @-

Al'!fl.lld• OBJECT OBSERVED

So'-''~

o;r Obnorv.,...• .... · · · · · · · · • · • •••.•••.••. , .. , .• , . Age

':!~.*.~ ~~ ~w~~~,; ,·~~ .

F?:-? ..

o! Obt"lerver ..

Atldl' O!HJ

OccupntiOl1 of Obncrver

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Dn"'-e nnd "'.l.mo of Observation (Time to be given i

..............~ .~ .:f~.~ .~ J. .......

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5.

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Duration of Ob:;ervation( s) .....

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time)

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\. ........ . .S~ . ................. .. ..

6.

Observers LoC<'l~ion at Time of Sightinc; ~G~ve details of own ~14S 14-b)4t:' pos1hon by map reference . ••• •. . .. .. . ••. .. . . . .. . . . .. .. . . .. . .. . ... .. .. 1f possible , or by known

• . ....

~~~~ .. ~ !~~.. .~f.~~. <;-} !Y. .crf.. ~p,e~~.1i_9marks) •

, " , -;--, • • •

••

••••••••••

t

1.

Weather Condit~ns at t i me(s) of observation(s) •...........

8.

Aids to Obserwation(s) . (Describe any equipment used in the rll', observation)

..........0~~. ~ ... %.!": .~ . ~~~~. ~E? .. V.l..... .~:·?.~~~ .. .v:i/'1 ..J:-9~/!~ .. f

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. . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . .. '•'there wa:. objec~ f~rs~ obserYed, eg, overhead , comir.g f:-o:n behind a hil:, over tbe hJrizon, etc.

9. .

......

...

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.

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k'"""4.!:>/A-noN ASoJ~

•••

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-!ttu Rc:ct- re-Ps

•••••••

,

••

,

••

••

••••••••

10 .

What first attracted observer 1 s attention , eg light or noise. NO I LJI<t!. A f>A)..J..ocrJ g...; R-s , rJ (;

~1.

Did object

c - , .......... .... ........................... . .....................s..... appe~r

as a light or as a definite object.

1-................. .I:-! ~t!.r:.. ........ -: ................ ................ . If there was more than one object , how many were there, a nd what was their formatio!l .

12 .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -~.~~- ...~';-1 .. . ............. . .......

t

••••••••

••

, 3.

What was the colour of the light or object ..• 0((1~.(4.

14.

({h a t

15.

Was any detail of structure observable ......••

16.

''I , as any me .... h o d o f

i7 .

Was there any sound .. . ..................... ~.9............

....

· Cif<(.~~. was l· t s apparent snape .....•......... ..• ••............

~}~ ........ .

. ht , He1g

. . N0 propul'enon obv1ous ...................... .

l of orange

'

.

.

'3 0°

e~evat1on ............ · ···••#•• ·•••· ••••

H~:~~~~J. .~~~. {!~.~~~.l ..

i9.

Speed , or angular velocity .

2V

,...as t he ooJect · · . ~,;. ..... - 1r/1 s .... at1onary? .......'vj, , -. . . Tlh'J..J...(. · . ... · ·· · · · · ·

~.

21 .

'Uhat was the direction of flight with reference to landmark" or points of ti.e compass .. .

············ ····· ... ~~~!'-./. ..................... ... ·············· --/

.. . /2. .


-

-2-

Did the ob,icot remnin on a straight path, deviate or

........ ~~~~~~~~·~. ~~. ~~~ :~~t;t:' ~~:. . 23 .

I'IAs 3ny

~ ~ ~ ~:r:~...~~ ~~ ~P. .

\

7. .l..

trail of exhaust , vapour or light seen ...S.':"'. C?~.~....

\','here ~id ob~cct disappear, eg in mid- air , behinds hill over tne horJ.zon . '

24 .

~ I,./ M ..... ......(-1\--l) .. .. ..r........... ........ ...... ...If..R... .. ..... ........ ...... '!)

25 .

;-

IJ)

I

Existence of any physical evidence such as fragments photographs, or other supporting evidence . '

No ... ......... ..... .. ..... ... .... .... ... .... .. ........ ........... ...... 26 .

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously ••. • ~ 9... .

27.

If so , give det ails of

28.

inc id~nt(s) . . . • .... . . . f':l.)0,......... .

St1te ony experience which ~nab les observer to biJ reasonably certai l'l about the answer s given t o .19 and

19.

NIL •••• •

•••••• •

29 .

•• •

i

•••

••••••••••••••••••••• •

••••• •

••••• •

••••••••••

N

Are you a member of any or g anisat i on i nterested in aerial phenomena?

!\:::::::: ~ : : ~::

0

~~: .....~~~~~ . ~~~ . ~~~~:~~ . ~~ . ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~: :: : :N)

...... ...... .... ... .. ..... .. .... ....... ... .. .... ................ .... . . .~~.~. . . ~ . . ."'!'t . .. fl.s-:.r:~ ................ ... ....... .... . Signature of

32 .

Observer~fu.~.d~ . . .. .

Location of any air traffic i n the v ici ni ty a t the t i me of s ighting . p(r/tfrJ ,.J /M r frtc. l rl . s

... ... .. .... ... .. ....rio......... ... ... .. ...... .. ..... .. ~\ ···· · ··· ·

.. ......... .~~';~ ..../f-~"1)...... ... ... .... ......... : .... .. .. ... .

)): .. ...

~~~~. ~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. ~~.~~~. ~~~~:\~. ~~~~:

34 .

Connnents ... . ..

r.~.. .7!~ ..4~~t;,u;-! .. ~.. f!!t!: ... .'...... . . . . . . ~~~'?.1.6: ... ??':'!. J?.~~';-~~~.r.. ...'t'!?.. :~ .1/.~j .. .~.·~~;:--~~ ... . . .~.. 'f."."! ...)? .~. {. .-;;<! • ~'!. .<;~!'. . .f/ff~ !":'. •.'Y. . ."!!..d7H.';"'!-.. .~~~'!:>. _

Signature of

Interrogator ·~~~j~JP

Qv'3ST:;:ONS 32 , 33 and 34 to be answered by ir.-cerrogator .

Note.

~

Since it is nor-111 ... ly imposs i ble to estimate the height, and speed of a strange object, :.t will usually be better to endeavour to determine the angle of elevation of the object , the angle tl"..rough which it moved, an d the time 1 taken to do this .


~~n.,ICT• :bJ

MEMORANDUM

WtiC>I

Ot

ptlnt ciHtly

RAAF FORM A173 MAR 63 ,_OM

TO

~J PRINTED NAME

I r.or: ~/41C..ff

~K AND APPO_!!::lT~T

~-..- L"Y,.c_ ~/{) <

PHONE EXTN

J-*' .

c.o.o 9771


• 3/A/5)

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"a... !'lle ~,

,-,f o'o s"'"nrv..!l..,.. .... ... ~ .. .........u • s

2.

;.ddress of observer .... . }1. ,-;-: •• •••..- ••••• • ••••••••.•

_:, i.... - WLUU. T G ro • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • :~• • • • •

J

• •

AGE .. c:.. .. . ... .

• •

• •.. • .••••.•••..•..•• •• ..• • .• • •••• PHO!rE . ~ . • •... ) . .• •.• • ~

.,

Clccupat~on of obs~rver ~ .• ~: : '-.-. . ~ ; . .1 ••• •-.'"'~: . .•• .' • • •• • ••.• : • . J:. ~ • •-

1. .

Date and t~mc of obst'lrvation .•. 1-:·/ . .. : . )? .... ~,1~ .1.. ? . ........... .

:> .

· .._ · "" ..... . ....... 1 5 d •w ' es o f ob sarva~10u . •. .. .. ..•....•........... . . Du rat~on

6.

Obs~::rvers location at time: of sighting . ; , ./.1.J.. : ~".". ~ .. t .. •

7,

l,.t •. • •

~

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5

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9.

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(b)

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'Vas any meti:od

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17 .

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1 9.

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20 .

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21.

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If so , give brit:f details of incident(s) . ··'···· · . ..• . .•.•.•. .•. •

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..... . .......... . ........ .. . . ... ... . ...... .... . ..... . . ....... . . . 28 .

State any experience w~i ch enables observer to be reasonabl y c~rtain ~bout th~ answers given to 18 and 19 .

29 .

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30 .

name

and nddress uf organis.."'.tion •...•.•.•.. .. ... ..••• • ·. • · · · · · •

31.

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re:.a,;es to tnc: sighting .

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32 .

'ihe followir.g :iE ta::::; airc.ra:-t -ere in th vicinity of the reported UFO pos~<:ion at .:.Oe •ime · , _ Aircraft type •...... .. ........•.•.•.. . .... . ....... . . ...... . • ..• Headl.n ••.. .......... ....... T

•• ••••••• •••• T •• ••••••.••.••..•• T

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•. •• • ••. . .••• , 000 ft . . ...•.•... , 000 ft

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The following civil aircraft were in the vicinity of the reponed UFO pos1.tion at the time : - "'"· Aircraft type . • .•.••.• . ••••• • ••• •• ••. • • ••••••. •.••• . ••. , ••.. .. • , Heading ...... , .•.•.•.•. T •... , ••• • . ,., • •••.•... T • . • , •.•.• . ..... . ..• T ~t ...•.

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.••..••.•. , 000 ft •..••.••.••. , 000 ft

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34 .

Calcula:tions s!'lo·.\ that the following planets or major stars were in that portion of the sky at ~he time:- •...••.. • .•. . .•••.•••.••

........................... ........ .. ........... ..... ' ... . . .... 3~ .

meteorological balloon was released from ••••.•.•••• . •••••.•••••

h

~+

•.• • ••••••

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could have been in the reported UFO

position at tne time .

36 .

The State Observatory in the nearest capital cit:r affirms that aerial phenomena in tha~ por~ion of the sky at the time were l /A . •... . . •. ..•..•• . .••.. (comet , meteor1te shower, etc) .

37 .

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_::::J--

1iame)


YASS. 20th.

Police Station 1967

aupe

Pilot Offioer Kelly Pairburn R.A.A.P C!DERRA..

SUBJECT â&#x20AC;˘-

Request for Police to interview persons concerned in eighting of unidentified Plying Object at Burrenjuck on 17-6-67.

RSPKRENCE :- Telephone message received Yaee Station 19-6-67. - - oOo- I have to report that the request for Police at Yaee to interview Mr. w. Cregan of Burrenjuck and obtain information in relation to the sighting of an Unidentified Flying Object on the Burrenjuck Road at 12.40am an 17.6.67, has now been carried out,and full statements have been made by Kr. William Arthur Theodore CREGAN and hie wife Eeme Alice Ver,nica CREGAN,both residing at Burrenjuck Village. The statements obtained are here attached. I have now ascertained that the property on which the alleged sighting of the unidentified objeot took place is owned by Ledgeworth Pty.Ltd. of Yaes,and adjoins Bogalong Station and Dr. Pagan's property. No person on the Lsdgeworth property witnessed the flying unidentified object, and there has been no previous reports of a similar sighting.

On checking a Milittr)' map in relation to the course taken by the alleged unidentified object, it was last seen to be headed in the general direction of Murrumbateman over the back waters of Burrenjuck Dam, and not in a direction between Bowning and Yaaa as stated by Mr. Cregan, this direction given would have been too far to the north, it was a general easterly direction . I made a close survey of the grassed paddock on the Ledgeworth property where the unidentified object *as first seen and alleged to have omitted a blast of greyish light towards the ground, Nothing was seen to indicate that the object bad been on the ground or had caused any scorching of the grass or earth with the blast. I am of the opinion th,t taa the two persons all the sighting of the unidentified flying object, have given a rMI~~LUll statement of what they saw, they are both matured persona, and highly respected citizens of Burrenjuck, and their report in this instance would be a genuine one. There is no suggestion that either o! the two persons were under the influence of liquor at the time, and it would appear that they did both see something unusual in the sky early that morning, which matter could possibly be connected with other reported eightings of unidentified flying objects over the Sydney area later that same morning.

This file is here forwarded for your information and further attention aa requested. ff,t;./

/ /? ~

<----

( A.B. Vale ) Sergeant 1/c


P. 190. New South Wales Police

STATEf\lENT in

Place:

mntter of:

.bu1· ~ o::uJUC~

blacK 1,,

_h_o_a.;..d.;_______

u~e

Dnte:

nilJ..iam

~rt.nur

Tt.eodore

Address: C.or.s er·v<:~.t.l. un

Occupation:

STATES:-

't .. oH C.ouu.uiss iou - .t>u... <::nJucK Lam I

a llla.LI.l.<::U u.cul ae,eu bb ~t:c.rs . a cL.I d<1•!.~1· l.<'l oc~:~o~a:t.lou ew!'lo.;, ea u,> Lhe •• ater (.,o~se.va't.Lon an c.. II'l'ita<:. t.1.on vOIU!JU3o;,J.. ~ H at .oU.Lit::liJUCK .vam. I !lb V.: uot wor·keu sit,~;<.;. f e:Lr ......r .Y 3lil

1'orw~rly

l.:lbi.J as rt:sult 01 uacK ii.Jur.l.es l.:Ce::1vs:~oo 1n tus:i l·. • A. a . l: g,:t .. es'teul AUStl'aliaz ana l nave Ut;..t;;ll rt::Co:..l.V.l.U!!; .be~atria t .t-ot :..t.ot - ion ueu~::1its sihce l'::lbo .

-

At au out 1- . 40ala1 on 5aturda;t morning t.ae lrttn 1 JuHe d.rivinb my Holueu sedan car 1~0. CZN- dJO at tu.t:: tiiDe

l.;~b"/ 1

I

VI' as

ac(.;Olli~aniea

DY.. ~ v.-i1e, LSllle X-L ice Cregan. 1.e naa QQtn I.!!H<U r..t tnt: ~QI.(.It:: . s C..luu at. .x.ass 1 allQ was retm·uL.a howe to .OU1.1 t:!l•JU!:;,I:t . .. a~u tr~v~~l iu~; a.Lo •.~.b i..l.t.~ ...,1..4.L J. t::•!JUCK .noaa., t;ov. ... ras .OUL.;. t:oUJ ... c.r.. .v.;.w a.J.C 0.0

:s,ana

anivc..l at &AiJ.J..e•• • s Lreu a ...t::asw-ea. ai~I.W!~!:i Q1 ~J .l [ul l es east 01 tn~: nuwe .ti 5 m;ay L•t.c::1·sect1on .. :.1.) a ttt: •• tion ·:.as dra11.n to an OOJect .l.t> tne SAY abou't a l.a11 a m....Le a ,leaa. 01. tH<:> Cal" Oll the le1 t naua siae OI the road, _,y_ ~iH:: •iz:s:t di:clla I,;,_ at. te1. tiou to tne or-Ject v•.nicn i.as tner~ auQU:t t;QQ 1 es:t ll~· ID :tue air over an o~en ~rasseu ~:::auuocK a_,u_ \.itniu :w.t "-!.l.J f:t::t a. t ne

""'

ro<>.d\\ai . Tu~ ou,1ect I sav. \.as a r~ eJ.or,j lib C[ ,1ect ,:t,•e coloux: 'as al.t. orar.ge rea, t"1e ·.. .no.Le t.f.l.i.ng seer..ed to ue a rea IOV. t .F!lo T sc.w a u.Lc-.st 01 e,le_risn ·.. J.lite .Hgnt 111 a v snal:!t: CQ.J•E: J.rQu. tni~ OGJE:C't towarus tne ~rouna. 2 it v.a~:o O.t.l..lY. Q,i. SOOl:t Ul .I Btjon ] COi11 ,e ' -ed to. ..JY v.He 1:nat .l.t .looKeu li.n.e SK:',i l:O!::Iis::ts, S[1e sc j . , llO its ,.ot sKl: roc ...ets aua. its not a i:!lane . l :toe•• sta~1• ec. Ill~ c~ x: Bl1d got 0 OH to t t1e roaaway . I tnen made ~ !::.lase oLtsez:llatJ 011 Ol tot:: Ol•,jiO:Ct I sav; that the OUJE:Ct •• as a !.air siz.e J I' t11e dj st. lice it looo~.t::d. ue ai.Jout six feet across. I sa~. that t.he c::ro.<:a r>P • . .~;.c:: c::i ~11l' +:n an old tlle uo::er t.arrel wnicn v.as lxiug Q&o i :ts sloe . I s ~ l~ to at ±l:1e OUJE:Ct v.aw tnen WOVll!B to;.aras DUll.'t::t~ I:W.C~ .. lid ~.a r:a 1 1t:l J tc, tc1e road,. i t wa~ Oil,li moyi ng slowly I got ' ·ii<C1l i••te a .y. 9aF 3itGt I >.as trave.Llli,fi aL a110llt ~· ~ d Olld las I t a I I Cll1f::U :tllf: OI•Jt:Ct , ca.tcniug Ul,! to t1le oP,]es;;:t, I lQ.l.!.O~afi:Q H I Ol: a .~::as. z:ed. 1 i.U ~~-.;,.. 0 n.i.les to a p..Lc.ce ul!eie t ..ere is a rise ih tn!-< ro "' .... ·,t t.r.i c:: T, ., ..... -tT tiwe I ~.o.s tnen on.lv a ...out i200 arus C. 1 ST~1H, t'A n "'• a 5 a1r. sto~ 1-t:a tne car to ou§~ry~ t'l"S OwJE.Ct , I tile I sal I H'-t a.~,J .... ec.z·eu to Lit: r.:a l.1.gnts tli!;;~l g 2 1 1 ercu1 a t e Ol•c~a::ct ,~t se& w to ...e tr.e ot.e lif,l1J< !.l:i.soid.ng alJ. iii:OHa.O toe o1 Ject t~:e •J.:~.cld..

.

1

'

" ~s lliUCu ,jU.1.s;J.I:s,~l toa.:t :r.ba:t us eo Oll a j z:cl 01" t. I uac;i "'t:;&~tt geG et:tt 01 Ul.:£ car Q,, to tue I:Oi:ld~.a;)l, ana es I O• S4i~ll4iiQ :tit~ ea;jt:et eett.Lu ai s t11.c t.1,y n~ar a c1ic.li.il•~ IlOise COJ...iHg frou. thl:: o~..;Ject 1t \'.C.~ a

*

Witness:

- - - ~"--

Sisnature:

Av~

/

4vv


P. 190A.

(~)

Page No.: ~TATEMENT (continued) in mallcr of:

Name9h.t:.t.iAI~

----

~.i.U.iam

ArtHur Tueoaore (Sum--;.; io -:;tab) - - - -

- e.L libUi:S :-it car Ul11U\. -_y.a.§. quit~ ax~ ~f.!iL>le loua noise, uUt l>Ot t ••ces;:.i vel.1 ~~~I -~"t!.O.!t.t. t:U ;y__E a_r -~ sa;·, tne OUJe(..t ..ua.Ke a XXgm le.t. t~~n..L_aua. it nt:ao.~_si oi1 to·.. ~ rds so..ue hills in a airectio.~ _oe.H::l ...lly t.etv.eeu. -_tne_j;_OJ:.ll..?_ Ql _P.O~.uilib aha ::t.ass 2 t.ne o~.~-L~ct ~ a.s st ill o·.J.~_tra'lel.lJ.ll:g _at a slO>\ s~~o::a, it diC1 ~lot al:!~::~.::ar to ~aiu or loose ~·> ue1~;,nt, _,I_ llid .J~o.t ic;;_e ..£-_s_:!!he ouJect trave.Lied awa~ Iron; me ~!- a.~~k"~~to .o.~v..e a...J.>.OU..-l<:Y ac_ti_oJL_l rom one siue to tne otr.e!:~ it ;.as ou.l~ I coula lltar the Ho .... se oi ~. J:~.bn1 ~Q_vewe!_~t !·rom siae 'tO siae. - half u.i.le dist..ulc..e as i t illove_£ aw~x__._I_ tH~Q.~!!.£~....£Q.!'....<!._gO Od _<;J)utiu~e_g_k_ v.a_~cn tlle ouJect for a 1Jel i?_~_ o1_Jen w.iuutes 1rorn tne ---last t:.i.ute }_ Q,ad__~~£.P~ed the car. 'lhe .OLJJ6Ct cor.t i •• ued on a't its ·--slow §.£e_~9- ix. tne air~ctl.on of ~:.~ety<eth ~~~~!b._~1a~~-I tne.n .&..9t uacK i.titq the car I naa a couversatl.on v.itn Jl!>: wi~LJout tne OI.IJ6Ct ~C1~EH...f arove horue. I would say_~~~~-~.fl~_g_-~~~ OuJect uoise

-s~milar --

Uu<..er

to an amlJli.1.iea Loise

w:t__q_~.~servations

01

tor al:! ~:::r-oxi~a tel)' lb

wi.J1~_'!; ~s

irolh t.ue tit·st

S~Ml_tiL>g

O_l_j._h_ I .1ave l•t:: v o::r seell

OuJect iH t.L.e

li.h.e tn1 s o.u.e ... o::.r~ _l. 't v.as SOi..lt:: lOI't:igu. ouJect. I woul.a say_ tr...at it •. as aot a.t~_(Qrw ...Q.i g;i.r!;r~J.:t jtn~:t I lUlQV. auout,~..... l na•e tl~~:i__,t'i Y."'--J. f;:gi s e.-uS.U...e._ce _-.u..tn....sur~.

On t.ne

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h ..... n.F,

I.i~:,nt

~olaiers

of sign'ti.~ tne u.ui ..... e~.t~liea ~1~~u_vis_i.t,~ t:1e Cluo at. 1ass 2 ana I did uot nave aHJ: U;0 re t:.a.. si:&. lliic......ies

oe~;:r_ _g~r..l.,...!~e

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lu now:s tna:t I J.•.?&...a_t_~~lELc-l U.O.J.Uu..__il.t...J..a.s.s... I

aau UCi ..J.~e.x.._a:t~®.t_l.O. Vu• r;na.t.Jli.&u..t..__ L ..aru....LJ.o.:Ls..u.~..J..f:.c.t_to .Jl.a.ll..wJ.i.uat.ioJ.lS, Ql: any: ihJYI:Y: ell t;Ctiug D~ eyes J..t,.utr-UI'~ . -Lam yui te cot.viuced tnat v..hat I \S:a:w _t!J._<;Lt_H:i..Et..n.t-~...s.e&&.tni.ug_ . r~alistic , anu v.as SUp~ortt~!!1t.._j.HJL_SE:~;),_1,1J:.._t..u~ .Aii.W.e~..c.t.., aHa my w11e is an austaiuer from liguor. - l.ll t:.e ll.rst it•stance I ;.as r•ot l,!re.l:!area tQ J.:.~!.Q!:.'L.tlliLS.U.U.:ti~lg 01 ttliS ouJec~.l as J. aid HOt desire c;uq~J:~£~_t-~~out 1 t. !JUt on vi~;;v.L.g tne teJ.eyision Hews !'rom t.he •• 8. t ..=!-_QJl.<!J.,_fl.t~t.J.Q.u.s....o.u.__ ~~~Ltne lb:-b - b7 _\4_._i_aSI.....Lk.~JLU.~.1u,g_.....Q..LJ

i t ,.·. as S:t..l;l.tea tuat S.eY.e.....al

J ects

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area earl,.. .aao tnt: _0:• ~··ev~ous baturaa,t .illorr..ing ,_auu l _ tal.e.H Q&C:,l.w...e.a._t~ t,1e wat.tt:r_Q1_ s....t. Sl.f.ntiug,as I felt tJ.J.C1t tu!:1'~ .. ~s-~ Qm~ SQH~t.;i..QU.. ~.1 tn_ tnt: otneq__l'o::!JOl t.ed si5 .rus~.L..tn.e.....o~o~~t:.c..t.

----- - - - - -

ue.er~een

·-----

-----

-

----

-

---------

·-- --- .. Witness: 97 11

5.6l St ...20

-··

-

---------------------

·-

---·-----


.•

. t'·.

~~

New South Wales Police Place:

P. 190.

-...rrt: •. Jt..c..,_ .o.~ac.~.\ r.a.....g e

-lac~

Date:

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.ass to our

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toe .tiuwe nib_s:at a.ua nad trs. .. eJ..J..E:i.l aoout .,. .ll..L.ts

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<doc.&; tne ,~;,urr·e .. Juc: noaa to .. ar·as L'U.! ... E:u.tUC.K . a.I"'- as toe car caJiie to ~AilJ.eu' s c...re:ek , I tneu sav.· a strea.K of sou.etning lix..e a f{re} coJ.our , it wa:. uot <..istit.c t lit:.llt lil•O. i t >.as not 101:. .

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---

--------t JJ.

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-- ____,·

PP1DE?AIR

E S T R I C T E D A3 UFO SIGHTING$ PD UFO SIGHTINGS REPORTED BETWED~

BAI ~!bDALE AND SALE ON EVENINGS OF 8 AND 10 J UL 61 PD

INITIAL Rt:P()(T IS A) FLAT SHAPE wiTH FLASHING LIGHTS B) EL[\ATl~'-4 20 DEGREES C) TnAVELLING FROM SC'UTH TO SC\JTH IllEST PD

IN\rf.STlGATllG

Oz:o~FI-::.i

APPOINTED

'B't

L


--•

-ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR

TELEPHONE: 69 OSSO

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: "AIRCOMMAND. MELBOURNE"

IN UPI.Y QUOTE

HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND RAAF VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

5/61Air(69) (

- 7 JU;_ 1967 Secretary Depart Rus CA UN-IDENTIFIED FLTING OBJECT DAPI . Herewith is a report of an un-identified aerial object sighted by Mrs F.M. O'LEARY on 18th June 1967 at BULLEEN Victoria.

:l!t4

(L.B. BROWN)

Wing Commander For Air Officer Commanding


路..J\


.

~a~e of Cbser-.·er •. . . -~ ,-,r; . . ~· .0. ~~- .... . ... . A~·lo •••'- ."f.

. •.•

Cbs~r.-er .. . .4 . ~oP..•.f1$t:n. ... ~':"~)...~. ~~(.IJ~.t;Q ••• • •

4.

Addrecs of

).

Oceu_.~.tior.. of Obs .rver ... . 1/()fl'.~ ])~e,~ .. "f-. ~.~f :- . ~n:'"fJ;. ~1. ~..;t1 •:..,.~

'

~ate

'T •

(~iue

ana 7i-:nc of Obs..,rv.:.t:.o::

to be given

locz:.1. <;i e)

il!

.. ..... . I~ l.i.fo#. ;fl. f. ...~ .. .'!-.-: :·?'. ~~ : ~ ...................... . Durat:.on of Oo .. c.:-vcttion(XJ .... . ff/Ar:t: :< •• A .. . ,<f'~'. ?.-t ...... . . . 5. 6.

Ol.server c

Loc,.tio~

at '::'i::.!e of Sig.•+.iLg

~Give

details of o.1r.

p 1JOSition by • ..-ir . JA,(l$ ,. ,t;./;9/'~l. 1 f'. ? ..~11. NJ('/:. . (?ot;~r... . .. if .t,'OSSibl.a , "T"

!D.'

r.. ref!:!rer:.~~

or by r..r..own

1 landmarks) Pf .• ())Y. .IJql'(le .. S:H . •->.h':t:J."• • P/1• • •~/.<~.t-~[1. . ·ti).fft-or.. '1 t=t: .1.1 ~-/.I.J . . .. ... ... .

7.

Weath.=r Co:1dJ.tions at

ti!:'~::(-o1 of obs·::·v"'tion~ .... ?-.Jff1r. .. ..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v' •

J\i t:s

110

Obs_rv::.tion(s) .

k

(::Je;crib;; a.n:· e:J_uip e,.t used in the observation)

... ... .... . . . ....• . . N•. . ... . .•.. . . . .... . ... ... . . ... . ...... . .. . ..... .

. . . ..... . . . . . .. . ... . .. .. .. ... .. ... .. ..... .. .. ... ..... ....... ..... . "

9.

"

1ihzre ·,ras oojcct first obs~rve{l , e;; orertead, c o...i~:g from bellind a h i ll , over t:.e hor izor. , ett:: .

• . • . . . . . . • • . • • • • • . • . • ..... 'ltrt' • • QP.r.I.'Z.:~ ":" •.. . ..•...•.•.••.•....•....... ..

10 .

~nt f~rst nttrac~ed

obser,er ' s

~ttent i or.,

eg ligr.t or

nui~~ -

. ..... .~!'!Jfl.L. .. ..f:. iJ .h.~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . .. . 11.

D:!.d ObJeCt appear

~s

a liz!.t or as

~

clefinitc ob,i ~~t .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:-!.J.If~. . . . . . .............. ........... ... .... .. ' .. . 12 .

I f iiher<:: was "!!lore tnan one obj act , how whn.t WSI.C their foru~~tion .

m.~ny

were there and

.. ... .... ..... .... .. ~ ................. .......... ... .. . 13.

Ht'iht was

. ti? . ~( . sh" _.o . . . ... .R.o.4.1J~( .................. .

the colour '>f the light or objact .. . )'.e/(t?"!':

~-il.'lt wo.rJ its 3:t>pn..:e:1t de-t~~il

of s"!;:.·uctta"e o"'Jserv--nle .. ... •

N.e: .. ......... . .

15 .

v;os 'lny

16 .

Wns any method of propu:sion o7rious ...... . . fJ.c ............ .

17 .

Ia.> thcrt..! a~ soun-J ......................... N..C? .........

18-·

·· .1c1· ·h ..t, or• ar.crle o...~

19 .

Sped, or angulcr velocit:r .. ~f.'<. . P.rt.''P•.. } . '?! 1f1} •. t:r.•...

20 .

'J-:.:.s t .•e object

21 .

Y.'h:.t

1 - ~· lt .4'5' e~e,e,~on .. .'~.Po t i. r.(t,. •••••.••. 0

. . ..

/lr;. ··'::J ·e..... · ·· ·

/1 .~fS

sta-:;::..o~'"'r:T ........ . ........ . Nk ....... ...... .

y;~s the C.iraction o!: f~ig.ht .,:.-;a .:-ef.::rer;.ce to laadr::ar}:s or !)Gints c:: the com!_)as;: . ..

. . . Yrr:(~ .. I.<>:~C .. .. 4C? . .'-~~~t: ........... .. ................... .. . . . /2.


-2-

Did the object r .. main on a str'1ight puth , deviate or ~ rwno~uvr.. nt ~, l? I'LJ-'f

. .

·: .It: ..·V.V':'fl. .(~ .1? n 2) .

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t.

t

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t

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l~-~ ht oe ·n .. . 'VeS I' . . • . . . . . . . .

V pO"" Or '41.

dis::~ppec.r, eg ::tid-ni::::- 1 bei.ind

uhvl'C did OOject hori~o· .

2.; . t

tl' i.1.

¥iS l\n:'-1'

_

.t. . (~'. .~ . ~(,_j~t!x. t/.o.~'':'~-:a.":'.t. ·~. f:!'~ .M~.4r. . ~ : '!-ksc ui • .l, over

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.c.>:istehce of m1.:r pl:ysic~:u. evidence su.c .. as fr. ~ents, "'hnto ..ra,hs , or ot:1er sup~o··ti::g evitlence .

<!5 .

. . . . . . . . :P.r~ .. !jl.1t. ..~$ •• •~. ~!?~? .. t?.~~n·y~.( .~Y..rr~. Th~j~~.. C?.:;e

fk~

.,

.. . .

26 .

rian: you observed any unusuc.l phenom~.:nn preYiously . ....N..~

27.

If so, give details of inciden~········· . ...... . .

I

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St3te :..n,v ~xp..r::.ence which enabl.:s observer to b ... r<::~sonl'lbJ.y abou·t th~ answc··s giv·en to pa1•as 18 a!1d 1 ~ .

28 .

certai1~

·· ··· ······ ···· ·······~······················· · ········ ...... ... ......... .......... . ... ........ .. ... . .............. . ....... . '

Ar~ you a mc~bcr of a~: orea~iaatio~ i~ter~sted in aerial :t:her..omentl?

29.

···· ··· ··· ··· ··· · ... J>l.q ,, , . .. . ...... . .......... ... ................ .

30. •

Na~e and adc.r0ss of org~::.is~:ti~ ................ . •

0

34 .

•••••••••

..

••••••

•••••

••

•••

•••••••••••

0

••••••••••

Location vf -.ny ;neteorological st tions ir. the gc::.crn1

33. ••

!'I fL.. •

0

••

Nil .

•••••••••••••

.

co=entsf.~~~~ ~-(~~ i~r:r. :~4 .?.-t.~_.t...,t--

.~ .~~~.~ -~~- ~ - ·· · · ················

·- ~~-- ~..~~--~/~ : ....... ....... ... .~ · · · ..... . Si¥!.::.turo Q'JE3~'IONS 32, 33 :..nd 34 to

oe

,:.

l!lta~_"v

tor ..

nr.3·::..,red by intcrrogEotor .

.

.

nc.t<; ... ~in~c it is noru::1lly i~.possiblc to e.3timutt= th~ height nd spe~d of A ztr;mgo o'Jject, it ...,ill usually b0 bett~r to cndc vour to detcrmit ..) t.!.:l angle of elevation of the Goj ect the angle thl·ou.gh •vhich it moviJd nnd the time t:-k..:ll do this .

to


-

• atRr.W~PP! _.

. ~-P.A

('

lol U4 1'0t>2 1 Z

.ZN-J !N?!?l\lli R JPRPYQPZ FN HQAMB TO ,PA~wPP/DEPAIR ~~ -· .- ~•lltR OP IHQOPCOM

.....

BT

'

R E

s

T 'R I

C T E D AP4 REPORT OF OFO SIGHTING ID BETl·'EEN 04ir> 325 Z ANn

K140 3552 A SRI GHT AND sHINING CIGAR sHAPED siLVERY OBJECT WAS SI "l-ITE' BY HfAD~AsTER CMM sCIENCE MAsTER CMJ1 AND NUMEROUs sTUDENTs O• s~INT PAULs sCHOOL sTRATHPINE ROAD BALD HILLS "LD PD OBJECT AT FIJ;~sT J;lf.MUNP.., Sl'ATIONARY FOR sOME Tiiv,E CMM DRIFTED NNW Fl?Ol" BALD HILLS CMM THEN ACCELERATED TO VERY HIGH sPEED IN SA11E DIPECTION PD NIL NET R LLOONs RELEAsED IN AMBERLEY BRISBANE AREA PRIOR TO 104'051UtaZ PD ~·ILL INTERVll:.v1S WITH WITNESSES

0~JUL AND REPOPT


-'

I

zs

NNNNV DRBoq 0UD/re'r¢'V¥•

c'l .........

HH

f t-RA:!WPP n::..aYROB 45 6 05/0 ZNi ~~RR

--

R ~5<~:272 ZPO

I

_......_..

FM HQOPOOM 10 DEPAIR

BY R E S T R I

C T E D AI126/SOINTELL

-

<A> INTELLIGENCE

-<B>

U F 0 SIGHTING REPORT FROM AMBERLEY

JKC} BETWEEN 040325Z AND JPRPETTZ ABRIGRT AND SHINING CIGAR SHAPED OElJECT WAS SIGHTED BY HEADMASTER CMM SCIENCE MASTER CMM AND NUMEROUS STUDB'lTS OF SAINT PAULS S(l{OOL AT BALD RILLS NEAR BRISBANE (D} OBJECT REMAINED STATIONARY FOR A TIME CMM DRIFTED

NN ~1

FROI1

PALD HILLs CMM TRtN ACCELERATED 0 VERY HIGH SPEED IN SAME DIRECTION <E) tHTNESSES NOW BEING INTERVIEWED AND EVALUATION FOLLor•lf

FrJ'


\

v,

1

..

~

. ....... ... .

3


ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE TELEPHONE: 690SSO HEAOQU...RTERS SUPPORT COMMAND

RMF

TEUGRAPHIC AOORESS " A IRCOMMANO. MELBOURNE'

'"" IW'I.r ouon

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SCI VIC

5/6/Air( 57)

27 J

.~

1957

SIGHTINGS OF UNUSUAL AERIAL OBJECTS

1, Herewith reports on UFO sightings submitted by the following people . J . D. O' BRIEN, J. ROSE, 11.J . BOYD, w. RITSON, 14r POTTER,

Yarrambat, VIC East .Kew, VIC Thomastown, VIC Newnham, TA.S

Trevallyn, TAS.

2. Comments by this 3ead~uarters have been annotated at -paragraph 34 of the reports. FO:::"''arded for informatiox:;.

~~ BRO','ill) Encl

I

( L. B. ,'iing

Commander For Air Officer Commanding


•..:.i:'c:t~ o;: .AS2h.::. o:o.r:::c::' 1.

:iu~L~

2.

Address o!"

) .

. 0 cc~::-·3.t l.On O-

.&-

.~ ...

4.

L~te

~i-e

of

.

C3S:::~v..::n

of 0'bs rver . . •-f':-.0. ~\~.

ani

Y. ~!"?.: ·.-"" .. ( 1/.~ - ~ ... J..,j! . ::?.'7 Obser·.re:::- .". ~ ~ .'. n:->.'1. ~- •• /~~. "! . Y.IE./f .n: .;::_.J-. . :-J'.:':".~ ; ~"9 r. r

..,,..

.J ~"Yt.6-,t?"'r C"' server ......... . ...... . . ... .... .... . ........ . 7

O'bse~a~ ~o~ l~ine

to be gi•en ir.

?/sjtC,67

lt"?P"Yl

.

loc~L +",~)

.. ....._

. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . ........... . ...... ..... .. .... ..... . ;.

.&'

'.J.J.

7.

_ 1/Pitl?o~ S-A-t""" ~L..~ 0 oser••.,~·., • .,l.o~~"" ' · .. ...... . ...... ..... ... .... . . . . . . .

i'1eat.1er Conditione at tir:e(s) o:f observ<tiou(s) ... . . . . . .... .

. . . . .~/4!'.~ .. -~· .~:1!/fft.r: ..13.'*:~~~ ... . ...... . ...... . ......... . . .

e.

.;ics tc U0Sel'1..-~tion(s) ,

t4

(:,e">Cri bejn~- e'J_Uip;..e!'lt U.S~1 in the

-

-

observP.tion)

................. f r'!.~ .. . .. ... . .. .. .. . ............. . ........ . . . ... . . .

. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ' .. .. ...................... ........... .. ....... .... . 9.

li!:!er.:: Wl:lS ouject !"ir5t oi:lser""e~ , eJ o.-err.ead, be:und a hill, over the hor::.zor., etc .

cooi:~:g

from

.t:~S...-f~ ~t?.l?.~~~~!. ..C.1~ f:l.l': .~~-'~. ':'.~!. fi.-9K~~: . [';~!. fl.': .'1~ .C!¢1.. ~s S.lr..,_ 10 .

"lhat first att,. r";ed obser·· cr 's a-c-:entior:, eg light o:- noi:J..:: .

J....tc-117 ......... .. ............ .. ............ ............ ........ ..... ....... 11 .

~~c

obJect apnear ~sa light or ~s n uefi~it~ ob;z~t . r ...... ' ...... . .. ... ............ .... .. .. . ............. ...... J...tG-# .........

12 .

If t!1ere was more th.?.n one object, ho•:J many were there and what ·uar: their foru:~tion .

. . . . ... ........... p ('1:' ~ ••c. :'( !-.t.................. ........... .. ... . 13 .

i'fh&t ·mas the colour 0~ th\3 light o:- obj;;lct . .t-Y.A c r.f. 4t~/fT. ..

14 .

Yfl,::~t

15 .

i':as c.n:,· d~to::il of :;tructurc o1Js2rv·e:>b . . .. . ':i. ~ .... . .. . ..... .

16 .

\bs ~ny oethod of propuls::on o'Jvious ......

17 .

"iac thc1·c

'18 .

Height, or angle of

19 .

Speed , or angu.lcr velocity..... ~ . ~.:f:-. ~~·r. . ~.1 .lJ- .c/~rc .1 . . -...;-:

20 .

·;;... ,; the object s-;;a-:;::o-::::.ry .....

21

7lh::::t \':::.~ the C.ir~ction c:: flie;ht .it .. reference to lar.dmar}~s or IlCi!.tS cf the comrmss .. .

was it::; appa..:ent

a~..y

.

sho.:-~ - ~tffl.1:. ~. ~~.'f'-!f.T. . ~ . 9~~~~~ -~

soun::l . . ...• • •• . ...

F. .'-: . ... . ..... . .. . .

f'!<.J. ... ..................... · ..IJ -~

~,. frlf•

<frtfo

p FF .;....,._-

rc, &fs r

..,~.,,;

111'

r

r

"

~

...... .r:'-{

!'!. ~- ...... . ............... · .. .

. . . . . . . .9ouri,~A• . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..q~c.r . . . . ./c. . "'" . . . .r'"~~'~~ .. . . . . . .. ..=t...-.P~ . . . . . . ._ . .We . . . .sr .. .. . . . . . . .. ...f

{)

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ele-..at~on.f!fk:\.C.-.. .. ~~<1-ft/1.~&-;if._ . ':~ . C. .-: .. .'"tt~

v

. . . /2 .

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-2Did the objl? ct rcm•lin on ::1 str~ight :Path, dcvint..! or c.,noeuvrc 't '111'?

22 .

...•.. . . . . •.. P.£; Y.'I rf .t:. /-. ':".~ ':1. .11. s. ~~!.Jf. r:~ ~..."f .I!('. ~ ~'.~ .f!. ~ ·"',~ r~ 1£.-c?

/(, b I u t/1 wl1t:.•J """;,;.:£ I...·~Hri il s ~ny t1' .il of exhaust, v pour or lLht se.::n .p,. /~,..

2~ . -

.ih~re d~d 0bject dis~ppear, eg ::ri.d-ai::-, be~ind a hi~l, over

2.;. .

th.:l

25 .

..

~

~or~=-o~l .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .c... . ~

..

11 '11?.._,,,/MOWf.tfNT/fl<{,f,,

"'

:~ ~. . c:-.'. :.~ ................. .... ... ... .. .

Existet.ce of <1r.y physic'll ev:.dance sue:. as fra&nentst hotogrt.phs, or other sup::,>m.•tir-g ev·idence. . .. . . . . . . . . . ('(, . .A... . . . . .. .. . . . . . .

. . .... .. . . ... . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . phenOt~ena previously ...

!:'.?'.... .

26 .

Hav.:: you observed any um1eu8l

27 .

If so, give details of i ncident(s) . . . • ...••. :~ . .. . . ... . . .. . .

28 .

St3te :'n,.V expr:rience which enables observer to b"' reasonably certain about th~ answc:;.·s g i ven to paras 18 and 19 .

. ... . .. .. ............... .. .. . . ........ . ... .. . . . . . .. .... .. .. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . ,()_ f?.~1-.~ ~':!!':~~ . f.~ . ft./~~/!Y.Jf ~ S . •(.~ P.'?". ••~:··t .t:t ;r~ ~·-. 9. ~~~ , . . . . . .I!.0/~1~ . !.~": .~ '.~ ~~~ ("~.~ .. ~ ~ ~ . (1 ff/.C. '!'..'? 1.~1 r-:::~~6?-.n:~ ,/~/1.r.n. ... 29 . •

a ucmber of an;r organisation i::ter~sted in aeri::..L phenomena?

Ar<: you

••••••

••

••••

••

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••

/'lo

••••••••

••••

•••

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..

..

.

.

.

...... ..

..

..

.

Na~e and addr3ss of organisat i on .... ~......... . ..... . ...... .

30 .

. . . . . . . . .. .. .. . .... ..... ..... .... ...... .... ..... .... ............... . 31 •

A,·'.Y

... d·t· · ......porm~:~~t l.· on ....• i c.I,•C;I<~l} w rn c,vJ. a~..: l. l.ona 1 ~l" . •.....•.•.•.......

-4"//ITo,.-, .. • .• . •.•. ,'lA&~;. .

.V':'.~~. ! . .1-;''?-• •(:f! ~. .~! ~. ~~'?~~ , ~ .':~ :V,~~.f:! , (/,T_ • ~ ~~ f>./':J:. /:1.'-f , f/..~ ft,S,O,'"f. {OA. 0

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t;.~:s.:d .' ·;..,·v · b·.q~(}:,;r~A· 'ifti.i'o' iii.sc/ ·e,i.;M·.s~o ·c· · · i:f.J.;:- ·w ";;J. ·~ ~: M-f fl<-4s Ori/VAD ObS~I?.v&'iJ Sig~ature of Observer . .• . • . ~. . ~. ,:Jt.on-, ~v,rv ow Locat ion of any air traffic i n the v i c i nit y 3t the t i me of sight i ng . ;; ~ . /

32 .

·· · · ··· · ... ....... ..... ... c~«....... ~~........ ........ ........ ..... .. .. .. .

. .. .. . . . . .... . . . .. .. .. . . . . . .. .. . . . . .. . .... . . . . .. .... ............... . 33.

Location of c.ny meteorolo5ical st'1tions in the gt:ncral ••rea .

~~:

....~~~~~~~ ::: ~:;.: :<~ : :~ : ! r::::::::::

• ••• •· ·~ •• ~•• ~r •••~. (?~. ~.. . . .. . . . .......... .

· ·· ····· · · ·· ····· ··· ·· · · ·· ······ ~~~~:~~~ - ~~ - ~~~~~~~~;~~~~ QUESTIO:l'S 32 , 33 and 31~ to "be answered by interrogator . note ... Since it is nort:l,:.lly i _possible to estimate the height and ~peed of a strange OJject, it will usu~lly be bett~r to cndc'l"Vour to determine the angle of elev~tion of the object 7 the :.m~le thro~·.;h which i t moved .'1nd the time

7--

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~3PORT

OF

AERI.~ OBJZC~

O»SERVED

~?. .. (1 t • • • -::._: . "o-/• (()Age . . .'ir:J .. . Observer . .. . =?~ . ~~ .":"~ ~.C! . .• ~; . ~ • •ii/·K t::. " , }l ~ ..... . ,_.:t .

1.

Name of Obs erver . .JJ-.... Vt!Y • .

2.

Address of

4 •

3.

' tl p. • • t.- jl • • • Oc cupation of Observer ... • . • .. ..,r;h--.•. • • •• .• , , ~ ct t:.;,

4.

Date and 7ime of Obs ervat~o~ (Ti~e ~o be given in ~oc~l ti~e)

... 2.2./j.f'! ..~1~. i · ... l

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e ' "'

I •••••• • • • • , •• I • • -••~ ",_·..J• • • • •

5.

-..Jurau~on ... ' . (-) of Ob servat~on <> •

6.

Ol.serv·er s Locetion at Time of Sighting (Give details of ovm

• •• • • • • • • •

r c l't l I~ . /l I II .tJOSition by msp r eference .h~ ... ,l ;V~t- S . .t:v.•. i. .f[c:.L.~.W~."it; . , . fi 1•• •t.t ":t •. •. i f possible, or by known r I ..., n ~1andmar~ ) ,. .\..J .b . Jtr. .T. J,IIJ'. .ll<. \ J- :~ ;,_\I Pt:.. ~.~l.~t:._ .\!:V):rt;. .I. ~~~~<:• • • :r. .C! \ . ~~~It, t. .-: >I.J.;[ 4

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1.

~ #I'

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I

w T•~ !ct..tv/tPI""l ·J IGv~ C -r"( A'"' •ICI.i1(.. '?teath~.;r Conditions at ti~re(s) of observation(s) . : tr !- .' ?~ . .....

0 I=

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Aids to Observation(s) .

(De~cribe any equipment used in the

observati on) ~ Ttl · ,.: f r"'···• "'~"'·~ li:~D7 / A<.: c. £.1 - rw-•• P (. (••)..1p,., ~""CJI'I •- ~ J\··'.. J • • 'A., r r ,,,. _t '•"•• -.~.-AF , ,,,1.:;>j ....... •, ••• ••••• ~ •• / '""' I'

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d?" ,, .; (. , ' ; '· ,;...-· ~;

Where was object first observed , eg o1er head, c oming from be!lind a hi ll , over the horizon , etc .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .l .. "· ~ ~. lf1.t;" ~ .t:::> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10 .

iihat f irst attracted observer ' s attent i on , eg light or noi s-:: .

. . . . .'Tte. l-.' ~~~-::r.. ~. f! :{JF;.c.;.'? . . ~.T. .. !."~.'-.. ft.'!f/n... L >.. ~.. P.-.- ..... . 11 .

"> 71'"P{ ),_p ~ 1. • v .. ~ e.-rl ...t Di d obJect appear a~ a l i ght or as a def i nit~ object .

. . . . . . . ~ :1 Cj ~ tC.~L. .. I . ~.". . .l'?JfI ( ll-:f .1. .... ?! I{~. . .. 4. . S:r. II. ~ •...•...... 12.

If tnere was mor e than one ob ject, how many wer e ther e and what was their forma t ion .

. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .r::. N.~......c. !'!. ~(· ... .......... .. ....... 14.

What was t he colour of the l i ght or objec t .... .\1... 1:1.1.T£ • .•.•.. . appa:-ent shape .... . ... =:r•fJ. ' What was ~ts . Ht'-~•/(...4 ............. .. · ..

15.

Was any detail of structure observable . . ....

16 .

Was any method of propuls~ on oi:lvious ...... . ... l .l.......•.•.•••

17 .

Was there any sound ............ . ............ . -r:

13 .

18 .

1\.c., .......... . I

ft ;--.... ....... · ·

· J) Height , or angle of ele;;ation .. .... ;-. • ... l ~ •• rt·, ...- .-r. ... ..... .... .

+.

19 .

Speed , or angular veloci~y •. . ..•.";:>.• ... . ~ ....1-? ,r. I

20 .

Tto.s the object stationary .... . f..'-: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. ..

21 .

'Nhat .1as tne direction of fligh"t v:it.w reference to landmarks or points of the com~ass . .. fY.~

..· .~. . t; ... -

• •••••

.... ..................... ..... .... ........ .... ....... ................ .. . /2.


-2-

22.

Did the object remain on a straight path , deviate or· manoeuvre at all?

..... ... f.t?! M. /{H .. 5:~·.. A (V.Q •• Tt-t.~t, . . .IJ r>r~,.·,~~E.Q . <9. -:lixv/. P.V.L. . ~JVIII 23 .

\Vas any tra i.!. of exhaust , va pour or light seen . .. ..

No .·..... .

~h~re did object disappear , eg mid- air, behind a hill, over the horizon . • . . . . . . • . • • • . . :~.~. H'!).• JHt;. . .. k<:.Zt~ ... t.\1•• 1i 'YP.. .;Nrc... . •C. J.... Q t. .~ • .•• •

24 .

25 .

Exister1ce of any physical evidence such as fragments,

•• • ••••

~~~~~~~~~~1~ ~ . ~~. ~~~~~·. ~~~~~~~~~N:~~~~~~~: ....................

26 .

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously ..•. J'iC . \ . ,

27 •

I f so, give details of incident(s) .. .... . ...... .

28.

St ate ~ny experience which enabl es observer to be reasonably certain about the answers giv en to paras 18 and 19 •

NC.. ...... ...

..... ..... ............. . ..... ............... . . . ............ . ...... . .. . . . . . . . . .V.\ ~.Q •• :r:o ... R~r-.c,r;.v.tN.<t ... .tN) f!(.r,.'.f'Yl fNT . .1?~.4 P.'ft/C.~ .••• . .. .. .. .. ~ ~·)P..... P.<.- ......1: ?.~t;.)i f/'iD .... :-::7.~.17 ~~J\1~'·..... . . . ..... 29.

Are you a member of any or ganisation interested in aerial phenomena? 1

................. ......... ................. .~v..L.~ ...·... .... . ... .......•. 30 •

. t 1.on . IV ,. Name and a dd ress of organ1.sa .... (\ . . ~ .............. . . . ...... . .. . • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • •I • . . • • • • • • . . . . . . • . • • . • .

additional informat i on .•....•... . ~~'. •. fE.. ~(e.r: r.

31.

Any

32.

Locati on of any air traffi c s i gnt i ng •

.... .0. h'?..

.. . . . . ... ..... .. ............ ... . . .... ...... . . .... . . . . .. . . . . .. ... ..... ... . . ........ .. ....... .. . . . . ... . . . . . . ... . . ... . . . . . . . . .... .. . . . . . .. . . . 33.

Location of any meteorological st ~t i ons in the general area . I

... .. .... ...................~A-................. . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 . Comments .li?!. ~~-~. ~ .~.7f't. -:{.~~ f:-:.'?'.~~ . ~ .~~ ~"-'

~.A.--.51 ~ ~- ~

.K-31-o/.&, 4-u~ /l'a.> - lfto

~ ~ ~~

.1

.,UJ4·1c:~ '{:-.:J.~:,.;.-~'lf.¥ ~~ . '19' ;a,.;.;,; ~· ;.:.:,ff :..:./: ...

,~. ~..~f~7'· ~·~~~~:~~~ . ~~· ~~~:~~~~:~~~:·& ~ :::: QUESTIONS 32 , 33 and 34 to be answered by interrogator .

~t-T

note ... Since it is normally i mpossible to estimate the height and speed of a strange object, it will usually be better to endeavour to determine the angle of elevation of the object 1 the angle through which it moved and the time taken ~o do this . 1 o.

e


OF Al~iiUL 013Ji:..'C r

RS.."O~T

ons:::.nvsn

,.w\1...... ...... .................. ~ .......... ... ..

1.

N9.111e of: ObRsrver . ..... . .;-•.t-t,J

2.

Addres.:~

3.

Oocup .tion of: Obse1-ver . . .. ':" ... • . , . •. .• .. . . , . .• , ...•. . .•.. . •.••. . . .. , .. .. •. . .. ..

-1 .

Date md Tiu•e 01

o:

Observer . . • 1CI.Fopl ar. Street , .'ftloi.1Utowu ••••• . •••.• e e.

ft

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~b:;e rve.tion (Time -co be given in loc'lJ. time)

.... ' 7/5/?7. :-. I'PJ•m, . ' ?9./rJOI!. !'-!>~~ .. . . . . . . .. ....... ... .... . .. . .. .•..... . .• . . Duration or Observe.tion~s) • .. APp~•. J .~9~, . .. . . . . . . .. ... .. .. ..... .. ... .. .... . 6,

Observers Location at Time of Sighting (Give details of own position by map reference if possible , or by knovm • . •• , ,._t, p.,bpr~• •edd.re .•. . !J!Jt . •••• •. •• • · • • • · • • landmarks) I

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(Describe any equipment used in the observation)

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'flhere was object first observed, e . g . r-ve:rhead, colllin8 from behind a hill, over t he horizon, etc . •

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What first attracted observer's atten-cion, e.g. light or noise . S~W1ke •

11 .

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Aids to Observation(s) .

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Weather Conditions at time(s) of observa.tion(s) ........... . .. .... . ........... .. Cl ear sky - nil ol oud . f

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~d ~bject appear as a light or as a definite object . ike star• .....Detini ......te.... .....' l........................................................ . objeo~

12.

If there was more than "ne object, how many were there and what was their formation .

•.••• Ql)t.9~t • • .•.• • .. . ••••.••• . •

ll···················l·······················

13.

~at wa~ the oolour nf the light or object • .. .• ~q ,qt4; , .....•.•.•• , •..••.••..

14.

·.That was i ts apparent shape •.. tt"wO. •.. . •..••• . . ••• . . . •.•.•.•... . · • · •· •· •· •· • · •· •

15.

Was any detail of structure observable •... . . \ft

16.

Was any met 10d of propulsion nbvious . . . . .. . . ~? . .. . ... . . · · • • · • •• • • · • · • · • · • • • •• · •

17.

";7as

18,

Height, ..r angle ?f elevation, • • • YP~. Wetl.

19.

Speed ~r angular velocity . . . • ~~. ~t~~~- ~~.~?~~~~~~

20.

..•• , ..•.•...•..... • • · • · • · • • • · • · •

thet-e mzy sound, •.• •• • 1'9••• . ••• • •• •. • ••. •••• • • ••• · • • • • • • • • • • • • · • • • • • • • • • • • •

, .•.•• •. • .•.• · . · · · • •• •• • • • • •• · • · • •• •

... ........ .... .. ... ... .

1o Was the " bjec t stationa-lj' . . .. . ..... . . . .. .. .. .. . .. . . .. . ... · • · • · • · • · • • • · • • • • • · • • •

... /2.


- 2-

Wha.t was the dil:'('lction of flight with reference to landmarks or pointa comp11.ss • ••

"'J..' thfl

~roD •

north-west to eouth-eaat • •

t

•••••• •••• •••••••••

Did the obJeot r emain on a straight path, deviate or manoeuvre at all? ov.d elo'fly 1n eb:a.isht line •

22 .

............................................... ................................

2) ,

Was any trail

24,

Where did

No..•.• . . . .•... .. • , .•.. . .•.•. , exhaust, vapour or light seen .,, ..

~f

~bject

disappear, e . g . mid- air, behind a hill, over the horizon.

............................................................................... l l.id-air

25,

photograph~,

Existence of any physical evidence such as fragments, supporting evidence .

or other

Nil ." .......................................................................... ... Nil

26,

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously . •.•• .••.••• ••••• •••••.••••••

27 .

If f

28.

I

so, give details of incident(s) ................. .. ........................ .. t

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State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to paras . 18 and 19.

Nil ............................................................................... ............. ....... ......................................................... . '

29,

A:re ynu a member of any organisation interested in aerial phenomena?

30 .

Name Blld add.ress of orgarri.sati\Jn, •••••.•••••••.•••••. , .•.

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'l'olephoned. Signature of Observer .. , .•.••.•••. , .•.••••.•• ) 2.

Location nf any air traffi c in the vicinity at the time of sighting

... ......... ....... ' .... ...... .................. ...... ...................... .. ..................................... ........ ... ....... ....................... '\)IL_

33.

Locatien

-r any

meteorological stations in the general a~~a . t<JIL

........ ..... ............................. .. ............. ..................... 34.

Cemme:nts •••••••• • , , •••••• • •.••• •• •••••••

I

•••••••

,

•••••••••• ,

•••• •

•••••••• •

....~ .. :?...4 ...~.. ~ ........... ..... ....... . .................. .... .. ... .. ...... ..-. ...... ..... ........................ .... . QUESTIONS 32 , 33 and 34 to be answered ~:

by

J..R,J!OodlrJirdo Signature of Interrogator ••.•••~:: · ··:. · ~ interrogator. /'(~" -?

Since it is normally impossible to estimate the heiRht and speed of a strange object, it will usually be better to "lndea.vour tc determine the angle of elevation of the object, the angle through which it moved and the time taken to do this .

\7 . .


RS!'ORT OF

Al~!UA.L

'>DJBCI' 013S.O::RV.:!JD

.:. ",

Ham"' of Obaervor ... . . Ali"t, ,\~~..C!l l • • •••••• • • •••• • ••••• • , •• • , Age 2 talkers Ave. , Uewnham, Taau'\nia. ... . ' ... • · · · · ' • • Addre ss of Observer . .. , . ..•. , .. . •.... . .. , .. . ... . .• .. .... . . .. .•......•. • .......

3.

Oecupation of Observer .• !~~ .~~~'!~~

4.

Date ..nd l'ime of tbse1-vation (Til!:e to be given in l('lc1.l time)

.. . ... , . .. , . .. , .... ... .... . ... .. ..... ... . ..

. .... ~1.'~19~191~ . ~~¥t .·.~ !1 9~? ~ . .. .. ........ ... .. ..... ... ....... ............. .

...... .... .. ..... ...... .. .

J.

""'.........,. - · -t ~ l· on

6.

Observers Location at Tio1e of Sighting (Give details of own position by map reference if possible, or by knovm . · • •• · • · • • • · · • · · · · · · · · · · · • · · · · · · · · · · · · · landma.:r:lcs) Obaarved throusb window of bouse - naked eye,

C' f

Observe.t 10n · ( s ) . .. Ann1'0Xo ·""' . •. •..1 . minute. . . •. • . . . • . . . .

'

························································· ······················

7,

"' nea.t her

cond1· t 10ns ·

· ( s ) of ob sexvat l.On · ( s ) ..• Fine and - plonty a t t l.Dle , • , , ... , .•cloudy , . , .•..•.. , , . , , ot •.,,

stars vieible • •

e.

'

••••

••• •••• ••

t

••••• ••

Ai ds t~ Observation(s) .

••••• •••••••

•• •••• ••

•••••

••

t •••• •

• • •• •• •

• ••••

(Descri be any equipmen~ used in the observation)

..... ...................... ..... .......... ... ... ........... .. ... .... .. ....... . ........................... .................................................... '

9,

\"lller e was object first observed, e . g . ,.verhea.d, coming from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc ,

..... ~. 11,. m;a. PP~. ~!lP~. !SP~. ~-~ !J. ~?P. ~!'Y!t~. ;, !'PI?~~.~?.~.~:. ~':-'?~?:.• .• 10 .

«hat first attracted observer ' s attention, e.g. light or noise .

• . . . • !'}l!J,t. ~l'!JP.e.d, .:t.o. ,B!J!J. ,l.if:t!.t.•. ... ....... . ..... ... . ....... , .. , , .. , ..•.. , ...•• 11.

Did

~bject

appear as a l ight or as a definite object •

.......A.ppea.red .........as...lisht ......at...least ......12" ....in...dia...ot ......e.r.•.............................. 12.

If there was more than ,ne object, how many were there and what 'vas t heir fo rmati on .

......One ....lieh ....t..only ....•.............................................. ........... . '

13.

V/Pa t was the colour nf the light or object .. ... ...~':~ .................... ... .. ·

14.

Simil ar to a very l arso oar t ail light , ·,fuat wa s its apparent shape . ....•• • •..••.•••••.•••.•.•.• .• . •.. • •. • . •• • · • • • · • · • · •

15.

Was any detail of structure observable ....~~······

16.

Was

17.

No 'Ja.s there any sound • • . •• • •• .•••.•••••••.••••••• • •• • .•.••• • •••.•• . ••• ••••••••.••

16 •

He 1· ght , . _ r Sl'lgle ?f elevat1.on . .. . .... Juet, ..... above. . tree t op. . level. . ...... ... ... .. . . • • • · • · • • · · • · • · • • • ·

19 .

Speed , r angular velocity .. . ~~~~~~~~ .•..............•.. · • · • • • · • · • · • · • · • • • • • •

20.

Was the ,..bject stationa.cy . .. . .....••. . .. . ..••. ••.•• . . • •. . • · • · • · • · • · • · • · • · • · •• •

a."ly

··· •••· · ····· · ··· · • •••••• · • ·•

met 10d of propulsion nbvious •.•1'!~, ..• , ...... .. ......•. •• •· • · •· •· ••••• · •

... /2.


- 2-

What wa s the di rection of .flight ~d th reference to landmar ks o r points t he c otpass •..

~t

Jtat10Jla1Y •

•• •••••• •• ••••• '

Did the

•••••••• t

en a

~bjec t re~~n

.........

~~;'~~~-

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

path, deviate

straigh~

o~

oanceuvre at all?

......... .. ............ ........ ....... ... .... .............. .

2),

~as ~IY t rail ~f exhaast, vapour ~r ligh~ seen •••• • ••• ~~•.• . •••.•.• • ••.•••••• . •

24 ,

iihere did

25,

Ezistence of any physical evidence such as supp,.rting evidence •

~bject disappear, e . g . mid- air , behind a hill, over the horizon. :llaar; 4uu ..d then reap, ·e'U'ed in 881.8 •sition but IL:lll er in diro.»t or•

....................................... .................... ... ................. f~ents, pho~ograph~ .

or other

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26.

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously • • .•.•••. ••• • • •.•• . ••• . ••••••

27.

If so , give details of incident(s) ............... . ... ...... ......... , ...... . . . .

............. .................. ........... .. .................................... 28 ,

Stat e any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to para.s . 18 and 19. I

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29 .

b:e 'Jou a :nember of any organisation inte:res~d in aerial phenomena?

3C.

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....... ...................... .. .. .... ...... .. ...... ...... ..... ................. ....................................... .. .., ................................. . Si gnature o£ Observer ...•.•••••••. • ••.•.••.••

32 .

Loeatinn ~r any air traffic in the vicinity at the time of sighting 2 Viaoount departed Launceaton :J!'I1llW8,Y 32 t or Bobart, at 06 10 1 ~' and

··········061o24·~~j·~~ii~~i;: ·<.r.·~M ·~c~ ·r;~i'i.)·: ········ ········ ··········· ..................... ....... .. ........ ........ ... ....... ................... ....

~3 .

L~cati •n • f w1y tt~teorological stations in the B9neral ~a .

- o • et. 11alloona roleued c ...... .............. • ..........Lnunceaton .......... .Ur. ..·'.ort ................................ . :1rl.n;.;. ~riod

34.

f

... ... ................. ....... .. ......... ... ........ ' ... ..................... . I

31 .

I

Ce::nr:~ents .• . ..•. . ~. ';";-r.. .. ·¥-~

.....,.............. ,.............. .

............................. .. .. .... ....... ... .............................. . ... ............. ... ... .. ....... ...... .......... ................. ................ U. Gibbe. S ignat=e a f In terrogat or ...J .;o;a; •(,/5/G?: •. 6

Q.iJESTIC"S

2;ote :

3:: ,33 ~"ld 34 to be answere1. by inte=oga.tnr. Since it 1:; normally i.trpossible to esti~"'te the height and speed of A. sr.ranse obJect. it will •.4sually be better to 'lndeavour to determine the Angle of elevation o.f the e bjec~ , the angle through whicl it moved and the time taken to do tl':is .


• •

REPORT ON AERIAL t'!BJECT OBSERVED • POTTER ,.f Cbsorvor •• • ·• ·..................... . .......... . .......... ... .. .... . . ., ,

1•

N~o

2.

Address ef Observor • ••• ·••••••• • ••••••••••••••••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .• • • • · ..) • • ·

.3.

c/o H. E.C. Pov1er

S t ation ~

Tr e vallyn .

. .. . (1~ Ooaupation ~r Obsorver • •••••••••••••••••••• •• ••••••••• • ••• • ••••· · · ·· · ·· ~

Onto and Time ef Obsa~ti~n (T~a give:1 in 24 heur cloak zol'll!.::. tine) 05211 5. ~ ·~ ·T· /'lA'/ f ~ 6 'l · · ············· · ·························· · ······················· ·· · * ~ •· '-~

Observo.tinn (a) ••••• ?..~<?. ~••II2t~!l.t.~~ 1................ .. . ... . .. .

5.

Peri rod

6.

Manner ~f Observat i~n a (Give details of ~wn pnsiti~n by map reference i f possible , or by known land~rks , and descri be any equipment used in the observatinn) .

t'f

MOv'BRAY DRIVE-I N - naked eye

············ · · ·· ················· · ························ · ·· · ··· · · ·~~~~~~ ~ · •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • ••• • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••8 ~•on•or ,,

••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••~ • • • o~o c~ ~

7.

Where was ~bject first ebserved, e. g . overhead, cooing from behind a h:i.J",, over the horizon, etc .

Over Horiz on

·

• •••••••••••••••••••••••••~•••••••••••••••• • •••••••••••••••• • •••••• o • o~ •· ~~ ~

8.

What first attracted Observer 's attentinn e . g . light er noise.

Light

················ · · ·· ······· · ········································· ·· · ~~ft ~

9.

Did object appear as a light nr as a definite object .

Light

····················· · ······························ · ················· · ·~ ~ ~ ~

10.

If ther e was more than nne f ormation.

~bject ,

haw oany were thers, and what was thci·

one onl y

•••••••••• •

•• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • Ct •

• -- .

.. .

11 .

Wh.·.t was the col~ur ef the light er object •• ~:t~&il.t..~trJ..t.~ ••••••• •••• •· · •.

12 .

What was its apparent shape •••••• • •• • •••••••••••••• • •••••••••••····· ~~~~-. ······························· · ·························· · ····· · · · · ~ ··· $ · ~~·

1.3.

Was any detail of str ucture nhservable ••• • l'lP•••••••••••••••••• •• ••••' -•• ••••••••••••••••••••• • • ••••• • ••• ••••••• • •••••••••••••• • •~• • ••••••••~• ru ~ ft~

\.

14.

Was any oethod of propulsion obvieus •• • ••• ~?.~•••••••••••••••••••••• ••• •··

15 .

\.Sas there any sourrl ,. ••• •• • , •••• • • • ••••••••

16,

Height, or angle of elevation

18.

State any experience which enables nbserver tn be reasonably certain about. the answers given to 16 and 17.

tJP••• •••• ••••••••.•..•••.•• ••-- ,. , . .

•••• •• • • ••••• J${~ •••••••• • ••• • ••• • ••• •• ~ft~ ~

··················· ···· ·· · · · · · · · ··· ·· · · ··········· ····· ··· · ····· ··· · ~~~~ · ~ ,

Since it is normally impossible to estioate the height and speed of a strange nbject, it will usually be better to erdeav<>ur to determine tht1 angle of elevation of the obj ect , the angle through which it moved, er;d time taken to dn sn.

. ./2.

t •


2.

.,

Rop~rt ~n

AeriAl Obieot Observed

Direction

~r

(Contd) . t~

flight with referenco

landoarka or

p~int ~~f

the

c~pasa •

Approached from N•'-" • - described an arc to S . E.

···············•·········· ······•··••···••·•···•••••········•··········•··· ,,.

Did tha

~b ject r~~in

nn a straight path, deviate • r nan,.,euvre at all.

Straight path

•••• •••••••••• ••• ••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 21.

\.las any t rail r.f exhaust , ~p~~ .•r .. light seen .J:~~t.J..~ .9f••'illUP••U~l\\. Where did •bject horizon •

disappea~,

e. g.

i~

cid-air, behind a hil1) • ver

th~

. . .~;?A~~. :.1.~~~. A~. !!1!. .~ :~.·••~~r!l~1i'. ~!. .~fl...•. ..................•..• ·:.1.

~istence of any physical evidence such ,suppC>rting e.v idenca.

P..S

fragments, phot("'graphe , ;or othei"

.. ..-. -~~:~.P.~. F!l.~~t1..B:~!.. ~~~:~~~. ~!i.~~: •._ •••• ~ ••••••••••.•. ••••••••

~ ~~ ~~ .

0

Weather conditions experienced at time (s) ("'r

~bservatinn

(e) .

Fine and clear

·············~······················· ·· ················· ·· ······· · ······ · ··

25 .

Location nf any air traffjc ln

th~

vicir.ity at the tir.le ,.f

sightin~:; .

··· ······ · ·· ·· ··· ~ ··· · ··!· ····· · ···· ··· · ··· ·· ··· ··············· · ········· · ·

•. ..•......•• ........••..•..•..••.•.•.• •..•....••.... •.... ..............• ~

26.

Location t-f any oetenrnlngical stations in the general area .

.... •...•..... ~

27.

~

. .

~ ~~····· · ······· · ·········· ············ · ···~ ·~··············

Any additional infnrohti• n •••••••••• •• • •••• •• • ••••••••;••••••••••••••••• ••

......•• ••..••....••..........••..•.••........•••••..........•.....••....•. t ••

············~············· · · · ··· · ····· ···· · ···· ··············· ~· ··········· · ····· · ····~········· ··· ····················· · ·········· · ···· ···· ··········

Questions 25, 26 and 2? to 'be answered by interrogator.

P. La Gr ande

A/F.S . o. I

T .O . R .

o61625' E.S .T.


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272,a30K HAS oE"Et. REPORTEu PD INITIAL REPORT IS STRANGE liGHT OR

BOPNltJC OtsJJ::ct VW ON HORIZON PD INVESTIGA Tl1'IG OFFIGEp APPOlt,TED

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ATTENTION

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Date ar1d time of obser:ati?n . • • .• •••

Duration of ob3er1ation • .. • •. •. .. ~~,.(~:'::':~.. .

6.

Oboorvcrs location !.Lt t i me of

7.

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objoct first ojser 1ed?

a hill, over

10.

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(~g, overhe~d,

.

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••• • •••••

coming froo tehind

ho::-izon •

What first attracted

obser;e~ ' s at~ention?

(og, licht or noiso) .

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12.

If there \V:ls mot a t!-lat one object:-

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13.

~ ~~v

~· ·t~~re thorc? . ............ ~ . fJJf.:: ....

.he colour

~ o.

.

.

.

/)

th~ 11~~ or ObJect? • .•~

~. • ••• • •••• •• • • • • • • • • c"Jscrvllcle? •••• •. ••• P.!:f.f.~ •-~ • ••~ · · · ·

Yl'"-S its "PP!).!'Cn: s.C:..P'_? •• • •• ••• • •

15.

\iss

ny do!.lll of str:Jeturo

1

~ ,JLt. ~.._,,;;, .•.•• •• . ••• , • • • .•• ••••7 L

.. .../2 I


16 .

11 · 18 .

~j- ....

~

'•• >ey oethod o>· propulsion •'viouo? • . •/.. • • {"':. : •• •

l.ac there iihat

~:

sound. • •• • ••.••••• . •• • •• .

W:l3

i. ta he1.g.ht?

(

XO. ... .... .....,... , . . .

0~ :.r.gle of ~le·:nior..) ••. ~<.t?.. . . . ... •. . ,--; .•': .•• ~ /

..u~lar

(I

·:elocity) • .~(.o...:J. 1 ,.

,..

!Pr.~........ . .. ... ..

19.

l1hr1t wo.s its speed? (o!'

20.

\iac the object st.a.t!.o.n.:lr.,.r: . • ••• • . • .-:-:-:. , . . . . . ....... . .. .. . . . .. . . . •. •

21.

ilrun •.. ~s the direction of t"lifht 'ut!-1 reference to 1-l.ndm:trk!l or po~n-. 3 of the compaso?

... ,.,-. .~~!~ · ·~ ..~ £ .~/.~. !.. ~. L ......... ... ··· ·· · ..... ..... .

W..YE 22.

23 .

Did ~he object remain on~ str~ght path, devi~tc, or manoeuvre at ~11?

.. 1..&":'! .. ~! 1)')/ , . . .. . . . .... . . .. ..... ..... . . . .

-

. .. . . ..... .. .

\ilo en.v trail of exhaust, vapour, or light seen·? •.•.•••.••• •... •••.• . ..

-

............ ........... ... ....... .. ..... .. .......................... . ~

24 .

\Thorc did oojcct horizon)

dis~ppcar?

(eg, i n mid- air, bahi.ld

........ f.'. I::~ ..~1..!?::if~(t!~·........... .

:l

hill, over the

.... .... .......... ..

::>c YO'..t J.-.now of any phy::ical evidenc~;;? (such ~s fr~cnts, photograph:; , or other cupporting eviicncc)

26. 27 .

~~~~-~~~-~~~~~~-~-~~:~:-~~:~:~.:-~:~~;;~:;~;:;;if~;q;~: ::::: I f so , giv..: brief details of incidcr.t(s) .... . .

..

.l{t:-;; ........-;:. fi...f<: ... .•

Jr.~..,fl.1-:~.. .. .~.'!... :':.. f. r:-.1.~ ~.<... .'.

< ':1-. ,;: .. ~. ~~ .~':': ..

.:..·.. f '!-:-.( ••••••••• •••• ••••• ••••• •• . •.•• ••• •••••••••• •••••• •••• ••• ••• 28.

State any oxperi~nco which on~.blcs obser ver to be reasonably O(Jr tain about th-3 a.nswors gi v...:n to 10 Mel 19. fJ

9

.... .~J/19.~ ..'.~.. /.?.~.~-.. ..~.<:-:(~ ~---. ~ . ) ~ .. !.~·.~ ~.":-::. C.-<.·

29 .

Axr.: you a member of ;:.:rzy organization interested i11 aori-Ll phonomana?

.

. . ../Vo .... ........... . ..... .. ...... 30.

.... .. .......... .... . ..... .... .. ...

!1:!rnv "'Jld 2ddr~sn of org.:..nis~tion ........ /

.•. .• • . •• • ·• ·• • · • • · · • • · • · • ·

............... ... .. .......... ............. .. ......... ............... ..

31

~~ ~dition~l 4nfor~~tion which rcl~t-3 to tho cighting.

......... ... . .......... .. ............ .. .. .. ... .. . . ....... ... ......... ................ ............... ... ...... .. . .. ...... .... ... .... . . ... .... ....... ....... .. ......................... .. ........ ....... .. .. ..... . . . . . . ./3


.--------

Rli:STIU CTl!ll?

- 3-

PART 2 - UNIT EVALUATIOll

32.

Thv followinc; mili t01ry '<ircraft waro 1·

UFO pouition .::.t the timet-

th n

· " ·nr.inity

of tho roported

,. ft \19,-~ ~ JUror a t,y·po. . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . • • . • . . . . . . . . • • • • • Hvading •••.•• . •••••••• . ••••• r...

... .

. .......................' T

• • . • • • . • • • • • . • • .. • • • • • • • . • • • • • . . • T

~oight ••• . . ••••• • • .•• • • •. ~.~····~···· · ···,OOO ft ~ 7--~ ~v ~P~<..,d. • • • • · • · • • · · • ·. · · • .. •K. .............. • • . • 33 •

• • • • •

K ,

• ••• ••••• • • • o

000ft ,

• '

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • A.

Tho followil'.g civil aircraft ·vcrc in the vicinity of the reported UFO position at tho time. -

.

""''Ilk

Aircraft type . . ....... .. .. . .... o • .., •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • ••• • • ••• • ••

. . ....... ~ ·· •••••T •• . • ,, •••• ·· •• •• • •••T ft . . ... ..... .. . . .. . Speed • •••• •• • • , • • • •

34·

• • • •• •K ... . . . ... c

K •• •. • . •••• • • ••. • •K

Calculations show that the followine; planets or :najor ste.rs were in that portion of the sky at the time:- ....... ............... .. ... .. ....... . ..

..... meteorological ball::>or. was released at •• • • ~. Z

position

~t

• • • a • • • • • a • a • • a a • • • a a.., • • a • a •

from.~

.k. ¥.. ....... .

end could have been in the reported UFO

the time .

The St~tG Obzerv~tory in the nearest capital city affirms that aerial phcno::JcnJ. in th:lt :portion of the sky at the time were

#~ .;~l'.(co;nct, mctaoritC; shower, 37.

ft . . . .... . ... . . . OOOft

•••• " ••• • • • •• •• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • a • • • •

36.

,ooo

Any other relevant rom~ks (cg research br.llooms) •••••• • ••••• o••••• • • • • ••• • • •• •••

etc) .

satelitcs, rockets ,

• • ••• • o•• • o •• •• • ••••.., • • • •••• ., •• v •••• •• • • • • • ••• f' •

38.

39·

Tbc object roportccl could have b~c~~· £ • •••• ···4···· · ••••••· · · ·· ···· ····

........... ...............

40.

.

.. 0

....... .

... &

•••••

••••

of tha sighting c:mnot be dctur·ninesd.

····•···•.~!!:! ~ 'f:1tJ. ...... ... .(Unit) .... .... .. ~!. !(;;//! /. ... ...... (Date)

... f.~.l'f~..!.. F. \('YIY~~.<-.{Namc) ..............1.~ L ?~/.-tt.~.IS., . . . (R:mk)


路~ MEt llAAF

'NDUM

Fo<- wltll1~ ~

~Of\,.,

Wtier "' print cleorlr

FOR~

TO

PRINT拢0 NAME

r ;r ~ffc.tt

IAAN~. I

AND APPOINTME;J

I

PHONE EXTN

~.J't< (. ~0 ! $~~ c.o.o.

9777


c.~.&.

c•

, O'NIDE11!UIBD 7LYmG OB.JEOT SIGI:I!DIG

••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••• U 0229 hova em !huroc!q l!q 25th 1967, Aue:t:lraliu Central Time ,

e.n thddentified ·~iDs Ob~ect ('0'.1'.0.) ~ eighte4 1D the Southern

Sq. !he ob~ect, which appeara in the 41e,u8El&tic akt~toh above, 1fG.8 aov11l8 at groat apoe4 from the •orth-Woet to ~e 8outh- Baot aDd ~t the low eleT~ticm eat~te4 to be about 25 desreee. !he ob~ect wae first ai(thto4 ineide, trOD a hall--aa.:r pa8sage, through oponed, glaaa lowvere4 w1D4owa and thon oboorTod from an opened kitchen 4oor-waJ, which 41eooanta any poooibilitJ of it being a reflection. It w.. well eetablisho4 when firot aeen and the whole o1&btins w.. approximate~ ~ oeocmda. Alth~U§h this ~ first o1ehtins of such aD object, it didnt follow tho «•neral pattern of Taried flight novecent, but rather a dead leTol path aerooa the horizon, slowly broaking up and 41sintergratins which to •• faToura tho idoa that it may have been a rocket casing or oaoe other man-~o hardware. ~he low tra~ectorJ ACROsS and PARJ.t.TJCL to the horizon aeemo too creat an 8J18h!..for the entrJ of a meteorite. Tho length of the object just cant be comprehended, but appeared verJ large. I t fiDalq atotnt~eaJ iDto one small , red object and then disappeared. • A ful.l Elocm wae directly overhead, TerJ high, but &bing good aurfaoe T1Mbil1ty and 1/8 Oirrcatratua was the observed c:Lou4 cond1tiona to thia G,eotacular sight.

;a

_ , OlJSDVlm: Allan Wood •••••• ( ~··

Moteorologioal Office Daly Waters Northern Territory IZ51 THIS PAGE IS REPRODUCED FROM A BADLY FADED OR ILLEGIBLE SOURCE.

~ SCANNING THIS ITEM AT A HIGHER RESOLUTION WILL NOT IMPROVE ITS LEGIBILTY.


-ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE TELEPHONE: 690550 HEADQUARTERS SU PPORT COMMAND

RAAF TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS : "AJRCOMMAND. MELBOURNE "

IN 1\EPLY OUOYE

VICTO RIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

5/G/ .tl.ir( 53 )

16

I 1

Secretary Departmen f Air Russe ffices C ACT UN-IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS 1. Enclosed herewith are three reports concerning the sighting of an un- identified flying object by three 15- yeare old youths, and the report by the interrogating officer, Flight Lieutenant A.G. GREIG, previously a GD Navigator. 2. Subsequent enquiries by No 2 Stores Depot confirm that there were no aircraft in the vicinity at the time. However, the Meteorological Bureau report having dispatched a weather balloon at 0810 hours on the day of the sighting and, because of the prevailing weather conditions, would probably have been in the area of the UFO sightings.

3. It is, therefore, assessed that this sighting was a meteorological balloon.

Encl

I

II?~

(L.B. BROWN) Wing Commander For Air O~ficer Commanding


(i) REPORT OF AZRIAL OBJBCl' OliSEiiVED

Na:ne of Obaerver•.. A\'h-'. •..•.•

K~.1 .~'!1~.~... •... ....•.•.ae,v•• a8. \<=" • •H•••• ••

Address o! Observer••• ?.?..~R~')I.~N .• .~:t".. •••.••;£~~9.9.'-l A ••..••• Occupation of Observer.•••••••••••• ~~"~~P:;t ••..•.•......•••. . ..•. Date and 'l'ime of Observation

(Time to be given in local time)

................. ~~ t.1 ..... .~<? !'! ~~- .. ::t-1 .~1 A'-1. ': ='· •.••..•••••••••....•..••••.•.• Duration of Observation( a) ••••••••• •• :1. !'0. 1.~~~• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

6.

Observe:"S Location at Time of Sighting (Give details of own position C.. .0 .9 rv1 by map referenoe if possible, •••••••••••••• •-.t'!'e'!.o'Pj. ~to·••• ~~ f": .'. "!:.. .. . or by known lan<baxks)

?.'f ...•

~K. AN'rNE"U ~~ .....,.(,.o .................................................................................... tL(II)C.E

~-...w,uther

Conditions at time( a) of observation(s) ••••• .1:::•."!~

•..•• .• .••. ••

.......,.:;....--"!mere was objeot first observed, eg, overhead, coming fl"'OII bebind a bill, over the horizon, etc. 0

....•........ . ........•.. .. ... .•9:.. ~.~.'! ~- .. ~.~ti-~.... MfAA't.. :r:f{~~.{l~~-·. :3.1-?.... ~Iff 'f'D

10.

t)Cj?'

~1,),- ~ IV\\.;S -

CA1,..c:,..IL..~

~'f ~I(! • ~LE'S •

v:he.t first attracted observer's attention, eg, light or noise •

.......... ... . ..... ••• . . • • •• • • • . •• ~~~IN~~- • •P.F. ••9.~~~ ............... .. ...... . Did object appear as a light or as a definite object .

• •• • • . . . • • . . . . . . •. . • . . • • • • • • . • • P,~.t:- :.~~'!~ ... ':-~c;:..~r........................... .. • If there was more than one object, how maey w11re there, and what their formation •

11'&8

••.•..... ... . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .!!~~ .. ~-~L;.t .. ..... .... ........ ..... ..... . 13.

. ~~ tf"~ L..IC:t+'r What was the oolour of the light or obJect ••••••• . ••••••.•••.•••.••••••

16.

~ SI4AP£.b i?IV1"'••.• L..l~ltr" ,...A-De!"' unbat was its apparent shape. •."-e.l . •• .••• • ••••.•••••••• ••••••••••.••••• ~A-t..\> TO 6 E: i) ~t..S I'""- • as ~· detail of structure observable •••••••• . • • •~?. · • • • · • • • • • • • • · · • • · oJ I II. - CD-IL.C>III''I' "t"EI..L Waa any method of propulsion obvious •••••.•••.•••••••••••••••••••••.•••

17·

ao there any sound •••••••••• • •••":::~I?. f.'¥:.-~~ . . . ~ • :T!-:'-;'-; • • • • • • • •

18.

M~, 10° ~~ u.o't•"l.orl Hei g ht , o_- a~ e of el evatioc • ........ • • · • • • • · · · · · • • · • · · · • · · · • · • · • • • · • ·

19 ·

Speed, or angular

a;>.

Was the object stationary? ••• K.Q•• ~.·~FIL"J~./il,q~)..i .... • • • • • • • · · · · • • · · ·

21.

;;bat 1111lS the di raat1on of flight lli t!:i reference to l andmalke or poi nto of the compass

14.

15·

veloa1t;y.'/~~ ••~l-f!.~ ..(}l•.P.~~..!.~."'f)...... .

.... -~~~~ ... fP.. ~-~.f. . :f.'~ . .. et.o.~: . ...................................... .. .


2 -

22.

Did the object remain on a straight path. deviate or manoeuvre at all? T'O l>lto P <:) 1"1+RII -o cL.eV"Tlo--.1 A1-ID S.E.t:o l~j) ~

APPc:p.~~

r

••• • •• • •••• •. • •

v:-

~.,-co ~·., •,, .. . • •, •• • • ,..,.,.y , •• '·o~ ,.. •, " • •'Jt9' ~I.:.C'L.O~

f'~ oi

ae any trail of exhaust, vapour or light seen .........~'.\- •..• •• •••••••

23·

24·

·~ •• k n, ...... ,'1/(:' • • • • ~.. • '•?i'"t' • • • • • • • • • ~\V. --· ·· .

Where did object disappea::-, eg, in :nid-eir, bebind a bill, ovar the horizon •

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. fAt'o. -~~...'~ .~~~"!"t':'.~. :-: •. ~.. ~~P. . •:~!.9. . :~.~~. . 25·

E:d..stence of any pcysical evidence such as fragments, photographs, or other supportinG evidence.

tJtL.....................................................................................

26.

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously •••• ~.1 .':-:. ••••••••••••

27 -

If so, eive details of inaident(a) •••••• • .• • •••••• :-:-:7•••••• •••••• •••••

26.

State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably c"!!rtain about the answeru ~ ven to 19 and 18 •

e.•7 ....~ . .'?W.7tl?-~ •••

• • W."!'PM.~t> .• ~~~J• •~ •• P.'7.•~~*.~."!r:s ..Th-.E'f':l •••~ 1:t:! .• Ner.r

29·

.D~

~A,,.~.,

PAS.

...e::A.t:>l sc.s.

Axe you a member of any organisation interested in aerial phenomena?

••••.....•.. ••. . ~..0. :-••. ~~!'=~ .•1.~. !'1'11rrt~1~.. ~ •..~~ . •~~~~.fl•• ~{#>•• llllrc::~te.n:-D

,30.

t"' f'f!>rv..s:mlOf'f\.'j -

l~'fE:ltST\?1)

Er.~ov c:~

ro

'I"T Ow .J ~E'L.rw. t::'C.. c.o~ ,,ame an a Add ress o.,p orga ni sati on~ •••••u..A..•r ~~~ .••.•.•••..... r •••••••••••

,..,......~

.................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~~- .. er.. -~~~. P-9.\: ....••..••......•...•........................

............................................................... ..................... Signature of 32·

Obse~er•••••••••• ~~~ ••••••• . •••••

Location of any air traffic in the vicinity at the time of sighting•

• • •• • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • •• • • •• • • •• ~!La ••• 9~~~\ .~t; ..• . •• .. . .... . .......••..•.•.•.•. . .•..

............. .. ................' .................... ' .............................. . 33.

Location of any meteorological stations in the general area •

• • • • • • • . . • • . • . . • • •• • • • • • .~~~4;fPtt'•• ,, H1)1•• Jt~'P!\'~"......... _4.1f9~."J •• -~-~~.o.~F ..•.

•SW\'i'l\1 ~G .• .• :~ . .-r:'I.F.'t. 'J1;Iq vff. AM •.~~~$-t~ •. P•.J. ~. P.-Jf;. Pf. .~~ ..~t+T.' .lT. !'•• ~~. ~~.... .. ~U!Jtff. .N.~ .~~ .~1.!'.. P~. ~.~P...~'1~. JJ...• !:!P~~. ~~- 'TI\f; .'.'1L'If.PJ~lV•. . \lltllll\'t\f. 1iiE ~fPc-ere!> 1l+E J ttrJ\It; 0'1 TliElf. ~~~~~EEJ. W ~ ·

t.

Signature of Interrogator • ••.•• ••••• •• • ••.• T •• \ ••••• • Ql."ESTTOBS 32, 33 and 34 to be anBll'ered by interrogator. Since it is nomally impossible to estimate the haigbt and speed of a trnnge object, 1t will usually be better to endeavour to dete~ne the angle or elevation o! the object, the angle through wbiob 1t moved, nd the time taken to do tb:l. a.


REPORT 011' AERIAL OBJECI' OBSERVED

Nrao ot Oboerver•••••••

£':'~ !-.'.~ •.• ~.~ff'.'! ~~. ~......... ·As•·, ,t~ •• ,., ••

Addreoe ot Oboener•••• ~.'••• ~!".'.~~~•••• •';\'( ~•• ••••••• ;!~.'": 5'P.~I\ ••••••• Occupation of Oboener•••••••••~~.~~~~••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Dab and 'l'imo

ot Oboervation ('l'ime to be

g1 nn in local time) . I

······································································~············

Durstion ot Observation(a) •••••••••••••••••••• - ••••••••• ••••••••••••••

6.

Obeenere Loo.stion at 'l'ime of Sighting

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

\~

(Give detf,e o-.m pold.tion b7 map ret noe 1f poet!iible, or~ kao 1 lana.a~o)

··························································\~······f< .:.......•.•.

7.

Weather Conditione

a~

time(e) of

obsarvati~s) •••• "~•••••••••••••••••

••·······••······•••·•·•·····•••··········•·•·•··•···•···············•···•··•··•···· Aida to ObeerYat1on(a).

6•

(lleooft~j t?oqut"'i\\(..oa 1ft tbe oboo,.,.tloo)

.........•........•.••.•..••..••...•••.•••.•. ,...•......• ~·························

............................................:.~ .......)t .......................... \

Yibere wae object tlre~ obs~, eg, overhead, OIX!iag frolJ behind a bill,

9•

.............

:~:~.:::.::~::::.::~:~.1(;~ ........ ~~·······························

T:h&~ t1 rst attracted o~erver' eattention, eg, light or aoieeo ••·······················•·· :\.~'····~:-.\ .•.•.•...•............................. 11· Did oble.. appeo~o o ligbt •• as o det1Di to obje...

10•

·········•·······•···•···•·····•···••····•····························•······•······ It 'here wae more ~han one object, bow m~ were there, and what waa their foxmation.

•······•·······•••····••···••··••···•·····••·······•·······•··········•······•·•·•·· Vih at wae the colour of the light or object. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

14·

tbat waa

i~s

apparent ehap•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

r.ae aQJ detail of e~ruoture observable•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

t.aa aD7 method of

p~pulsion

obvioUS•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

"•a there anJ oound••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

18.

Helsh~,

or aagle of eleYatioD••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Speed, or angular veloalt7•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

ae the object 21o

atatioD~··•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

ba~ ,.. the dirooti.on of nts~ with reference to lantba:dce or pointe

ot the oompaae

••··••••·······••··••··••·•·•···············•··•·•····•·•···•·•··········•··•··•••••


2

2i.

:nld

~be

ob3eot hllaln on a straight path, de"fiab or manoeun-e at &1.1?

·····-·············································································· 2).

24·

Wao

a~ trull

ot

exhaua~, ~pour or light

eeen•••••••••••••••••••••••••

11boro d14 objcot dioappoar, eg, in 11114-air, behind a bUl, oTor the ho:r1eon •

••......•......•........•.........................•.............•••.....•.....•..... 25·

E:d.nenoe ot aD7

p~llloal

e"f14enoe

auoh\ ae fftBIDente, pbotogr&l)he, or

~

other aupporting e"fideDoe.

············································~ q••••••••••••••.••.•••.•••.••..••.••• ~ \ 26. BaTe JOU obeerYed ·~ uam~al phenomena preViouelJ••••••••••••••••••••• Z'l·

26.

It eo, give details of 1nai4ont(e) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

ro'D'

State arq exper1eaoe abou-. the llllllft!"a

~~oh

enables observer to be roaeonabl7 oerta1n to 19 and 18•

.........................:s·tv..................................................... 29•

An 70u a m~

ot all7 orgamaation intereehd in aelial phenoauma?

•••······•··•···••·••••···•··••····•·•··•···••••·•••••······••••······•·········•••• ~.

lame and Addreea of orsaaiaetionoo•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

••·•·········•··•••••·••··•••···•·•···••••••••••·•··••····•···········••·••···••·••· An1 additional

1afo~ationo••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

·············································································~······

••••..•.••..............••....•.....•.•.•••.•.....................•.............•..• Sigtlat\lre

32·

Looat1on ot

~ a:lr

of Obserter• •

€•• ~ l ...•..........••.

traftio in the v.lcdnit7 at the time ot aighti••

.•..•.....••..........•••...•.•....~~~

...

~~ .~~

.•••••....•..•..•......•.•..••..•..

·····················••·•··•············•··•···•·•·•·•····························•· Location of anJmeteorologioal abtions in the general area.

...•..••....... ~ )4.

(.l) 'f

ll.NI\1/{'f'"f"

-J

t.o? )~DI'lM~

••••••••••• 1 •••• ~~·········~ ~-~·································

..:.·« •

r&

~ •• ,~ ¢.(, ;:; ..J_. ~-ti ~~ ~ ~en t ••·•••••••••••·•••••••••••••••••••7••••••· ~:•••••••••••••••••••

,.__

• ....c- ~ r/u;,f: J1 /1. h.-ill. m/1. .•........ ···························-············································· , ~ 1-GIS1patu.H of Interrogator••••••••••••• • ~· • • • • • • • • .. • • • •

QUESrlOIB 32, ll an4 34 to bo answered b;r interrosator. Shoe it ie nomall7 illpo..ible to aetimate the beisM and qpood ot n et-zoanae object, 1 t will ui!ILlally be b etter to endeawur to detomine the &118le ot olnation of the object, the angl e throUBb wbiob U moved, and 1\be time takflD to 4o tbls.


"•·am• ot Obcerv•r••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Pere-~t EvAr..ss 1~ •~• ·······~ ••••• yr•••••• ~~ •R••••••••••••••••••••• •c..t..:A-tt.D Ri) &fl~ M ~~~J•••••• Addroaa ot O'b rver••••••••••••

2t

Ocaupca\lon ot Obaerwer.. ~ta

:;,... · ·• tl.o-.J

·····i\~~~································ and ftmo ot OboervaUon (Time to be fP. Yen in local Umo)

"'

. \v

····················································· ~ ····························

5•

Sisb1

iUl"'ltion of Observation( a) •••. ••• •••••• , •••••••••••• •••••••••. •••. •••••

6.

Obaert'oi'D Loctltion at Tiae ot

I.

•••••••••••••· •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •

(Gin detaila of own pold.Uon b7 map :reteronoe 1f posc:dble,

,

or~ known lan4ma~a)

.•.•......... ...•....•..•..........•.....•.. '\~......... ......................... .

1•

eathar Condi tiona at time( e)

J

oboervaU.o (!) ••••••••••••••••• •• •••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 8.

Aida to Observation( a) •

( Deaortbe

azv\~p:!ltmt uued in the obael'nl.t1oa)

··································i<·~······· ·~································

;:············::::···:·::::::·~~·.:::::::~·:::::::::·:::;:;·;:::·::::::·:·~~. over tbe horir.o(' e\o.

•..................•......

1

··~····················································

att~oted ob~r• a atte~~t1oa, es, lisbt or bOlee• •....••..•....•....••~ ~....... ~ .. ~ ....•.•..........•.•.....•..•.•....•.••.•. 'hat tint

11e

:tid

..

obje~ppear ae a light or as a det1ni te object.

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 12·

I t there waa more tball one object, hotr ~~~~ were there, ond what was t htd.r fom!ltion •

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 13·

.bat wao tba colour of the light or object••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• hat wae 1te apparent abap••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• aa aar detail ot

16.

et~ctur.

obeerwablo•••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•• anr motbod ot propuledon obltOUGo•••••••••••••••••••••••• • ••••••••• ae there anJ oaund••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

18.

Heigbt, or anGlo of ele..tton••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Spee4, or ansular Yeloa1t7••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• aa the objeot

atatio~•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

hat wu the Mrecnion of night ,rlth referenoe to lan&Dal'lts or pointo >f

t~ OOI!IpU$

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••


2

.

Il:l4 the ob3Mt ~a1n on a etl"llt.~' pat h

22·

'

c1-

..

.......... or

•••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••• 2l•

ao

2 •

nr

mano~'ft"e

•••••••••••••••••••••

trc11 of oxhsuot• Yapaur or 11Gb' •een•••••••••••••••••••••••••

~~r:o:!d ob3eot di capp•r, ~. in 11114-ld. r, bctb1ncl a bill,

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

25·

at all?

ovor

tbo

·· '\ ~·······························

Exi ateaoe of aiV' pb38lcal mden//'uch as t':apeDte, photographe, or

V

other supporting ev14enoe.

··········································~{Q ...••..............................•.. uv uau.aq:1 ~p'heDOIIIena

26.

Jla'te ,-au obocned

27•

If eo, Give dstalla of

pr.'liouely••••••••••••••••• ••••

inal~(a) •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

State eD¥ ca:porieaco ~oh enables oboener to be reaeonabl7 oerta1B a'tout tb.e c.nRCrc 6'1~t!,..:to 19 &Qd t8 •

•..................•.............~{ .....•...........•.•...............•..•......... 29•

Are 10U a r:u:JDbe'

~ anor o~aaUon lnt aoeahd in aerial phe11C0tma?

I ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••~ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Daoe and Addrosa ot

30·

o~eatlon•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• An, ad4ltlonal

infb~atton•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Sisnstuz. of

Ob~er•••• ~-:.~:.~:••••••••••••••• ,.

32·

••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••• ~J~ •••q~fft~~ •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

...•............~ ....•...•.••.......•....•.....•.•.•••......•....................••. Location ot arq metoo!'Olos1 cal stat1one in the a eDeral ana. Mkc.O T

,...._. n

~~

I;(

P,AN'f::!. Tt.

k

,J

A.t:.P'

J)l?nl'o'l ~

.,

••..•.....•••.

············ ··· ············\· · · •••••••¥••··· ~ ·· · ·········· · · · ···~··· ·~ ~ tt~L:'"r..)..t.._ ~h~~ ~ Ccmo.a~•·••••• • ••••• ••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••• ••f•••• ••••••••••• .U.

:.tt;

• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

"~p,,c- ~·.J

H

., ·- -

~

~

,;.l • • • • • fl"• • • • • • • • • • •\ .... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

·····~-~~ · ··~·····~..1~~- Z~....•.••..••..••...••...•..... ~ ···· · ··· ·· · ·· · ····· ~ ~ Signatuz. ot Interrogator••••• • ;} ••• , •••••~• •• ••••••• • ;

Siaoe i t le nomall7 illpoeld.ble t<> oeUJaate tbe helgbt an4 apeed of a 8tran&e Object, 1 t '1'411 1UIIlall7 'be better to elldM'VOUr 'lo clehm1D8 tu anGle ot el...-aUon of the obje~, the angle tbro'll,lh tl!d.oh U cove4, and t he t1l:le taken to 4o tbia.


THIS PAGE IS REPRODUCED FROM A BADLY FADED OR ILLEGIBLE SOURCE. SCANNING THIS ITEM AT A HIGHER RESOLUTION WILL NOT IMPROVE ITS LEGIBILTY.

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ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE TELEPHONE : 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND RAAf VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SCI VIC

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS : "AIRCOMMAND. MELBOURNE "

I

5/6/A.irj.51) IN II.EPI.'I' QUOTE

'= 9 J••r; 1967

UN-IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS 1. Forwarded are reports of sightings of un-identified flying objects sighted in South Australia during May 1967. The reports were received from the Australian Flying Saucer Research Society in ADELAIDE.

2. This Headquarters has nothing further to add to these reports.

At~ (L.B. BROWN)

Wing Commander For Air Officer Commanding

Encl

..

,..,, .

,..


1

..

File No .

Claseifiontion OCCUPATION

w. R.

R~DIO

If M

FlSHL?.R.

Please a•ate briefly ~hat you sKetch if possible

IECNN/ C I AA/

6-

CE'P / .

Use additional sheets if neoeesary and

ea~ .

dra~ a

Wnere were you at the t1me? ON

fRO~Y/ 1/e'"RAD~t-{

;f!)CIIE

oF

HO,..tG

Da 'te end Time of sight ing , I Ol.f.S"O ON ~

f)OC>ee$ $

a "'PI/0,( osoo

(/NIT OJ.J..'-1}

c

What direction was object from you?

llfPRo>< object was ~oving WF:SI oF OvE SOvTH esti~te

(

J

t

I

7

,.

70° -

80°

Size

Directio~

Could you

o..; oN

What angle was object above horizon?

fAS/ SJ.I6H7";.. '-f

OS~6

$<!.:

Nort=s .

speed of object?

~ba't

was the

Cifs..tr1 , NO CAllVDS STJtKS. C.OOL

1"RA\IERSEO ltN fi-N6L.~ I FR0"1 M'{ PO!.ITIOAf OF 11PR'ROX 30° IN 1/PPROX I {ewe) MINUTe

~eather

at t he time?

VISIBL E

BRI6H.T

-

Witnesses : 11A

W

0 ,GRflo ...../

Addresses

Please give any information you have of anyone else who may have seen the objec t s.

Vnat were your personal feelings at tr.e timo? CCN'/INCI?O

WITt-(

1

"T"H~I

O(j.;;-;:.c./

@

1{/ I..ER$/

1

wliS

Pf.IRPO.SE.

v'"

ti:e above c!eteils to the f.~,stralian Flyir.g Saucer Reset>Ich thct the Society ~ ~/may publish them ~sing/wM'a.~ rtf',[ nrune . /. " •.;!---/7~ /. . Signed ~'/{/ . / <\ ~ "i gi

S~cicty, u.~derst~~~r.g

!.<lte

'

...,.


"'

!"- •

~ . .lt "racioel:r 0450 hr::s . on :..o:otA'\:, 8 . 5· 67, I left :JlY hotLc by the front doo r to .-:slk ~o ·.ro::k, a. ~!..atilr.co ~( '*bou't ~ CJ..:.e.

from t'!lc :::-ont :~<Ja.t!:.er c~ndi tions.

·.ro::-.:~r.d:lh,

':no s:r.r

whicl: f-:.ces rou.ghl;r 3~>st. : g:anccd ap to c 0., 0 ·..: of clouds "' :;lCr~·::c::r calm, with cl~.; r, bright

w~s o:!e~>:r

s~a.ra .

~t t~2 ti:c r ~oticcd wba~ a~ ~i~c~ ~~,en~s~ to b~ a ~ntcllite moving in a direction :;Uglltl:' .eat of Sou!::, l< a;>:-ro:ri:::a.tely 7C to gc !eg:roes abo.,·o the horizon. ! •vatc!l.::i tbi:z for a.bout 20 cec.:~n:is, -iu:-ir.g ;"!:.:.cl: tirn~ i <;;c c.?u::-;;e aeemed steaiy. It ther. Wii.vered ir. i '!.!. cou:-zG., s"ti::!. o:: r.:>~ghl:t ~~e ~a:::19 he__..-air.g, but ,_-eaVif'l6 fc.:l::- or :i·te ti:nes f:om eidc:. to sldn, a slow.:.d to half 3peed . Fo::- :lllother 30 sees :;. ~ procae:ied on ~.-- co~::-se, o::e which ; took notrs of b;• oolecting a star for which 1 ~was !:o>ldir.g. -.s 1! nar.red this st..::-i' posi tior. it s:.ov.-ed further - & than stopped. !h.:r!.r.g this t!rno I b l.d walked some 1CO ya"Xds up 'fue St":"and. toward work _ "' I cor•~i.r.ued to watch it. ?:.e only tir..9 I tooic rr~' e,;as from it was to relieve any ch'lnce ";!let : wl'.:l •:;ccin; tll.ir.g3'. I wn!c!:ed its proc;ress both wnlking & st!U'.ding stil l. l;o sha!'e at :~.11 vme v!. .. J.D!n, only n lig!:t ·,o.!:!cil, ouce s~tior.nr.:r could not 1 at leost by :::e, h~vo bean diotlr1 "'U.isood from (). st~r o: c:..es.r, mcdiuc brightness . I refer to thi s as O:BJ ...,CT ' : ...• . Durir~ the next 8 to 10 minutes tte object remained stationary & I took the o;>portuni ty to fi:x its position wi tb several suxro~ndir.g s • •rs o t: good brilliance . Tbcr., at ~bo~t 0500 bra I detectod ~ f~b of ligAt directly above my head. vlo.:-.ciJ16 up I s!.<W a t'econd, ver:t dafini te flash of ~oi t1:: light of 1 to 1 ~ 8608 <i'Ur!!t1on. ,. ht.lf minute l&ter, two r.:ore !'JDohes ca.'lle f:rom the sa:ne poe.i tio n, their size " brilliance o=~,uival.::r.t to a'oout tv~_ce t~ .~ o; .~.e o':'ightest star . I have noted tb.is a:; 0:9JE'CT '3 ' . .• minute or twc:. la..e:::- l ~e-.ec-:u~ a ."'lovement in OJ3JECT ' .A'. I t m:vcd r.ortc , incretsin~ its dist~~ce fro~ ~~e ~ijacent star by more th~n hal f - abou~ two or t"~b& dc~::-ccs of tr~vcl- & tnen :ret4rned. tJis wa~ rep~ated several t ime s up ur.U'!. s'.lnri.;., . I arrived a.t wor.< at :J511, '"-pointeti the ObJ._ot out to .Jr. \r . O' GR.i.DY ~ho ~reed t~at it hp?eared to ~~ve a~ ~d~ times to a sligt; d .. g ee • .. t 0545 we coth .;~·.-; dircc;:y r.oo·•; !l. tl:.i:::-1 object, ON.:vT •c•. ~checked the time ic:r:i&dio-:ely ll:: 05~5· ~ ~ were St.<r:o..i .•g cr. t-:e fr.,nt pvrcb. -:>f 5.... j5\-L Tra.nsmi ttFt'!' b~:'!.~t n~, & t)...i8 object C!l.:::El fro~ o:.!>;.nd -;'1e ' •.,..;;_::-:'\ side of the buildinr, iu;adicg ~'!: .. South at a epcei tucll that .:. t ~:!.o~~p. 'i:r ... ~ , r,.-:- -::!::3 ::.or::.zo!. :.c. 30 :;.in::: . I-. vtas f~r bri~hte r tl:.~~ ars s"tnr, & muc~ ~~~~3~-- ~~a ~~vG cr si~ tlmes .~~ st~ . It appear e d -:o "Je cu:h :ower than ei tee.:- o • t::, ;:::-...v!ous o .. ~sc~a & ::.. t~ c::.lour v~ried oetv:een v•hi te " red, vr o r~~e - not p~:::1~ 1 b~t ::-n~he:::- twin~ir~ . It soe~ad to ~~ver v~ ry slibh tly, &. J.:r. o•GRA:!)Y otr... ol! to t~iu, Lowc:ve:::- r cau: c. :;ot ;nGsent a st::-one C·•Ge SC"inst this beir.; a sr.t.::E~ .... oxcopt ";o sa·./ t!l.it! e:rso:-;~::y did r.ot ttini• so . :;: feel it was to !ol't, so:::cw!:at ::.cas t~sr. c. rr.ilc, t~c ·::.::.g, &. ";oo b::-ig!lt to be :::o . ::o eh'-'pe was vi:;ible . This third ~bjcct I za.w ~s.in two nig~ts :ate:::- <>t precise-ly tb9 s~e time 6: on roug~..l:r tho 3aco course..

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n, • t-

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/.

AUSTRALIAN FLYING SAUCER RESEARCH SOCIETY

File No • Classification

ADDRESS

.,_.,..,t"lln t''ll'-' L...r>f"'N' d;< k .l.<-s :Cr '"'. f f""C' !.>'• Al oe:.. 'bl G"("~( f

1C,

Where were you at the time?

&-h.'-<. ·r•,....,

rn . . I"T'( ~~, 1"\-,c~r,t-:..

11

l"'r ,.-,nvl'fl ~ /h

Direction object Y&s moving

t.:'\\Y'c"'

·cc,. . .+

. 1\'IC"<...<::".

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1-c Lwt~.~

Coul~ you ( hl'... d"'-•

< 11--c -

estimate (_1 1x.,.

1 L-<' ~~ c.k: '""""\

(''(')(~CL)

Size

?K.\k\ ·. C'h.

ICfb I

Colour ~ \');~)Cli-J

Shape

Rcund

··1 \Q ...J

What was the weather at the time?

Cleof"

<.1

Names

r::c.:{ \ - l·c-v.\·~lc.l 1'2c ,.,. d

·2s

r\ \ f"lClL~

~-<:·

~peed of object? >)C ~\Crli_, I.J

Witnesses a

OCCUPATION I'-d 0 .,.;I- C.~'!.t--k..•.,

'1 1\:,

What angle Y&s object above horizon?

k hu""'d

I \'-cC')

L.

I

Date and Time

What direction Y&a object from you?

!( I\-..- !"'l(~p\ c\

AGE

kt'qL':A t

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~~~nc~.

Addresses

lcJ,_..,.. •\ ~ tc·J h: "'"Yl('t 1~ o< >; v·c.·-r,.

Please give any information you have of anyone else who may have eeen the objeote.

n('

( I ''•

What were your personal feelings at the time?

I give the above details to the Australian Flying Saucer Research Society. understanding that the Society sRsll Ret/m~ publish them uaing/wi-tbholdi~- name.

Signed

{)&c;t,61;1:',hZ(:Y.(') '" ....... . .

/lct.l~~-/l{L, k

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uk.~.

\vrt~~. . fl::lO.C..-4

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i-

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,1.

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AUSTRALIAN FLYING SAUCER RESEARCH SOCIETY

File No • Claeaifioe:tion

ADDRESS :~A

t. o"\•,>

AGE

,....\

Please etate briefly what you saw. draw a eket6h if possible

;:

..,...._..,,

Uee additional sheet s i£ neoeeear,y and

...L

) ",-;" ~-""'.; /1.:.'\,.;. .

Where were you at the time? .Ic: ,.vc.;

,_

,y~ _;)

"'o/a..,~ j ; -

Date and Time of sighting

--<.A",-.c._) .1'rV''}

// 3 <./ What angle vas object above horizon?

What direction was objeot from you?

Direction object was moving

Size

Colour

Shape

What was the weather at the time?

Could you estimate speed of object?

Witneases s

-

,. _..,q-<>c

J

/?

/ (. '/

OCCUPATIOU

Names Addresses

Please give any information you have of anyone else who may have seen the objects.

What were your personal feelings at the time?

I give the above details to the Australian Fl ying Saucer Research Society, understanding that the Society shall not/may publish them using/withholding my name. • Signed 'f t J}<'' c' .......

I'f

Date

..

~;:

,c/ (.... z. ·-·. .


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sr

t2..

r.acoss&ry u..d

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object

~rect~or.

~~o

moving

Colour

-- ______

Wnat

St ?a

~·as

,..........

1:he 11eo.t1':.e::- at the time? -ch~ /( c ~"'-~ ..-? &....te..,

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L- R. tl..~d~ ~I s/67

.


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THIS PAGE IS REPRODUCED FROM A BADLY FADED OR ILLEGIBLE SOURCE. SCANNING THIS ITEM AT A HIGHER RESOLUTION WILL NOT IMPROVE ITS LEGIBILTY.

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' ... T•L&e iiiiAPtf>C

<lOD'•&M

.. NAVY CANOE:RRA•

-

3. 1.6/4

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA Naval Irt],.~tu:l:_Qn,c~ C.ANB~

._

.._

DN\!Jaion, •.

l \ M~Y \9~

The Director of Air Force Intelligence, Department of Air, ':!A!r.BE." RA •

REPORT OF UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECT The attached copy of a report by the Third of the MS SEAIVAY KING is forwarded for your information and any action you may consider necessary . O~ficer

;I

cv(}atf(

Directo~ of Naval Intelligence .


CMoD,/DKE

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND OCEANOGRAPHY

PO 90~

n

CRONUU.A NSW TElEPHONE ~230211 1'1;U"GRA"~ CO~! '•RCH CI!ONUU.A IN I!EP\.Y P((ASE

Y001111£f:

QOOrt::NJ3/5

April 27 , 1967

The B,ydrographer, R.A.N., Im! !uilding,

Kent Street, ~

U.F.O. REPORT Enclosed ie a eel£ explanatory letter and report from Mr ! .J . Ditoher, Third Officer of M.S. Seaway King.

L~-~ fl_ '

~

(G. F. HUMP1fBEY) Chief of Division

o.c. Mr B.J. Ditcher, M.S. Seaway King Union S.S. Co . of N. Z. Ltd, G.P. O. !ox. 534,

/

--~·~.

..

·~

./ ""'

~ey

6'}

tii·\Y

YDN ""'-z-

,

COioiNONWEALTH SCI£Nllf'IC AND INOOS'TRIALMSEAI!CH OIIGA.NtZATION AUSTRAliA

I

w -~

I

,,\

''

· .,../

..........

I


"•

m. s . "Ser"'"Y l<"1nt: 11 ,

Unions . S. Co . of N. Z,, Ltd., G, .., , 0 , i3ox 531 ~ , SY!)"S".

16th i.D•U , 1967 . IIi OGd•lt

ce:::·-----­ The Representative.\:s~

c. s. r.

R.

o.,

SYDNEY.

Dear Sir, Please f i nd attached the report of unidentified flying obj ects seen by myself and my Bridge lookout on 5th April , 1967 . I appre cia te that this will 'be of hardly any interes t to you r particular branch , but perhaps you could pass 1 t on to someone wh o i s i nterested in t his type of occurrence .

Youl's sincerely,

}:#.

Tm'RD OFFIC3R.


r

U. F . 0 . REPC'RT

:.t 2130 hrs E. S . ":. on 5th April , ~967, three senarate and distinct cornet- like objects \'let•e see. ... D!l!le~r be:wine 2750 (true) from the ship . 'i'hey ·--ere seer. as reu ex'1"us .. trails , ::md ~·•ere a t an "ltitude of' bet···een 17° ~.1d 20° . T!1e objects >7ere movinc par~llel to the horizon, ane ~ere vis~ble ~or about 25 second:; . Their ~ ... _ ~..;-e: •• ~. -o·•o.:. Je •• t ~:c.l·~· ··r 1·th i" t, .1 the:; i'aded !'rom vie-;-, after nerging oear~ng 025° . ""hey \';ere rnoving at great speed . At the time of observation, I ~as on the con,ass plat~orm and able to ~ ake ~ccurate bearings . The ship ' a position \7as 41 °32 ' S , 148°44 1 : : , course 1!?7°, speed 16 1~not s • .leather conditions - wind S x :1 1l.J. knots , sea slight , s;·:ell 1 o,l .. , sey ' cl~ sa , ' 1 1. ..,w -v c ...... .:~,. ~·ood , • ·..,._.....o., ._ "" -~ · .,.. '·~, ·) , u-~"e \..L.L .1,.,._ 54° • The incident r:as ''ecor lt::d. in Gl .e s! .~-:.. ' ::~ ::L ... ~ • _,, u::. ~bserved by myself and Able Seaman Johnson (8ridee lookout at the time . ) . J .....

..,__

_.., •

:

#-~~~ ~u·

".

DITCrER , TRBD Ol'i'k'ICER, ' . S. "SEA.''Av KI:~G"


...____

J- ..,

..,.

ROYAL AUS TRAHAN AIR FORCE TELEPHONE: 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND

RAAF TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS : " AIRCOMMAND. MELBOURNE/

IN P.m.Y QUOTt

)/f.

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOU RN E SC1 VIC

y•

7)

' 1967

ur-ID .... NTIFI:::D :'lYING OBJZC1 ... '}"'~ICI::S

+ .J.}:Y,....... -

1. Forwarded herev1i th are reports on Un-identified Flying Objects as follo·.vs :(a) group of reports and covering letter f~om :!.J~r..b Saucer Je~earch .::~ocictZ~· , .A!lE!..I'.IDZ; (b) re~ort and colour slide of invest i gation of sight i ng in :i.A!.~OK VIC by'!ur J . 1i!~;:!HEAD :

Australian

(c) report on sightir..g by r..:r 11. F . CASEY . 2. With regard to t!'!.e sightin_,s nt (a) , these C.J!parently have not 'teen i!!vestigated by Rll:' auth;Er · · es but only by the civilian organisation.

c~ "(.~~ (E . lL

1t..Y)

ling .::o.mn..mder For Air Officer Coilllllt:.nding

Encl


:llJJfl The Australian

.a.-

. ,Flying Saucer Research Society, Adelaide. Add r~<

oil corre•pondcn« to Ihe

H ()-.:; ::.£CRETA1t\', OOX 1-1.5"' G.P.O •.<lOEL,IDE. SOliTH " :STRA LtA. \~ Orld wide I U('Ci2110o V.ilh !lmifu r=areh &rouPS aflili:ll~ with C.A.P.I.O. -\usttali.t and ~.I.C.A.P. Wa.\htni!IOI

O.C

30th April, l9 7 .

De nx•

Sir ~

I u .. t apologi se ·or the de lay in sending on to you the ~'ollowin • l '<:i.t-Oril l'n·m , but it Wl<es a little tioe to get ul l the people

to ether . rnere ,aa also u tape an1 the peopleconc erne~ spoke a ott th~ enginos of the ...a!S tnut s t opped whib the object \las ln the near vicinity . <1.: I as ... n Jd.rcre\ dw· i g tne a1· and 1. t us ben I as in Ger nl n . A . 1942 that I saw for the first time on unusu&l c r aft and rr • t tl e on ! havs ooen ver r interested ~ n t e suh,1ect of unido'lt11' ied o't>jocts . It wes ond.erful news t'or 9 en 4 'l1e subject a ro g t !'or lll·d in the late t'or ties .

I ava in y posession man.r report forms and tapes Qf rso'lo l int.et·v·e th people ho ha•1e si~ ted '3UCh t ln~s! .. have lecture1 ell over ....uatralla and appeared on ":V ~adio and tne press . I e.1n telling you 1 cbuse I ~auld like to put all he evidence to your ...erG'ice u.s con~ider t'le time is More than Ytri~ht to p tt the sto •y t'l !• 1'11 c . ':'hera cn·a man rood m&c·Eazines t'rom otner countries (nd 1 o., sUl'e uu ar·o u SNJ of tnj s t'ac t as the F; . A. A. ~ does koo p u dos s.i.er on ~ne su'l)jec or U. l.<' . O•s . I have discussed th ~;~ with memlmrs or u;r l1nent , i t' ou CHr a to make some arral't'Jments t'Ol" "'e to brlng the r•eport 1'o1·ms and tapo to b9 studied £-<nd to take copies then 1 wo tld onl ':lO too pleased . y enthusiasm is not fanati a al but tne evidento is ovs1• helming

ond I feel s ould be looked into correctly .

'iours Plli tnfull/f~a.~

Co,.+;Ln ~rrise'l't; .:/, ·~ QUARTERLY MAGAZINE "~Itt o-Juotratl~i~l¥'"~ ~11':& f~~~~IJ . ·..-


AUSTRALIAN FLYING SAUCER RESEARCH SOCIETY

ADDRESS g r( .... o~c.o "-"../

P•

(1,

v~

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~

<:..A .

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Direction

~~

U-. ~ ·~ /

A.viJ?

3o

was object from you?

o~ect

was moving

!J .___

1~ ~ ~

&<.

~)~A

(~~ /J..f

'

Date and Time of sighting

I& 7

'

,o

a· .J o -

.

angle EBWhat )0, 0"'

ll

c;~L

Size

.

I ?~.(0 I)~

Could you estimate speed of object?

~~ ~-. Witnesses: /}IV

.

1

o

was objeot above horizon?

{if) S'o

5Dv i H

{-JOA.I

~<

~

1..-._, -}

(;AST

t3)

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6)

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Where were you at the time? l-lt£..L..

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a. I I - - -· L . . ~~-

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rJ<> ('1.)

OCCUPATION 1-\ {;.(

Use additional sheets if neosseary and

);~. ~ • *" ~ .::.-

'"'j I. ~ ...~

,.,

AGE

C.,(

oA. o

Please state briefly what you saw . draw a sketoh if possible

lJeCI)~

File No. Claesifioation

wll..l..tA"1

Names .., ,., I

T

1-1

1

J.Ax._ Shape

Colour

t, s~·

~~·

AL k-

C)"""-

~-

What was the weather at the time?

~.

c

.c;...............

Address.ea 2&f

1"1 ()<,

{..

0 \..AJ

C, I

P•n<JFLD.

Please give any information yon have of anyone else who may have seen the objeots.

What were your personal feelings at the time? j.,....,..k w-.~

r~

I give the above details to the Australian Flying Saucer Researoh Society, understanding that the Society shall nct/~blish them using/~ my name . 11.. '{4, c;.;;:::v.J Signed

~4 .~J ~. Date

... ( &J j..~J::

/6 .7...............


f. ---~-

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--(

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File No. C:!.c:~:;ificatio:l

ADD?..ES.,

OCCUPNl':OJ;

Addresses

e?

+~o

.1••.:.. t:rali n :'1 lint; 8~! jm3y y~bli~h

Date

Sauc

t.cc

!"

Rat~ :J.rC11


:'.. le !to . Clc.... ~ir:..eatior.

I"'""''"" briefly ~~a~ you saw. d=aw & sketch if possible

P:c~~d sta~e

Uce

\.~

,_ J

~ \ l\l..~,\..U.l...!. -;'"\_ 'I

:.,.u)_

<.,

'j

Date 拢nd Ti;:e of

Direction object

ob..~ec'l.

~~3

!':-om you?

moving

SiZ<:l

i~at

~\..

s1.g~ting

l.

r.".r.s-: d::.:-ection was

"'

t .::0

,.J.

L'-.

\l. '-'-

an&le was object above horizon?

I

Colom-

Sba:p..

l

Could

j

ou .:st.lltaloe

spat~Cl

of object?

Witr.esses:

What *as the

at the t i me?

~Ta::.es

,_

'

0

Please 6i v~ e.."''.y info::'JJU:.tior: you have of a.:1;rone e:sa w!:o

~~4"

~eatner

re you=

persc~al

\-:~y

!'.s.ve seen the

ob..~ec .s 路

feclincs at tne time?

! t,-iv"' the abc'le detu1.ls to the Austra:.:.an Plyi."lg Sa:;ce:.路 ~esem-ch

Society,

~.d.rst~dir.g

'l:.sir..g/"O::!:hl::olr!!~

tt.at the Society

r:::; ~e-;:;.

~hell not/~ ~~blish tr.c~


File

no.

Cl:~.oJil'ica-:ion

t.:JD?.:ss _.-_ 11.' V t rfi'V

~~

fl._,..-t\"'"•1 ("'6H ~c: IV <.), ..... I

OCCUP A.':ro:;

(. ~u ,.., 1'>"'\:,;v

)-lo~sc;w, r::G"

TT

:J&te a:r.d Tit:~ of sighting

~~ere ~~re you at the time?

It:.-'+- b 7

St1TiN'7 ON ("·!?~l+CJ! Gv~f!.J..r.£-"ONCj 5u6 t .S ~ C..O~i;,/Ai" ~

9-15'

\·.....at ~:-.gle ;,_,. o~ject above horizon?

~~at dircc .~on ~aa object fr~ you?

StlZ•-11£711".- LIP. ~ ... ;;- vu£J.,L JIJ r v~o· fJ 'rl.f.€ S. ·~'"' ~r. c:Sha-pe fX/i(j/.4

Colou::.-

13P..tC,tll otMtJc;t: Could you €Gti~te spee~ of objec~? i.;C, Bvl ,,- HciN?I) F/1Nrll$1,c4J.l.'!

Fh:;;-• "

Qr,.tt(/.[

HI!(.

.e

!!C:.ti>Jf), lf)P HNJ...l=

t.PJ~II~IV

;,'hat •,o~as t!".e ....·... ather at the ti~t.e?

I

rJN£

~'I[ "-?11 ...-... s.eJ?tv.JfiV_,..,(!.cfl_.j'.:r ,..,f;" .~.. -1 ii'_ - I

;iame:s

'tl- v.lt:S.o~~S: /-ff

Prt

AC.dxesses

;J-el S ~~ Nl).

f}.fsoih:i

Please if... ve any inforr.:ation you ha·.re of a."l.yonc else 'l.'hO CJ P~t!.t;.oi\J.41d..'j I0LO NC: A-

#JNI K/JCI•v ,..,

C,C'/).lrk~IY"'N

t.vrtCJ

Oil;£

rF/I.oll

'""r~nt wcra yo"JX pc:rso~.o.l fee~ings e.t the ti!!le?

Oc-n...:z

Sce~cty,

'7>cd-.

a-U {;;;;;

~o

unde::-atn::Cing th&t t .. e,:ce.:da-::; 5

/3WT

fi/W>

/Iff

A-~'o

:1ar-.tc.~­

~~

. .-

we.--;)

~

: give the above deta.i::.s

"''''"'""""'~""" "" ""'•.

Cllt1tvCC

have seen the objects . "

J WCV:J cr.-L..-:J~~ : .~1~ ~" c9 '7»d ~~ b~ co-J/ia(&.d.

r/3z.:ru-.a/.cu, 9 IJ~ed!4. ~/fo ~ d 0'~

!LlJ.:f

SJ,"V .;-

·~

the

f.•.urtreha~

Flyir. · Saucer P....ace.::-ch

s~~{j/L~:A.y.:bli ..h /'

9 ~-- 11 -(/a. ~to

the:::

/7

~-

/

:.C

-'f-·

bl


. ...4

..._

Could you esti mate 1}11)

e~ed

of ob ect?

~~ ~~~

\.fnat "'as the

"'eath~r

at the tiloo?

v~楼41c~4~do

v

Please give any information you have of anyone else 'WhO may have seen t he objeot s .

Wnat were your personal feelings at the ti~e?

Mt-

~ ~

P~

~~~att

fi cer~"tt-cd

I gi>a the above de~ails to ~e路Australian Flying Saucer Researoh Society , unde:r3tanding tr.a-; the Society shal:. not./.;;.. y p..1b!iah thee ~/wi. thholdins r;.y n=e. ~ ~ /'0 ~. _ Signed ~~

-r:-

C C:::

Date

/9'- q

-9


~

FLYING

SAUCER RESEARCH SOCIETY

Fila No. Claoaifioa.tion

NANE

OCCUPATION

J>,Cj _'"DuNf\J

C:t?t1'Z Itt~

Date and Time of sighting

t~ · 3,t.) What direct ion was object from you?

.f

ov

j{~ f't:v~ f.-

\.Jha~

~ j>-l.f:>.,-l>M.

angle ,.'S.s object above horizon?

/-r....~._... ,;{~ k'·'t!.A · jfv.fv.,:;fVhf /'v..W>SJ-

'

Direot¥on oyject was moving

(/1/ f"'Jf'l, Could you estimate speed of object?

\o/hat was the weather at the time?

I

Ntl Witnesses:

1v~.-

-

. v( "rv. ~fvf. ~0

Names Addresses

Please give any information you have of anyone else who may have seen the objects .

What were your personal feelings at the time?

'1(l :tL trCr,f. 1/IN,-...:; e{/{;t;.,lv_'v. WoN./ A.j ,V;il.;f. ~

,d;·v.. ~ t\. .1~.>1/\/f

I give the above details to the Australian Flying Saucer Research Society, understanding that the Society shall not/may publish them usir.g/wi thholding my name. 0.

r

Signed

...

/

,

YJ{/AJ~ , . . . . . .. nate d.~.l t?}.vr.i L.) .· . .


File No .

Classification

What direction was object from you?

Wnat angle was object above horizon?

/'/. /l/./Jf Direcoion object

~~s

CA.-~~

~~ I)路 If. /.) ..f~ "J.../

(J"

moving

4--'E/'1 ;f

Size

Colour

Shape

IU?L ,?;~

I

I

Witnesses: Addresses

Please give any information you have of anyone else who may have seen the objects .

What were your personal f eelings at the time?

, /_,/;C.t-A.. -/!;_~

/c:..C/ -fr,{;a,/',. ,d_,.._,

...'-tv<'/}~""~~,~

I give the above details to the Australian Flying Saucer Research Society, understanding that the Society ~..a:'i-'no(/~r.ay publish them using/~e,

路'-;! ......_._

Signed

~~~~.....-' Date

_,;;: f,. (t _,

7


File No. Claseifioation ADDRESS

NA.i'lE

--r.:........

~

~ .r-c.t\.

AGE

-r

-.

Please state briefly what you saw. draw a sketch if possible

"'3"....,..._,t- C..\c.~L

Use additional sheets if neces~j and

Where were you at the tillle?

What

dire~tion

Date

c ...-.de.-,

?ctc:...\:.c.-ewl"'

OCCUPATION

1\..c:,\""-'oi 1<...:: '-.\,.·-~>'

X 'r

.... _ ··-····

..3 -

~~d

Time of sighting

1r - <. r

"J

~

1

s ?

r'l

\•/hat angle was object above hor izon?

was object from you?

/C - IS

Direction object ws movinc S~c.\,._~C:' I

bw~

"'(.)"' ~r

•''J ".;,1,~-..\ 1

l

Size

Colour

it"'~' What was the weather at the t i me ?

Could you estimate speed of

<..-k..:.- .:..

Ct. """

Witnesses : Addresses

~..;..~;:..-

( .c

"'?e-6-k.-..~~~

Please give any

informatio~

you have of anyone else who may have seen the objects .

What wer e your personal feelings at the time?

,...

' ·"' ''

"" "" /

\Q~oc.c..\

<:

•o --~\ , eo,

I giva the above detnils to the Australian Flying Saucer Research Society, understanding that the Society sha±l-not/may publish them using/wi:thho-~ my na:ne. (";:\ Signed "~ Y'-L \.~ ~~ ·

Do.~e

?- 1 - ~

:

6I • · · -


~U.IAN FLYING

SAUCER RESEARCH SOC:ETY

I

ADDRESS

x \"

R.~.\\-....;o.• lc...c.

) __l..::...-v-..

Please state briefly what you saw. draw a s~etch if ~ossible

c..-t.•

c.

'"'

...

C..\<::,..l_

Date and Time of sighti ng

C c.-.C;\ c.·-y

J - If- ~'hat

(, ')

6 's

c,f

? ,.,

angle was object above horizon? IC - IS

Di rection object was movinc ~\u.\•c~c~1 b~ "-c~-:.- • 'j "':.\, -.\!

l

Size

Colour ftc.<..

-~~.:..

Could you estimate speed of object?

What was the weather a t t he time? Lk.c.- ~

Wi tnesses :

Cd'"'

Hames Addresses

..:.....,~"'""" C;

0 .......... ()-

~se aaditional ~beets if neossaary and

L.... '-~t

c/o 7

OCCUPATION

1'1

~

What direction was object from you?

"3"c~......

Claaaifioation

AGE

•,.'here were you at the time?

Pc.

File No .

. ('. ._ c ~c.r ~-~.\j" I

Please give any information you have of anyone else who may have seen the ob j ects .

\.'hat vera your personal feelings \....Jc....

c..c....\

\'..... ~

c-..

1

.:lt the

\~,c.c..\

I give the abo,·e details to Society, understanding ~hat the Socie~J using/•ont.hhol~g T11Y name . Signed

time?

ctr·-. . . ~\·e--~he

llc...

Austra:!.ian Flying Saucer Reaea.roh publish them

ah~ot/~y

, ~ ~"'\... '\"\(..~. V \: j ~(..\/" Date

.l. I

-

~ -__(:,I •

• _ ...


rJ-:PORT 01.7

J\SRJ.AL OBJECT OBSERVED

lifuJ.I.. ...<fl1~ r ..........Age •• :$$."•. Ob server • •• •fJ.J•••\.I.Q.J;:IP.(Qil.J, . DRl n:: ....IY.~ TIN~ •• f'/JB.(

Noma of Obsorvor •• •"f.t:.ltN •. •

Address of

Oooupation of Obeervor • • • • . ,., • .IJJ).C/~. ~1,/(f:; • •

....................

Date and Timo of Observation (Time to bo given in local time)

; •.. •.• .•.•.•.•.• .I. P.; 1-1,;.6.7.................. ....~ : h$: .. t>.H.. ................ Duration of Ob sorvation(s) • • • ••••• • ~• •J:t/Nf/1.~$. .. . , ..••. • .• . .•• . ••.

6.

Observers Location at Til:le of Sightins (Givo details of own _ posi tion by map refere nce . /1.f..'111./i.• /i.'~VJ:. .• AI)Il({~;;_s .. . ... . . .. . .. . if ~03aiblo, or by kn~"'':'lr

: ••4N.T.Eo #.I\ ~f. . .tii... fA!}~ . • P.f.. ~'If~ ... :~~~~~~~ ..... .... ..... ..... .. . Weather Condit i ons at t irne(s) of observaticn(s) •• • .. Fll'IK .. .."; ..t;.J..£1/R.

.......................................... ............ ....................... ,.

8.

Aida to Obaerve.tion(s) . ,..

,

(Describe aey ec:;.uip~nt used in the observ<:.~ion)

•••.•• . •. . . •. ... .. . ... . ... NA 1J.~ •.. . .. •. •. . . .... •..• · · · • · • · · · • • • · · · • · • · • • , · · · ·

••••.• ...•.•• ••. .. ...•.• •. .•..... ... ... .•.....• .. .......•.. ...••.. .. •... ••..• .. i'lhere was object f irst observed , eg, ovcri:cad , c oming from behi nd a bi ll , ove r tbc horizon : e~o . t-.. JA~o-r-iV

fill£ A ""

•••• • ••••••• • • • • • ••• • •• ••• • • •• ·'~'• •"'"\> ') ,_,,~,.., . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .

10.

'tlhat f'irst attracted observer 1 a at tent ion , e.3 light or noise •

•... .. ... .. . .. . . . ... . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . h~ ~."!':( .. .• •••. .•. . .•. ...... ..••. •..• •.. 11 .

Did objeot appcnr a s a liglrc

Ol'

as a definite object •

.s r. ........... .............

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • ~ ,r;, . .... •JT... •~/ ~. 12.

-

If t here was mor e t fum ono object·, h0\7 r:1~1~J' \';~re t her e , and w~at _ was the~ f ormation, OfVI....y ON£ OI!>.J"Ec...T. U IVTI.I, 11 Al'~cAI!c O

..., ., .• ~~ .• ! .~~ ..'? !'~~ . .'.1~.'Y.. ??'.~~~.. !Yf.1Jr. .. ~f."~.~ . ~ . f!fl.~ ':-~~ . .~f. . •• ~: 7.~ .1 Wbo.t was t he c ol our of t he l ight or ob,joot( " ' .. .P.<tS~f.. .•C~Ji~Fzl:m..

uuat

\'JE:.S

Pas any

n'

1'1 ~'"fD(lC' r )vi'IE l?.ouNn RE.tJ•w 13Ui ~. • • Y. 7 • • • • • • • • • • T • • • • • • Y • • • • • •

U NlVti"'N 1'"/IE IDP ~"''..,r• / •l~ .ll. · ~ ~~ P• .••IA1I.. det a1. l of structure observnble • •. ~~r ~ • •o•. • •• ON 1/(t:: .J..ow;;J!. H IU.. • o.f- o~v£ ~~oli

its a.ppa:rent ShC.pO • fZ • ~. :\ .

III

Was any met hod of propulsion obvious •• .•• Jvo• •••••• • •• •• • ••• • • ••• • •• VIas there

an.v

soun_d • • • ••• •• • • • •• • N

{). . .. .. . ...... . . . ... . · · · · · · · · · · · ·

Height, or angle of clev:\tion•• ~l.f..APfJ/iQI<.t. o. . .hl!.lf•. ft.f:C/1-J.. 1/l? It• t;AST. Ell• J.. 0 tJ /N /I'll? ~>f.: Speed, or ~ular velocity • .• • . • •V.. .. .

f ... ... ....... .. .. .....

20.

\7aa t he objoct stc.tio!U\r,!? •• • . ~!).. • •.1!9• •• ~tH~..Jo".. .. •Y.e~ · · · ·· .. •· \'/hat was t he direction of flictt po~ts of t ho oompasa•

\7i"t ..

r .. ~ .::..•,:- !J;;;.:. to l ;mdmarks or

•• . •.. !:.'if.t:~/tf-0)... ..•.. filfl'l•••. ••. •..f711. ft.~'Y.~f.·· . . ; . .. ..... . ...... . .. ... ~ ..

. . ./2


: Did

th~

cbjoot

ro~~n

on

~ ~traight

p tn , deviate or manoouvro

1\t .:~11? ..-

2).

Was any trail of o.xhaust, vnpour or llght soon.

0

("l

.

••• : ••••••••••••••• t.'S !f.N'wP••• tc-.qtfN'?•• P.'V. Ilf{• • vf'PT. ... i?ft:_?y•• • r; IA1Gi1Jr auT tJilt:7l SE)'J •• •••• ••••• •

A/.Q. Jl:~lf...,,. ~~.Z" . {1/f:.19 PJ0c..«Ke"""1J

1/hero did object disappear, os in mid- sir, beilind a hill over the horizon. '

.......................... .0 Y.t:;!;f'J.. ••• {({{. ••• •~~ ~~ff.~. 25.

/itl.tf...

ru "'"~l.le

J.

SN IAfH/i IZ.

.....................

~~stance of nny physical evidence such as f r agments , photographs ,

or other supporting ovidcnoc .

•····•·························•••··············•·· ·························•·· Have you observed any unusual phenomena provi ously ••• •• ~.9........ .

26.

If so , give details of inoidcnt(s) ••••• •• • ~ •••••••••:::• ••••.•••••••

28.

State any c>..~orienoe nhich enables observer to be reasonably certain about the ans\"lcrs give11 to 18 and 19 •

• iA.uqNt •.11/VY. .&; J(./!~l?.t~ NrV. ... &I./I. 'f~tr. li~~IJJ.@••~{(f.;:~a ..lt#.C:. , t(q~ .IF /.JP/JffMt""l cO HG.

29.

_\rc you a member of any orsanisation interested in aerial phenomena?

NO

-

••·•••••••···· ····· ········•···•••···•··· ·· ···•••••••••···• ··••·• ••••••···•·•· · 30.

Nama and Addrcas of

org~isation ••••

• • ••• • ••••.•.••••• . ••• ••••.•. •••

•··•••••·•··•••·· ·•· ····•··•··••·••·•······••·· ·······•••···•··••·•·••••••·••··

. 1 . nf t. c- n, . -n.'r ~6 n 2uii.JJ:.IIl)C /.....1 l"lf Any add J.·t ~on~ ~ _o~m:' :-on•• ·· ~-'TN:~~~···~ ·· .,:·:'"··· ···~·~·····•

I

31.

I of

.)t-. ••PJ.AtVJ; ••• 70 . ('P.H./N.<). 1N.~r.Q. ~1.-fiNa~ .. .;(ti.~: ~ Mf.~a: .~ Tl#:"'. .. ~ffleo . -,t10A l . r, ¥.\I •• /')A/ y.· r •

roO/ /JNrl M()l/6"1/'iu -, ovc~• !l. /~€ . •'j"""~ET ; ; ••• • 'K.' • .•.•• • v. ••·. s • ••• r:. . . ..... .........

"If?! •• lt.t. ·f'Ylfi.~FI c r-"I:ZIJ

. :'r:;. ;!.".:•.?.:;.- •:;. ;.•.~:.C:;(.. .•.-.•..;•-·;.~. -.•. .;•. .;•;. .

Si gnat uro of Observe r.:•c.;•::..;. •..:'..c';.•;;..:c•..:•c.;•::..;. • 32.

Locntion of any air traffic in .sighting.

th~

•;..•

vicinity o.t tho time of

···•············································· ·•·•·•·•····••···•··••••·•···· •··························•··•·••···········•··· ··•·····•············•·····••· Location of any meteorological stations in the general ar~a~

··:··· ························· ················· ···· ·············· ·········:·· · '

34.

Conunont s •• •• • •• •• •• •••••• •• •• ••••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ·

······················· · ··· · ··········· ·· ········ · · ·······················~·:~·

·••·•·•········•········•····•• ·•••·•·•················ ··•······· ····· ·· •·•·•·· Signature

o~ I~orrogator

• • •••. • •••••• • •••

QUUffi'I ONS 32 , 33 and 34 to be answered by interros::~.tor . ~~

Since it is normally impo~nible to esti1""1te tha height and speed of a strange object, it v1ill usually IK bo"tter to endeavour to detormino the ;mglc of 131evation of the object , tb.o onglo through \"lhioh it moved , and the tir.~c t:tlton to do this.


- --::av

~~

D

Age: 16

L

ic~ of Observ~tion (T~~ to b~ ejven y "13C our~ en -n.lc;.:; 23r Janua.r

t

5.

lhr tion of Ob erv tion(~):

1).

0

20 minut

'

'I

~

Cb

in loc 1 i

rvet

-lto -~ 1·un

~'

3 °

t

~1

n:

i.d

'tr- Ob

J,'~

~

r ·rst

obs :l:v G:

v'

t ~~ a li with eorne sharP. .

t

Li

1:

t

t~

t w a tb.P colour of the li ght or object :

13.

r t -

nt rs could

o J ct :

A e

rr tl: '1D onl'l j t, b n:J Two objects ere obr:P.rv..d b

t

5

~tati.

""t

14.

- 1(-

'hat wae its arra!!ent shape :

shap~

Cl'f!scem

,~

t w "

r

"l110th I'%' .

Li ilt oro.nee. with circular eha; e to

let~ .

15.

Was any det ail of structu.-e observable :

16 .

•ae any cethod of 1 ro}m1Bion obviou

17 .

a

18.

t '.lre any

~1

H ivut , or

r

1 .

cund:

of

No . l o.

no l~v

.:r v lo

n

tion:

i y:

Approx~-t~ly

-.. it€

<f'...,

n of

lil)bt:

lOQ

l v ti n •

nt

o

t.

y

y

X"

'" rc i'

trs.ignt

1

ur, ur .! t.

n ly:

27 .

If

,

~\

d

~5

""U.LA" 3"

er1i t• n(FC): rc.

o .j

S, Lon l 6°

l:?C~~, .

aom

f8 ut

):

1Cii67.

£: .

L at Tire(s)

s.

r

aile o • .1.nc1 er.fk):

o.

u.

•.• 2/

~, .

1


- 2tat ~>

ny

exp~ri~>nce

the answer A.~

1./

hich enaol~ ob~orv ~ a~onab' y c r t lq snd 19. ot ai lie bl~ .

u a m~b"'r or any h~>n~m na: I o .

or~<uti ~tion

3(1 .

_l

interP

ot a Any additional in ·o!'!llatiou:

• "'bowi

' I

I flt1

t~d

in

a~ri

,

licabl • dir •t ·

I\ f/ It

0

c If F II

(J. JEl

~)

jJ


Loc ti011 of any uir tra;.'i' ic in tl e Vicird. ty 'lt tliq t nibllt i r~: .d ::. . Locdi n of rul,.V R.W' .Ji! .:.ll.l!; ) •

Co

ent~:

Ao~

t~orolo~ic 1 t tiona in the ~enor 1 nrra: eatht?r as _ r ..;.uestio~ llo 7 .

Li 1 of ei_ t :. ... a i's.irly accurat bearin.:;; o+' +.h first sightint;. Line of siert 2 ir. an ;prox' te bceri~ o thP IJotographic vie~.• It i~ considered th&t a ~1-oba.ble ce.u::lt\ of 'th~ 1- llnoa:nnon &An is tl:.e r~f·l,.ctr>l' lie;hts of ::. r to 'tl£ fro thP low cloud oase in the dir ection o' view. The v.riat·on in ~iT of tll<> cloud base could cm:.<~P. "";bo> a}.lpe.rPnt , OVflm<>nt of tbA light 6 urce obsorveJ •

.L~LfL;t I·

l7tl, ..pri'

"

, "' ......

o

t'l.i

"

o

:1.

- .,

' I

..,J u.t na11t

IUVP~tivut · ~ cr~ic~r


'-~


el ' •

L!X'.·1. ~·.

r:. qa,S!Jf • •. • •.......•. . ..• A~c •••.••..•

........ ... ....Victoria ... .... Observer . . ~~~~e.r. , ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .

server •. ?6~ II?IC~D;fl?!l }~o.a?-:-t }~o!Ci nnon. S. E.1 4.

of Obs,:rvo.tio:l ( Tit'lC to be givt:ln in loc~l time J

. . . • . . .. . . 1Q•.3P. 4..JI\• • . W~~o4~ j ~tl:l AP:rtl.,. '96~ ... .• .• . •• .... • . ...••.....

5.

Duration of Observntion(s} . ...1P,JQ.a•• tJ1 t

:to. , Q,40. , ,11)., . . ... . .... .

01servers LocAtion at Ti:.:1e of Sighting (Give details of o·.m 1 osition by map reft:lrenc-qn;r,• .J~qo}'?!'l$ .a.nP.. <A~n!l~~l.Y. ?ol!~e_,. ~~ Pal;ll.t:i!'t}.q. •• . if possible 1 or by known landmEO.rks) 6.

•••••••

7.

••

••

••

'

..

••

f

••

••

••

•••

••

••

Vteath.;r· Coi.lcii tions at time ( s) of observ<Jtion( s) .. .. .. . . . .... .

• . . fit}e. !iil1' ,V!'tf1 .s.l'-sh.~ .c;t9y4,, :VS'n: MM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ai ds to Obs~rv~tion(s) .

8.

(Describe any eluipwe:1t used in the observation)

No aids ......... ... .... .... .... .. ...... .............. ....... ..... ... ....... . .. . . .... . . . .. ... ... . . . . . .. ... . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. . .. ... . .

i'ihere w&s OJj~::ct firRt observed, eg ~.:erheadj cor:ti~ from behi nd a hi ll , over the ~ori zor.., etc .

9.

• • • 9~j.e.o: . 1!~s.

y~~ .h ~~ .iP. ~'1?: .i!l. ~~u.t~!X:~Y. ?~z:~c~~?~ .a.t. ~~ .a;n~~~ .o.f . ~P.P.r.O?=. 4~' . .

10 .

;,-~cat f::.rst "ttracted obse_:ri-.~ • s attent i O!:, eg light or noi se: .

.. . ~ ~~.

!l :~ ~

My attention was directed to the U.F.v. by a friend who first sighted it at

. • . • • . . • . . . • • . . . . • . . • • • . . . . . • • . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ...... . .

D:..d object appear ~s a light or as 'l defini te object . It appear ed as 11 a very white object or it could be described as a very white light about 6 i n ,d.il1111et.r.e. 9hen i n . fllgbt .i.t. appeared. .t.o. 'be .a.bout .6. ;feet J.Dpg .a.t. that. &reat. he!gtl.h

11 .

12 .

If t aere was more than one object 1 how many w~re there and wha"G wac their for~:"tion .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . 9~Y. .OP.'! . qb,j~~~ .. . . • .•••.......••. . ..•..• . .. . . . . t h~

1 3.

';/hat was the colour 0f

14 .

What was its appa ...·e~t shc:p~ .1\o.UJ:IQ..Ilt. f;Lt!lt.,. i!)~n i"llen .i.t. IJIQv.ell. oj,gll,:o

15 .

',?as ~ny detail of structure observable.Np, ,Ql\lY. fQI.\P$1 . .• .. ... . •

16 .

\7:.:.s c:.r..y octh()d of propulsion ol)vious . . f!o.t. ~~.f.i~ ~ . ...•. . . •. •••

17 .

'!fas ther~ aP.y sound . .. 1!~ . . . . . ....

18 .

i-ieight 1 or angle of elevation•. 91'}£\".lP. ~q .e!JHDla.d~ . q.tti.BJl~ll • .. . . . .

1'.:i .

s . . eecl

20 .

..o.s t.1e ooject :::t"'ti.o!:"'.ry .. s~~

21 .

Wh:1t w:::.s the direction of flight with reference to landmarks or ::;>c.int..; of the com Jass .. . Original •as appr oximately over

light or object ...Wbite .. . •••.•....

shape with no w1ngs or rwUfer

Uoorabbin'

1

. . . . . .. . . .. .. ... . ... · . . · · · · ·

or angular velocity . ~~e. F'!t><?x:t. 9~.b.aplt • . •• . . ..• . . .. .. .. . . ;re~xm:t.

Ptt .qss::\c • . ••. • • ••• • ..• • .•• •

its f light was t owards Port Melbourne where it di sappeared

;:: ·; ·· ···· ·; ·· · · ·· ··· · · ·· ·· · ··· ····· ·· · · · ·· ···· · ··· · · · · ~ : : ~·{~

c

c


AN:>'WER TO 18 & 19

fi st directed to the U.F. O. by Charles Poetolka My attention was r disturbed bv its presence that be called He was so " . b who saw it at 9·00 a.11. t his very close friend Jan Zejbrlik - w en 0 at ~ garage to point it ouedti t 1 ~ called me to have a look at it. Jan Zejbrlik saw it be imm a e " I was unable to offer any reasonable explanation and called on passers by to offer an explanation with out success.

However a±'ter observing this object for about 10 minutes I want back to my work and then tb.e men still watching cried out 'its flying' • I i mmediately ran outside and saw an U.F.O. heading towards Port Melbourne at a very fast speed, wbere it disappeared . I have given this UFO considerable thought and at the time I estimated that it disappeared in seven seconds. The approximate distance was eevel miles which sets the speed at 3,600 M.P.H. I have since observed several aircraft passing over our garage and they appear to be going eo slow that if you were in a burry you would be inclined to get out and walk. These are the names of those who watched this UFO with me . Charles Postolks Jan Zebjbrlik Jack Day Norm Jones brArneil lfiok Gilfoil

87 Darling Road, East Malvern 4 Druitt street, South Oakleigh C/- 649 Glenhuntly Road., South Caulfield II

II

11

II

II

II

II

II

II

II

II

II

II

"

II

"

It

II

PS If someone from another Planet saw one of our spacemen walki08 at about 2000 MPH and reported it, I feel sure they would be ridiculed in th way as most of us who claim to have seen these unidentified flying object:.aame


-2·· Did the obj "'Ct remain on o. s .._.. r:ng · 1l t .hJ:lth , dov" :">tc o.,., u:·woeuvrc "t 1.11? --~· • yath... . .. .. ... .. .. . .. ...... •..•••. • • • • . ••• . • Strai~t ... " .... . ..... . . . ....

.

.23 .

., .

~-;-.

Was r.n_y trai_ of cx!"J.aust, v a pou;;- or li~ht se~n . . )~o. . .

. . .... . .

. .. ..... .

l;norc did object disappear , eg :nid-air , be:"!ind a hl. l.l, the hori~o·~ . over

.. ...... .... ... .... .. .. ........ ...... .... .... .. . . . . . . . .

•.•. •. . • • , • . • . ~n. cloud over Port Melbourne

Zxister.ce of 1.ey ptysic:l1 evidence s~c:. as fragment s -;..hotogr·•phs , or other suppo~·t itog evidence . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .~1}. . . . . ........ . ... . .... . ... . . . . .. . .

25 ·

. . . .. . . .... ...

26.

Have you observed any unusu~1 ph~nonena previously . . . ~~+ . . . .. .

27 .

If so, give details of i ncident( s) . . ••. , . .N.U •••• • ••••••••.•••

28 .

St ~te any

. ....... .............. .............. ....... . . .... ... ... . . .. . . . . .. . . .. experience which enab1~s obs erver to b~ reason~bly certain about th~ answc:-.:-s 5 ivan to -;?aras 18 and 19 .

..............See . .. aneweres . ..... . .to.. 18. . .&..19. .on...back . ... ........ .............. . ...... . . .... .. . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . . .. . .. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 .

Are you

~

member of any organisatio!", i!:t erested in aeria!.

phe~omena?

....... ..... ..... . ... .No .... ... . .... . .... .... .. . .. ... .... . ...... ... ... . ... 30 .

Nar:::e and

nddr~ss

of

or go.~ iso.tio1: ..

. ... . . . . .. .... . . . .. . . . ... . . .

• • • • • . • •1!1.1• ............ . . .. . .. ... .. .. .... . ..... . . . ... . . ..

31 •

• · 1 1· nf orma t 1· on .••••.•See back r..:ry a dd 1· t 1ona .. ...•.•• . .... .. .•.••.••• . • • •

Signature of Observer . 32 .

;.tf6 . ::J:~ili1· ....

Loca ti on of ars a ir traffic in t he vicinity at the time of sighting . ~ ,., .L . :

........ . !(.(-;'-;-kr./..~-:: . ~· ~~..~ ..~f':';1. :-: . (~:. ~.~ «-<--. . . . .. .. . "' ..... ............. ....... ......... ....... .. ... ......... .. .... ... .


L~

MEM

AN DUM

AAAF FORM h~· • - ••• Sl

FROM

DA~I

-,

I

PHONE EXTN

7.~/

QC<A;;

c.o .o.

.. 0777


..

RESTRI CTJ!:D

__.

DiTELLIGniCE .. REPORT OF AERIAL OBJET

O~SERVED

(Opera tional Com<-end ASI 3/

11/5)

BEPORT :SY ODSERVER

ob~, • Jj~ •.•A..-.~~ . •.l~f.1!f..~ ...............AGE,.,tf.~ .... - . i"J.L.._;, _ AdclreM o! _.,se-,vor.t!f. • • f'~•:-.r.;.~' : ...{ ~.l!". y·•~•-::~ ~"'- ·~. • /.~ft'..:fi-.....~1{~'.-:"••. d. f .. •....... •• ..........~ONE•• • /.9.~ .(. •........

Na111e of

1.

t

...1

...'•\

2•

~~ •••~. ~~~ •.•• • ••• ···-•••••

).

Occupation ot observer••

Date and time of

Duration ot observation ••• • :~•• (f.~~ •••••••••••••••••••••••••••

observation. (~~.(//?. ••••••.{~~~-~--: .~~;;••••

6.

Observers location at time of siehting•• d~~ .-~'":

7.

. t'~on ••••• vt~Weather conditions at time of ooserva • ••••• •• •• • •••••••• .-r.. ._.

.......-........ ... .......................................Y.~.~.l. . f.!~. :.. __ ···········~···················· · ···,····················· ··· · · ··········

8.

Describe

~ aids or equi p.'llent used 1n t he observation ... • /Y~:} •..... ••• ••.u

·············· · ············· · ············· · ····· · ············ ·· ········~·

.... , ... 9.

~ ························· · ·············· · ······ · ················

WheN was object first o bs erved? a hill• ovor the horizon). (

10.

't!'-::1.

A-

1-

(e.t., overhead, ooming f r om behind

,

.4 ~ - CA-~ ~ ~..•.•.•..•..• /'1• ~1. ~~ ...•....•..

· ;~~:· ~ ············ · ······· · ···· (·~;~ -~

~;U' ~ ·~~-.. d.'7f.. -~. ~... .fr. ..'':::d..~~;(~ .. /h ~ ~ ~f.J. . ~. -~· .~ . ~.. :. ~ ....~t::~:-:t. ..-:;.~:<-< ~

/(;ri"attracted obsorver• s

~~ -~

Did obj ect appear as a

l ~ht

or

atten'\ion?

(e.g., light or noi se) ..

¥ ·

a3

a definite obj ect? •••••~··••••• • •

················•··········•·····•·····•· ·•··•· ·••··· ·········•··•·•··•·· ••····•········ ········•·· ••······•···••··•·•···········•·•··• •··•·•··••• 12.

If t hero was mor e than one object: ~ ( a)

how many were there? •••• • •••• • ~~ .~:: • • ••• • •••

• ••• •• •••••

(b)

in what formation ~ere they? •••••••• • ~•• •••· • •• • •••••••••••••••••

13.

What was the colour of tho light or objeot? •• • • ~t<~ · · •· •••••••• •• ••••

14.

Wbat was i ts apparent sh3pe? •••.• •• •••••••• • • ~• • ••••• •• •••••• •• • • ••••

1;.

Was any detail o! s tructure obacrvabl e?, ••••• ~ ~ ·· • • • • •• •••••• • •••••••••

..•/ 2


RESTR.!CTED

Wns any method of propulsion obvious? • • •••• •1~ .... .. ...... . ............... \7as tharo artY aou.nd? ••• ••••• ••• ••••••• ••• •

18.

19. 20.

1'1hat \Vas its height?

t. :.. ..... . ··•·· ··•••···••·•···

(or angle of alevl}tion)~~: . ·~ ./__...._ .1_ ~ .vr ~~ t.·~ - r~ u.., .....<:.. ~jl.; (or an.,autar valocity) ~ . ~.c••-:-;-. ~A. ·~ ~ ,_

· · ·• · -.,...

~HL· ..- .·~ ~~ ~

l'lh;:~ t \las its spee,Sl?

~~ ~ ..L.~ ~ t:; Ef.f'i

OL

/.G....,. ~: :_~· ~• .-';' ••'-~

"'

nJ .. ; -+~ ·~ '~ r;z-- ·'1--1~ ~ ..-~ ~ ~...was tho ob_Ject ate. tl.onary-?j-. ' ~. • ••• ~ .•• , ff..-=.~l· ,tl.~~ ..t:C...__......

,_._

:;::c;·:(···i ·· ...

~,... ~ ~ ~ ·~~21. l'lhat was the direction of flie;h_t with reference to Wdmarks 0 -j po;:{a " : : of tho compass? :,· "" .t...-...c.r~ .....t....-..1- r -4.. ~ d ,4. c.c~ ~ ~c: .•

tl._,.d c:~Ai( L.. .._...

.

#.. ~ ,....., /11 ~ - ~ ,-........,

.....................

22.

~

t:..

Did the objoct remain on a s tra ight path, dev!ato, or mano\Wre at all?

. .. h .. I.f. 7.2. ~.................................... ............ . 23.

-~

.................................. • • •

W<1s any tr; il of exhaust, vapour, or luh t seen? ••••• ('! \ ........ . .

ill • • • • •

...... .

................................. ... .... ............................... . •'

24.

( e . r.· , in mid-air, behind a hill , over the

Where did object disappear? horizon)

[i......- ./.- . ~ I~ ~ ••.•••••. ~ •••• .• •••••• ,,J • •• •. " • .• •••••••••••••••.••••••••••• •••• •••• Do you know of eJ!Y physi<T"} evidenoe? or other supporting evi -~tee)

(such as !ragmenta, phot o- graphs,

..•...........•.. , No ..... ~ ··· ········ · ·· · ·········· ····· ·· ···· · ······ ······ 26.

Have you obsnvcd any u.1usual

phenoc~

;J.'; ............. . ( s J •••• •· · ~····••••••••••••••••

27. If so, give brief deteils of incident

previously? • • •

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . f • · ~· . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~·· • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . ......,

28.

•• ••••••••• ••••• •• • ••• , ••••

St3to any expcrienc<J which enabl e s oh,.o1:'ver to be reason~-.... certain about the a.n3wers :;iven to 18 a.~d 19· ., I ... ......................... . ................................................

29.

Are you a mepu~r of any organization int erested in aeri~l phenomena?

. .. . . . . ."!

.,J• •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

)0.

Name and address of organisation ••••• ~;'A . ~

}1.

Jmy additional information \Vhich relates to the sighting.

... ....... ................... . ................................. ....................... ......... .......

.

.......... :t... . ... ........... .. ... ................. . ..... . . . .....•...... ............... ................. .............................. . ........... ~-

.. •

.. •

RESTRICTED

4o •

•• . . . ... .

.

.. ... ...... ..

. . ./ 3

-; 1


llli'STRICTED

-3P6RT S - UlU'l' EVALUATION 32.

The following military aircraft

~ere in

the vicinity of tho reported

UFO position at tbe time: .Aircraft type •.•• .. . ... . f'! ~

t................ .......... .............. , .....•

Headins•• , • • ••••• ••• • • •• •• •••• • T

• •••• • •.. . · • T•• •••• • •.•• • .• , • ••. •• •. • T

Heig.ht • •••••• • •• • • ,ooo ft . .. ...••... ... ,ooo ft . . . .. .• •..••.•••. , 000 ft Spocd, • ••••• • • • • • • • • K • .. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • · • · .. K. • • • • • •••••••••••• , ••• • •• K

33.

civil · The followinB"aircra!t r1ere in the vicinity of the reported UFO position a t the time: Aircraft type

1I .•• •....IV...... .• •...... ... .............•. •••.•••• •• ..•. ••. .

HeadinB• , ••• •• • • • •••• • •• T• • • • •••• • • . • • • •••.••• · T • • •••• • •• ••• • •• •• , • • • • •• T

Height .... ... . . , .•..••. • ,ooo ft . ....... • . . . . .... . .•• ,000 ft .••• ••. •. .. • ,000 ft S];)eed . . . .. .. . .. . ... .. .......... . . •• K. • • • •• • ••••.••••• • •• •K••• • • ••• • •• , • • • • K

34.

Calculations show that the following planets or major stars wore in that

portion of tbe Sky at the time:- •••••• • •. . •• • .• •• ••••••• • •• • •••• • •. • . ••• •

......................................................................... {'1k(:A

35. A meteorological balloon was f/IS-

at • •••• •• •• • • z

36.

~

'

..o

re~leased from•• ~·:'! . ~~ .•G ;: .-;••• •• ••

__ J._LJ - IJ:;./';A-

..___r-~

and~ eould

·

have been 1n the reported UFO

· ·

poslt~on

at the time .

The State Observatory in the nearest capital city affirms that aerial phenomena in thct portion of tho slcy at the time were

..........": !.~.................(comet,

meteorite shower, etc).

37. .Arty othor relevant r emar ks (e •.;., about S"".talites, rockets, rosc<~.roh balloons) • •.•• . ... • •.. . •. . .... • .. .. •. . . .. ...... . . . •. . .• • •• • •••.. •• • .. . . • • •

38.

......... .............................................................. . {'J I \.-

There is conclusive evidence that the objoct raported \'Ja a • ••• • • •••• • • • • ••

................................................. ............................................ ............. ................ 39. The object reported could h~ve b een •.. • f?~~ ··· · ··• ••• ••·•••• • • •••• ••• •

~~· .........................................................................

40.

The cause (or likely cause) of tho sightine canno t bo dete.roinod.

.~ .. ).~~. '.1....... . (Unit) L/ ••· · •·

a· ~ . · ·· .. . ... . .. (Date)

•••••

~ . •••••••••• •• • • (Nal!lo)

.....+..4

RESTRICTED

.......... ....... (Rank)


APPENDIX ' A '

TO OUR

6/3/4/Ah• ( 10) i?1 APR G7

r OdS ---------------· . . . . . . -.·--of Observ~r •• ~:;~~~~~ . r~,:~ !':'E . ~~~~~~~Y...

~ttVt;D

HEPORT ON AE.1I AL 03JEC ~

Niil'!e

1

,

2 Derby Street, ·· ;: ········· Addl•ftss of Ob server ...Lot ........ . .... . ... J' . E.-,~~·~;~;: . .. . , In.oleburn G.-.r~ " Occupation of Ob SPrver , "'otor • • , • • , ldechanic • • ••• • • , •••• ': • . , .,.,.. , ;-r... P.o rrn

2.

................. ............ .

r_;

J.

Date and Ti~c of observcltion (Ti~e givon in 24 hour clock 2000 qnd 2200 hours zonal tine)

4.

.. .... . .... . ....... . .... .. . ......................................... . 17 APR 67

~

('

5 ..

Period of observa. tion( s) •

,

??.~~~~;;~ . :?:?.P;!'~~~ ............... ..

0 .,

i:;...nnor of observation : (Give details of 0\'10 position by map r eference if possibV~, or by known la.ndnarks, u.nd describe any equipnen t used in the observo:.. tion) . Soe ::tt"ta.ched copy of Gregorys Sydney Street Di.rectory m·r~~d in red ~..: • • • • ( !lhOt~U1~· po~1 tiMJ ' of • hon~e · a.nd • ~li t'ection• H.~h t~ • si~ht"' l'l? • • • ••••• nal{eu eye ancl also viewed through binoculars ~~••••• e • • • • • •• ••••••• • •• '\ tttttt•••••• • • • ••• • ••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••

,.

••••••••••

••••

• • • • • • "'

•• •

:t • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

•••••••••••••••••••••• •

••

P. . g . overhee~.d , coninu fror.1 bCl1ind c1. hill, ovP.r the hor i zon, etc . Moved from the Nest , became stationary, moved off .,$1\)n tn t-1e R1,e1e · ~b · \fuc~.t fi r st attracted observer • s dttention , c . b . light or noise .

7.

'Nhnre \l...,s objac t first obser ved,

· · · · · ·seen· :rrom· 8.

Reti xm{ GrP.cn

or· about·

aeerees · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

and intP.rminJ?lin.o<rhts .-v ••. ._., , fl~Rhin1• •• , •••. y , li • • r •• ••• ,

•• • • •• ••• • •• • •••••• 1 •• ••• •• , ••••

9.

•••••••••••••

Did obj~ct c~.ppeQr as a light or as a definite object . intensity n-1.' 1'!. ~tar . Could not see throuc;h li~ht to "Scertajn

•• • • • • c. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

10. \lhu. t

I f there uc~.s nore thcin ono objP.ct, ho;1 i'\Co.ny Her e there, c:1.nd their forr~a tion . One object siehted at 2000 hrs. Two obJects sighted at 2200 hrs

'lu.S

' ' • •• ' Oh~' wa~· ti\l~ · M~~t · th~ ' b'lih~t:- · ~M ' C>fi' 'tt> ' "th~ ' fl~tJt • ~I')O.th ' fi~s t~ • '•' • •

,

.

.

Red , green , white and

~1tb~~c~~~u~~hour of the l1~ht or obJAct ••••••••••••••••••••••

11.

could not be ascertained Wha t 11"'-s its app<ircnt shape ••••••• •• •• , •••••••••••••••••••••••••

12.

••o•~••• • •••••••••••••• • ••••••••••• •• • • • • ••••~~• • ••••••••• • ••••••••••••

13 . •

Was •

.. 6 •

c~.ny dc~il of structur e observable •• ~? .......... .. ....... · ..

•• •

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••• •

• • • • I" • • •

•••••• •

•••• •• ••••

No 14 . Was c:~.ny nP. tho d of pr opuls ion obvious ••• • •••••••• ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • No 15 ~ ;l.J.S ther C' uny sound . , ••• , • • • , . • . • • ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ' about 20deg angle from standing 16.xx Height , or c:~.ngle of elevation . position~···••••••••••••••••••• • ••• . No idea 17 .;.;x Spe~d , or angular veloc1 ty •• • • ••• • ••• • • ••• • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

18 . State any experience \lhich enables observer to be reasones.bly ccr t""in ""bout thC3 ~ns•1er s ei ven to 16 tUld 17 . From his own judeement _ •••••. • • ~ . ,. ,.,.,. .,,":" • f'l •"••••••• <~~~~ • • •••*•••• • •••• • ••• • ••• • ••••• ~ ••••••••••

Sine~ 1t is nornally inpossible to estinc~.te the hcieht .... n~ speed of a. strv.n{;e object it Hi ll usuullY be bettor to ond~~ v l~ to dcternino the unGle of olcvution of tho objectt t~his 6 thr ou~h v1hi ch it uovod , c~.nd tho tina t....!con to cto •

- 1-


..

.. .

- 2~e~ort

19.

on aerial object observed (c?nt.)

Direction of flight wi iih reference 't'J lendmorks or points or 'the compass . ~oved off to the West from house. (See item 6 )

.....................·.........................................

2}.

~

Did' ·~he object remain on a straight path , deviate or manoeuvre all.

. a·ii

l\o• •..•••••• tr.:-il o£ exhaust , vepour or 1·Lg ht Goe n••••••

21 .

Was

22.

Where did objec ~ dieappecr, ovc::- tne hori?.-:>n.

23.

~xisvence

24.

\'/ee~her

~ny

in mid - air, behind a hill ,

of eny physic~l evidence such as £ragments , or oGher eupporGing evidence. Witnesses only : Shipman ' s wife , his neighbour s who a.re Judith and conditi:>na experie nced at time ( e ) or obecr vati'Jn (s) Slight Fog in the atmosphere

••••••••••• •

25•

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•••• •• •• • ••••••••••••••

,

•• •

•••••••• •

•• •• ••

Location of a ny .:- i r traffic in ·the vici ni ty et · the time of sighting. See attached report paras 11 and 12 . ( 6/ 3/ 4/ Air (1o) ,.

............... . ............ " ' ·························· ····· ............... .. ........... 26,

(# l!l ········ · ····ft················· ~

............................. , 2.7.

eta·~ i ope

Locatio n of any meteoro l ogi cal

l.h the· gcnore.l area •••

~ ···· · ·······~ ··

················

......... .................... .

Any additional infonnation••• . . (6/3/4/Air (10) ~

••••.••~e.~ .e,~~ql)~q .x:e.no.r.t•.•• ~ " . •. . .•••• •. ••••••••••••••.•..••• • • • •• • ........ !S::,~ •• ?!~ .· .~:x::;s: ...... ........ .......... .

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~ ········· . . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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.

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... ,.

~ues~ione

25 t 26 and 27 to be

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by i nterrogator.


A.P.PE~WIX

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t I E D A3 f2 FOR ATTENi JON DAF 1 AND SO JNTEL PD RE?ORT OF UN lDENT lF H D FLYING OBJECT AT 2~1l33 0L.

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THO POL ICE OBSERVERS

11'1 Vl i.JN lTY OF KlRRA BEACH COOLANGATTA PD SIGHTING

REPORTS l\S r OLl.0\•1 r.MJVT !IR JLL JANT toiH ~TE L l GHT CMM SIZE OF TwO SH J..L lNG P ..E Cf Ct1M TRAVEL!.. lNG IN NORTHERL Y Cr~!t-" NORTH WES TERL v D l REr- . ON PD INVEST ll~ AT . ON f0L LU\~ 1~1(,


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RESTRICTED

INTELLIGENCE - REPORT OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED (Operational Command ASI 3/~5)

PART l - REPORT BY OBSERVER

.'1'.

LA"IRENCE

t~t~ M ~ ••• •. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

AGE ••6 q ,&;q5, ••

1•

M Name o f ob server •••v:J;

2.

Address of observer Qq~~J;9~.~4\\.~1~Q~q ....~~~ ... ......... ... .

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f9~H·t.~4q.n~~~ )}9:lL~1.~~~q~q~ ..J'f~~ •••• PHONE .I!~c;~~t!<L~~1~ .. .

3.

Occupation of observer .~~~~!~~.~g9q~~~~., ..•.•...•.•..........

Date nnd time of observation .~Q.~~.~~ ... 1~~~~~ ............... . . 5 - 7 minutes.... .. ...... ........ . ....... . 5. ·Duration of ob serva t ~on .............

4.

6.

Observers locatj.on at time of sighting ~~~~~~Y. .~~ ••~~~~~~q .....

1.

Weather conditions at time of observation .~~~~l.~~~.1~~t.~~~.q~lm, i Sc 4000 iCe 25000 l ••QNH 1017- Richmond weather 1900 hrs ••••••••••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

6. Describe any aids or equipment used in the observation ••••..•••• No aids usP.d ................................................................. .................................................................

9.

Where was object first observed? (eg, overhead, coming from behind a hill , over the horizon). Overhead, about 75 degrees above the horizon due west

............................................................. ....

10. What first attracted· o'Qserver 's attention?

(eg, light or noise).

Lights ............................... •'............................... . ................................................................

11. Did object nppeQr ne a

lig~t

or as a defini+.e

objeo~?

••••••.•.••

... vr~~P . ~f.~~~~t~.i~.cr~~c~~~.~~~~Q ... •. .......................

...................................................................

12-. ·.If there was more than one object: 4 - 8 lights (a) how marly v1ere there? ...................... . .· •· · · •·•·· •· · · (b)

in what formation were they? .9r~~9~~~.~l;lf!-p~~.Hl1~ •.••..•.•

3. Vlhat was the: colour of the light or object? 9r'P)6~ •. YJ:l~g~l')B. ~Q ·blue

.4 . '.'/hat was its nppar.ant shape?. Qif~~y~:t;r~/.. ~H:PH9~t •~l}q.p~Q • .. • • · • · • ~ 5. Was nny detail of structure observable? ~ 9:Q~. ~Pl?f!-nrrL • • • • • · • • • •

RESTRICTED

..

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·.

RESTRICTED .,

-2-

.........................

16.

Was any method of propulaion.obvioua? No

17.

Wno there or~.y oound? .N.q ••••• • ••• , , ••

18.

What was its height? (or angle of elevation).~qqq•, .... ....... ..

19.

What was its speed? (or angular vcloci ty). }~q -~~~i;tJ!~t.~ •..••••.• No Was the object stationary?

....... ............................ .

20.

21.

. ........................ .

What was the direction of flight with reference to landmarks or pointe of tho compass? Due west

..................................................................

22.

Did the object remain on a straight path, deviato, or manoeuvre at all? Remained in a straight line

...............................................................

23.

Was any trail of exhaust, vapour, or light seen? -~~~&~~.\~~~~ ­ similar to that of a comet f

24.

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Where did object disappear? (eg , in mid-air, behind a hill , over tho horizon) Over the horizon

.........................................................

25 .

'

Do you know of any physical evidence? (such as fragments, graphs, or other supporting evidence) No

................................... ........................

26.

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previouoly?Y~fo•••••••••

27.

I f so, give brfef details of incident(s) .'!'.1.tJ1.e.s.s,e.d, [Ip.)...ey!P....

comet as a child ............................................................... ...............................................................

28.

State any experience wl1ich enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to 18 and 19. None

...............................................................

29.

Are you a member of any organization interested in aerial phen-

..

omena? , •• ~.o. , •••.•••••.••••.•• , , ••••••• ••••.••.•.. .•.•.•... · • .

30.

Name and address of organisation ••••••••••• · • · • • • • • • • • • • • • · • • •

........................................................... N/A

31.

/~y

additional information which relates to the sighting .

• • • • • • • ~,op,e, ••• •••. •• •••• , •••••••••••••••••.•••.•..•.•....

......................................................... ............................ ............. .................... RESTRICTED

. . . /3


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RESTRICTED

- 3PART 2 - UNIT EVALUATION 32.

The following mili ta:cy aircraft were in the vioini ty of the reported UFO position at the time zAircraft type ••••• (\/{ !-.. ••. :·••, , •, •• , ••• •• •, •. , , , •, ••••• , , •, •• , , Headinf' • •• ,,, •• , •. • • • •,. • • ••• T

Height •. .. ...• •. ...... ,000 ft

• •• ••••• , ... , . T • . , •• •• •• • , , , •••• •T

•.• . .... .. ... ,ooo ft ....... , ... ,000

Speed •••••••• , • ••• , •••••• lC • •••• • •II• ., •••• ••• , .K • • ••••••• , •••• , , •• •K

33,

The following civil aircTaft were in the Vicinity of the reported UFO position at the time a-

'Jf.~~, •... . ,. ,. ,, ,.. ,,, . ,....... ,..... ;. , ,,.. .

Aircraft typo., •• •

Heading • • , • • ,,.,,, •• , .T, •• , •• ,, •• , ,,.,.,.,,, . T•• , ,, , ,, , , •• • . • , .. •T Height ••••••. . . ••.•. . ,ooo ft •....... . ...... ,ooo ft ••••••••• • .. ,ooo Speed. , •••••••• • •.••••••• • K • • • , • • , •••• , ••••• , • •K •• , , ••• , • , • , • , , . K

Calculations show that tho following planets or major stare were in that portion of the sky at the time :- ••••••••••• •••• • ••••• ••• .J'y.,h-1-"y D~t:EKv/Jic.~y t;vhet{..JJ 1,/!,-, .... no AtL.

.. , ... -;, .... .... .... ..f••· ······ ··"' ··· ·············· ·· ··· .... .

35.

A meteorological balloon was released '...-

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at.7.>:,J[;: , .. z ahd could/ have beer in the reported UFO posi tion at the time.

)6.

The State Observatory in the nearest capital city affirms that aerial phonomena in that portion of the e~ at the time were ,Jy.b•l!j'_ C't.~l;:,;,.v ~rc,..!J ~~,;,. •.,r~.J 'c l'v.•,r.;.J 8 .... ·-r ·~ /"C.>.J·,~'{'/ !r-. : 'h-.r:(/':~!.••..••.. (comet, meteorite shower, etc). Any other relevant remarks (eg about eatelites, ros,ksts, ll ~/ "!';'"111/j;,_ ,- ! r .J.,·,-;<lr ;, .$"',-; -J 1"( 1 11(; .;.(· t,J ~ C. reeearch ballonne ) . ..,L'Ji . ; •••••••••••• , • • • • • •••• • ••••• ••• • • • • • • • • • • • C••,~,,t/;1. '"~~"'•'"' ,..',-;',, """"/ rr- -r'J/I n..__ /3r'Ti t/l'l, C'V~ / 3 t.-'4.S.id /t. /Ty l'r..f..•/,-C4..C...ITC, f

38.

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There is conclueive evidence that the objeot reported was • • •••••••• /'fo r I(,C' .,/,v

··· •···••··················· ··•·· •···· ···• ··· ··· ••····· ····· ··•···· ···· •· ····•· ····· ···· ····· ···•·•••······ ···•····• ·•···· ···· ······· · 39.

The object reported could have been •• •••••••• • • •• ••••• ••••••••••••

............................................................. . . /to;' I(,..,C\v,.../

40.

,

• •

The cause ( or--i-i-k*y-oauaG) of tho sighting oannot be detol'lllinod,

J

--

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1 II r.,/:'.1' /._ rv '

···· ·•·•········· •···· ·•·•··

h.t, •

(Name)

c·-' (',~-,-=' r(.."' (Rank) ···· ~·'-····· · ··············

t


Police Station, Goolagong. 13th tllarch 1967.

4t

Australian Security Intelligence Organisation.

S Y D N E Y. SUBJ~T:-

Reports of Two separate sightings of mysterious happenings over the Kangarooby Range, Goolagong .

* * * * * * * **

I have to report that it has been reported to me at this office,on Two separate occasions, by reputab le citizens of this district, of the sightings by th~m of mysterious happenings, in the vicinity of the Kangarooby Range, Goolagong on the same day as it was first announced that an orbiting satellite had landed in \'/estern Australia. The Two persons mentioned refrained from reporting the incidents as it was considered that it had no connection with the lost satellite, but upon hearing news broadcasts and from the press on Friday 10th instant, that Authorities believe it may have landed somewhere between Forbes and Gosford, possibly in the Canowindra district, and as these ranges are about 15 miles south- west of Canowindra, the strange sightings were then reported should this information assist you in your investigations. I am refraining from mentioning the names and ad dresses of the reporting persons at this stage, but would supply them if r equired by your organisation. The first sighting, reported to me on Friday 10th instant, was by a middle aged married woman, who stated that about 2.30 to 3am on the morning of the day in question, she had been fully awake for about 30 minutes and sitting up in her bed in a sleep- out on the western side of her residence, she looked out of the open louvred window and saw a large circular yellowish coloured bright light , on eastern slope of a heavily timbered mountain range on their property. The light appeared to be about one foot in diameter, and was about two miles distant from their home . She continuously watched this for about 10 seconds, then went outside the house and could see no It was a moonlight night and she kept constant watch for about 30 minutes, but there was no light visible or any movement at all. There were no persons in the vicinity at the time, the area is far too rugged for any form of 11 spotlight,'' shooting, and impossible for any vehicle to be anywhere in the vicinity. The second sighting, reported to me on Saturday 11th instant, was by a middle aged married man, who stated that about ?am on the same day as the first sighting, he was working a property, he became aware of an extremely long white- grey coloured vapour trail, in the form of a spiral or knotted pattern, generally in a south- west position from his particular location. He estimated it to be about 8 to 10 miles away, commencing 5,000 to 6,000 feet up and continued do,vn until 1 t disappeared behind the Kangaroo by Ranges. It descended in the form of a slight arc in a cloudless blue sky, there were no other trails of any description visible, no sound was heard. The t appeared to him to be about 18 inches wide and remained visible for a period of 5 minutes . At 7.30am on the same morning, this person heard a broadcast stating it was believed that the sa.telli te had desc Western Australia, but recently noticed in the press that it is and could have fallen within this area. From a comparison of these Two reports, the distance between the two sightings would be abont 5 to 8 miles apart.

-

\ /路,(?-

.

( . 路 \c/L /J;-f~, . R.F.Lup拢n. Senior Constable No.7317.


I

NAnONAL STANDARDS LABORATORY -DIVISION OF PHYSICS

UNMIISilY GROUNOS. CITY IIOAO, CHIPI'tNOAU:. N.&W rna>HOH€ 680~ TELEQRAIOS CORESUJ!CM SYDNEY

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U.S. AIR FORCE TECHNICAL INFORMATION

..

Thla questionnaire hoa been preporod so that you can give the U.S. Air Force as much informat ion as possible concem ing the unidontifiod aerial phenomenon that you hove observed. Please try to answer as many questions as you possibly can. Tho Information that you give will be used far "'search purposes. Your namo will oat be used in connect ion with any statements, concluaions, or pubtlcatlotlS without your permission. We request this personal Information so that If it is doomed neceuacy, we may contact you far further details.

2. Time of day:

1. When did you aee t he abject?

\0 · \0 frh ± lO ...,_·~ Ho~•

h....J...

..

Minute•

(Circle One):

P.M.

Month

Ooy

3. Time Zane :

(Circle On e);

4. Whore were you when you saw the

object~. W~ . '%~ ~·

~~~

~

Nearu t Postal Addreu

'

5. How long was abject in s ight?

City or Town

A1l C,

Store "' County

7-101'4

( Total Duration)

~of.. c. Not very sure

a. Certain b. Fairly certa in

. d. Just o gues s

5.1 Haw was t ime in s ight detarmined?

~

5.2 Was object in s ight continuously?

Yes L

J)

'<~

"tr. ~:7e . ..A

,

No _ _

6. What was tho condition of tho s ky? NIGHT a. Bright b. Cloudy 7. IF you saw the object dur ing DAYLIGHT, wllore was the SUN located as you looked a t tho abject? fCircle One); a . In front of you b. In back of you c. To your ridlt

d. To your le ft o. Overhead f. Don 't remembe r

t.,'..L\_ OAJl. ·, .. , - " \ ~ 1

.n ...

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~

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1 · "''" 9r'' •

tl"'r.t

FTO

OCT 61

)64

Th l• lou"'

•up• r• ed••

P '1'1') 1•4• Jul 41, • hlo"' I• ob• ttla t• ,

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,

X

Poo• 2

B. IF y0<1 sow th., ob1.,ct a• NIGHT, whot dod you notice co-c"""ng tho 5TARS ~nd MOON?

8. 1 STARS(Corc:leOr.., J: o. b. c. d.

8.2 M00'4(Circi<>Onel:

None .• • , A fe w Many Don't re membeT

o. b. c. d.

Bright moonlight Dull moonlight No moonlog\,t - pitch doric Don't """e mber ~

I'

9. Whot were the weather conditions ot

the time yO<J sow •he obj <>ct?

C LOUDS (Circle o~e l:

WEA THE 0? (C irclc On" I:

a. Clear sky b. Hazy

o. Dry b. Fog,

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c. Scattered ciO<Jd"

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11. tf it oppoored as o

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d. Snow e. Don'!

•' :!'O..,e.,ber

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c:. About the SO"'!<' d. Don' t know

br ightn~ss to some common objec:t:

II

c. Other ___________________ r.______________

One ):

(Circle One for ooc:h ques tion)

13. Did tho obj ect: a. b. c: . d. e. f. g. h.

.'

or light rain

12. The edges of the obi.,ct were: (Circ ~e

; ..·

fht: ,.

c. Mod!!r<>t~ or heavy roi n

li gh~, wcrs it brighter than the brighte~+ ~tors? (Circle One):

a. Br ighter b. Dimmer

11.1 Comport!

ni~•.

.,;

Appear to stand still n l Ol'ly time? Suddenly soe..O up ond rush awoy ot ony time ? Break uo into oorts ~o- exolode ' Give off smo;,.,? Change bright.,-:-s ; ? Chan ge shape? Flosh or flicker" Disappear or.d r~oppecr?

Don!.f Don't Don't Don't Don 't Don't Don' t Don't

know know know know know know know ~now

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Pooo 4

• Did the object dosappeor while you were watching it? If so, how?

a.-...A>~ ~ 5 ..--..::. ~ "o ~ I - '2- ""-", ~ "'7' - W::.. ~

., 15. Did the object move behi"d something at any time, particularly o cloud?

G;;)

(Circle One):

No

Don't Know.

itmovedbehtnd:~

J.AA ~

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IF you answered YES, then tell what

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16. Did the object move in front of so.,...thing at any time, particularly a cloud?

-'G)

Yes

(Circ:le Ono]:

Don't Know.

IF you answered YES, then toll what

tn front of: - - -- · - - - - -

17. Toll in o few words tho following things about the object: a.

b.

/), ,

l~ ~ ,..,A. • ' .. _._ • ~c;....,~ro·&.·~ .... • ..n.c..._ +: . - ·•l-~~ - ~ Sound ___ _ _~~~~~-~~~~~~~-~Jd~dd~~~-~~~~-~~~=:~ ,I ...--L ~~ .- \J~ J Colar------~~~~~~~~~1-~~~~~--------------------------------~ 1

.... ..':l

Au

J

-

_.,.J..,

18. Wo wish to know tho angular sizo. Hold o match stick ot arm's length in line with o known object and nate how much of tho object is covered by the head of the match. If you hod performed this experiment at tho time of the sighting, how much of the object would hove been covered by the match head?

19. Draw a picture that will show tho shape of the object or objects. Lobel and include in your s ketch any detail s of the abject that you sow such as wings, protrusions, otc., and e specially exhaust trails or vapor trails. P lace on OtTow bo sido the drawing to show tho d irection the object was moving.

.

.

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.

0

.

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-....----

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~- Do you thin~ you con est lmoto tho speed of tho object?

(Corclf! One}

@'

No

IF you onswerf!d YES, then what speed would you

estimate?-~ ... ~

21. Do you think you can estimate how for away from you the object was? (Circle One)

Yes

~ "'-- ~

No

IF you answered YES, then how for away would you soy it was? - - - - - -- --

23. Vloro you (Circle One}

22. Wht!re were you located when you sow the object? (C~<clf! One):

o. In the business $<>Ciion of o ci o. Inside o building In open counlrysi o . d. Near on airfield? e . Flying over o city? f. Flying over open country?

b. In o cor <CO"tdoo : :i:=> d. In on airplane (typo) e. At sea

f. Other---- -- - - - - - -- 24. IF you wero MOVING IN AN AUTOMOBILE or otho

g. O t h e r - - - -- - - - - - - -- IC'Ie at tho time, thon complete tho following questions:

24.1 o. North

e. South

g. West

b. Northeast

f. Southwest

h. Northwest

_ _ _ _ _ __ .milos per hour.

24.2

at any l imo whilo you were looking at the object? Yes

No

25. Did you observe tho object through ony of the following? o. Eyeglossf!s b. Sun glasses c. Windshield d. Window gloss

Yes

No

Yes Yes Yes

No No No

e. Binoculars f. Telescope 9· Theodolite h. Other

Yos

No

Yes Yes

No No

26. In order that you con give as clear a picture as possible of what you saw, describe in your own words o common object or objects which, when placed up in the sky, would give tho some appearance as tho object which you

w..-'1-e:~' ~ , ~

~ _.% ·


.,

'

..

l'·~ ,

27. In tho lollowin9 sketch, imagine that you are at tho point shown. Place on "A" an tho curved line to show how high tho object wos above tho horizon {skyline) when you first sow it. Place o "B" on tho same curve d line to show how high tho object wos above the horizon (skyline) when you lost saw it. Place on "A" on the compass whon you (~rst saw it. Place o "B" on tho compass whore you fast saw tho object.

go•

28. Draw o picture that will s how the motion that the object or objects mode. Ploco an "A" at tho beginning of the path, "0 "B" at the end of the path, and s!.v" .:.ny changes in direclion during tho course.

_/ !_'"!-~ f\y~

..-(, ~

~~a).~~ p"-·----- -,rj> . t .~

,.......n ..... -,.,o~ ..........

'

..,~~

~

'!>-< "l':.-

'e. . ~

29. IF the re was MORE THAN ONE obj ect, then how many were thoro? ~ ~ : Drow a pictu re of how they were arranged, and put on arrow to show t o di rection t hat they were traveling.


!O.

Hovl'

~ov ever Sof'n th is, oro somilor ab,oc l ~fore. If so govc doto or dotes and location.

(9-----·--No

- - - - - - · - --

31. Wos anyone else woth you ot the lime you sow the ob1ect'> (Circle One}

(9

31.1 IF you answered YES, did they sec the object too? (Circle One) 31.2 Ploose list theor names and addresses:

No

a.-..

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h....

Yv--

S.

~~ IA.,-f-.-A 2o ~

C.l~vi~

~ ~

·~

~ Ri~ (~~ F

TJ1

ltc:C

32. Please give the following information about yourself:

firsl Nomo

ADDRESS

7 "tJ ,·,r 011 ' <&r •

c~~_s~

Streot

TELEPHONE NUMBER

/5{ "3 0

Middle Namo

City

+\

AGE _ _ __

Zono

SEX

Stoto

~

r:

--!f"' ~.--

,

Indicate any additional information about yourself, including any spec ial experience, wh ich might bo pert inent.

33 . When and to whom did you report that you hod seen the object? Day

Monlh

""v-:1 ....... .

IW'I' -A

Year

-----..,

I.,...~ ~....A.~J

__ ·~ L.Jlr'.

A.


P•a• 7 -

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lh•~ qursrioMo~re·

D"ay

1 •

.,s.

Month

6?-Ye ar

odc~uot o 1Y coveroa-' on I he speer"II c points of the

Jnlormotion whoch you leol portonont "''d • l.ich Is not . • ., oro notrorovc explo.notoon of yo1.r sighting.

qvostoonno or~

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AIR FORCE TECHNICAL IHF

ATIOH

Th is questionnaire has been prepared so that you can give tho U.S. A1r Force as much information os pouib le concerning the unide nti f ied oeriol phe nomenon thot you hovo obsorvod. Please try to answer as many quut iona os you poss ibly con. The information that you give will b. used f« renorch purposes. Your nome will oot be usod in connection with any stotomonta, conclusions, «publications without your perm iss ion. Wo request thia pors onol informat ion so that If It Ia deemed necet&Of)', - m<1y contact you for further d etails.

~

-

2. Timo of dey:

1. When did you see the object?

Hour

-; Doy

,J'

~

Month

Yeor

3.

Time Zone:

...

Where were you when you sow the object?

(Circlo One }:

.

Neor..l Poatol Addreu

C ity or Town

c. ~o~ure d. Juat~ess

5.1 How wo1 time in sight determined? 5.2 Wos ob ject in sight continuou•ly?

.

P . M.

~sr .

Stole "' C o unty

vu __

Second o

Minur••

H o Ur •

/

or

3o

5. How long was object in sight? (Totol Durollon}

6.

A.M.

/JS~N

)

o.-=Certoin b. Fairly certain

Mi nu te"

( Circlo One): o . Daylight Sav ing b . Standard

Eo stem Central Mountain Pacific e. Other

(Circle One): o. b. c. d.

CflN -

No _ _

.

.

A~-r~

ff R..t:..A Pf~ro

What woa the condition of tho •Icy? DAY ..-" o. ~

b. Cloudy,/

NIGHT o. !U,j_ght b. €ioudy

7. IF you sow the object during DAYLIGHT, where was the SUN located o s you looked ot the obtoct? (Circle One): o. In front of you b. In bock of you c. To your right

..

d. To your loft e. Ovorho od f. Don't re member

~ .... PPo")E>-VI.'J LA1JT> , ~ ·


you so- the obof'CI o• NIGHT, -hot dod yov notice co-cNnong thl' STARS and MOON?

8.2

8.1 STARS ICrrc/e Orr): o. b. c. d.

None A few Many Don't remember

MOO~ rC~rclc-

o. b. c. d.

On,.J:

Brtght moonli11h1 Dvll moonloqht No moonloght - pi tch dark Don't remember

9. ",ot were the weather cQI'Idltl~s ot the time you sow •h" object? WEATHF.R (Corclc Ont-)·

CLOUDS (Circle O,fl!: •

o. Clear s"y

o. Dry b. Fop,

• •

-~

ni~t,

or light roon

c. Modornt-- or heavy roon d. Sn ow e. Don'! ro..,ember

c:. Scottere<f c:lovdc d... ~ic:lc.. c:oc ~..., c: 1-,uds

•• """- ..., ..- ~ ' Ci<-:le One):

d. As o l ight e. Don't remember

o. So110 b. Tronsoorenl c. Vooor

11. If it appeared os o ligh:, wos it brighter tho!' the brightest

~tars?

(Ci rcle One):

c. About the. sa'1!c

o, Brighter b. Dimmer

d. Don't know

11. 1 Compare brightn ..ss to some common object:

T he edges of the obie cl were: (Circle One}: a. b. c. d.

Fvuy or blurred L•lc• r briyht star Sf:aro ly outlined C:.r't remember

Did th e object: o. b. c. d. e.

Aooear to sto"d still nt ony lime? Suddenly soecd vo and rvsh owoy ot any time? Breolc vo into oorts !)I' e><o lode, Give off s,...o;.~ '> Change broghr-.-ss, f. Change shape? g. Flash or fl icke r, h. Disopoeor or:d r•opoeer?

o. Other - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - -

( Circle One for each questoon)

-i;J ) rs 'rrs Yes Yes Yes ( es

"Y~

No No No No No No No No

Don't Don't Don't Do,'t Don't Don ' t Don't Don't

know know ~now

know knov. know know know


Poge 3

â&#x20AC;˘ Did the object d is oppeor wh ile you we re wotc~ing it? If so, how?

,.., ..... I

'.

'-1 tv.te

N G-~ A r ~ 11t<??J

r

Did the object move behind s ome th ing of any time, pOI'ticulorly a cloud? (Circle One /: Yo~ ) No Don' t Know. IF you answered YES, then tell what it moved beh ind: __ __ _::________ __ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _--l

Did the object move in front oJ someth ing ot a ny t ime, porf iculorly o cloud?

(Circle One}: in front of:

Yes

No

Don't Know.

IF you onswored YES, then tell what

------------ ---------------------------------------------------~

, Tell in a few words the following things about t~e object: a.

/o r1

#IAJ.1Ht (1}(,. W

Sound~~~~~~-~~~~~~~~~~~~-~~~~--~~~~~~~~~~~~--~

8. We wish to know the angular size. Hold o match stick at arm's length in line with a known object ond note how much of the object Is covered by the hood of the match. If you hod pe rformed thi s experiment ot the time of tho

alghtlng, how much of the ob ject would have bl!en cc~ered by the match heed?

19. Draw o picture that will show tho shape of tho object or object s. Lobel and includ~ in your sketch any details of the object that you sow such os wings, protrusions, etc., and especia lly exhaust t rails or vapor trails.

Place on onow beside the drawing to show the direction the object was mov ing.

\


Pog. 4

you thonl. y ou con esto mo te the speed of th e ob1ect? (C

.rei~ Oncl

(5)

No

IF you answe red YES, the n what spee d would you e.stimote?

21. Oo you th inlc you con estimate how far owoy from you the object wos? (Circle One )

No

Yes

IF you answered YES, then how for owoy would you s ay it wo s ? - - - - - - - -

23. We re you (C.rclo One)

22. Where were you located when you aow the object? (Circle One):

o. In tho business sectoon of o cory? b~dentiol soctoon of o cory? c. In open countryside? d. Near on oirfiold? e. Flying over o ciry? f. Flying over open country? g. Othor ___________________________

:;:>

o. Inside o build ing b. In o cor c. @tdoory d. In on airplane (rype) e. At seo

f. Other----- -- -- - - -- ---

24. IF you were MOVING IN AN AUTOMOBILE or other vehicle ot tho time, then complete the following que stions: 24.1 What direction were you moving? (Circle One ) o, North b. Northeast

c. East

e. South

g. West

d. Southeast

f. Southwest

h. Northwest

24.2 How lost were you moving? - - - - -- ----'miles per hour. 24.3 Did you stop ot any time wnile you were looking ot the object? No

Yes

(Circle One)

25. Did you observe tho object through any of the following? o. b. c. d.

Eyeglasses Sun glosses Windshield Window gloss

Yes Yes Yes Yea

No No No No

e. Binoculars f. Te lescope 9路 Theodoli te h. Othe r

Yes Yes Yes

- No No No

_.__---~

路 26. In Ofder that you con give oa clear o pictur& os possib le of wha t you s ow, describe in your own words o cofTimOn object or objecta wnlch, w+ten placed up In tho sky, would give the some oppeoronce os tho object whi ch you


Pogo S

In the lollowong sketch, omogone that you oro ot the point shown. Place on "A"' on tho cutvod lino to show how high tho object wa s above tho horizon (s kyline) when you lust sow it. Ploco o '"6 •• on tho somo curved lino to show how htgh the object was above the horizon (skyline) whon you lost sow it. Place on "A" on tho compou when you first sow it. Place a "B" on the compau whore you lost sow the object. go•~:

28. Draw

0

picture that will show the mot ion that the object or objects modo. Ploco on "A" ot tho beginning of the

path, o "B" ot tho end of the poth, ond ' ''"" .loy c hanges in direct ion during tho courso. ~·;.,~-,..,.H

t .-;.:..

·~ ~.~,.- ll•l ~

(P, S~:. 8••) N<r•\e rufla..L~f ,\"'"''"' cAj.-(;-

.

~

Jo.A ·"J:J.

29.

IF there was MORE THAN ONE object, then how many wore thoro?

----~0]) '-'-_&r___

Orow o picture of how they wore arranged, ond put on cwrow to show the direc tion that they were trove ling.


/ ( •

H•••

'~ •••• ""<h.,,~ • ,..;1,. oboo" bol«o, ----·-·---

If,. •'•• dO<o « ' " " ood

~~ ...~.

-

31. Was anyone e lse w1th yao at the l•me yao saw the abject? (Circle One) 31.1 IF you answered YES, did they see the object too? (Circle One)

Yas

No No

Yos

31.2 Pleoae liat their nomu ond oddreuu: /I}._'/

1' 7//tv

.._.~ ,,

;~I;<

s (,: ;:,v,,f"

,, t\

'.

32. Please give the fallowing information about yourself:

F irat Name .J

-

Middl• Nom•

...-

"-' ~ ,P 7,, t-/l/1 ,, I ADORE~-~-------------------

s.•••,

Za,..

City

TELEPHONE NUMBER - - - - - - - • AGE - -.'- ' - - -

Stot•

SEX----

Indicate a ny additional Information obaut yourself, inc luding any speciolexparience, which mighr be pertmont.

33.

When and to whom d id you report thot you hod soon the object? (

<I

Doy

~

Manti.

,.

•J

Y ear

J'~t,

.


/ Doy

Monti.

Yeo,

35. Informat ion wh ich you f"l perttnent and which is not adequately covered in the specific points of tho queat ionnoire oro narrative explanat ion of your s ighting.

. "'

() J?. 5/ltf.J Y. ttef.t~J.L,

c

JJF?.trt/ ,.J(,- A I ~L.G-55L ' /â&#x20AC;˘

.'


-=--

-

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nrrvv

- - -----.)

m.CLASSlF lEr

r0R A

s. dLSON

.. D C A i1ELBOUP.NE 3 6A

HANNAtl , MU . BUREAU - HELBOURNE '£1LP1 OF AlR CA.lBERRA ~ 4"' v

rr.m1 BENTLEY E A CAt-:BERRA

•' GHOS!

BALLOONS .

TRA~Sil7TlNG ON 15~~2 KC/S

9T


~~/

M' TO

JRANDUM

Fw ...., witbl• the MN' ottl'f Wrru or pflllr cleorfy

,.,1

PRINTED NAME

I

I

PHONE EXTN

~ (~f{t.- f( c.o.o.

9777


(Operation~ Co~~ -~ 3/~/5)

,....-.~-

p

.

-

j .

~ ~ - . ... " . . . .M . '-. . .. .. , . . . ... .. . .. .... .. , . .... . ;,.;~....~ ..., . ...-!;.C: lia::1e of obwerve ........ ... .. .

2.

l.ddress of observer •• (;~(-; •• (.1';/.f{(.~ . /."!!.~-.~. 0

.. .. , ..

• . . • • · •••••••• P' •• NE •• •••• • • • ••••••

).

o~cupJ.tion of o'bcerver/.-?~~'1":".; . .. . --:-: . .. ~ . ... ~ ..... . . . ... . . . ~ • Date a."ld time of observatl.on •••/7.1"' • • . ,. •. ,... #".-:- • • • ••• • ••• •• •••••• , • • •• •• •••

5· 6.

.~- /.;;:; /.._ ,.:;'!. ~ ..... . !».:ration o f ob :;er1a t .1..0n . .• • 4-J •• -· ." •••••• • • • ••• • Obcr.z~ors

location

~t

time of

,.; •

-s~ght~rl.g. •

• .J

•. ••• • ••••••• • • ••

_.

~

L .

I

-.

...... .. . ( • .... . . ......... . · .......... . ·..... •' •"'

,'/V ·I ... ...../.' •'• ... . ..-,... ..... ... .... .. .. ...-..{. ../ \•.-,. .. •... .....

I L. J• •• "'i/l""

)1",./

-

i7e.:~.ther

8.

Deocr~te ar~ ~ds

condl.tions

a~

~

-/•, 1

/II'

observation.~C ...kt?. ._;/;.~t....(;( .. .. . .... . .........." . ..... .. ....... ........ ......... ... .......

or

time of

e~uipment used in

,., ' .t tho observation • • •(~; . ,-,.;..; ~1-';-••••

.. ........... ...... .. . .....,t . vlt.... .. :7 .......... . ... . .............. ...... ........... ............................ o·J:;crvcd? ( hill, /J . -r?/'. - / :y _ . . . . ,_, /" • ) //. JJ/:> -~ ~'"')•

Ct:~..,......_,...:-

IT!icl'e w:l.a object fir:;;; a over the horizon •

<

. . . . . ............ . . . ..

~ -:-,-c t

10 •

. .. · · · ·-·· · ·

eg, over::ucd 1 corning froc behind r: ·t }?' !~ ••• C, •

• ~.... :;..f.r-••

1'.

~• • t.-4 ~

• •• • • •• ••

_-,:v-.... cJ: ~ . . . U -'L .£ ....._.:.-zt~_, ...,~ "' Wnat first at;ractad onse~rer's a•te~tiorl? (eg, liGht or r.oisc).

.... (:;p .t:~~.·.................................................... .

..... ............ ............ ........ ....... .. .................... .... .

Did object apJ.:lear as a ligt.-:. or as a definite object?. • :·. • • • ••• :-: .• ·•• • • ,..,-

.r-:1./!.6~-.. :..e.~ : .............................................. . .. ....... ...... ' ...... ....... ...... .. ............. ..... ....... ........ ... ---

12.

If there wls more that one object:-

~'{;'

y{ . ....

("

(v.)

how m.::m;.t\'torc thcTo? •• •• • •• ~ •• ~ . ..

(b)

ln -y;ha t :for:no.tion v,·er.c 1;hey? . . • • • . . . • . . • • . • . .

.

.

<; • • ,_, ,, ••• • • • • • •• •

_/ '/•

. .. . . . . . • .. • 4

e, . /.

i'lhat w3::> the colour of tbu light or OOJEJCt? • •~ .. {-!/: •. • .... • , ':;'. • •·• • ~--:-. ·

v·~s its epp....ron-:

0.~6.( .. .t'f-•. .4:'. 1..:( .... · · .. .. ·· •.. ..

i4 .

llhat

15 .

Ua::; '"-"'Y dctro.l of stract1Ze c·,sc:-vai:lc?. ·'· •• 0.t:C!. .,

sr.apo? •• • •

. · .. . · · •••· •· · · · · . ..../2


,.

- 2 -

i6 .

r.as any Qethod of ~opulwion obv~o~c? ••... :.? .. :::: ................ ... ~

17. 18.

.- ........... ........... .

an:,· :;ound. ............. :::.~.~./:.., .. .:1,.,..·,. {·, ~-' •

l"i.::; there

·I'J::at vu.1s i tw height? ( or ::ng:e of elev~t.ion) • ... •.. . • .... • , •....• ..•..

c~t w:.o

'9·

· ? S"t:ltlonc.ry. .. • • • • •.• , •rr • • -• ,

z t,'

\•,a:; th e

2i .

\fuct T.cs tbe direction of fligln: w:!.vh reference to of tho compns::;?

· t 0 b JCC

/

}

•• • •#"~• • ••

• • • • • • .. •

on~

Did the object romein

.'••

c. ,

J ., .... ,.. , ~:;

,

••••• , , • , , ,

• ; •

landllllil'K:~

or polnt.::

.-.'. :..?0~~-~ ~... .~-. . . .. .. ......... .... ....... .

!

(#__

~-.

1

~·•• -.~. . . . . . . . . . .

1

1.

its speed? (or ar.gular vcloc..;.t.,..) .... ((.: .'..

20.

22.

~t ~11?

straigh• pcth, deviate, or manoeuvre

....c :~.(! ,7 .-.~6:{ ,.~~?<.:. . /.f-... ..... ..

.. ., ...... ....... .. . ,•7

=:...J:;. .<·~~;--..(

23.

\,'s.c :m,y trail of exhaust, vapour, or light seen? ••• ~.?. ..

24 .

\7h~ra did objoct disappear? (eg, in mid- air, behind ~hill, ovor t~e

.\.... .. . ........................... ... ............ ..

~·,~/ // --~r/ •• • '?· •••-[.. :r~

horizon)

./

1

L, ~ (/ , ,? · .~;~. k, c. •:-*-~;_/.'.( .4.-:'.-':.~:.~ tJ

v

,

''''' ':6.~- r;·,< (:_;,,;;::~

25 .

.

,(;( • •

Jo you know of any phy=:ic:>l evide~cc? (su:::n as fr:~cnts, photograph=:, or othor supportir~ cvi~cncc)

/C) ·'·. . . ....... ..... ..... .................. . ...... ............. ......... ....._, l.

~-

---/7 ,.-..

·musual phonomen:. prc:viously? ..•. / •••• •• ·"- :' ...•.

26.

Have you ob.:;urvcd

27 .

If co, giva br iJf details of i.'1cidcnt( s) .. .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. • .... . '

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................ .. .. ... ....... .............. .. ...... ....... ' ........ .. . 28.

State cn.y cxpcrionco ·:;r"icn enables observ'lr to be rcc.aonably certain abot<t th_, ,'-'n.cwcrs given to 18 and i9. . / · / :./ 1 /

a

'G · ~ · .t: 1 / ... .... . L .-;: ..: . .. Cv.h'.</.~i... .:.'.,..<~{C.-.'; .'-.:;. J

29 .

h:roJ you u me:mbc:- of ;my organization interested in acrio.l phllnomana? I

30.

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·

/7 .~.'-/:.t.; .. ..(£_ ~ .'.'I< (

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. .............. ............. .............. .. .. ... ......................... ............. .. ...........

!~am

1.11d cad ross oi' ort::mis~ tion .••

31

... .... .. ............... ........... .................. . .. ..... /3


P..ES':'ftiC:i.'ED

- 3F.·.i'':' 2 -

32.

:'ollowi~ ru.lit.u-y .:-.i:-cra:ft wore in position ct tho tima;-

Tho ~~

~

tdrcraft t.}"PC• ••• • • •• •• •• • (. • •• •

vi.r.inity ..,f th.., ::-oportcd

T.hc:;

~•• •••• ••• , ••••••••••• , ••••••••••••••

Hon41nc • .. . . • .• • • · • • • • • .. • • • • =' • .... ................ '!" •••••••••••••••••••• 7

........... ,coo

f t ••.....•. ... • .. ,000

1~t

•••.••••••••• OOOft

Speed . ... .. . ...... ... . · . . .• . .{ . . ...•.•••. . . ..... ..• . K., .........•.. • . . . 1( 33 .

Tho following cinl .:nrcraft wore in t.hc vicinity of the reported UFO oor.i tion at the tio:o:-

-

/'II I

Aircraft tl'J>C. ·. I~on.dint:·

/--.....

. •••• • • • .... ~. : • •• . •.•..•• • • • • •• • • •• • . • • ••. . ••• •• .•

..... . •... ,.,. •.•••.. T •.... · · . . · • • ... ..• . • T•• . • • .•.•. . . •..• . • . . T

Hoigh t. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •. ,000 ft. • • .. . . . •..•.••

,ooo

ft •... . • .... • ••. OOOft

Speed ••• • ...•••••• • •• • •••• • K .. . .. . . . . ....... . ... .. .. • K•• • • • ••• • •• .. •. . . K

34.

Cclcul~tions show tbat the following plane-ts or major st.u-s were in that portion of the sky ;:;. t the time - •••. •.. • .• .• . •• • • •• . .•. • .•••••• • .•. .. • .

.. ... . ........ ...... ..... .... ............................ 35·

~ coteor~lo~lcal

balloon was

releas~

from •••..••• . • • ••• • •. •. • ••• •••••.

at ••• . •• •• •• z ~nd cculd h~ve been in the reported UFO .t thu time .

pouit.ic~

:,6.

T!'\13 St .t... Ob:;crv:ltory in "the na"!T~:>t capital city .:.ffirms that aerial ph':lnonon~ in th.t portion of the sky at tho tiro~ wore

.................. (co:nct, rnoteoritc shower, etc) .

37·

Any other rolcv~~t rom~xks (og about s~tclites, rockets, rosoerch bi::!.ll ooms) . .. . . . . . . ........ . .... . . . . ..... . • • · · · · · · · · · · • • • · · · · · · · .

38 .

Thoro •

... ... .................... .......... .... . ......... ............. . . . conclusive evidence th~t tho object reported wnc •••• •. •. • •. • • •

J.S

.. •

.. •

••

li • • • •

. . . . . . . . . . . . ....... .. . ...... . . . . ..... . 7

••••••• •

••••••• •

•••••

..., .... . ·,... . . . . .. . . .. . .

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""h • c ob'JCCt r ~i'orto d co uld h :l.VC b ccn•. •.f .;. . ·;_.··· -~;..-r. • • ... •I ··'I'' •

40.

Tho causa (or

li~oly c~usc)

.\\!}. . ./.::,?.(f. ........ . (Unit)

7 • • • //) •

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~~ting cnnr.ot b~ doto~incd • ...• : / .. A-4-:~:.~.'(.'1, :(.? ..(1: nc)

of thl

· · · ··· ::...~. (.,' ./.-!.''(;'(.: ,: ...... (:>ate)

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:=:....•. .. •{R~.k)


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:<a::1e of observe:- • •. '. / , ?"••••..~-. •• t!, ... . , ....

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..ddres::> o: observer . • . , . !.~:

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5· 6.

7.

, ,,

D . ,.J '•J.'/ ..... - fl<IT ~ 0:1.-F,I~I~'-" .... ··· ·"··! .. . ....,. ''"'' .. ..... •..... . .... . . ...Vt'lt ,., c,,.. ... _-v,t?/ V,CJ,,,',7Y .!'r .:13.7EcT.

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aids or e;uip:::ent used .:.n ,;he observ:>tion . . .. .y : ~h~ ,r;. , . 'i.Xt:

... . ........... ". .... ......... ............. .... .. . .' .............: .... ... .... ...... .................... ............... ... ............... . ...

;r·u:~ra W:'." object fir~~ :l?Ser'l.,.d?

(~6, over~ead) comine; fro::~ '!'ehin:l.

a hill) over ·he ho:·i:z:on •

'.~ '· • •~: ~.. • (1 •• ••~~ . ~: ••• •

••

10 .

?>-

ll·.)~ r.' f ./f. ...1'$... :.'.....

'r..lti .:2.1 ~~at i1r~t nttractad o~~~rr~r ' s atter-tion? (eg, light or noise) .

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definite objoct? ...l-!'l't.!LC: ........

at.t.-~f.lll"j',. . C' . . . •~llt:'Jl . . . . . . . ' . .iE,·T .. . . . • . . -. . . I'J'('C.JlJter. . . . . . . .:_.;. .. •"" . .. ..-. y . . . .. . /·tll·o''.t:lt . .. . ,. . . .•. . ..

..

,.,-,.,. . .. 1.:: .

... ... .... . ..... ......... ..... . .. ..... ... ........... . ..... .. ,

If there w:>s

.•,

rtOl.J

1'1.CcA...'

tn:..t one object•-

(a)

ho·,, ~r.an:r were there? • • • •••• •• . • • ,t:; A-'. E

(b)

i!'l t~~l:::;. t i'orm:ltion wera the~·? •. •. ... ... • .•......

t~o colour of til ... light or

13.

li!l'lt

14.

~at Yl"~ ito epp.::ont sr.:...pe:? • • ~:.i?.c:•..•.:. r • . .. .. . .. ... . ..... ...

15 .

Was .my dot...-...l of ::;tr"Jct\U'c c'JGcrva't:lc? •••• • ••• J/.4~ .. . · ... · · · · · · · · · · · ·

Tl'il!J

OOJ9Ct? • •• .'.

l i /.1. • • • •. • • • • • • • • • • • • •

... . . .

..... /2

r ( r'\ ~~


- 2 -

, ,_ •. <"/' .... ... . . .r:,............. Jv'l ............... ..... ' ..... ..... ..... .

.

i6 .

"'Z!s a!".._v method or.' propulsion ocviot.s? •.•. .1,

17 '

u3.0

i8 .

~n~• wa~ ita heigh•? (or ~~le of olevation) •• ..

~9 ·

litv.t v.as itn speed? (or =t:;~l~ volooi't;r) . .. .~1 !':'.<-!.'!' .. :-:~ ........... . ,

20 .

lia:; the object sta tio~.a.ry":. /lP.! .':!'!.r.; .. ! , ..... .' ... '.'/. • . .. •••••• • ,·,~,,..,.!:> c 1-t:if:<.f!) ••••

21 .

inat •:a.> ~h;3 direction of f:iight with reference 'to landmark;; or points of the compass?

thc . .:·e

tu"l,j' :iOtU':d ·, . • , , , , , •.

• .

;. •

~

f! ... ~~ . ~.~ ......... .

r-r

\, ,JJ. " -f. t!ff'• ··············· ···········!,···· t;. -:-·· ·· ···/··· ··· · ··············· ....... r . j

I

• I

22.

A.){~ l"i

-

1:'~

I ::

<-l.o /.).. B.G•

..

~ str~ight pat~, d~viate,

Did the object remain on

or manoeuvre at all?

I,;.. . . ... . .. .. ·····"····,· r r ··· ' , tu .. t;...., ; ,. ... ..... ..... ..r- ........ ·· .... ........... I'\

-1 1 •'• ,,,

23 .

\ia;:;

t

,

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,,..._

t1'

,-..,

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J 1 -t

,

\

t-...

".../

cr..v trail of exhaust, vapoc..r, or light seer."? . . . .... ,'-!k. ... .. .... ..

.. .... ......... ....... ..... . .... ............ .. .......... ...... 24 .

\Tr.cro did object disapp~ar? (eg , in mid- aiT, behind~ hill, over the hori::on) ,~

~F."&..!V

:-

t::=u,,..,,,

"-~ ,),~ vcPP..I·.;~

c ...:_

...1 "'-

.,..,:.,;;;. •.• : . ; ...... • •••-'• • •••f"•• • • • ••• •••• •T~-•• , ;1', , •• •• • •••,)••• • ••••••••:

25·

::X. yau kr:ow of an;,· phy.-,ic ..l eviO.ence? (such e.s :fr~ments, pho'tograph:., Ol' othor- ~upportir,g evia.cncc)

............. ................. .... ....... .......... .......... .... .... . !v (.

26.

Have you ob.:;r:Ncd any unusuz.l phenomena previously? •..•• :Y, F.~

n, . c,., (r

••

' ,,

,.j)._•,sr.l'

' " ' ' " " I,/: I ;' • • • •""• • • • • •"-.' -, • • '11-S • ••• ••p ...... ,• t • •/• • • ~ • • • • • .!./. ' • r::Jt../'.'' • r'• • • .. i • • •

.. .. .... . .;,£'lit-

IT'/

• • • • ' • • • •

1~£ ..'>IC-1'171..._< /[',EJ-iF•'cf'. rt-•·'n 1-'ft ,,._,~• ..... . . . . .. . . . . . 4.. J • • • ' ••• •',) • . ....... ..,... • • • • j-1J•'c • • •••• • • • ti:Ep/ ,. •• ••••••••••• •••

28 .

J?t t.- ;-.~.-c, f(:. Af, SA 7' IE/,,_, r E ..) State ;:my oxpcrionco which en<?.bles obsorv.)r to be reasonably certain a.bou't tha answers given to 18 and 19 .

.. ......... ... ....... ....... ...... .. ... , ... . . .. ... . ........ ... ........ . ,

29 .

Are you a member of <!llY organization interested in aori.•l phonomana?

................ . .. .... . • . . . . •.... N /.'. ... •. .. . . ..... . ....... . . . . .. . ...

~dr.1ss

.1:-:) //....... · .. · •. · .. •.. ·· ·.. · .. . ........... ....... ..... .... .. ........... .. ... .. ..... ...... ......

30.

!b.':l" md

of org:!flis."!tion.......

31

~-~ 2dd:tion~l ~oroation ~hich ~cl~t~s

to tho sight~ng •

.. t.f .1. f/J. ... .n. Ff .~.r:>.v:-·.~... cv:;rN. r. ... ... ";-~ ... ·.

. . ~.'I... .. :... ..... .

-.rr....... .'.-.!(!.~~. .~ ........... .

.. !<:t••\'! . .. rl'!~<oL ... nA --:t •• ::.'.c. ....

• f'..f..~-:f.'-1.~ ]";)... . !>.11 >E. I! "'~'n. 1. ~..• ••;{1f-,T.• .....• ~! '1 . 1-'/.-. ( .. . . . . · •

..... . ./3


J2 .

:'h.1 followin{; military ::d.:-crl!.ft 111'0 ;>ooi tion ..:t the tiw:. : '.i r...,~ f~ t •.,..,c • .,. ...... "~

1 '•

• .. • •

,. • , • ,•

• • •

.. .

. . . .. .

u _ _,. I '- 1 f'> I r.O""""l.fl€ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ,. m .. .

'n th~ "i o'\ ni ty etl' th

11 ?'>

. . . . 4 • • • ._ • •

(

rC'poricd

.. ....... ............. ..

~

..

'-

-

. • • ........ •. T • . . . ... •. • • . • • • •. , .. T . • ' • •., •.

Hoicht . . . . . . . . . . ....• . . . ,ooo .ft • • • . • • . • • • . • . ,000 ft •• •••• . • •• • •• OOCft r :pocd ..... .• •.• • . .. .. . . . • •A· . •.. .. . ••. ... . . . .. . . . K. f • ••••• • • ••••• •• • ;:

33 ·

':'(. • follovnr-..g civil ::;.ircr ::lft ··;ore: in tho vicird ty of tho rupol'tcd

~'FQ

po.i tio1·, .:.t -&he time; . r.irct'clft t:rpc. • . .. ... . .. . . ... ... . . . . ..""• . II -·' • •• f:t,lA.J.:tng

,.1. . , ••. .

• • • • •• • •• ••• •

·,

'

m 1 ••

.• • . . • .•. .. •. .• .• T .. . • . . . . •• .. .•.. . • . . T

H"ight •• • . .• • .••• •• • •• • • ,000 f t • • . . . .... • .. • . •. ,000 ft. • . • • .. • . ..• . OOOft Spocd . ............... . . .. . . • t.: • •. • . • • • • •• • • • • • . •.• . . • . K, • .. • . ••. .. • .. . • . K

34 ·

Cn.lcul.... t.icnr- 3hoVI that th<. fcHowin:• p:i.a.nats or :n~jor :1~ .r~ wert: i1. th3t portion of the :::ky .;.t til-:: time· - ..... .. . . . . ... .... ... .. . .. , .. ....... .

... ...... ... ...... ....... .., .. ..... .. ..... . .... ........ ................ . . ~

,.

relc[!S~

35 ·

?Qsitior. ~6 .

~t

the

fro:1 . . • . . . . . . . • . .. . •.

ti~0 .

Tho S-,; -t-.l Oboorv. tor,.,.- :.r.. the nc:!.:' >~"t c:;.pi t~l ci tJ· <:ffirma thJ.~ naria l ph-::no::1on:;. in thnt porticn cf th'"' sk:: 1.t t!!..; tilllv wcr u .. • . • ~ .• • • • ( co:::~t, moteori tc sho".?C!' , etc).

37 .

RnY other rolcva.'lt r om.ll:ks (cg :!.bout s~tol i t<..:s, r oc.r..vt.J,

ros·).:!.rch b::.l looos ) •. ....•. . •.• • . • . . .. . • ..... ..... . • . · · ·. · • . · · · • • · • .. · · · •

..-------

• • • • ••• • • •••• • • • • • ••••• • • • ••• • • • • • • • • • • , • • •• • •• • • • ••• • • • ••••••• • ••••• f't .

36.

Thoro is conclu siv o cviucucc th:;.t the objcc t. r eported ,.,.lt>• •••••••••••• •

...........·····. '?'''.............................. .

.. .. ........... ..... .. ... .......... ... . .. ... ........... . ............. . '

-j-; .

1

T'"'"'c. ob.:JOC t rcportoc, co~ .. ' d nc.vc . '"uccn " ,... ('' /.. 1 I . ... J•••• • ~ • ••• • • • • •

r._,=., •,:: ,, 'I · ·

(Unit)

~ -;:'{?.~~;;:;--::.(?::.c)

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• . . ... ('J.?~ . .. { .f!.{ .. ... ..... ... (R:.:-.r.)

·.. · ... .

I.'.~~ l)~.J. .. . . .. .... . ... .

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R E S T R 1 C T E D A1~ 4 UFO lNTELL REPORT PI' FURTHER NY A703 OF 7 APR PD AMPLIFYING REPORT RECEIVED FROM Tf,tO STOChMEN

AT RUTLAND PLAINS STATION 13~Nl1 NE OF NORMANTON P'l' AT ?1115 HOURS LOCAL 4 APR SIGHTED THREE OBJECTS RED IN COLOUR BEARING

~5~ DEG THEN OVERHEAn TO ~10 DEG SPACED 8-1~ MILES APART AN1" EXTREHELY HlGH ALT !TUDE PD F lP.ST OBJECT EX.PLODE1" AN'!' BROKE INTO FOUR PIECES r.1lTH BRIGHT YELLOralSH/T;lHlTE TAILS ?17-3~ FEET LONG PIJ AFTER Tr~O Ml~~UTES REt-lAIN lNG TI:REE OBJECTS EXoLOnE'!' r.r ITH

LOUr REPORTS AT EXPLOSION

?

30

SECS INTERVALS FOLLOnEI' BY F lt-.AL LOU

MINUTES LATER Pt CHECKS r;1lTH DCA AT AS~~ ABLR ATCS

ATTL ATNM CONFIRM NIL OVERFLYING ACFT OR FLYING ACTIVITY AT TlME OF SlGHTlt\G Pf' OTHER REPORT RECE GED FROM OBSERV£Q AT MOUNT lSA lNDlCATE EXpLODING METEORITE $HOr,1ER OVER CAPE YORI\ lNSULA PROBABLE CAUSE _

_ _ J:lT._ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

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REPORTS AT

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SECS INTERVALS FOLLOr.rEn

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EXPLOSION ? MINUTES LATER PD CHECKS r.1lTH DCA AT ASMJ\ ABI.:R ATCS ATTL ATNM CONFIRM NIL OVERFLYING ACFT OR FLYING ACTIVITY AT !UtE OF SIGHT 1NG PD OTHER REPORT RECE GED FROM OBSERVER AT MOUNT lSA INDICATE EXPLODING METEORITE SHOr.TER OVER CAPE YORK PH INSUL~

BT

PROBABLE CAUSE


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ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AI R FO RCE TELEPHONE: 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND RAAF VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURN E SC1 VIC

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: "AIRCOMMAND, MELBOURNE"

5/6/Air;k~3) IN 1\EPLY QUOTE

(

967

SIGHTINGS OF UN- IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS

Forwarded herewith are reports on UFO sightings investigated by this Headquarters . The sightings were made by:Julie Ann SPAIN Douglas George ELLIOTT ldi'S

R. A. REES

( o..J~) C.'":::.._ k'-'--'-'-'-)

(拢.. _t._U..... ~-) "(<

I.aureen Jean PEKRS.~

Encl

/

y

(L . B. BROWN) fing Commander For Air Offi cer Commandi ng


-·:o j .J .,. oi O'bsc!'·.-er . . • ~,_~~4. ·i;/~ .•...-:. :f-.-.~" ...... . ;.,e.

Addrees

o~

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o~ -

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v

~....

• • • •

.. .,..-.1 ·.. . .. . . . . Ad{' •·- .

/ ,./,~.. ~~-·

:-t-:.y . .. ~ ......... .

.c: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •~ • • /.~ • • • • ,y.• • • •••

D::..te :l'nd 7i-:nc of Obs .. r;;~tio!:!

~ .

-

R.t

:€';-.; .. .

~7i::..c

to oe gi·:en in

locc..~. ~i .~

1

~""'~. ....-/ ;.:- L',.._~ 9'/ . ~.-,. /.-~~~. · -::..:;,~· .. . . . ~ · ...... . .. . . . . . .. . .

... . . . /

5.

.i:lurstiol~

6.

Ol.servero Loc,.tion at

1.

\Yea.t:-:.er Co:ld.i.t'ions at tir:e(s) of obs~:-vation(s) .. . ~.o~-.r.-, .. ..

:Jf

O'bse::.· :utic:m\ s 1 • ~ir_e

• •

.cyy!'t'f":<".·. ./.('. . ·, . ~.,;,,, . ... . . . .. .

of Sighti!lg (Give details of 0·.~~

.-.v.o 1!-;r/.) 'L .:..osition by m':l.:p rcf~retlc .. . ~.. t:tp.. r.f/.;. · 'y;/.f:e.~"'.;... .~ . . . . . .. . .. if possible , or by kno1m . . 6\ .. //.0 . .".#.:~//~ .. A.r.(~;-. .f:~~ ~la'~?~~ ~ .. .. ....... ... . • • . • . • . ~$..:-c, ~~. ... · "" ••. . •. •• ••• " ••.• • • . • • • • .•. • • ••• • • • •.•• •• ••• • . • . . • •.

8.

Aics to L'b3~rvct i on(s) .

(~e>crib3 a~- e~uip::..~~t ~se1 in the

9.

Where ··1 s ooj..:ct first obsar-...-eC' , eb o;err:ead , coLi::;g from b:hind a hill, over the :·wr:::.zor., et:: .

/C observ~t~on) ............... d. ~. .. .. ... . ..... .. .. . .... . . . "..... . ............. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. ... . . .. .. .. . .. . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .

• • • t":'Z;~ ~ -; ..

r.:-: ~1

t h

• :.-.

A'.-"":/4"f...,.~ :~~r.c.'";-;- .......'............ .

"i!'.at fi·Lt :lttr...c .. .:d obser;~r 's '-~-;;ent i or., eg ligct or noi.3..: .

10 .

. . . . . . . . .-(".!? tt: /./,..,. .~· / y/'.J.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~~~ OOJCCt a:pp~ar ~sa li~ht or ~sa definit a ooj~~t .

11 .

··· ... cv; ..p.~~ .

h

.

/./

#.:~:-. ..£;?~ · . h!.~Hf)J ·

{

<;.~ C""

)

. <n" . P?r• • • ••••••••• •• • •• •.•.••

If tnere was r.!ore than one object 1 how !W'lny w~rc there and

12 .

what wa::: their fort:!o;.tion . •

0

..

.

....

.

. . .

.

. . . . . . .

0

•••••••••

•••

••••••••••••

t

.

........

..

.

13.

.ir..&.t ·::as tne colour

1-. .

What was its appa..~e'1t sha~1~ .... ... ............... • .. · ...... ..

15 ·

";as

16 .

s

17 .

'l::'

th.? light or object .. . .CI'"Fr:;p. .,. • .•....

:tn:t d-:t~il of st~ucture obsgrvable . . . . 1'1.'" . ......... · ·. • :l!!y octhod

of pro:pulsio!·. {)b"Tious . .. . . . 4 . <" • •

•••••• • • • • • • • •

'7os tr.crc a!".y sound . .. .. ... ..,...::: .:; ........ ... ..... · ··· ··· ·•·· · ··

.,

neifl:t , or c.ngle o-:' e le~o -t~ or:... .. : .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. ?

1';1 .

Speed, or angulm· velocit:' . . . ........... .. ... .. · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

20 .

·1-s the object ztr:.t:..o!: ... ry . . .. . L~

21 .

·,rfi:lt \';c.s the dircctiO!!. ~= f.~-:.:-1.;;

or pci?1t.., cf the c onp~s s . . .

4~7· . ~ . ~~~ . . .

~

....... .. . . .. . · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

w:.l> _.

·r-< . . ../.(.~£. 4-. .. .

:..-ef..:.J.'<:.!C~ tv lar.d!:l£:rl:S

<0 .. .r.~('":-a ~

:- ..<: .... . • . 12 ,


-2i5id the obj~ct r0u1uin on n str~ight path , dcviat0 or n··u·oeuvrc 1t 1l],?

• · ..•. . . .. ./-1. 't',r~ t-1. - - .A:. • .. ~... -~ -

f._r;-..././.; .4-<~r·P.~.fA •.c'-..... ,.::. ..:: .,..,_;:

.3 .

\Yas ar,v"tr.iJ. of exhaust,

?• _..,. ,

'V ...

po~

0r

Aytf. ~ . ~I<·.~,. .~- .,/.. . . / ;/ li_,ht sea ... .. .~·. . •....... . . r-. -·

:·;her-e did object disappear , eg :lld-air , behind a hill, t !1e !'ori::;o·l .

• • • • • • • • • • • ..

~..4·'•""'f'!"' • • .h,. ,..,_~~

... ... . ................ ... ........ .

uve.~.·

. . . . . .. . .

.z:;xistence of ··ny physical evidence sue:. as fragments~ photogl""::.:;hs , or otiler supporti r..g evidence . • . . . . .. . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . • . ..4. ~.• . ..••...•. . .••..••. . ......... . • •.•.• 25 .

26.

Ha\"C you observed any unusual phenotLena previously .. .4!f. . ... .

27 .

If so, give details of incident (s) . . ....~ •.. . . ........... ... .

. ...... . ...... .... ..... .... . . . ...... . ........ . . . . .. . . . .. .... . .. . . . . . . . St ate ::-ny experience which enabl~s observer to b~ reasonably certain about th~ answe~cs giv an t o paras 18 a1::d 19 .

28 .

. . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . ... . .. .. . . . . . . .. . .. . . .......... ....... ..... ...... . . .. .. .. ... .. . .. ... . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . ..... ~

J.re you "' ncmber of at:~ organisatio!", i.::t erested in aeri:u phenomena?

29 .

.............. . .. . ,1..~ .. ... . .... . ............ .. .. .... ... .. ........ . . . Nar:1e and ndd::.·ess of org~~" i sation •.• :~ .... . .... . ............. .

30.

. . . . . .. . . . . . ... ...... ........ ........... ........... ...... .... .... .. . 31 .

1-.ny

add~tional

i nformstion .. •

t:'r_c. T..~-r-.~(!f. ,.(.,. ,..,.: f ')? ··- /

~ -y, -~A . . /. . .... . .. . --~) . .. .~/,{,#-~~.:;. ~- ~~-/iAJr47 · . .L -

J

· ...n-. · --'~'177. /"'~rrdl'. A . .

~

-M+---y .. f7l<t' /... .. .. -;.":. ... :.. . .. . . ... . coc;J;J,,

Si g1.1.ature of Observer ..

y

32 .

-~ \......-,..., . . .... .

Loca tion of ar_y a ir traffic i n the vicinity a t t he time of

..~.A:'l~~~.% . ~~ . ~~.~~. ~~. ,f-<'(,~7 ·

~- ·

~.. ~-;-r-.4.. ......... .... ... .. .................. ... .

33 .

Location of o.ny :neteorolobical st~tions in the g~ncra.l :lr ea .

34 .

Coments.-#.;_e.;/.~~- {f'~.,;:rA .~-A:-:-: .-<.-

. . . . 1:(.~4!~ .. .)4.~~

..... .. .. .. ..... ... .............

~">"i".P,A~-:/..~~~r.-/f{. ~ ... ~- ..

~·?~ ..d.~--;-;~ . ;. .. ....................... Si...:;naturc

o~ Int<l:-rogrtor

. ..... . .

~;/,'..(.'~~-·

:iUESTio:m 3Z , 33 aud 34 to be ar:sw-ared by i nt errogator .

ncte ... Sincc it is norm~lly i~possible to estimate t he he i ght ar.d speed of a strange object, i t wi ll usually be better to cndc'lvour to determihe t he angle of elevotion of the ob ject 7 the cne;le throu.6h w:lich it moved "'nd the time t~.lr .:n 1i o do this .


REPOTIT OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED Na111e of Observer .. ~P~.~I-:fl) ';> . · q.f~~<!-~ . . . l?. ~l:-\ t? f:T\ .. . . Are 2/ ...

Observer .f!.~~ ~ . . ~.6. ..C::f":'~i:>. •~.T. . .. A~~fi."' P.0/'1 • . Jrc

.Address of

Occupation of Observer .. .( <;-.""1 f~':\~ ..... P.t~!=-.T.o/.. .......... . ~.

Date ~nd Ti~~ of O~servation (Time to be ~iven in local time)

"'

•.. • ••.• • ..••••. [f!.. !P.A. Y. .'.l... ~AI\ c; I~ .. . ! ~ ~ 7..,. . . $.fJ.P.R.,O.Y. •••• <3 / ';'(.•..•••• Duration of ObGervation( s) . . . ..

5.

!?. .':'!~'Iff.~... l!t:lf.<P.)(...•. ..•.

6.

vbservers Location at ':'ime of Sighting (Give details of own q)., GL.t=J...l .r ~ 15 \'by map reference ........................ . ......."D'""1¥.. . ....... :positio~ ~f poss~ble, or by known Gl..EN .r f\l "S landmarks) 0 1c.. I

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10

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Weather Conditions at ti me(s) of observation(s) .. . ... . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ ?-.~~.~ .. 9.~~ ~.1-! Iff\.~ . . h 1 ~/t r ..\J.A~D.. TP.. ":'.D.~r11 8.

A1ds to Observation( s) . (Describe any equipment used in the observation) fJ ~

....... ..... ...... .... .......o,.., ....... .................... " ... ....... . '

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9.

f

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','lhere was object first observed, eg, overhead, coming from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc .

.. . . .. .. . .. . .. . \: ~ f:\.'14.~ .... ;-(l;l~~~.().t1 ..... ~P~l}t. ~~ !;-1.. ~ .~.~S. 10 .

t

. .... .... ..

·,·;hat firSt attrac+ed observe!' ' s attention, eg light or noise .

M DuE. M&N I ........... D t= /.../ Gt-i ................ ........ ......... ...T .... ................. ... 11 .

Did object appear as a light or as a definite object .

. . • . • • • . . . . • . . . . . . • . . • • • .1:-J ~ft :r........ ...... .... . .. ...... .... ...... . 12 .

If there was more than one object, how many were there, and what was their formation .

Of.lG: .. ' . .. .. ..... ...... ... .. . ...... .. .... .. ......... .............. ........ 1}.

What was the co l our of the lignt or object .<?-.~~til.'-~. 1 ~.~

14 .

Vlhat was its apparent shape . ....•~ (lt;\/1:-~A •• • T.~ ... ~TI?I.fl... • . ••

15.

Was any detail of structure observable . .... N9.......

1 o' ·

'Nas a ny me th o d of

17 .

Was there any sound ....................... . ~·~ . ........ · ..

18 .

Height, or angle of elevation .. ..... . ...... · .. · ...... .. · .. ·

19 .

Speed, or angular velocitJ- . ~~~!t.l\1$. . .t:'Y. . ?P. r:":4J..t.T.I-i~ ...Qft~f\.Vf<P

20 .

Vias the object stationary? ... .. . ... . . ....... N~ .... · · · · · · · •

21.

What was the direction of flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compass ...

. . . . . . . . . . :T~ !tP~.<>: 1~ ••• Vtr.P-E"l/

pro~u

•S.o.u.r.~o~.~r.f..if.

.No ~Tit E.A~T

• •

l:J/~'/t.

. .... .

1 s~on · · obv1ous ........"'0 .. . . .......... .

$-~~. f".Jti).-1 . ~..:>c.>ri~~'f . .~~~~<;\'!>~ ... "!"!~ . Til-EN

... /2 .


-"(

---

-2-

22 .

Did the object remain on a straight path, deviate or .manoeuvre cit all? U

·

···· · · · ·~~~·~·~·A~~ : .~.·.~ .~.~~ 23 .

~i a.s "lny trail 01 exha"'st, vapour or lig~1t seen .. .f:J.C! •••• • •••

2~ .

\','here did object disappear, eg in mid-air, behinda hill over the horizon . '

........ . ........ -~~ti!~P... $-.J...c,u,t>•• .lfJ... /'!i?/}~~ . ~-~~ . .~F.

25 . t

.. !?1'\Y, •...••.

Existence of any pl~sical evidence such as fragments photographs, or ot ..er supporting evidence . '

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26 .

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously .... ~Q ...

27 .

If so, give details of incident(s) ... . ....................•.

28 .

Stat e any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain aoout the answers given to 1 ~ and 1q.

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Are you a member of any organisation interested in aerial phenomena? I

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30 .

:~arue

and Address of organisation . . • . . ... . .... . ........ . ....•

31 .

Ar.y additional infor!llation ... fV-:~~ . . . ~~~i;~~l;.l? . . f}.( . .i:'~~ .. ~1JM..:

. . :-f~':'~. . .~'f. .. .~'!-. f-FH. ~fi!".G..t:,L!'- .•••":'~ :;, , /L f..t+J.O.T.--r_ ••• ~•.t.<:._ ) ? .~..~~ 1 911 .. fl N O

. . .~. .~ sc:. . . . . .3'. A'-' . . . .14'-\...'" . . . . .TT. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. ... .. ........... . .. .. . Sig11ature of Observer .. . 32 .

Location of any air traffic i n the vic i nity at the t i me of sighting.

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Location of any meteorologi cal stations in the general area . 10

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. Comments ... {?("~~~~. ~-

··· :./.~ .J7.'.;7.~ ."'.~~~4. ~.~ - ~·

· ~· ~·~· ·· ~· · ··········· · · ····· · · · · · ·£. ..... Si3nature of Interrogate~~~ ~

QtJES'::'IONS 32, 33 and 34 to be ans·.vered by interrogator. Note

Since it is normally impossible to estimate the height and speed of a strange object it will usually be better to endeavour to determine the'angle of elevation of the object, the angle t'lrough whl.ch it moved, and the time taken to do this .


THIS IS A LARGE FORMAT DOCUMENT WHICH WILL NOT BE LEGIBLE IF SCANNED. IF YOU WISH TO OBTAIN A COPY OF THE DOCUMENT PLEASE SEND YOUR REQUEST TO REF @ NAA.GOV.AU

M"'atC.t~aiJhn

Rowtc Rowtt

.....

Sporn Crturtfl Coli L•n>t { CM

KEVJ 0 f:l

Publ•c. ~


REPORT t F J\ElUAT, OBJECT OBSERVED

No~ote

of Observe· . .Mf?r;_

.. /?. /~.. ./f~J.~ ..$........ . A~ e . .Q.Q.

~,e!ft\1!'1/J. AY.~. £'1t.~1./':1Jtt.Y£Jf<l}/ Observer .. . /la/'1~ .. P.L!.f.~~$.............VtC.

2.

Addresn of Observe· . ././

3.

Occupation of

4.

.::>

5.

Dtu·ation of vbservation( s) ...

6.

ubservet•s 'Loce:-iou ~t Tit'le of Sitihting (Give details of oNn L S.ec.r I) v· ~osition by map reference ... ~ ......1 IN .....r/.'\ 1 1f poss1ble , or by lglown f) landmarks) .S 70

te

"t? ....

:~

"

o- ''::l~·erv<>tion (Time to be ..i.,en in

oc 1

t 1

e)

.. /~. ~ !.7.;:~(J~f(/,~~.G H .. .1Jf.q..7 .. ... Af/.1!-.o .r .. .~ . ).C?.fl. /:1 ~A O.t.f..~ •••~.Rf. ~J!.J(.. . ... .

1: AA .t,:...-1~1./:I!I: .. VP-.If!..}/.

(J.tY. . /:1 A f. . !!:N .<;.L: P.$~P. : . . IJI.iill.lf. ~~. N P.QNP.A.I. r;. 1.

.R. P. .. ... :-: ~.vv .

Weather Conditions ...t time(s) of observation(s) ..t!t.~~.~ .,.FINE .

. .-1NP. ./:1.1.4-.P.. f •• Nfl. C.. .~~ 1/.P. ·r .M Q.Q AI..L .1. ~ 1-I .T. . ........... . 8.

Aids to ObserV'l:ltiods) . tDescribe any equipwent used i n the

........................ .A.t o.A.J.~Z . . .!3. .v. r. ..rw.a . .#." .y..F.~~~~~~~~~~~

.............................. .... .................................... 9.

\".'here was object first observed, eg, overhead, com:ng from behir.il a Lill, oo;,; e!' the horizon, etc

.. f\.1tJ.Y. .1.1':·(.r;;_ .•• f"R (1~1 ... w~$. f . . J!! ..£ tf:S.(.. /:IJtP. WAy . IN SK'y t3e. IV\/EEN HoI( 1 ~ON 0 R He"' D AND

~hat

10.

firSt

at~r~cted

1/e

obse!'ver ' s attention . eb

~ight

or noise .

.A .M o.'l t/\1. ~ ....$ . (~~ t. ~ ~.~ .. P~.JP. .~ r... f}l'h.~:::. (N .t:r ..l.t.N t>.T l-Ie~ ~id

11.

object

a~pe~r

S..,...A- R.

A

Cl

S 0

v

AI

0

as a li&ht or as a definite object .

. . . . .A ..~ . ~ ~ /:1. .T .. , .. . 11. .B..~.!. ~. L~ . /. • •• •S. T.tt .~..,........ .... . If there was more than one object, how many were there, and what was their formation .

12.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .O.NJ!:. ... P. N L . ¥ ·'· . . ...................... . 13.

What was the colour of the light or object . ..Wlf.C!:F."..

..

14.

V:hat was its apparent shape .... . ~ .1'ft.R.h/.X.F........... .

15.

Was any detail of structure observable . . . .I.VO.......... · ··

16 .

t'ias any method of propulsion

17.

Was there any sound. ......... . .......... .

18 .

Height , or angle of elevation .tiJ/ P.Wit Y, .Qf.;(W li.&.N. .

19 .

Speed , or angular velocitJ . . f\~. Q.V. ( N .c;..

20 .

Was the object stationary? .... J\t~...

21 .

''lhat was the direction of flight with reference to landmarks or point~ oft e ~ompass ...

· obvious ...... /.1/P. .... · · · · · · · · ·

N.?. ... ····· ·•··· /f,.,O

/f.O~~AZDO

OveR~~

. l?../fP./.0. .4-. if,.··

.... .......... . .... ···

r.1- ~ P: tt.r. .. r.8.. fl " ·"' ...w.#-.$. T. .. r:o. .£1t .s.r. .... w.h£ N • .t.-.(f-.$.r. s.e.etv 17

W t1 S

f-1

I C

H

t't A/ D

I

I'{

j) I~ E

c

/I

oN

0

f ./'.1fl'.. /.) .11 Ill o £No


-2-

.,

!>id the object remRtn on a strai ·ht pat", deviate or oanoeuvrE t . :. l" ............. A . . SHIP.<?. f. 11 ...... ~I.R..~./.(9. H . 'T. . . j?.~:J:/1. ...... 22 .

..

NQ ... ... .

23 .

\'las ~my trai.L of exhaust, vapour or light seen . . .

24 .

\'i'here did object :. ...sappear, eg in mid-air, behinds hill over the hori:on . '

.... fl. (.q..ff. , .. 1!."1. -r.r.l;-...r?. f/.7.. .0.f ...$. t .Gf.lf: :r......... ....... ... . 25 .

Existence of any physical evidence such as f:r:;agments photogracl1S or otl1er supporting evidence . tVO '

.. .1h P.P. R . .. .M.i f !1.~ .!1/?.. S... P.J>; .c-'f.f:/1 ;.4.V. .. Y.l/. 1.t:N f=.$ .':i P. .D Have :lou observed any unusual phenorr.ena previously .. :-.J /!i..:S.~

26 .

If so, give details of incident( s)'J.h~ ..

27 . 28 .

;

r

S,P.V.1.A.U:C ': . ({J, .'(.#/tR..SAGI>

State :my experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain aoout the answers given to 11? and

1q.

I T .t. $.. ()tv. fl. S.(' /t .~ . .1'?.. ?.e.#. ..1.1. /~ AP..!P. .4-.Y. .Mtl.V.IJ)/. ~ . :.S:r:!1. R. .. /1- N f) rJ,J: t1crve.Me.Nr 29 .

10

WAs S;,+nLA/?

S.t9r&L.t.; re SeEN

Are you a member of any organisation interested in phenomena?

aerialy'.e-A~s

10

,..,

........... .. Nt;~: ...... ............................. .............. . 30 .

:1a!lie and Address of organisation . ............... . .......... .

. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . information. 1/l.~. . Y/.Q{l/P.£/? P. iJ. L. A .c.l/.lft..Ve 111.£/ffi. .1./.1/ •. .S.pA .c ~ .. £.-rP.t. f!.-R 1.1. 7.1."N. . 1.4". .1}1.~ /.,ff:s.r.. r.~ vv..y EA-~<s 1~1/A-/1~ .. !J.t--t.y. ..tJ.JY.t!.S tJ.A:k . ...$>·~ rt.r. ...V!.~/.1. h .. r.C(.Jus:r/?A-t;,tt 31 .

Any addi tior.al

rO~

1~~t~~foC:s~r.fe[~... ~ ..~

ScieNCE

32 .

Location of any air traffic in the: viciW.t the time of

........ ~~~~~~~~: .. NJ .~ ... .. .. ................ ... .............. . f

I

If

33 .

I

I

0

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

0.

I

I

1

1

I

1

1

I

..

0

I

f

I

I

I

I

I

o

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I.

I

Location of any meteorological stations in the general area .

• • • • • • • • . }/((J,({

~ ~ P. 13. .I.A.( . .. //.1. R .P..o.IS :r, .1'1.~1'!:1 ~ 1:1. • . C!~.v. t .vk Rs 1 ry

~ . t•••• ..~~~~~-s:.~f...,.,./~ .~-: . ~~··77~~~~-:. ·~~r-~·,/..o:-:~.7 .~. ('?... ~<.<? . .. ~~~~~f.~< .....

34 .

Comments ... (~~~·~/~. .

". ~ ~ I n~erroga ~ t w1;na~ure or

~/.._.,_-< ······· · · ·· ' '-

QUESTIONS 32, 33 and 34 to be answered by interrogator. I~ote:

Since it is normally impossibla to estimate the hei6ht and speed of a strange object it \\'ill usually be better to endeavour to determine the'angle of elevation of the ObJect, the angle through which it moved, and the time taken to do this .


.

:~OR:

Na!l:c of Observer .

OP A:3:A: ODJ=c=

OBS:~VLn

.f'lttS~ f.FJ?-.1{ • • • •Jf.H."'. . . ?~~?1. . . ..... A-e ..~ ~ .... .

!.J. . l"L~! ~~ . f"'!. .. fc.i.~!..': . . . ~,1.~. . .. ..... ... " ..

2.

l.:.ldress of Obscr-;e!' .

3.

Occu!J<:.t:.cn o:' Observer .. . .. . . .. .. ..... . . . . . .... . . ..... .. .... .

4.

JJ:;.te

J/CIJ$e'-'•FC

~a ~ine of Obs ~c.";:.c::1 \~ :.me to be gi·Ten in loc:;.a. -:;:;,;:C))

~J?S.iJo:'ff• • -71 .":. /*'Jf!t:cJf. . .A. f .. fJ. .~~ f .'1 . . ........ . ......... .. . . ....... . .

••

:Jurat~on of Obser·ration(s .

5. 6.

..«.: ! . ..5:~~'?":"~~ .. . . • ...... . . .. ... .. .

Ol.ser·:er s LocO!tiot! ~t ~i::..."e of Sig.:!;iug (Givi;; details of o\;r. " ,., ..-;, \t-osi tion by r.ap rofE:r.::nc .. 1l · I' . ox . . vI'>J. .. . ..:>.:> •••. .lJ q. "t •~,':J • • • ;t. • •- • • ••• • • • •• 1• f poss1. bl .a , or b y knol'ln ..- n L lcndmarks ) '''E., h

r. ()t:1t...tt,IR,.

... . .. •

7.

••

•••••••••

··rtea t n.!r Co:1a::t. • · t 1ons · · ( s ) of a t t 1me

f

••••

••

•••

•••••••••

· t 1on · ( s ) . CLe.4R ooserv" . . . . . . S'i:v ..t...

8ng, r S'v ............ .... ~~~~~v.s:.......... . .. .... . .. .... .... . ... . ... ... ... ... .... ... N

8.

.'des t-:> O'!:lscrvt.tion(s) .

•••••••

t

..... .. .. .

(:;e!'Jcribe any eq_uip...e~.t useri in t .i le o1lservc.tic.n)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . .

............. .

.

.

... .

.. .

N/f~R/} .E yES . ' ' .. ..................... ... .... .. ..... .................. .... .. .. . .

9.

,-.. _re was ooject first obsar-·ec , eci o,rerhead, cor::i2:g from be ..ind a h i ll , o·,rer t!:e !1or izor-, etc .

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • .C'.".£.~ ~"!"!!. .... . ...... .. ..... .. .... . ... .. . ............ . \'i!1at first attr~c-ed vbse:!·-:~...r ' s a~tent i or: , eg light or nois..: .

10 .

. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .&.tr;N/ ... . . .4.S.If/ .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . . . .... . . . . . . . .... .... . . Di d ObJect a!rear ~sa l i~~t or ~sa defini ta obje~t .

11 .

_

l~R'f~'(/!J:~~~"::)..»::.':~~r~( . f~~ ~~: :: .~£.c':'~~ .'"'.':~. ~~~~- .~ ~~:~~ :. ~ ::: .. .. . 12 .

If there:: was more tr..an one object, how many w0:cc t here and what wa~ their forL~tion .

. . . . . .... . .. .0. "'!~'/. . . '· ,IJfJ..r.f.,~ -r:. . . ..... . ..... .. ............... .. .. . . . . 13 .

1fhat was tnc colour of the light or object ..~ -!?!"I. ..

14 .

17L'.lt wo.s its

15 .

Vias o.n~· detail of s~ructurc observable . . .. -1~ . . ..

16 .

Wus ar.y ncth:>d of !Jropulsior:. o?vious . .. . tl.t . . . . . .. . .... · · · · · · ·

17 .

"'io;:; thcr.: any s ot:.nd . . ..

1 a.

!1cight, or anelc of ele;rat::!.or:. fl.IJ.c.'-.'. • .T.Hf. !.IE."~('.~;.~ tJfP~~ . ..

19 ·

S pcec.• , or angular ve_ocl. 1 · t:r . { ' • .... ·-- 4 . .. "";~.-EJ. J ..•,.e.c, .. . . ..... . . ~........ ..'.

20 .

7ia.s ~:'!e obj~ct S'C::.-:;ior::lr:,· . .. .

21 .

iih~t ·c.s the direction o~ flight or pc.il.ts of the coml}BSS ...

t..

."':',.:r.f...

• • • •

7.

4

~~

. .. ..... .. appa.·ent shape .. FF~.~ 1?, .-(-t(l.f .. IJ .~/L.. ."'!~~':'.. ..... .

'i;

r;

J(~ : .

.. . . ..... · · · •

. ... • . •.. ..... ... . ... .. · . · • · · · · · ·

A'L . . . ...... . . . .. . ... .. .... . · · ·

;Jv , ... L!

v.i"t;r..

reference to lar:dmar}:s

So . . -,.

• • • • • ' • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ' I' • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

... /2 .


... _..,_ .:Jiu the object rc:nain ou

c~~oeuvr~ ~+

~l~?

str:::::.ght p:J.t:h, dc·r::.ate or

8.

. ....... . . ........ .R.~"'!'!'~~iJ. . . P'! . fl. £71!1'~~. --: . .P."ff.'.. los any tr ~J.!. of c:-:ha\.<st, v ...:;:ou::' e;r ~~~rc diu vbject d~s app ear,

24 .

. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . seen . .).. .s~r . . . .. . . . . . . .

:!.~;Jut

-

eg ~d-ei~, behind a hi-1, ov~r

tb.~ !l:>rizo~~ . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . P.'-~E.~ ... :r.P;:_ . . f!~~.z;c:~ . ..... . . .

.. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . .. .

25 .

. . . .. . .. . . . . .. . . . .

. . . ... .6: .. ,.,,.,, ..... /'I.C, ... , ..•..•.• • ..••..••. • .• 26 .

Hav ~ you oos "'rved any unusu~l p!:leuomena :-revious1y .. 11.~'(-7'!-...

27 .

I f so, give C!etoils of incident(s) .... .. , .................... .

t

••

•••••••••••••••••

•••

•••••••

"

••

.

•••••••

St.:Ate :::.ny c;:p~rience whicl. enables observer to b"' r~aSOt;!:l.bly <..bout t_'l~ answe:·s gi-r..:r.. to Jaras 18 and 19 .

28 .

ccrt:?.~n

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1~c. .. -ffr~.IJ.llf.M?:. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .... .

.... .

. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . ... . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. ... . 29 .

J..xc :;.rou

'l

:t:he~omen::t?

ar:.~·

ucmoer of

orge.n:i.s:::.tion i .terest<:!d in aerial

........ ......... ....}/l' ..... ..... .................. ... .... .... .. .. ..... 30 .

odcr~ss

Naree and

orgar~sat io~ .

of

. .... • . . .•..... . .. ...........

. .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . ..................... ... . .. ..... .. ........ .... .... ...... . '~"" a_ ~d·t· _,?NC.(~.sEJ' .f.f,rm;ll "·"" J. J.ona1 J.·nfor~·t·J.on .. .P.tsnJ£ ...•.. ..~/h-P ....•....•...•..•...•...•

31 .

. . . . . . .. . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . ... . ... ... .. . . .. . . .... .. . ' . ' ... .... .. . . . . .. .' ' .. ' ... .. ' .. .. .......... ........ ..... ........... .... ... ' ' .... . /,' j': . ?-!f.>? . .... .

Signature of Observer ~.(fi/1W1'-:"

Location of ar~ air traffic in the v i c i nity at tte time of sightinc;; . /

32 .

. ....... . ....... . .......... __ _, . ............................................ «~

t

t

t

33 .

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

f

t

t

t

t

~

t

I

~~+-<--.....,_,..

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

"

f

t

t

"

"

t

t

t'

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

"'

t

t

t

t

t

f

"

"

f

t

f

t

t

t

t

f

t

f

f

I

t

t

Location of a~y ....etecrolveica: st 1.tions in the g ... r.l:ral a r..:;;. .

. . . . . . . .('~~ :-~ ::~ ~ ~~~~~ ..... .. ... ..... . .... ... . 3.;. . Co::xm:ents ,g~ .-....r.'-.:-•• ~-/.· r,:4. ~ ."'t:~-: .• -:<:•.• :

. . ':": .

/;~:-:-. y&-.. 7~:-r'0~~~~. ':'-:'~:_:_·Y.~. . :-. 4,4: .-d.<~ L A . /C. .~ ~ ~~,.,-. ~~ . =-·. -: •.. ~~-:-: ~ .. . .-~--;.--. = . ~-'-.~. ~~/h. . ¢.a~~ ~-- --<f.~~.,.__ - ~<>---- ~.........__~. / . . ~....,....._..____.c_ /'-I~L~ o>- ,.q ~UES_rc:~

d';;;r~ }'~

32, 33 and 34 to oc

<'

S:L_,;_!:~e,~~!ltZr::'Oert

an~ ;red

oy

. . . .. . .

/ 2...

ict~rro gator .

note ... Since it is norual::..y i "X,.ossib:.c to e::stim::tte the r.eight r..nd speed of a stra::..Je ojjec-t, it will usu&lly be better to encic e.·.-ot~.r to determine t~~e ar>.g~e of elevation of the object 1 t~e an~le tr.ro.1g:1 w::.ich it moved a nd the time truc..:1: ,;o ao tr.J.s .


:JS ~ Sl

r:;;r

J'Ofcp- #~~t.

.J'~c..,.la.Y

.lc w,C::..., ;i)nD.f=_,q k ))

-<

f',.: H

i~~.t.r ,!;s"''


I \

.S

' ROYAl AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

TElEPHONE: 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPI'ORT COMMAND RAAF

TElEGRAPHIC ADDRESS . 'AIRCOHHAND. MElBOURNE" /

IN UM.Y QtJOTt

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

5/6/¢<'42)

Secret Dep ent of Air R sell Offices CAr-BERRA J\C'l'

-

i)f\'4"'

\

.

INVESTIGATION INT O UNIDENTIFIED

FLYING oBJECTS

1. Forwarded herewith are reports of Unidentified Flying Objects submitted by No 2 Stores Depot and by Headquarters Zast Sale . 2. The report from 2STODEP concerns sightings made by Kenneth Albert ~Til and Stephen BURNS .

3.

rio 2 Stores

Depo~

has the following comment to make :-

.•• "Investieations with :Jepartwent of Civil Aviation officers at ~SCOT aerodrome show that at 0126 hours on the 16th W8rch a civilian DC- 4 aircraft landed at USC<Yl . This aircraft approached from the Glenfield Beacon and it is estimated that the aircraft would have overpassed very close to l4r IUARTIN ' s residence bet·veen a height of 1500 and 2000 feet . Depa.rtment of Civil Aviation officers have also advised that it is quite possible that the pilot of this aircraft tested the aircraft landing lights at about the point that the UFO was sighted and this could account for the brilliant white light observed by !.!r MARTIN . II ( .........."-*)

4. The report from Headquarters East Sale concerns sight ings made by : Mrs J . A. FERGUSON \~~ "-t..~ ... \'.,.._,- ;.tS•.~ Mrs C. E. L.t.':TL:EH Mrs M. . HOWARD l!r .it.T . Bt'.rLER .

5. This Headquarters has nothing further to add to these reports .

BROWN) ·ring Commander For Air vfficer Commanding (L • .o .

Encl

/


REPORT OF AERIAL OB.TECT OBSERVED 1.

Name of Observer • .

X~!'l. fnl. ..N-;~~...~AA-T.I~. . •. . . . •. Ago . :3.~ • ••

~~••• ':<~~!~ .. f.~... f~.~ .. ~.ad: ..... Observe r ... ~• .• •P.~~~ .. ~PP:~~.......... ...•

Address of Observor •• • • ).

Occupation of

4.

Date and Time of Observation (Time to be given in local time)

........................ .~.1.' :~ ... ...l ~.t ?.i.C:>:? •.~· .• ••. •.•••..• .•.. .•••.. ""· · U Jo il• • ••~ .uurat 1.on o fOb sei"Va t·~on ( s ) •• . • • ••••• . ••••••• •• • • •• • • ••• •~ • • - --·~· • ~.

5•

6.

...Yr.}~..

Observers Location at Time of Sighting (Cive detail s of own position by me? reference if possible , or by known landmarl<:s) ~ ~b.·~··

..

... .. .. .

.......... ................. ................ ....... .... ........ .................. . ~

~\.L.4-t

"

'

Weather Conditions at tima(s) of observation( s) • • •••••• • ••••••••••• .

· · ··· · ······· · · ~ · ~·· ¥· ··:-.~...~. ~..~ ... 8.

Aids to Observation (s) .

(Describe ~ny equiiXDent used in the obse:l'vation) NIL

................................................................................... ................. ...................... ............. ................... ............ 9·

Where was objeot first observed, eg, overhead, coming from behind a bill , over the horizon , etc .

;1

1,~\4-J ~ ~ 11"~-· • L,.D.J.-- 1 r..uJ.. ~D.J.. ~.w ~~~

~~·~~~~~·~·· te~~~~f.~~:~~~ ............ ~.~ .. ~. ~ . : ........ ........................ . 11 .

Did objeot appear a s a light or as a definite object .

12 .

I f there was more than one object, how msny vter e t her e, and what was their foxmation •

··· · · ····~· ·a,~ ~ ~··a-tr~ ~~: ~···· ... ... .. .... .... ............... .. .... ....~...~................ ......... 13.

What was the colour of the light or object . • •fkJ.. ~ ••

14.

What

15.

Was any detail of structure obser"Ja.blc • • • ••

16.

Was any met hod

11 ·

Was ther e any sound .• • •

18.

I ~ -:;:to He~ght, or angl e of elevati on ••• A • •• • •••• • •• · ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

19 .

Speed, or angular velocity • . ~.'7 :7.--:-( .. • • o·; .:·. • ~ ,-.._ .$~.

20.

Was the object stationary? •••• ~. ~ •• • • • •• • •• •• .• • .• • • • • ••• ••

21 .

What ms the direction of flight with reference to land:narks or points o! tho ccmpass .

·

v~as

~ .... . ..... .

its apparent shape • •• ••• .•••~•• ~.~.

Qf

~

~ • • ••• • • • ••••• . .• • •• •

pro~vious .• •~w:;._···~ ·_w

~•• ~~···~•~ • ·•· • ·· · · • • 0

AL..~...-~ M .P,._;~-~...,~~~,..

.. •••..•.... .. ......... .. .. . •.. ... ... .. .. .... ... ... .~ .::. :'¥"~ ..{<f.-a. (';.':~f. .... .. . ... /2


- 2Did the object ramnin on a strl"ight path, dovi a.to or manoeuvre at all?

·······•·•···•· ~ " :·.. : .. ~. ~ . ~.. Ph-r . M?: /u..J~ ~················· i ... ~ ······ ·········· 23 .

Was any trail of exhaust, vapour o r light seen •• • •~ . • ••• ••.••..•

24 ·

Who~e did object disappc .r, eg in mi.d- eir, behind a hill , over tho hen. zon .

................... ............... .... . ........ ... . ............. ....... .. .......... 26.

Have you observed arzy unusual phenomena preViously .~. f.~. ~

21 .

I f so, give details of

28 .

State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers gl ven t o and ~ . A..vL ,q

incident(s)~. ~~~~.~ ~~~~ ~ .

'fE. ..................................................... ........................

Are you a member of any or gani sation interested in aerial phenomena?

........................................& .. ...... ...... ...... ................... . 30 • •

Name and .t.ddress of o rgani sa t i on .... . . .................. . ..... .. ... . •

32.

0

.

.

..... ....

.

...... .

................. .

.......

.

Location of any air traffic in the V::..cinity at the time of sighting .

......... ..... .............. ... .«~~....V.~J.~t.'r!-?... 4.~~.. ..'~ ~ . . .~~•. ~· .~.~. .a'!':q.~: .~. .~~k1· ~Glf.'(. (#.Jf~ .. ~~~.... 3J.

Location of any meteorological stations in the general area .

. .. ... . . .. . . . . .. . .. . . . . #!.N.~tP!i~ ...l.t:t;r;)/;(; .n:? f.. ..... ...... ................... . 34· Comments ~••~¥.¥.~:~ .~/.41.4. ..~:~.&.7: ~":C. ·¥

••

. ~4.~~. 4-~ ...f..~~ .'!~.':~~~.~~~~~~~r..~~~ ,41/.~••{'1. f; ..~If/1.4~ IM~/.. ~(4!/.t:t".~ ..ft. ~~.~~ - .. . ~ .~':"'

~<f.t~~ f-u,-v..d_

~

;tk -::..§~ ~ /U3C ~~~

~ ~ ~~ ,AUI'~ i atu.n ~f Int.;rrogat or ..

. -

7

QIJESTIONS 32, 33 and 34 to be answered by i

R~

lh7:..

:lote:

~~·

crrogator~,..t.,l'kLt. . 6ti·

~JL .~.A r:~ ~ ovt o.osr~

.4/Jh

i(~'(v.v.

--r

.

f&,~Jt7D;.'"'t'ct..i.li.t ~~+)

ana

TSinceit is normally impossible to cStHilate the height spee!I o'fa.r strange object, it 1'1ill usually be better to endeavour t o detennine .&9cx the angle of ele· ~tion of the object, the angl.:~ 1jbruugh which it mov~d, and tho time taken to do this . ~


.. .. ..D

II'


REPORT OF AERIIIL OBJECT OBSERVED

Observer •• . $J:.~t?tl~('! . ... fi~W. .~ ..... .. .. .... . f18c .•4f..l( . Address of Observer • •• •.• A~

.. X~~.~~. .... f.'J:?~•.... ...•.. .....••

j.

Occupation of Observer .•••... ?.~t~ bQq~-C .. .. . . ... . ............. . .

Date and Time of Observation (Time to be given in local time)

. . ........ . . . ..... . ....~... F.~I-~.~ ..It'!:~ ... ...l.~.\~io1.. .... .... ..... .. ... . 5·

D..!ration of Observation(s) .... .... .... ~ ••• ~ . t~. ~

..

6.

Observers Location at Time of Sighting (Give details of own position ~ ,...~ .__ by me-_1 reference if possible, • ··· •• ·· · • ..... i • ~. -~ · ·· . . ~ • • ·· · ·l· · .~. · . · or by knovm landmalks) ~C.Iu.-.l

....•.. . ~. .. f:~ ..~.................. .. .............. . .... ..... . Weather Conditions at time(s) of observation(s) .•.••~ •••••.• .

....... .............................. .. .. ................... ....... .. ............ . "

8.

Aids to Observation( a) .

·/ -

(Describe any: equipment used in the obeel'-

...... ................. ~~::~~~ ......... ..... ....... .... ......... ......... ................... ..................... •

.......................................

Where was object first observed, eg, overhead, coming f r om behind a hill, over the horizon , etc •

. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9~.~- .. -~~ J :t..O.N.. . :-:-: ..~ ~ .... . . . 10 •

What first attracted observer·s attention , eg light or noise.

. . ... ..... ..~. ~ ...~ . ~~ ..~~... ~ ..~~j~..J~ .. ~· Did object appear as a light or as a definite object .

~ l\C.WfS ~E:D) ........................................ .............................. .............. 12.

If there was more than one object, how many wer e t here, and what ·.-as their foi1!1ation . /

•1 : • • •. • • • • . • .. • Wba • . • t. •. • ... ~ ... . 1 •.... ..•. h••• 1.... h. t. • ••• •b. ~ • . t. • .• • • ·~ ~~ • • '{ J•

was tue co our o~ t e

~g

oro

Sfi!j ·~r·\ •

J6C •• •• •• • • •• •• •\ •• •• • • •••l~'

14.

ND \ S•:-n to €..... • • .. • • • • • • • • • What vm.s ~· ts apparent shape .. . .... . . . ..........

15.

Was any detail of structure obser:1ble •• ••••••• t:-l ~. • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • •

16.

.)er E:~c...' ~£ tJoiS't Was any method Qf propulsion obvious ..•.• .. • •• •• • • ••• • •. • • • • • • • • • ' •

11·

Was there any sound . . .. .... .. ~ ~ •...J .~ ~ • • .l:--~ ~ ~. •••~. ~ /:' ••· •· •· · •·

18.

Height, or angle of elevation .. . . ..... . h~~~ . .+-:-9~ . • .... • ..... ·• • Speed, or angular velocity .... •~T~~~~ ...~..

f.l.t?Y~.. · ... .

20 .

Was the object stationary? .. ... ...... .... ~~~T!~h'-:-Y. .. ......... ..... .

21 .

What was the direction of flight vath reference to landmarks or points of tho compass.

Sov'"'f\~ ............... .. ................. .................... ... ........... .... ...........

.. ./2


- 2Did the object remain on a straight path, doviato or manoouvr~ at nll?

................... .... ........... . .... .......... . ......... ................. ..... . 'Y.~ ............. .

23 .

\Vas any t r 3i l of exhaust , vapour or light seen ••• •

24 .

Where did object disapp£ .r, eg in mi.d- ai r, behind a hill , over the horizon •

• • ••• • • ••••• · • • ..•• • ~. ~ ~.'~. ~•••~~.~. . 9 .~ .•.~.l M~ .... . . . ..•..•.....•...... .... •.

25·

Existence of any physical evidence such as fragments, photographs , or other supporting evidenro .

.. ................. ........ ....... .. ................. .. .. ....... ... ............... . -

26.

Have you obse rved any unusual phenomena previously • ••••~ ••.•..•••

27.

If so, give details of incidant(s) .. .. ............. ... ..... .. ..... ..

28.

State any e xperi e nce which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to ~ e:l'Hi 18. e~.-- 19

............................... .............N IL.. ...................... ............... Are you a member o f any organisation i nter ast od in aerial phenomena?

rJ o ................................... ........ .. .... .... ..... ... .. ......... ........... 30 •

Name and Address of organisation ..........:::: . •...•.•.. . ..... .. .•..

................................ .... .. ... .... .. ... ... ........ ... ....... ....... ....... 31.

Any addi tional information ••••• ·:h~

...~~ .. ~- ..... .

...)!A.~ .~.~ .. ~..~.~ .. ~ .. ~..·:--: .. · · ·~·~ t~·~-.';1-;~ ...... .... ............... ... ......... . Signature of Obse rve r •.$:8t<Ct:'.S. .. . .. . Location of any air traffic in the vi oini ty at the ~ime of sighting.

33.

Location of any meteorological stations in tho goneral area .

. .. . ... . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . .ff./11!.~~1Pwd. ...... ............ .............. ....... . 34 • Comments ••• b... :4.. ~! .. '!!'-!!if~ ..~f. . (~ . -:'!: ·'·<~..; · • ~ · · · •• .. .. .dt:!!-.~':Y. . .!If: .tlfot..~. ~~.6:<?..~4. r?~~ .. .~ . ~ . . .. . .

....4."1'-- : .4<~...... .. ......... ... ......... ....... ............ . Signature of (l.l~TIONS

32 , 33 and 34 to be answered

by interrogator.

Sin ce it is no rmally impossible to estimate the height and speed o-f o. strange object, it l'lill usually be better to endeavour to detenninc the angle of ele· ::~.tion of the object , the anglv jhrough which it mov.:Jd, and the time taken to do this .


INVESTIGA'riON OFFICER'S REPORT AJ:;R!AL O.BuECT OBSERVED A.tiD UliiD.I:iliTIFIED SOUND

IN TilE CARRAJUNG AREA 19TH ..tA.RCH 1967 - 21ST lolABCH 1967 Introduction 1. This report deale with the attached statements by Mrs Fergureon, Mrs HOifard, Llr.s Lawler and i4r Butler.

Unidentified Sound 2. Investigation reveals that the noise heard by all observers was from a direction coinciding approximately with BAZSLWOOD Power Station. The eng~neer at HAZELWOOD raported that on the three nights that the sound was beard a steam line bad been blown at the power station. This steam release was of 30 minutes duration, repeated at 30 minute intervals. Meteorological recorda at ruL\F Base EAST SALE show that on the three nights in question an inversion was present at the 5000 ft level. This would give a sound reflecting surface 3000 ft above the observers at CARRAJUNG. Aerial Object Observed ). The aerial objeot was sighted by two of the observers, lire Ferguraon and Mrs Howard. It appeared as a ''bribht star" on an approximate bearing of 290'1' from Urs Ferguraon and 300T from Jure Howard. They both state that there was only one object in that part of the sky. Reference to the Air Almanac and Volume 2 of AP 3Z70 shows that, at the time of observationb the planet Venus was on a bearing of 293T and at an altitude of about 9 â&#x20AC;˘ Although neither observer could give an approximate angle of elevation, both stated that the object was "just above the horizon".

4. Venus would have passed below the horizon at approximately 1940. This agrees completely with the information given by Lira Fergurson. :Mrs Howard, from ber position, would have lost sight of it earlier as it descended below a hill between her and the horizon. Conclusions

5.

The following conclusions are drawn :-

(a)

The noise heard by the four observers was made by HAZELWOOD Power Station and was reflected by an inversion 3000 ft above CARRAJUNG.

(b)

The object seen by Mrs Fergurson and !.lra Howard was the planet Venus as it descended from an altitude of about 9° to the horizon.

~~~-~

jJ .V. 28 Mar 67

ROSSri'ER) Flight Lieutenant Investigating Officer


BEPORT C? ~ 0LJ3CT CllS3RVED

1iace of Observer. 2.

Address of o·aserver .

3.

Occupation ot Observer.

4.

CABiU.JU1iG via 'i'RAlULCO:u. ffousert!'e .

Date, Time and lAJ.ration of Observations. At 1930 on Sunday 19th £arch I head a loud noise CCIIIing :from a norte- westerly direction. It was similar to a car travelling past the houe. The noise recurred on Monday at 0115 and 2200, wtd l'uesda.y at 0600, 1730, 1850 and 2010. In each case, it appeared to last for about 20 mi.mltes. On IJ.onday night at 1850 I saw a star in the west which appeared to be moving. I watched it for about five minutes. At 1930 it was still vi~i~le and almost out of eight and would have been completely ~one by 1945.

6.

Observers Location at time of sighting. reference 637 687.

7.

Weather conditions at time of observation. Clear night . iind was calm, except on atnday night, when a southerly wind was blowing.

8.

Aida to observation.

I.!ap

!lone

~ere was the object first observed . Above the horizon{ slightly north of west (290° T. Investigating Officer}

10.

What first attracted observer'8 attention.

11 .

Did object appear as a light or as a definite object. AB a light .

12.

If there was more than one object, how many were there. Only ons .

What was the colour of the light . star .

Loud noise .

Similar to a laree

14.

What was its apparent shape.

15.

Was any detail of structure observable .

16.

Was any method of propulsion obvious.

17.

Was there any sound.

~8 .

Height, or angle of elevation.

19.

Speed, or angular velocity •

• ot known.

20 .

aa the object stationary. stationary but then moved .

It first appeared to be

21.

Vlhat was the direction of flight . towards north.

22.

Did the object rems~n on a straight path, deviate or manoeuvre at ell. Straight path.

23.

Simil~r

to a star . No . No.

Yes. I1ot known.

!lowmra.rds, slightly

as any trail or ezhauet, vapour or light seen.

No.

•. ./2


- 2 -

Where did object disa;pear.

Cver the horizon .

:::X:istence of e:ny physical ~vidence such as frag::~en":s photographs or other suppc::-ting eVl.den ce . lio. ' P.ave yo-..t observe!! acy Wlllsual phenar.en

ro.

er. 28.

• reviouely.

If so, give details .

Stete any e:T-!lerienc& which ell:!bles obsez-ver to be ce=tein about the answers £ivan to 18 nr.i 19. Not applicable .

re~sonably

29.

Are you a ~ecber of ~ organization interested 1n aeriol phenomena. llo.

30·

l ume and address of organization.

Any additional information.

Not applicable.

none .

tJ.. ..::;Lii.S"~Si gnature of Observer . ••.. . • • •. , •• • ••••..•


Neme of Observer,

he Lawler.

C.L~U:G TO ....R.

2o

Address of Observer.

3.

Cccupation of Observer. Date, tiDe and duration. from 1830 - 1930.

5· 6.

Observers Location.

Age 26 .

Poet Uistress . On ~esda:r

Ya~ reference

21 at J.:.arch 1967 ,

712 664 .

~eather conditione at time o£ observation.

calm.

7.

Description of the Sound .

Fine and

The noise was Similar to a

wind blowine up or lo.td car noiseo

a.

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously.

9.

Are you a member of any organi zation inter ested i n aerial phenomena. No.

10o

Any additional informati on.

No.

None .

Signature

af

Observer •••~ . EJ..<". •~r •

••••• •


1&'-. • L . ~:lliU. CB.iEC'.. OBSE!ri.ED 1.

N::.:ne of Observer.

2.

kldreos of" Observer.

3,

Occupation of Observer.

;.

Date -nd time of observation . 1900.

6.

Observers loc~tion at time af sighting. 671 692 .

7.

J.lrs Rowaxd..

A:!e 40.

Post Office CA..li..~Uli\: . Post Uistress . Tuesday 21st Karch

~p refArence

eatb~r conditions at time of observation.

no

1967,

Cle~r night,

Wl.nd.

a.

Aids to observat ion .

Where was object first observed . horizon.

10 .

'ltbnt first attracted observers attention . We rtere diecueei&g the noise and the noticed what appeared to be a bright star .

11 .

Did object appear as a light or AB a light .

12.

If tbere w~e oore than one object , bart many were there. Ono.

13.

What was the colour of the light .

14 .

What was its apparent shape.

15.

Was any detail of structure observable .

16 .

lias any method of prepulsion obvious.

11 .

~as there any sound . Yes the sound seemed to disappear about the same time as the light .

None. Slightly above the

a~ a

definite object.

Similar to a st3r.

Similar to a star.

Height, or angle of elevation .

No. No.

Not known .

Speed or angular velocity.

Not known .

20.

Was the object stationary.

No.

21.

What was the direction of .flight.

22.

D1d the object remain on a straight path, deviate or manoeuvre at all . Str aight path .

23.

Wao any tra1l of exheust, vapour or h.eht seen.

24 .

Where did ob;;ect disappear.

25.

~iatence of any physical evidence such c.s fragments, photoerapbo, or other su;porting evidence . No.

26.

Have :rou observed any unusu~l phPnamena previously.

Downwards .

!fo.

:Behind trees on s hill.

:llo •

. .•/2


- 2 If eo give details.

28 .

29.

Ret applicable.

State any experience which enables obse::-ver to be reasonably eertcin about the answers given to 18 and 19. Not applicable . Are yoo a member of any organization interest in aerial phenomena. !io.

30.

lLme and address of organization.

31.

Any additional information.

Not applicable .

T"!le obJect :::ppeared in a north- westerly direction (300 T Investigator)

......... Signature of Observer• • . • •• • t • ·••~ •• •'-<1"'• ••••.•••


Name of Observer.

t:r R. T. 3utler.

A.ge 48

2.

Address of Observer.

).

Occupation ot

4.

Date, ti!:le and duration o~ obsel"V!!tion . On llonday 20th liarcb 1967 from 2300 until 2359, on Tuesday 21st l:arcb from 0600 - 0700, 18oo - 1930 and 1945 - 2030.

5.

Observers Location.

6.

Weather conditione at time of observation.

?.

Description of so~nd . On each occasion I heard a loud noise from a direction slightly nort~ of west. (275 T Investigating Officer) .

8.

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously.

9.

Are you a member of any organization interested in aerial phenomena . No.

10 .

Any additional information.

CAliRA.TU1iG SaJI'H

~server .

Farmer.

llap reference 713 683. Dead calm .

No.

None .

L f,, ) .t.J.J..._rr

--

Signature of Observer••••..• • .•.•••.•


i<AA-::

:

::; ~ "Ct N/

l7 APR -1 2 I I

.-

7~11

p

--- -

__)

-

F H TVL

-

R' ~PJH

1

<_

C T E D A703 UFO 1 TELL REPORT PD

S T R l

1\t:RUMB

11

E R

SIGHTED v ~

PR AT 2225 HRS

P.LU

.ITH

RED

TIM~

LOCAL

on NIGHT CLEAR \ lTH

LIGHTS

IN ONE UNJT OR

L!GHT I· FRONT FLANK~D .EITHER SIDF BY T\0 LIGHT AT ~EaR wiTHOUT GLOW

LIGHTS WITH FIHH BLU

RA.Dli\TIO'I PD DlRFCTIO

4~

nEG ABOV!:' HORI-01 WHEN

w(I.S ~

PORTED

FROM

OR

\.AS St-. TO NE ,ALTITUDE .APPROXIMATELY

FI~T ~ND VIS BLE FOR 0 E HT lUT~ pPPRuX

l

PERSO S ~T

TON REPORT U IDE T!FIED AERIAL OBJECT

IL CLOUD PD OBJ CT APPEARED AS SIX

FORM~T U

THREE

SJGHT~D

IORt!ANTO

~ 30

0

D OBJECT

11AI TAI•ED FORMtTJO J t.ND

11JNUTES

L.ATiR on

REPORT PHD ED

BY bR D PAl'JTER DCA COMMU' CS OFFICER A.T NM PD REPORT SUGGESTS uV RLYI'G AlRCR.AFT D.AR:lOU11E:A OR LR/B.,.AK TRACK BUT CO nRM:

T 0

BT

10!

ve·L BLF TO DATE


-~

I I I

't, I

-

H4R 21 ZJ 49

J PRI:I ~35

l

23 . ..-,..

路c ::

RR RA'fWPP

rE RAYQSl

0e2 2 .i. / 2247Z

ZNY RRRRR

R 2123002

n1 Hc.u:st

------路 ,,

TO RA YO./ HQSUFCOM

.-

~

- ~路 -~

..

..

\

I

- .. -

1----t~..IIIPP I DEP AI R

RE

.:>

T R J C T E P A92 UFOS PD UFO S !G HTlNG AT r ARRAJ11NG

Qt. r:IGHT OF 20NAR67 HAs BEEN REPORTED Pn INITJ Al

<ft.> ROUNI"

REPORT I S

RED OBJECT IN SKY <B> REI" GLOW (C >

L~1r C ONTI~UOUS AND uNFAMI L IAR NOISE PI" !NVESTTGATJNG OFFICER APPO!KTEn

-~


TELEPHON .

----

COMMONWEALTH

f" •

IN REPlY

PLEAS~O\.'h:m!" - -/

No

5/9/Air( 69'5

OF

AUSTRALIA

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

Headquarters R.UF Base PEARCE H.t;.

""'

21st i.•.arch 1967

:;~•artm•nt of Air, Russell Offices CAliB<>i!RA ACT or Information Headquarters Support Command, RAAF, Victorie Barracks 11ELBOURN:E SC 1 VIC

REPORTS ON AERIAL OBJECTS OBSERVED 1. Forwarded herevnth are certified copies of Reports received at this Headquarters on the sighting of Aerial Objects in Western Australia by the underrnentioned -persons:-

( a) idr. George GRANT (b) 1ur Robert JOBSON

~Lf~ (G.A. raRTIN) Fl ight Lieutenant For Officer Commanding


REPORT OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED Name of Obs erver • • ~~?~~~. ~~~

... ... .... .......... Age . ?9 •..•

2.

Addr es s of Observer . ~Y~~~~!C. !'~~9~ . ~9~L; !¥'!. yq;~t. 'fHl<}-:Hl • •

Occu pati on of Obs erver . . FARMHAND . . .. ...... . ... . . .. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . ... . .

4.

Dat e and Tim e of Ob servati on (Time to be given in local time)

5.

11 · ( s ) . 11...•.. A ~ew • eeconds Dur at 1.. on of ob serva t 1.on . . . •*'• . •••.

. .. . . 1~ . ~~~l!~~ . 9 ~ '? .~ - ~ .. .. . .. . <~·.":'J . ij . ! ! 6!•~ . t•ttttr} .. .

•• ••• ••.•.• .• ••••

Observers Loc ation at Time of Si ghti ng (Give det ails of own position by map r ef er ence if poss i ble, or by known l andmarks )

6.

.......................... ..' ... .. ....... .... 7.

Weather Condi t ions at tim e(s ) ofObs ervation (s) • • • • •••• • •• .•• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •.I!':i,l}.~ •Ef2;!.4 . QJ.4i~ .J:l.:i.gQ-ft •••. • •••.••• • • • • • •• . ••••

8.

Aida to Observation( s ) .

(De scribe any equi pment u sed i n the observati on . )

........................ ..None ........ .. ......... ..... .. .... .. .. ..... .. .. .................. ................. ...... . . . ..... ............... .... . ..

g.

Wher e was ob ject first obs erved , eg , ov er h ead , coming from behind a bi l l, over the horizon, etc •

• . . • . . '!ilq .1lh.e• •"!~~~ .1.11 .l.i.ll~ .v!l.~q .J.q.l.lt. .~vm .q~ A t\'(( .n:l.n~~ .qn .''Ell'll'l~:t:QQ .lid" 40 miles north

10 .

o ~ Perth What first attracted obs erver's att ent ion, eg l ight or noise

•• • • •• • • • •• Ai,g, .f.l.e.~:q .i.~ , W. J.:i.k.E~- ..J.;i.gq"f{:qw 11 .

• • •• . • • •• • • • •• ••• ••••• •• ••

Did the obj ect appear as a li ght or a s a definit e obj ect . Definite ob ject

.. ... ........... .. ...... ... ...... ... ... ...... .... .... ..... .. ........ . ~

12 .

If ther e was more than one obj ect, how many wer e ther e , and what was t heir formation .

...... ... ... ... ...... .......... ....... ........ .... ...... ....... .. ... Long red stem about

16.

6ft What was t he e,alour of the l i ght or object ,l.qt'\g .~~ .b.l:igb.~ .l.uminous green bottom What was its apparent shap~i{~ JV\e,p,e• .w.i.til. mn.1·~ ,'b.e\sA .l.i.k.e meatal on end of a piece of ribbon Was any det ail of structure observable • . X.e.A ••••••••• • •••• • • • No Was any met hod o! pr opulsion

17 .

Was ther e any

18 .

. Ap1 arently 45° elevation Hei ght , or angle of elevat1.on .... .. .... . ... . . . . . . .. • . · · . · · · • ·

19.

Speed , or angular v elocity .l~Dt.

20 .

Was t he obj ect stat ionary •.• • • • •• ~D• • ••••••• • •• •••

21

What was t he direction of flight with r efer enc e 0to landmards or pointe of t he compas s. ~P. ~~~~. P!. oh~er.Y e~A5• • 8~e. of.. . .

13. 14 .

15.

obvious ..... ... . . . . . . . .. . .... · ···

No

sound • . • • ••• . • • •• • •...•.• . .. • • •• •• . •. •• ••••.. ..

.ab~.

:to. rl.e:t.e.n!U.Jl.e. .• .• •• • .• • •. ••• •• • •• • . •

. .. . . . . ~t~Y~~t ?r. ~r~VPFP~.~~~~. ~~P. ~PRtP. P~. ~PP~~- ~Y.e~......... . .. .


- 2 -

Did th e obj ect r emain on a str aight path , deviate or manoeuvre at all? • •• .• ••• . •••••••••• . ._tJ} . ~ - ' H~r:~ . ~~:r~~~~ . ~~~': . ..................... . . 23. Was there any trai l of exhaust, vapour or light seen •.•..•..•

..... .... .......... . ................... .... . . .. . ............ ... .. ....

24.

Wher e did object disappear, eg in mid- air, behind a hill over the hofr~zon~~~~,.:~~~~ . !~!:fl . ~~~'? . '?~~~':l~ . :J~':l;~ . ?~ . ~~~~1 side o ··anneroo noaa . ·· Existenc e of any physical evidenc e such as fragmen ts photographs, or any other supporting evidence •...••• : ..•..•.. No

25.

........................................................ ............. 26.

Have you observed any unusual phenomene pr evious ly •. ~? .... . . .

27.

If so, give details of incidents( s) ................ :-:-..•.... .

28. Sta te any experi ence which enables observer to be r easonably certain about the answers given to 18 and 19 •• . . . .. . ...••• •..... ..... t

t

I

I

t

t

t

29.

t

t

t

t

f

t

t

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t t

f

f

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

f

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

Hone t

t

t

t

t

t

• t

• t

t

Are you e. member of any organ.i sation inte r est ed in aeri al phenomena?

Ho .. ... .......... ... .... .................. ... ... ... .................. ... 38.

Name and Address of Organisation .. ............. . . . .. . ....... . No

...... ..... ..... ........... .. ..... ...... .. .. ...... ................... 31 .

Any additional inf ormation ••.•.•••• •. •••••.••••.•.••••••.....

.... .... . . .... . . . . . .. . ..... ... ..... ... . ...... . ... ... . ... ..... .... .. . . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ne~~1s· g1.ven· v1e. tur e of . Slgna

)2 .

PMG Jines o b server •.•.•.••.•••••......

Location of any air traffic in t he vicinity a t the tim e of sighting

... .. ...... ... .... ..... .. ...... ............................ .... .... . .. . ... . . ....... .. ... .... .... .. .. .. . . .. . . . .. . . . ....... . .... . .. . . ... .. .. .. ~

)).

Location of any met eorological stations in the gener al

are~ .

.......... .. ... ..... ..... ..... .. ............ . ............ ......... ... PEBTH- PE \RC:O

34

l 1) (,, e.i. ,~e ot! eve•...i ~ 110 t llite lt:t'3 exrec-teii CommertttS • .••.••• .•• ••. •..•.•.••.• •.•.•• · • •• • • • · • • • · • · • · • · • · · •

entry. . . ........re-...................... ........... .... .. ............ ...... . . . .......... . ! f) . Pr.s.er.r.er. "!'!113. P.]:J.."Y}.p.e_ y~; ?-9?- : . ."'~. ~.iP .e.•• . •• • • .._. • • · Z 1

Signature of Interrogator • •~~:;--:-. >" ,

QUESTIONS 32 , 33 and 34 to be Note: -

ane~e~ ed by

~:-;-· ~r c.r

interrogator.

Since it is normally i mpossi bl e to estimate the h P'.ght and speed of a strange object, it will usually be better to endeavour t o determine the angle of elevation of the object, the angle through which it moved , and the time taken to do t his .


File Reference

5/9/Air (63A)

1. Further to ini'o.nnation from r.. r George GRANT at 1000 hours on 22 Feb 67, this Headquarters was again contacted by GRANT at 1500 hours stating that he had found an object in a paddock that was not in the paddock over one week. 2. The object is similar to an aircraft H.F. Aerial. Copper cable i" in thickness, approximately 45 feet in length covered by a plastic insulating material . At irregular intervale around the insulating material are white identification and/ or circuit labels, 2 " long. One end of the cable was attached to a spring loaded metal cylindrical assembly of 18" length, approximately 1 " thickness bearing the brand name "DAYTON AIRCRAFT PRODUCTS FLORIDA" and other data thought to be component n1.m1bers etc. inscribed in the metal. A further search of the surrounding terrain has not revealed further objects or parts.

3.

4. This information together with the material has been handed over to a Kr MILLS of Department of Supply PERTH who was nominated by NASA as the W.A. Handling Authority for Operation Lost- Ball. 5. Infonnation as to aircra:ft aerial or part has been passed to DCA PERTH.

~......

-./ (

....

( ~.A ,1'{,./I{{,,JI \

-

â&#x20AC;˘ /i;rt.-F


REPORT OF AERIAL OBJECT ODSERVED Name

of Observ er ..•• •1t0A~~ :~C!~~qN, .• , • , • • .• , •••• , .Age .lSI.• . ••

2.

Address of Observer. ,2.~ Ji~.I.~ .~~~:E:T. .NO,l~T.l'\ .I.N:~.lil!Qq •.• . .••. . .••

3.

Occupation of Observer • .•~U:X.~I?~G; ,qO}'\T.~C.~QH. .. ..•.• .• ••.••..•

4,

Date and Time of Observation (Time to be given in local time)

5.

Duration of observation(s) • .••~.~~qx..~M~~~ ... ..... , .. ... .

12 FEB 67 EARLY EV.ENmG ........... ...... ............. ...... .... .. .... .... ' .... ... .. .

Observers Location at Time of Sighting (Give details of own po sition by map refer... .. . ..~f.R.C¥..29. !¥.~ .~~~Tfi..'~.T••~~.I.~ •. ence if possible, or by known landmarks)

6.

......... ........ ...... ....... ...... .... .... . ..................... ..... ........... ... .... . 1.

Weather Conditions at tim e{s) ofooservation(s) • . ••••• • • • ••.••

FINE·'... CLEAR MOON OV:ERHEAD AT TIME... .... ...... ... .. . .... .. ........ .....NIGHT .. .. ·'· ............ .........

8.

Aids to Observation(s) .

(Describe any equipment used in the observation . )

3 OTHER WITNESSES OCCUPTING VEHICLE TIME OF ....... ............. ......... .... ........ .. ..AT.. ...... ... .. ..... ... .. . .. ...... ..SIGHTING ... .. .. ...... ... ......... ... .......... .. ... ....... ........ .

g.

Where was object first observed, eg, overhead, coming from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc.

ON HORIZON .... ..... .. .. ....... .... .... ... ...... ..... ... ...... ... ....... ........

What first attracted observer's attention, eg light or noise

10.

BRIGHT ORANGE LIGHT ....... ... .... ..... .. ..... ... ... ....... .. .. ..... ... ... .... ... .. .... . ~

11.

Did the object appear as a light or as a definite object .

AS PER..ANSWER NO 10 .. ..... ...... ..... ....... ... ....... ......... ... .. .... ... .. .. ..... ..

If there was more than one object, how many were there, and what was their formation • • • • • • • • . • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . •O!'f.E. P~J. .. .. . .. .. . ... ... . .. . . . . ... . . . . . . .

12 .

P.J9:FJi:.r••o~.G~ . .

13.

What was the cal our of the light or object •.•

14.

What was its apparent shape .... . ... W~P.. ............... ... .

15 .

Was any detail of structure observable • . 1~.0• .•• ••••

16 .

Was any method of propulsion obvi ous • • • ~9... . . .....•.. .. •....

'17 .

Was there any sound •. •• ••• . •• • •••. ~P•. • . • ••• • ••• ••.• . • • · • · · · ·

'18 .

Height, or angle of elevation 9~. J:IP!fl..ZP~. 1.0. •s...W.••••••• • ••••. • •

19.

Speed , or angular velocity •. J~Q~~~~. ~OY~l~~. •••.• . • • .• . .. NO - "BOBBED. UP DOWN Was th e 0bj ec t St a ti Or~Jlfn DI•s•iJ?'p'~'u' ..• ,&•••. • . •ONCE · , . • •OR • • ·TWICE •··

20. 21

••••.•• •.•.

What was the direction of flight with reference to landmards or points of the c ompas.s , ••.•.• . • . .•.....•.• .• ...•..••.•.• . • .

• . • . • . . . • . • . • • . • .. • • • . • . . • • • . . ...• "J..1. .AJ:f:l. $'SI. :-. :3. • • . • . • . . . • • • • • . • . . . . . .


- 2 -

Did the object r emai n on a straight path , deviate or manoeuvre at all ? .BOBB ·~ UP & DOWN ONCE OR TWICE THm DIS.APPl:iARED

....... ... ..... ...... .................. .. ... ..... ..... ..... .. .... .. . 23 .

"

Was ther e any trail of exhaust, v apour or light seen •• • . . • •• . A.N.::;.7EHS NOS 10 & 13

.... ..... ......... .. ..... ............. ..... .... .... ... ... .... .. .. .... 24 .

Vfuer e di d object di sappear , eg in mid- air, behind a hil l YES - BELOW HORIZON ' over the horizon

25.

Exist enc e of any ph ysic al evi denc e such as f r agment s photographs, or any other supporting evidence • . ..•.• : .. •~~ . ..

....... ......... ...... .... ............ .. .. .. .

• • • • • . • • • · • •• • • · • • . • •.•. • •• • • • • •• • ••• .• . . . •. . . •. .. •.•• • . •. • •. • •two •. .. 26 . Hav e you observed any unusual phen omena pr ev iously • ... 'tlO • •. •• 27 .

I f so , give d et ails of incidents( s) •. . • .•.••

· ----~7 • ••• . •••

28. Stat e any experi enc e which en able s observer to be r easonably c ertain about the answer s giv en t o 18 and 19 • •. • • . .• •.. ••••• • • •• •• •• •

...... ................. .............. .. . .. .. ..... ..... . .

29.

.. ...... .

Ar e you a member of any organisation i nter est ed i n aer ial phenomena? NO

......... .............. ... .. ............ ...... ... ... ... ......... ... .. 34 •

Name and Address of Organisation .• ...• .•.•.•. •••• • ••.• .•.• . ..

31 .

Any additi onal information • • ~??~. ?!~~!. DARK NI GHT

.. .... .. ....... .............. ... .... .... . . . . . . . .. ........ ... .... . ... . ~~:~~. ~~~~. ~

..... .. ... .. .... .... .... .... .... .. .... .... ..... ..... .. ..... ... .. ..... · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · be-talis· taken· b. · ~rao.· tines· tu · SJ.gna re

32.

0

f

.si Q+. ,.,..

Mrs , J . bLAYTON- Phone

o u s m . ....... . .... ... oe=-?196

Loc ation of a ny air traffic i n the vicinity at th e time of sight ing

...... .... ..... ... ..... ........ .... ...... .... .... .... .. ... ......... .. ........................... ... . .. .... .. .. .. . .. .. .. ....... .. ... . ... . .. 33·

Loc ation of any met eorol ogic al stat i ons in the gen er al ar ea .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ! .1) . JIPPPY~~.. ! ?) . ~Nt"PJ~.... .. . .......... . .. . . .. .. .. . . 34

Comments . ~~Pf?~P. ~~. 9¥. 9~?~~f9~. ~9t. ~JY~.~P1. ~~~. t~. ~AS

. ... ~Y1~~. P~. ~~?. ¥99~. 9Y~~: .. ~P~. P~~~. J~?P. ~. ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~. 9?. 9!-YtJ.. ~YQ:gS7?+ • •• •••• .19.1.3. ~ ~ - • :..:_,/ c--

Signature of Interrogator •• • .• •• • · • · · ( • A. IuARTIN)

.. -~

QUESTIONS 32, 33 and 34 to be answe!:ed by int errogatornight Lieutenant Note :-

Sinc e it is normall y i mpo s si ble to estimate the ht-•.ght and speed of a s trange object , it will usually be better to endeavour t o det ermine t he angl e of elev ation of the object, the angl e through which i t moved, and the time taken to do t his .


NN l'RB0l-Tt1'f\A f)e~

..

0 1 : t C'

uu

.

.6 I

~

~'1\i.fW pp

MAR 20

?__~

~TM~ ~ a81905111Z ~

oouou

R 19223i'Z

Fl'i RAFOPNG TO RA.IIIIPP/DEPA!R INFO RA1ROP/HQOPCOM

uNr.LA~ A!l0 UFO PD REPORT RECEtVED AsSISTANT DISTRI~T r.OMM!SSIONER

FIN3CHAFEN CUI TWO ROCKET LIKE OBJECTS WITH VAPOUR TRAILS PLUNGED INTO SEA THREE MILES EAsT GlNGALA POINT 17 945 0Z PD ONE APPEARED TO EXPLODE AFTER ENTERING WATER CMM NO REACTION FROM OTHER PD SEEN BY MORE THAN ONE RELIABLE WITNESS PD DCA REPORTS NO KNO~N AIRCRAFT IN AREA AT TIME

3 18


COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

D E PARTMEN T OF C IVIL AVIATION r-.-:

Ill

out

u ...--. ~= ....""'T __......... , . . . MJ,.:

lOX lll9

o~

r.o.,

"HENTY HOUSE,"

-.

49t LrTTL8 COLUm STIU!BT,

...............

21/tj~s7

MeLBoUllNe, C.l •

.......

,\

UN- IDENTIFIED FL YING C'BJECTS

••

Forwarded her ewith for your information and action, as necessar y, is a copy of a Police report provided to our West Australian Regional Office. We apologise for the delay in this report being made available to you but most of the delay was outside our control. This report was processed prior to the adoption of the procedures arising from your correspondence 554/1/30 (121) dated 3rd March, 1967. and we quite confidently anticipate that these procedures will obviate delays in future reports.

Encl.

I

A~. J.~~v. MOLLOY)

i (

for Director-Ge eral of Civil Aviation.


SERGEANT STOREY a

Re search for American Biosatellite, believed to have come down from space and landed in an area of 300 miles north-east of Perth, vide report in "West Australian" newspaper dated 17th February, 1967. I have to report that Mr. Ernest Joseph Hastie of )8 .Vinton Street, Carey Park, reported at this station today having read the account of the above biosatellite in the newspaper today, and recalled that on Tuesday evening, the 14th February, he was fishing at Myalup Beach north of Bunbury, and between 7 p.m. and 7.30 p.m. he noticed an orange coloured light a little larger than a bright star, travelling in a westeriy direction, and it disappeared over the horizon and apparently fell into the sea•

Lrr. Hastie said that he watched the light for a space of three or four minutes and at the time thought it maY be a satellite, but was puzzled as it was travelling so low. Re said the light appeared to disappear below the horizon for a second or eo, then rose again a few feet before disappearing altogether. He said that the appearance of the light rising may have been caused by the action of the \?aves, although at the time the sea was extremely oalm.

Mr· Hastie said the object be saw definitely fell into the sea, and when he read the account of the biosatellite in the paper today he thought the object he saw maY have been the oiosatellite that is being aearohed for on land• Perhaps this information could be passed on to the appropriate parties concerned through the Department of Supply, Department of A:rm.Yt Swan Barracks, Perth.

Bunbury Station, 17th February , 1967•

Sgd:

A.G. GEE• Serge. 2/c 1981•


~

RGs. TR.1C..n: I)

. MEMORANDUM

For "" wlchln 1M MN 01111 Write or print c/O<Jrl1

OUk ALE

~;,ij/At~ fr,, lif)

RMF FORM A213 MAR 63

DATE

FROM

W~ Of't:-RATI&NAlJ

bf=P~

TO

DA~

DCj/'4~

LO MM 1\rrv I) ATTENT10N

67-

RffEkENCES

~~~ BA)(.t€ R.t

At~

/

SUBJecr"'

11'\JfG"Li-.IC.-GNCt

·- UFO

SIOc1-tnNC.5

u J:o

'\

...

"

....

~------------------PRINTED NAME

A

C~

RANK AND APPOINTMENT

fC.ru-

PHON E EXTN

G, o.J TL"l.L..o c.o.o.

9111


RESTRICTED INTELLIGENCE - REPORT OF AERIAL Olg!beT ODSERVE.D

(Operational Commund ASI

3/A/5)

1.

PART 1 - REPOll.T BY OBSJ::RV'rn Mr John ALDERSON Uot known Name of obseNer . . . . • . . . • • .. . ....................... • ..... AGE . . . , . ..•..

2.

Address of observer. J.l,a.1.1. ~ A6.1. • .f»U{V.ALE .QLn••• •••••••••••••••••

I

• , • • .. • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • . • • • .••••.•••••••• . •..• Pttor:E . • ••.•••••••••• Occup:~tion

).

Not known

.

of observer . ... . ... .... .. ..... . ................. , •

. 2240 K 19 FEB 67 Date and time of observat1.on ...• .. ..... ................• .. .. ,, . .•. , , . • .

. Seconds only. Duration of observatl.on ... . ..•... ••. . • ......... . . . ......... . .... •. ..... f . h . Prooeed.inB along the Ipswich Road . Observers 1 ocati on at t :~.me o s:Lg tl.ng •••.•..• •• •• • . ••••• ••••••• •• ~ ••• ne~ the GAILES Weighbridge - in the direotion of IPSWICH •

5· 6.

......................... ,. ..............."··············,.· ·············

. . ... . . Nil cloud Visibili tv 25 miles Weather oond1t:Lons a, t1me of observat:J.on •• .• •••••••• •• ••• • •••• • f • • • • ••

.. . Lf+PfP. WJ:e~~. !'e~. m.~ F~ ..... . •.......•..•...•.. . ... • . .. .. . . .. Describe any aids or

8.

e~uipment

used in the observation ••••• •• • • •••••• • .

Visual observation

······"··· ···· ······· ······· ···· ·· ··· ·· ····· ······ ······ ···t····· ···· ·

.......................................................................

Vlhere was object first o·Jserved? (eg, overhead, coming from behind a hill, over the horizon • To the north of Ipswich Road

...................... .................................................

10.

..

What first attracted obserrer's attention? Fiery light

(eg, light or noise) •

.............................................. ....................... . ............................................ ......................... . '

"'

ligh~

11.

Did object appear as a

or as a definite object? • • ••••••••• ••• ••••

12.

If there wae mora that one object:-

Fiery light ....... ................................................................ ........... ........... .... ................ .... .......................... No

(a)

how mll.ey' wore there? • • •.... . ..... .-: • · · · · · • · • • • • . . • · • · · • • • • · • • • • · •

(b)

in what formation were they? •• •• • :: •.••••.•• • ..••• ••. ••••••••• • • •

13.

What was the colour of the light or object? .. ~i!.d.ql~t/..~~:r:'!. .. •......

14·

What vras i te apparent shapo? • .. • • • • • . · • • · · • · · · • • · · • · • • • • • • · • · • • • • • • • · • ·

Fiery

No Was any detail of str ucturo obaorvabl.e? ••..•... • •. • • •. • • • • • · • • • • • • • · • · ·

ru:5TRI CTED

... ../2


IIESTRICTED

- 2-

16.

Was any method of propulsion obvious? •••••••• ~?...•....••....••..•.•..•

17.

Was there any sound ••.•••..••••••••••••••••.• ~?. ....... , ••..•........••

18.

What was ita height? ( or angle of elevation) .D.e.s.o.e,n.,~ .a.P.~.e,n.t_l'!. ";',e;,ticuly

19.

\Jhat was its spe~d? (or angular velocit: ) ..... ~~p~~ ...... ............ .

20.

Wac the object stationary? .. ... .• .. •• ... •..... ~~ ............... , ....•. .

Vfuat was the direction of flight with reference to l andmarks or pointe of the compass? Deeoendi.l'l8 vertically in area of GOODNA. Mental Hoepi tal

21.

.......................................................................

Did the object remain on a straight path, deviate, or manoeuvre at all? No

22.

·······································································

.Was any trail of exhaust, vapour, or light seen? ••••• ~?·~··········· · ··

23.

....................................................................... 24 .

\'fuere did object disappear? ( eg, in mid- air, behind a hill, over the horizon) Appeared to disintegrate just above the ground •

................ ................... ................................ . ~.

_.

I

25.

Do you know of any physical evidence? (such as fragments, photographs,

or other supporting evidence) No .......................................................................

26.

· No Have you observed any unusua1 ph enomena prev1ous 1y ?.•• •• ••••••••••••••••

27 .

If so, give brief details of incidont(s) •••• ••• ••••• •••••• •N~~•••• •••••

........................................................................ ..................................... ................................ . '

28 .

·.

State any oxporience which enables observer to be about the answers given to 18 and 19.

reason~bly

certain

N/A

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o •• , •••• • • • ••••••• ••••••••••••

29.

Are you a member of any organization interested in aerial phenomana? Not known

30.

Name and addross of organisation ••• ~/~••••••••• ••• • • • • ••••• ••••• •••• •••

............ ..................... .................................... . .............................. ....................................... . .._

31

Any additional information which r e lat._s to t ho sighting.

.................... . ... ..... .. .. !i~~ ........ ........ .. ................ . At an adjaoent service station two other people advised wi tneseil'l8 the

Uei:Y' ot»jeci: · · 'T£.8 •A~-tiJ.18'h.ere:in ·;lex-a· ad.Vi~ea. · i~ •i.b.e 'iPs\~licii' i>~H~~; ·

:~tien~~.;?.:~~.~~~~~~Y~ff!~~.~ . ~~~.~~.~~~.~~~V9~~9~.~~~.tf~CR oe 100 bB.v~ -.:;he GOOJJ.NA PoUoe investigate the sighting.

po

Inquirmee

by

the Goodna police could not produce

any evidence to eUPPR!SrR!MEJSlighting.

. ..... ./3


RESTRICTED - 3 -

PART 2 -· UNIT EVALUATION Tho' followil'l8 military o.ircraft wore ; n UFO position at tho times-

32.

t.hu vi n'i ni

ty ot' tho raported

Aircraft typo • • . •. • ••••••••••••••••• !l.i}, .'llf.~.~!. .~"f.O.r.a.f.t. ,i,n, .a::.e.a_ ••••• Heading • •••••••• • ••.•• · • • • • • T • • • • • • • • • . • • • ..• •••• T • • • •••• • ••• . •.•• , . •. T

Haight •• , •. ••• . . . .. .• • •. ,000 ft • • · ·. • · • • .. • ... ,000 ft .• ..•. ... , . . • OOOft Speed • ..•..•• • • . . · · • • • • · • • .K • • • • • • • · • • . ... • • • · • • • • · ~ .K. i . •. • . .. .. •. ... , . JC

33·

Tho following civil aircraft woro in the vicinity of tho roportad UFO position at tho timo: Viscount TVI l.ONGREACH - BRISBANE ATA 191247z

Aircraft type . . ...•... ... • • • . • • . . • . • . • ... • . • • • .•.• • ...... . ............. .

~ ••• •·: ••~~~<2q'P:~ .~ ••~ql}~ .•-: .l!~\Wi •.• T.~:~ ..:~:~~~~ .a~x~%~n ·

ATD

191246z o~, 188M .

~ • .. • • • •Bakota • • ·~OO:&fie:sANE • .... ·SY/JNEl ' ,ooo ft ......... . ,~p,'l~

~ · · · · · · · · · · · ·· ··· ···X·· ······ ··········· ···· ·l· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·i 34·

35·

Calc~lations

show that tho

~ol:~~"%zPlg£~s o:; ~~h.!J.tf'5 v<fler~~ t~bve

Wri~tlfb~fflk a]28~~Jl.in,tr· ALDKBARAI-t'19' aegreEi ·a.oova~norfzon .bearing .........300 .....(T}. .......No....planets .........evident ..........at....this ......time .....•...........

EAGLE FA.Rr.4 Airport at 2100 hours from •••• •• • • •• •••• • •• . • • •••• •••• • W/V generally from the South Ea.st and could have been in the reported UFO

A mateorological galloon was 1100 at •••••••••• z

position

~t

rele~sed

the time .

The Steta Obscrv~tory in the nearest capital city affirms that aerial phonomona in that portion of the sky at tho timQ were No meteorite ~pwers expected before Anril • •••• ••• •••• • ••• • • • ~comot, m<:rtGor'l.tG Sliowor, Ct'CJ·

.. 37 ·

Any othor rolovant remarks (eg about satclitos, rockets, rasoerch belloom.s) ...•..•..•.• . .•.... .. .. .....•. . ... . .. .. • . . • • •., . • • • • • •

Nil ............................................ ........................., . 38.

Thoro is conclusive ovidonce thet tho object roportod v1aG• •• • •• • • • • • • • •

No conclusive evidence ....................................................................... ............~ .. .... ...... .... .. ........ ... ........ ........ ..... ... ...... . '

Not known

39·

Tho objoct reported could havo baen • •• ••• •••• •••• ••• • • ••••••• ••• • ••••••

............................ ............ ................ .... ...........

RESTBICTED

'


F..JSTR!CTED

O:a...;:::;c: CBS.:.?.":C:.:;

( Cp.ar~;;ior~a::.

Name of

.

:'J --=and Ks=

Laurence .;oseu!l

3/A/5)

oou......ou::;e

..... Adul ...

.. . .. . . .. ,. •. . ... .-.. . . . . . . . ........ . r ..G~ . ...... . .

ooser\rc.~-"" ,

2~1

·a~cho-e Roa~

. ... . ........... .

Address of o'bser-"er ........ . ..-.......... . .... ,. !' rt _ac -J.u.,rie

2.

~'m e • •••••• • • • • • . • .•.. .. •. ••.•• ••• ••• • • •••• •• PHONE , •.••• • •.• •• • ••• ,

.d. ,

Fishe.rman Occupation of obsl:::!rver .. •. ... . ...... • ..• . .. . . . . ·~ .... . . ........ . 20th FebruarJ 1967 ruidwl!fn d.dni ....t t . . . Date ana tl:nc of observa.tlon . •....•..... .. . ........... . ........ .

5.

Dura,;ion 0f observation . ..AJ!J!.r.o.x:i!DfJ..t .eJ..J/. ,1,5, .s,e,c,op,d,s, . . . . . . ...... . .

6.

Observers location at time of s i ghting ,F,i ,s,h,ip

,O'{l, .OJ.S.TJ5~.

pAY..• ••

area) .(Port . .. .. . 'ac ... uarie ..... .... .... ... .. ..... .... ..... ..... ..... ...........

'

·l ~a··mer concn tions at time of observation .CJ...eJ3..r . : .i A.1;t, ,Y~,i;tt"• . . . ...

7.

.s.-fl.l .l , . .

e.

!'.1!1.... .r f . ,c,...,o,U,d, ?}l;t, !l.OP..e••iP-.

Describe any

~uds

.~U:3!l-FMJ.:t•

.0"!. •s .iJl..h'!:.i-'fl/5.•. obs~rvation

or equi pmen;; t..sed in the

. . . .....

•.. ... . . . .

. . . . . , . .. .. . • , . • . . ..... . Y.i.s .llflJ.. _op.J.y, •.•••.•• • ....•. •. • • •.. • •.... .

. .. ..... . .. ... . .. . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . ... 3.

.. .r.-:r-: .• as t<_c-.. firs-;; observtd? (eg , overhead , coming from behind ~ ~i_::. , ou.:r +h~ hori~on) . NW rom ob::;erver ·' c:; degrees above horizon desce:r.d nD' ,., r.~t ver·~'icPn;r· t.h't' 'i h' sllghli' L>. -.-v10 . r'~ut !.rst a troc~ed observer ' s attention? (eg , light or noi se) .

a.rc· :rroin' wt: d.irecHon' · · · ·

y, ·'· · · · · ·

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~r~er.~ . ~~c5!'t~ .......... . .. ... . .... ........ . f

••

I.e

.

t

e ."

t

t

11 . Di d nb j<• r.+, ':1.ppv'.r

.

I

"\.A

I

e • • • • • •••

t.

0

I

••

t

t

I

t

I.

t

.

I

••

<I"

t."

I

•••

n J.igh~ or o.s a. defini +.e obj eo ~? . ••........

.. .. ...... ... ... .. ......Li~ht - ..... ' .. .. ............ ............... . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . .... . . . . .. . .. . . . ... . . . . . . .. . 1 2 . If

1 • _.) .

l

.

tL~rc

.va::; ::lore tnan one object: -

there? .... ?t;l~ . 9~ · . ..... . . . . ... .... ....... . .·1he.t fol"ffiation we:!".:. tc.ey? . . ............ · · · . · .· i· · ~·· ,· · Sligh~ ···· A b~i•ht

(a)

how many vte:!"e

(b)

~:1

'1/hr..t wo.s the colour of tho li~t or object? '-l.nt \':as i 't3 o.ppnr~nt shape'. .... 9~fQ'-.4':r . .

l:Y . :e .... ! ....... · · · · · · · ·

. ..... . .. . .... · · · · · · · ·

15 . ,,as any detail of struc"':;t~re L~S~.;rvablc? .•.. -. . . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · REST.RICT::ID

.. ./2


RESTRICTED - 2-

.......................... .... ... .... ..... ...... ... ........... .......

16 .

Was any method of propulsion obvious?

17 .

i'las there any sound?

18 .

What was its height? (or angle of elevation) • .4.r:.

19.

',/hat was -~ts speed?. ( or

20 . 21 .

22 .

0

" ·~::es A0ovtl • -.. tsee '317 · · · · • · · · ~ 0 -

Rapid .. ~: .~e.~I.~"."!i:!4 . ve 1 oci ty ) ;-••• . .... - .....esce:.."l4:5 •€. a- os t; v .. r"icA' Was the object stationary? •'To • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ' • • • • • • • • • • • ...t:~v, • • • o ........... ,, ~<L.>.ar

What was the direction of flight with reference to landmarks or PQt.n~ of the compass? De"'ce.m-<1 a-wO:o .. • erticall., bu.t in s.L.ght arc 'row n.. seen :C11 ..: .; ·u:r.'E!ctt:tdrt · rtd ·en; f!tVet ~· · • · • • • • • • • · · • · · • · • · · · · · • • · · · · · · · · Did th~ object remain on a straight path, deviate, or manoeuvre o.t all? Descen~.ng in slight arc .

................ ..... .... .... ....... ......... . .. . ....... ..... . .

23 .

VIas a:ny trail of exhaust , vapour , or light seen?

.'~o

••.•••. .•••

• • -; -~~l:lt• •~ . ~~8: .... ~e; .\q ;q~ .l:\ . ~\~!'!"!! .J.~gtrt: .v.:J.t.11~~ .~• .t.a. --.J. .q~ .d.~t.x::i.~ ... . 24 .

·;there did object disappear? ( eg , in mid- air , behind a hill , over the norizon)

25 .

Do you kn0\'1 of <>ny physical evidence? (such as fragments , photographs, or oth~r supporting evidence)

... ........... ........... ...... .... ......................... ... .. ~0

26 .

Htwe you observed any unusual phenomena previously? • , ·.o•• . .•••• •

27 .

If so , give b rie f d eta~·1 s of

·

· d ent ( s ) .• Observl;:r s .tes .• ••••...• ••••rJ""'i • . . .• •

~nc~

• : ~e.X:~ ~~ .m.t.t.e.0.X:~t .e.s. •h.a.d• •b.e.e_n. .s.~g_~t.e.d, .v~h_i.l.e, ,t.i.s."~.i?.g. ,i ,IIJ'fC.e.l}-.a,t .(:...;t.•

rrio1

28 .

29 .

~o

This siehtine. nowever , v1as n<""t 'f l"i"gnt"s': · • · · · · · • · · · • • · · · · State any experience w_lich enables observer to be reasonably c...:rtain about the answers given to 18 and 19 . s ecial experience but an 11 outdoors 11 t~ pe C.)!J.scious of' · · · · --r ·~ ·~ ·a 'c1ttt: ·dru •· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Are you u !l'le'CI.bcr of any organization interested in aerial phon·~

omena?

30 .

re 1orted sighting.

1 . . r_-r 11' "1.<1 ·rr~evrrM.s1.'Y "oos'ervea 'rri.e"t 'e'o'r

................ ........ .. ......... .. .. .............. .. . 0

"

Hamc a11d address of organisation •.. • •••.... . . · · · · • • · • • • · · · · · · · ·

.... ..... ...... ... .. .. ............ ... ... ... ... .. ... .... ......... 31 .

AnY audi~ion~ info~tion ~hich relates to tht ~ighting . "'he ob. e_ ,.._ s".. ~es ~hat 'the sig11ting was ....e ... cending r'-' i .J..~ but <'..t .•~ :;-, .... ~.... • .::~;r. · "'2.-~• •15. ~;::-a.e.s. ~·.e. ;tl'...e. i: .!• •li"l· .::.ot· , ,-. e~,_-oo to be "l ., e.:1 -~i 'llt as .. o~_ ..... occl.l.r +I'> the deplfl " "' c: a

"':t:'."!J!..""._.. ,e.•• •• • ..e:~ ;a.s..£t_ ~ .::1.

es,+~t.e. ~;.e. ..:;,...c;.~

ce. .;:;cc;. • • t e• • o ...t~-"· ·~!:

ob., .. "' e Ovserver coru iaer ... .J.. s .a e ..- to 5l _i ... e.s" . P..e. ~ e.t~ .t~.:a.~.•...i.s. .es.tj,."':'..ao+~.on. oi . e;....: .....t vue• fU: . •.• e • occec-t· "s~ e• ,_e.~ :? ou~ 3... , vCO ... eet 11 • He a ... so str e hnt · .e i. "e..sit.;· of .. t.~ ......6 ut .... .1.u .uut ai .•inisa as eTrec1.ea wio;n u meteor~ e/ r

. ..... ... .

.

......

RESTRIC~ZD

·· · 3


IW5TRICTED

- 3I'~R'!'

32 .

2 - l.iK: T £1ALUATION

The follo·,.;irl€ mili ta~· aircra:t -exe in the vicinity of the r eDOrted L?O DOS1tion at ~e time -

None - Opera-ions c!1ecked at 7iiLLL;;.::

v

a:.d

::rc::·: ·~

Aircraft type •••• . . . •••......• , .•••••..• • ••..•..... , , • . , •.• . .•• Headinp •.••.. •. •• . • .•. ....... : Height •• •• • • .•..••..•• 7 000 ft

••••...••.•. T ••.• • • • • •••• , ••••• T •...•.....•.. , 000 ft •.••••.•... , 000 !'t

Speed • • • ••• • . • . •..•...• . •K •••••• •• •••• • ••••••• K ••••••••• , , . • ••••• •K

33 .

The followirg civil aircraft were in the vicinity of the reported UFO position at the time :1IOne

Ai rcraft type .. .. . .......... . ... • , . ............. . .. , .... . .. , . , . , Heading . . , ...... , .... . T., .. , .. , .... • ........ . T .... , . . . ........ .. . T

Height •••••..•...•.. . ,ooo ft .•.•• . • • ..••••• ,ooo ft ••••..••• • .. ,ooo rt SJ>eed • ••••• , •• • ••• • •• •• , • •K . •• , , •• • •••••.•• , •• •K • • , , , • , , , • , ••• • •K

34 .

Calculations s:!lo·.~ that the following planets or major stars were in that portion of the sky at the time:- •..• • ...•.•• . .•• • ••••.••

... .,.,..~ ..applica'Lle ........ .....-..object ..... ....reported ..........as ... .desce .........a.ir ..... . .. . 15 •

"

35 ,

. 1 -...-11 "ILLIN-:;: ~ ,, mete oro1 ot;1ca ....,. oon was re1 eased f rom ••••••• • , ••••••••.••.• ,

1100

at •. .••.•..• z an1 could have been in the reported UFO

(:rote : lind direction supports possibility but type of sighting does not . )

position at the time .

36 .

The State Observatory in the neaTest capital ci-t:y affirms that aerial phenomena ir• tha-;; portion of the sky ?- t t.he. time were:

.t ~~~~ihybrlot¥!1~or;y advises t~t no s~gnlflcant meteorl. e

•.•••.••.....••.••... (comet , meteon te shower , etc) ,

37 .

An~· other r':!levant remarks (eg ubout satelites , rockets ,

research balloons) .•1).9 •••••• • •••••••••••••••••••• • ••• • •• • • • •• · • • • • •

............ . . ... .... .. ... .. .. , .. ....... ............... .......... , . " "

}8 ,

'

There is conclusiv9 evidence ~hat the object reported was •••.•. • .•.

... ... .............. ... .......... .... .............................. ..................... ....... ......' .. .... ..... ................. , ..... 39 .

~he

a lar"'e...

T

a..1

.~"~r

1 Mc:;.eorite

obJec• roported could have been • . • •.••....•. • •.•.. • • •••••·•••·

.......... ......................................................... 40 .

Tho ca~sc

\OT

likely cause} of tt~ sighting canno't be detcminv.! .

cQ(L~~ •~, • • • • IL.~..I.-.. • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

_,_. ,

(Un·1 t)

1 + 1 r.~ ·. · · · · ~.'- . :\~ . ;.u.~:r;~ ...--'.'": .. .. . (Date)

RESTBICTED

J ¥#

•••••• •

vLJ..i't

••• #

••••••••••••••••

'lame;)


ou.-.

FILE

RAAF FORM A273 MAR 63

ATTENTION

kEHRENcts

ArRJ

1

PRINTED NAME

RANK AND APPOINTMENT

1

PHONE EXTN

c:.O.o. OH7


(Cperahonal ~o:ncand .•sr 3/a/5)

1.

u'se -!"'•e!' , ! .':'?J•• !'f"'f!~... .?.-f:. ... .....••n~ .... ... , . , , • , , • , . , • • ,

ile'!le c.

••• , •• , •• • • •• , ••••••••••• , •• , • •• , •• • • , " , , •• , • , PHONE .. , ••• , • . , •• , , • , . , , , ,

Or.:cupation of observer . •. ,. , . ~f!ff.~.

3.

De te and '!;ime of observation

~<;.!f~... , .•. , ,,.,., , , , .... (7f~ .. .'~! .. {~ (~-. .~ ....... , ........ 4

•• , . ,

1.0. .7: . //. . f1tN ~ .. ,,., .. ,.. ,...,...,

5.

Thtra tion of observation ... . ... .. .

6•

· 1oca t·1.on a t t 1Gle · Cos!'!rvars of

N'.ti

· ..... !SH,Lt?.S Sl.gO. ... 1ng ,, •• •• , , , , , , , , , , , • , • , , , , , , , •• , ••••

. . . , 9.~~ t!~~tt/.0.'7!1~~ .. , ."':( rf'f!. ' ......... t

t ••••• ' . , ••• •

cathe:- co11ditions at time of' observation •••••• • •• • ••• •

•••• ,

t

• ••• t •

••••••••••

••• t

••••••

.........?:I.~.....'!.#-!P. .• .. .. , .••. ... .•. ••.••...•.•••.••.... ... ...•... 8.

Deacribe er;; airls or eq 'i]Der:.t used in the observation • • ••• •• •••.•• ••••

. . .. . .((IJ~t.fP. .. :/:~ .. -~~(.. .7:. -~~- ~."":'.":'.O.<P.Gt.~:?~~ .. t

.~e=e

j ,

~~3

object first obser1ed?

••

(eg,

ov~rhead,

coming f r om

b 'ir.d a bill, over th_ :.orizon) .

t, ••

~

.. .~(.Q .t-!~f. ... .Q!~~R':-! .. .rtf..~!'.":.. ~}J: ."!:f . .(f. ~~f: .Q.• . ~s-~41(~

10.

·~at

first attracted observer ' s a ttention? (og, light or noise) ,

..i::~Cr!!'. ... 'l.t::"'i!-.'j .~!~... .......................' .... . ......... ..................................................' .......... . Jid objoct

11 .

a~ear as a

light or as a definite object? ••. •. •.•. •.•• . . •..

.. . .. . . .~( ~ff..... ....... ........ .. .. ... .. . ' .... ... . ' ... ... .

.................................................................... .... 12,

If

•ne~c ~s ~ore

~n:1

{) (b)

in

·~!l2t

than one

\,

obj~ct:-.

t'ert: thoro? . ... ... , • •.

, ~ f=: ., .... •.. ••· •· ••

fOI"""...le.tion '"'rare -:;l::ey-? •• • , ••• , • • • , • • • , •••••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

13.

~t

m.a the colour of th"'! light or objcct? ..... S.d-,':~~J.'

14.

lh:.t

n:":.3

l

C'3 ~ny

its c::p!}~rcnt sbz:";te? ., .. ,, .. • • ,, .. ,, f'l.r,l,..,. ,.

-

...

, .,,,, .. . .. . ..... ,.

dct.c.il of str..lct"..;._rc obscr~a.ble? . •...• . ................ •• ··· · • • •


- 2 -

: J...

.... ....... .

16.

35

1~ .

os ttere ~!!:J :- ;,..ncJ.? • ••• • • ••••••••• • ••• ••• •"!) h.J . ..•. . •. ... . .••.•.•..•.

.i8 .

'h:.t

19. 20 .

an:r ccthod of prapulzion ob--ious? .• •• • •.• • •• f'l

•13s

heigh~?

its

'l!r.t wee its opccd?

(or E.J:f;14ar

velocity) .~M . t:~I!-P. /~..1'!~ . !9:-1'.~'!"'~

NO ·

·r~~ t'hc ob1"oc... sta ... 1-oY~ - -? •'-""

....

...

"'

...

~.C.~. !f.~~.~ .. 'i:. . ~•."Z;t;~

(o= angle of eh:vt..... "lO!l

"o.Q -

• •• , •••• •• •••• • ••••••••••••• •• ••••••••••••••••

!l'l.nt ~ra:: th" d:.rnction of Ilight :nth :rofor~;nce to lQr.d!i".a.rk:s or points ~f tho cocpass?

.. ........ .. f:i{~M .. ~:f.O~C.'J ..QI.~C.11 ~• ••• •f9•. •.1:;-.r:-.! § . . .. /~~.'?~~~~ . . 22 .

Did tho obj~ct rem~in on a str<.i~ht path, deviate , or ~ano~uvr~ e.t o.ll?

Snl\1~ •••• f

2~ .

t

f

f

f

I

t

f

t

a

t

t

I

t

f

I

••

I

0

f

t

t

t

t

f

t

I

:E!o c.ny trnil of exhaus t, vapour, or l i g1·t socn? ..

f

I

t

t

f

f

t

•• f

f

f

•• 0

t

t

t

, ,":), ! ~ .... . ..... ... .. . .

···················································· ··················· r.~ro did oojcct disappear? (eg, in mid-air, behind a hill, over

.!10 ~orizon)

.... ....

~~~~ .. f+;o~~~ . . .... •. .. . ......... .. . . . . .. . ... . .•..

o ;tou :-no··: o_ c-r::; ph_ysical evi.dence? (such as fneoonts , photo-

T~phc, cr otter supPorting eviden ce)

........ 26 .

'

.tV. 0.

I • , • . • , • • • • · • • • • •

..... ..

...... ... .

Have ~rou observed any unusual phenoL'lena previously? • •.. • ~ 0

?t~ If so , ~v~ brief detail s of incident( s ) . •. • .•• ~••• • •• , ••..•...... •••

.. ........... ........................................ ..........' . ··· ···································································· ".

23 .

f'tato any experi ence r•hich enabl es obs erver to bo COJ t i•1 .bout the ~n;:;·7.:.r3 given to 18 and 19.

r.Jason~bly

·:0~~~A·~~P~1; · :plf!l9!~x~··U~lf!ff~1P.t.~{/ri,t./c,s..1if~ ... 29 .

ru you c. mcmb<Jr of

pho:-c.ccnn?

a.n:r cr'::D.niza tion intcrost~;;~d i n ae rial

Nu ........................................................................ jO ,

l•c.m. c.nr.l adnruss o.

or0 .ni~tion •• .• •• :-;-:-~ ···•····· ····· · ···· ·· ······:·

................................................... ... ................... ~1 . t.ny =.du.1•io. .a~ iYU.erm.:l tion .-.:: ich re.~.atcs to the :agJ1t1ng .

.MW.H.. tvr.S.... ~.tJW. ..8g!~~-.~... n+~N ... .1/~t:J.~ ...••t;~... . H~~ ..~.~c=;.. ~0::~ !~.-. . !¥.(~<!: .a.ff:'f~. .o.f. rn~ ...Y.:tt!~t.t.. .

Pt.AIJtnS c1c. ..&:-.._TA-fvT .... .......Stetrns ..... ......Mui ......oFi£N .........ScTN .. . .. ...TA.:.ti.J ......M-............. . '

. ./3


RE!:iTRICTJJ!)

- 3 I'All't' 2 - UUIT ~V.'.J,UATICN

32.

Tho followinr, military c.ircxeft were in tho vicinity of tho reported ~~position at the time .-\ireraft type • • ••..••• , •• , •• •r:J.1.~ FondinJ •..... . .. . •.•.•.•. •T

... , , . , ......... , . , . , . , .. ,..... .

.

••••• , • • T • • , .. ,., . ... . ..... T

Haight , .•.... • •...• , .•. , 000

... . .......... ,coo

ft •........ . ,ooo

rt

3pcod •• . ••••• , •.•.• •.. . . K •• , , •••••••••••••••••• K., ••• ,, •• • • ,., ••• ,, .K

33.

Tho followil'l8 civil aircraft we r e in the vic inity of tho roportea.

UFO position at t 11o time : -

"!. ~ ~ , ..........,....,, .. ,......

Aircr a,ft typa •••••.. , • , • • • , •... .

licaditlg, ••. . ... , ......•.. •. T .• , • • .

. . ..... . . ..•. T ,, .,, , ,,.,,,., . ... T

. t ••••...••.. • .•• ' 000 ft .. , ... , ... , . 'coo

Speed .,,, .•• ,. ,,, • , . . • • , ••K.,.,.,.,,,.,, . ,,,., ,K, , ,,, ..• ,, ., , ... , . ,K

34 .

Calculutlons show that the follo~ng planets or major stars wcro in thet po::-tion of the sky at the t i me:- • • . •••••• • ••••••.••••••••.•

.................~~..·............................................ . 35 . ,, motooroloM.cal b"'Eoor. was released $' /)N(::~... from ,, ...•• '/., .•'/. •,.,., .. , .. • a 1: •• (

7. P.'P.. ,Z ~.nd

could have

be~:::n

in the reported UFO position

r.t the time .

36.

Tho ::'tat•:: Cb3ervatory in t=.c nearest capital cit;r affirma that a.ori:ll ph,.momcna in that portion of tho sky at tho time wore •.. , , , • • :-; , • ••. , ......... , . (comet, meteori te shower , otc ) ,

37 .

r'l~rks (og about sa telites , rockets , rco:~arc, balloons) , . ,,, •. ,. ,, , ,, .. ,.,.,.,.,,,, . , .. . , .. ,, .• . .. , ..•• .• .•

Anr otl:.er rolownt

.... . .... . ... f4f fl llf l tflfftlffllflffl··· · ·· · ·········· · ····· · · ··· · ··· 38 .

Thoro ia conclusive evidence that the obj:::ct roportod was ............ .

-

........ , .............................. , ............................... . ······································································

Tho object ropo::"tP.r could have b~en ./J. .~.1.-M<Jr/. .. f.,_,,;:: . ~Y,. · T!t1::-.. •

.~~..!: . ~.A~~ .. pe(.k~., ~'{~..~~~ ..Lt? .w.~::.~ ...~~~~D~ .....

liM€ ~TOR/ 10-11 ~J ~Antt:R l>otJQfull 40 . 'L'hc cau:1o (or likely cause) of the sighting cennot be dotcminod .

••· •· ·~ ••~ ..~.':1 ... .... .CIJnit)

·.... ,A-J .. ~~f · .......(Dato)

··· ·~· · • •••••t21o.~1o)

. , , , . f.~ ..... .... G ' .... L-1, .,, .... •, .. ,.,. ( n·~n'•)


RESTRICTED INTELLIGENCE - REPORT OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED

( Operational Command ASl 3/A/5} PART 1 - REPORT BY OBSERVER

1.

C~ JOBB HOII.l' Name of observer .•.• .• . •.•. .. ••.... ... . . , ........ .... .. . .... Age •.•• M>•• •••••• ..

2.

Address of observer ••• ~- !'!. :~!!!'

..fl!"!P.-'F. MW1~. 9f.1tPf¥1J•• •wn~u:.......... .

6544 OB3175 .•.•••••••••••••••..••••• • .•.• .••.••. ••• • .•.•••.••••••••• • • Phone . •••••........ IWlAGEi Occupation ot observer . ••. ..•.•. ...... .•• , ........•....•........•• .• •..• , .....

Date and time of observation •••• ,1?, '!f4B. .~7.• . •~I:r.~ ,1••,5.61.••11••• .OA ~·.OA ~.).\. .•• •••

10o-15 SECOBDS Duration of observation ........• .. .......•......•.. . •.... ••••• ..•••...••.... . .

6.

Observers location at time of sighting•••~ .~S. !~q~ .0'!. .'1'9'!P.SJ.'IJ.!#.. .OP. ••••••

Weather conditions at time of observation. ~• •s:;~. ,q.ppp, •••••••.•••••••

........................... .......... ....liCHWI .......ROAD ................................ ·•·•·•·•···•····•··•·····•··••··•··•••········•·•····•···••····•·•••·•·•······

8.

Describe any aids or equipment used in the observation••• •••• • ~••••••••••••• l ... ..•....•.....•............. . ..... . ..• . .... . ......•. . •••.•...•.....•.......

... ••..•.•• •..••.•••...••.••...•....................•.•.•.•...•••...•••.•.•••. Where was object first observed? over the horizon)

(eg overhead, coming from behind a hill ,

Sl TO DE JPPROXDIA1'ELT OvtliHLAD ...............................................................................

What first attracted observers attention {eg light or noise)

............. ~- P~. 9t5f~9'!' .........•..•...... •.•....••..•...•..•..........

............................................... ...............................

11 .

Did object appear as a light or as a definite object? ••••• •• ••••••••• •• •••• •• •

DEF'IBITE <m.n.C'l' .•........................................................................... . .............................................................................. 12.

If there was more than one object &(a)

how maey were there? .•••••. •. ..•••.••... •~/.4

(b)

in what formation were they? •••••••••••••~/.~ ••••••• •• ••••••••• • ••••• •••••

.......... ...... ..... · ••. · · •·

13.

What was the colour of the light or object? •••~ • •• •• •• •.•• • •••• •••••• •• • •••

14.

What was its apparent shape ..•• •• • • ••• •••• ••••Af'.~R.Of. .~~~~~ .~q~lJit~ ,i),W.,JULAli

15.

Was any detail of structure observable?

JiO .....................................

•. .. . /2 RESTRICTED


RESTRICTED

- 2 -

Was any method of propUlsion obviou Was there any sound?

17·

?

10

a. • • • , • . • • • • • • • .. • • •. • .• • • • . . • • • . • • • • • • • .••

· · · · · •• · · · · . ............... liP.• . .•.... •. ... .......... .... ( or angle of elevation) ••• ~~1'-'-r. &PP~nY ~- ~ .lPPS>P. n ...... . (or angular velocity) ••• . •• w-,.w.. ,,..~~~J,... m

V~t was its height?

19.

What was its speed?

20.

Was the object stationery.? • ...... ... .. ..... . . ........ . . ... .... .. ........... .. .

•o

What was the direction of flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compass?

SWTQJE ..................................................................... ...... . '

22.

Bid the object remain on a straight path, deviate, or manoeuvre at all? PATH DESCEliDDlG ..................... ......................................................... gr}LUQB!l'

23.

Was any trail of exhaust, vapour orlight seen? • •••• ••·•· • ·•······· · ········· ·

BO .............................................................................. 24.

Where did object disappers? (eg mid-air, behind a hill, over the horizon) m::ImiD A CLOUD APPROX BACK OF OVlllli'T'AD

25.

Do you know of any physical evidence?

.. .. ... .

... . ... .... . ..•.. ........ ......... ...... ............................ . (such as fragments, photographs, or

other supporting evidence} . 50

...............................................................................

Have you · observed any unusual phenomena

26.

previously? . ~~•• •••• · •·•·•·····•· • ••••

If so, give brief details of incident(s) •• ••• •• • ••. • ~/~•• •••••••••••••••••••••

............... ................................................................ . ............................ ........ .................. .................... .. . 28.

S'ate any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to 18 and 19. COllS:m.:RABL... EXJI:RIENOE AS AIRCB.AFJ.' PASSECOEII ..............................................................................

29 .

Are you a member of any organization interested in aerial phenomena?

....................................~~....................................... . 30.

NO Name and address of organization . .......••.• • .•. . .•. •. •. . . • · .. · • • • • • • • • · • • • • • · ·

......... .. ..... ...... ... ...... .. ........................................... .. 31.

Any additional information which relates to the sighting••• • •• •••••••••••••••• 1'10

.............................................................................. ......................................................... ...................... ............................... ...... .. ......... ............................... . .. . . . ./3 RESTRICTED


REST.RJ:CTED

- 3 PART 2 - UNIT EVALUATION

32.

The following military a ircx'aft were in the vicinity of the r eported UFO at the time: llAAJ' C130L fll mJ Aircraft type •• •••••.••••.•.••... ... .. .. . . .• . ...•.•••....•••.••••••.. .. ....•.. TL-WLt

Beading. . • • • , ••• . •••••..••• .. .•. T .•••••.•.•..••. ..•• T • •• . •••.•• ••• .•..••.• T

ASC J'L215

Height ••••••••.•••••• • •••• • .. OOOf't ••••.• • • • •••.•• C>C>Of't •• •• •••••••••• • •• OOOft 3(m

Speed. .. .. . • • . ••• , ••••.•.••.••• •K ..••..•.. •••• ••.•• •K •••..•••....•.•••••• •K

33.

The following civil aircraft were in the vicinity of the r eported UFO po~ition at the time , _ PAN AUEBICAN CLIPPER Jm Aircraft type . ..•.• . •.•.. .. .•.•.. ... .•......•...... . .. . . .. , ....... . ... , .... , . . NOtnmA-DAR

Heading••• ••••••• •• • ••• •••• . ••• . • T •.•... ••.• . ..••••. • T •••••••••••• , .•.. •. • • T

FL 310

Height • ••••••• ••••••.•••••••• OOOf't • • .• • • ••• •• ••••• OOOft ••. ..•• •••••• . • • OOOft

45<l

Speed •••••••••••••• •••.••••••••• •K •• •••••• •••••••••• •K •• •••••••• ••••• •..•• . K

34

Calculations show tha t the following planets or major stars were in that portion of the sky at the time

............................................................. ................. 35.

A meteorological balloon was r el eased from ••••• • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• at ••••••••••••••• z and could have been in the r eported UFO position at

36.

The State Observatory in the nearest capital city affirms tlaat aerial phenomena in that portion of the sky at the time were : • •••••• •• ••••••••••••• •••• •••.•••.••.•••••• (comet , metoeri te shower, etc)

37.

Any

other r elevant remarks ( eg about satelites, rockets research balloons)

............................................. ................................. 38.

There is conclusive evidence that the object reported was •••• ••••••••••• ••••• •

..................................................... ....................... . "

39.

The object r eported could have been • • •• •• •• •• • ••••••••••••••• ••• ••••••••••.•.•

............................ .... .. ............ ................ .............. . '

40.

The cause (or likely cause) of the sighting cannot be det ermined.

/'Lt'V./~ ~.:a~

•·••·.If.t;_ •!Y..{. .,•............ Unit

• •• / . . : . : ••••• • •••••••••••••• •••• •Name

••••(. ~...~::~ ••?. 7. ....... Date

h.-~-

• •• ...• . ••• • ' •••• . • •• • ••.•. •••••• • . Rank

RESTRICTED


-路 '

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE TELEPHONE: 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND

RAAF TEUGRAPHIC ADDRESS: " AIRCOMMAND. MELBOURNE"

IN AfPI.'f QUOTE

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

5/6/Air( 31 )

(

2

DAft UN-I DEl~IFIED

FLYING OBJECTS

Forwarded are reports, investigated by this Headquarters, of aerial sightings by the undermentioned civilian observers . ~his Headquarters has nothing further to add to paragraph 34 of the questionnaire. John Howard THOI.:PSOI\ Ivan F. BAP.TLETT Kenneth F. BRETT F . ,, , DI:rGER & family

!Tewtown Geelong Vic Blackburn Vic St Kilda Vic Brighton Vic

&~ Encl

I

(L . B. BRONN)

Wing Commander For Air Officer Commanding


' ;~

OF A~l.U,h-

OBJ'"~CT

OBS .....BV .m

Ob!lerve~· . . ./rA'! . .~~~"!~ • • ~C!~..fRK. •. . Ap,e • •#. ... .

1.

Numc of

2.

Address of Observer ..~- ~?7':-""i-?.

3.

Occupt."1.tion of Observer .. . S.tf-:-1:'"~ ..~~&.-r.,.~;l ....

.:,. .

:::>· te

ru

... , . ..... .

Ti~te of Obser·.;-ntio::l ('!'imc to be given in loco.l time)

.... .. 0P,?... .-~~· ·.. Y.·M 5.

% ~~~/.:'~"7 ,.,.. ~c:r-~~~ ... .

••

Durativt-:. uf Observ'1tion(

.?.'dn:-/.. pH., ........... . .. .

I). .... -~ . ·~.~~~.-4?........ .

6.

Ol.servers Locc.tion at Tir.:e of Sighting (Give details of OW"l ..1.-.L_ J1 _ j _ .1' }:>Osition by map refer.::uco.:: 1 .. .... . ~ .. ~..• ~· . ...•. if possibl.: , or by known landme.rks )

. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .... ..... ....... . .... .... .... ..... ... .. . ~

?.

'iteathcr Conditions at time( ~ ) of observ<>tion(1 ) · ..... . . . .... .

. .lf"f:.(rttJ."). EiP.~ ...c~~rv: .. .~:-!11.. .......... .... .......... ... .. . 8.

Aids to Obs~rv~tion(s) .

(De~cribe any equip~ent ~sed in the

observation)

..... ... . k~.~~ ................... ........ .. .... . .......... ... ..... . 9.

'i7r..ere was object first observed, e.; o,·er!.ead, con:.ing frr)m be:lind a hill , over t::te horizor., etc .

r

. . Ki¥.-. ~ .. ~e;;r..-. . 10.

~ .~r.. - ..... .... ............ .

"'.'l.at f:.rst attracte:d obse:·vcr ' s attentior., eg light or nois.: .

.......7M. ............... .. ..................................... '

11 .

Did object appear

~sa

light or as n

definit~

object .

·· · ··· · ~····· · ········ .......... .... ........................ . 12 .

If there was more than one object , how many were there e.nd what was their formation .

·· ··· ············· ·· ..... ............. ........ ..... ....... ..... ... .

£t!d.r.zr.~trl7'·

13.

'[/hat vtas the colour of the light or object ..

14.

',7hat was its appa •.'e:'lt shc.po ... ~---; ......•............

15.

Ylas any detail of s~:ructure observable . .. ~ . . .••. • ...... · ..

16.

Wo.s any mctil.od of propulsion ol)vious . . .•. ~ . ....... . · · · • · · • ·

1

7.

13 .

"los ther·.: any

soum:. . ~~·~·?-4 ·~/47-

Height, or &nBle of elev:-tion •.. . q;:~. .....

- .... . . . · · · · · · · ·

19 .

Spe~d,

20 .

·.-:c.s t!1e object stat:..o!:~ry .... ~&? . . • .••••• • .••• • .•. • ...• •• •• •

21 .

iiho.t .to.s the d:Xection o:: fliGht or pc..ints of tne coml,ass . ..

or a!'lgular

velocit~· .. ~. ~~ . . . .... . \':it~l refer~nce

to lar.dmarl;s

. . . .7 ~... ?.<-!....:.-r;1f!-; • .•~ •• •¥"~ ........................ . .. ... . . . . /2 .


• -2-

.. .. ....... ............................... .... .. ............ ......... 26 .

ne\·e you observed any unusual phenolll~::na previously .. • ~P. ••• • •

27 .

If so, give details of incident(s) . . .•. ~~ • .. . ...~ ........... .

. ...... .. ....... .. . ... ..... . . . .. .. . . ... . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . ... . . . . . . .. . . 28 .

State ~ny exp~rience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about th~ answc:..·s 5ivan to ....aras 18 and 19 .

...J.~.~~·~··~·~·~#

.. 'f/.'..~..~..~.. ~.~ ............... ........ . 29 .

J.r~

you a uember of an;-; organisation phenomena? .

i~ter~sted

in aerial

....... . ... . . . . Rt:: ........... . .. . .... .. ......... ... .... . ...... . . ... . 30 .

Name and address of organisat ion . .. .. ........... . .... . .......•

. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .... .. . . .. . .. . . .. .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 31 . A~':Y additional information .... ~... ~ .. ~.. ~. ·~· ·.--:~.~ .. ~.~;.~.~.~ .~.~.. ~~- .. ~..~~......... . .. . . . ....... .

~; .•.

Signature of Observer ..• 32 .

/

Locati on of any a ir traffic in the vicinity at the t i me of sighting.

····· · ····· · · · ··· · ··· · ····· · ······· ~~··· · ······ · ···· · ····· · ·····

.......... .. ............ ........ ~ .. ...... ...... ....... ..... .. ... . 33 .

Location of ::my metecrolo5ical st·-tions in the general ::.rea .

········ · ···············~ · ······· · ···· · · · · ··· · ········· 34 .

Collllilents ....~......•... .~

. ~. ;(.~ ..~.~ .~~~~

........ .... ....... ........ ...... .. ....... .. ......................... · ···· · ········· · ················ ~~~~~~: · ~~ - ~~~~~~~~:~~~: ~: QL1ESTI0:1S 32 , 33 and )t, to b..J ar.swared by

intcrrog~tor .

ncte ... Since it is noro.~lly i:z.!Jossible to estimc.te the height ar.d speed of a stra~e o'oject, it ·-.•ill usus.lly be bett ... r to endc"vour to determir.~ t~1e al'l,.ele of elevation of the object 7 the nnc;le through w:'lich it moved "'nd the time t ::1kcn ,;o do this .


/0 •

R3i'ORO OF .•L. : •.: CCSJ"CT'

1•

!la•e of Obs erm· ..

O~~::;·•!IJ:

/

~

jj

- -/&. <I

l..N;~ .'":".'t:t.l~~<..~~.<f.~ 0 . : .'{.• . f!-7.,. .,L'J

a c ~{};SS6;:~~~er·:er . fl.~..:.:'~. ~. :·.~-: Y.4.< '_ '·.~ ~ ·(* '~

2,

o~cupahon

3,

bser·•er ./A4:'t-.c.~ .. !~ . -::c...fP!:-: ..~..... ... .

of

L

r, .-

.

I V ~ ~~e an~ '":c~:\~:~!0/t::=-t:o.r>) (':'itle ~o be given in local tlme)

/.It~ · : · · /. · · · · · · · · · · l t:·~:<. · · · · ~~~· :~· · ( a_;a~~~· ·) ~ ·····

· · · · ·t 5.

1/· ...... ... ... .

Durat i o~ of Ob.:;erva;;ion s) . • .. . . · .. · . . ....

Observers Locetian at ?ir1e of Sig'ht:tng (Give details of own

6.

[.., G (_ "c&t .... ~. ~~.... ~ ... ~ ~ ....................

pos-i tior. by map reference if possible, or by known

landmarks) ......................................................... '2 , ·:... .

Weat her Conditions at 11ime( s) of observation( s) .. ~ . ~~.. ..

7.

. .. . .r: .f::.~<>:-:~ : .•.. ~ !:.J .- .............. .......... ............ .......... .

·'·

8.

Aids t o -..>~erv.ation( s; . (:Uescri be an:,• equipment used i n the £ observation)

Jt ...i

....... ............ ............ . ...... ... ..... . ...... ............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.

'lhere was object fi'!:'st o"oser-ved, eg, O'Terhead, com::.ng from behind a hi1l , ov~1 t /1 horizon, etc .

~

....':-~:·..(-:j.. .~ :':.'/ ... f.?. ~ ../l.'".~: .... ............ ............... .

. :z:t.

~~

f i:st attr~cted ob f "' r·;e; ' s attention , eg light o:- noise .

. . 7-7. ~f..... .--~(~:~.cf. J .

';"

I+

12.

6

Di d object appear a~~ :icht or as a deflnite obje c t . L e. .;) 'L A /.ct., ... ;.../ ~

11. I

:£'" 1. ~:~. .--:':"?:~ . ~J-?:-:"':":-:/~:'. .": .'i/ll!ft-{.. . . ~ / t:~'J··~~ ' .~~~ ~'-';I

I

I+

I

I

I

•.

+

I

I

It

I

I

I

I

It

I

I+

I

I

I

I+

+

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

+

I

I

I

I f tnere was more than one object, how many were there , a nd

Ytf at was tf'e i r format i on .

. . . . . . . . .c. ::,.'! ......................... . . . ...... . .. . ' :pt ·...... ' 1~ "'""'t "'as the co 1 our o f .... • t ••••••••••• ~ ,~ 4• ••••• .. .r.e 1·:t;;n+.. or OOJeC .J'

.. .....

..

14 .

't'ihat was i ts apparent shape ........ . ...................... .

15.

Was any detail vf structure ooser-;able ..... {(( r;, .'.... · · · · ·

1 o• .

-r .._hoa• o f propu1 s:2.on · · ( "' cr • "as an~r me" ob v:Lous ..................... ..

17 .

~8.

LA. . - • ..as tb ere any eout.c.. ...............•..•.......... ·· ·········

m

~~ . .9. :1:. ············ · velo.::i't:,· ... ( ?(. ~- ~ .. ~#~· f.P..~· •" '·

Height , or atlble of ele...-a'tion. ...

...

19.

Speed , or angular

20 .

Vias

21 .

What was the dl.rection of fllllht w1th reference to landmarks or p~i~ts of~e com~ass ~ . -

the ObJect stat::.onary? ... . ..

().~ . ~ .. : . . · · . · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

........'f ~ ?! . .h....-~ ...-~: ....&.....,....7 /.~~~~. . ! .:.:-.". ;.~ . ~ ~~ ... /2 .


- 2-

22.

Did the object remain.on a !traight path, deviate or ::1anoeuvre at all? f/ _/ /

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4~~'---~".4¥-. .. ... 'I ' ........... ............... ..... .

~ig!l"t seen ... (2. .C:. ·.... .

·,7as any trai 1 of ex!:a1.<.st, vapour or

23 .

2L .

obJeCt disappear, eg in mid-air, behinds hill,

d~d

lihere

,...j" o-.rer "the horizon .

~{t-_..~{ t'-<d ......

.

...

..

25 .

~.._ L'-o-(I..J..J_

.:w>l

...................

of any

~xister.cc

.

U

)

C

.....................

.

.........

eviQence such as

phys~ca~

••••••••

fra~ents,

qr ot ••er support:.ng evidence .

photog~aphs,

f

",(/-c.-(. .....

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0

0

••

••

0

.........

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

..

. . . .

.

pheno~ena previous~~· 7..

26 .

Ha•te you obsorved any ur.usual

27 .

I f so, give details of incident(s) &.'; . 1 ..

2P. _

State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to ~ and

29 .

Are you a member of any

..-:"f;(";. ~ ...... '... .

Ht

{~tL.(J ... ,.._P~.I . ....,~:-·~.{ , v ""....,..'-~""'/{ J -..i• I .. ~~C'v..~.;-y &~c.n.t,,c{,~ · · · ·f'· · · · · · · ···; ,:..:,.,· ;.,..< ·..L\:,·· ~~ .:.w · ·9·e, ·· ·: ·:.. ·; ~s ·:.:.~,~;; ~'i 1. 'W_.:~) phe~omer.~? •••••••••••

30. •

••

0

•••

{'~ •

•••••••••••••••••

]ace and Add!·ess of •

31.

o~gar~sation

interested in aerial

~

0

0

............

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

organisatio~ ...............•............ ••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••

••••

Any additional information ....... .. .......... .... .... ... ... .

.

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

>r ··

· · · · · · · ·· · · · · · · · · · · · ·· · · ·: · · · · · · · · · ~ ·:;-~·-~·2f{, ·ii:-···~i ·,:; tJ/ S~g.lature OI ubse~ver ... ... . . ........... .0-rA 32 .

Location of any air traffic in the vicinity at the time of sightlng. N I L..

e

<I

I

"

e

t

e

te.

33 .

I

0

e

f

+

I

I

e

tete

0

t

+ e

+ e

e

f

e

t

t

0

0

e

t

e

tete

e

e

t

f

t

t

tee

o

eft

e

e

e

t

+ e

e

t

e

e

e

e

e

teo

t

e

e

0

t

e

e

e

o

e

e

e

f

o

o

t

e

e

t

t

0

fete

f

1J

t

e.

e

e

f

o

e

I.

0

e

e

e

t

e

t

t

e

t

t

e

0

e

e

e

e

f

t

f

Location of any meteorological stations in the general area .

,v ! L .. ..... .. .......... ' .................. . ............................. .

34 .

Comments: . ~

!r . ~. (~·:". ~-r:-+rY.~r -~-~':"

. .{

.~ . · ~Jk -~

"-dv(. ............ .... ..................... ... .......... ...................

········ · · ····· ····· ....... ···· ~~~~~~ · ~~ · ;~~~~~~~~~~~~:: :: Q;Jr;S':'ICNS 32, 33 and 34 to be ar!s ered 'by in~err 0 ga·tor.

Note.

Since it is norma.ly 1m~ossib ~ ~ to estimate the height ar.d speed of a stra~e object it will usually be better to en1eavour to determi~e t~e acg:e of elevation of the obJC?Ct, the angle through ..._ch it moved, and the tioe taken to do this .


------------------------ ~ ---------------

REPORT CF 1.

.,

<. .

AERIA~

OBJECT OBSERVED

~ .f~ . . ~ . . . . Age. l-5': •. l.ddress of 'Jbserver . 6..8 .. ~ . A.!: v A.t: . ~, ..lN..t. . Nallle of Observer . .

Occupation of Cbserver .. - ~ ·. ~. . ...... . ..... . 4.

DRte a1d

~~

e of

Observat~on

(Time to be given in local time)

... .4-... 1• •f.:,.]. . .. ~ . ~- . q, ~o. pn. - ~ . 6 . ~· : 4> .7. ot~t.J.o f1'1 . 5.

Duration of vbservation(s) . . 4,. ~~ ................

..

6.

Observers Location at Time of Sighting (Give details of own 1\ • "" JL 11.position by map reference . ~. ~~ - ~r.~ . ~ - ~"-· if possible, or by known ~ .j_ --~~ landmarks)

n

.~ . ~ . ~ . ~ •• 9 .~ ••~-....o~. ~ .~ 7.

.~

8.

Weather Conditions at time(s) of o"oservation(s) . ~ · · ·· ·

. ~ . ~ . ~. ..-v..~.v.~ . ~ . AI~··· ..... . A~ds to Observation(s) . (Describe any equipment used in the

.

observation)

.. ft .. ~. Ar . ~ ..3 . ~. ~~ .............. . ......... . .

. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.

Where was object first observed, eg, overhead, com:::.ng from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc .

.~. k.. ~ . ~r~· ~ · ~~A-.~ . 10 .

What first attr::>cted observer's attention, eg light or noise .

.. A.. ~· ~ · ~············· · · · ························ 11 .

ilid object appear as a light or as. a definite object .

... ~ ..~ .......... . ~ ··¥ ··· · ·· · ·············· 12 .

If there was more than one object, how many were tnere, and what was their formation .

· ···· ~ · ~ · ~ · ~ ····· · ·························· ·· ··· 13.

What was the colour of the light or object .. ~ ....•

14 .

What was its apparent shape .....~

15 .

Was any detail of structure observable .... ~ ............ .

16 .

Was any method of ~repulsion obvious ..... ~ ........ . .... .

1? .

Was there any sound ... . ................

18 .

!ieight, or angle of

19 .

Speed, or angular velocity ..~ .. ~.···········

20 .

Was the object stationar:;? ... . ..~. ...... .. .... · · · · · · · · · ·

21 .

"/hat was the direction 0f flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compass ...

~ · o...*

:?:l.c:-: · · · · · · · · · • · · · · • elevation ... ft....5.~ ...t>;=. ~ ... . . .

. ~ . ~.~. ~.uk&::~.£vJ:::. .~ ~ ~~~~

... /2 .


-2ll :::tr·ti~ht

Did the ol:>.H•ct remain ou :"'1'\nocuvr ., '

22 . AL

path, deviate or

.. ~ .. ~ . ~ .-(:;;:'"~ ... ................. ....... . ... .. . ~tas

24 .

\There did object disappear, eg in mid-air, behind s hill over the hori=on . '

..~.

h.. . ~ ····· · · ···· · ····················· · ·· ·· ······

25 .

:Existence of any ;hysical evidence suer. as -Pragments, photo~~o~h~ nr ot er supporting evidence .

any

trn~l

o!' t:.u.a'"".)t, vapour or light seen .. :r.k:-.... . .. .

23 .

. . . .~ .~..-t.=:~ . ~...._. -~ . ~- -· .... ............. .. . . 26 .

Have you observed any unusual pheno~ena previously .. ~ ..

27.

I f so, give details of

28 .

State any experience which enablei;> observer to be reasonabl y c ertain about the answers .;iven to 1 ~ and 1~-

incident(s) /? . ~ . ~ .~~.&.~ .

····~~~ -~~. h;;.. ~-- ~~~~ -~ .~- ¥ 29 .

Are :- ou a r.ember of any orbanisation interested i n aerial phenomena?

........l.k-....... .............. . ............. . ................... . . J O.

Narue and J..ddress of orgar. .isation . .. ... . ............••.......

-~ . ~ . ~J)~ .·?-?~ .~-;·~-~.. ~~. -~ ·~ ·.t;;o.~ ..t;:; .~. c-. ~ :-.~~~ -~~ -~.. ~- ~ . ~ ..J.;. ~ .. .

Y'.

J..r:.y 'idditiol::;:. infor'Tiotion .

SiJ..ature of· Observer .. -/~. ~ ... .

32. •

f

Location of any air traffic in the vicini ty at the t i me of s i ghting .

••

0

f

I

0

t

0

I

0

0

0

I

I.

f

t

0

t

t

Itt

tIt

-""'L 0

t

f'

0

t

1

t

t

t

tot

t

tot

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

f

t

to

I

o

..

t

0

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

.. ... ............ . .. .. ...... .... ........ .... ........ . ........ . .. .... "

33.

Loc at i on of any meteorological stations in the general area .

. . . . . . . . .7!'4( . i I 1 ?: Ll , ..... . /.'.:~~~ ........ . ............... .. . .

~.c.~ . ~ ~ -~ ~f. -~~~ .~ .k:~ . ~.... ·~-~-(-~. -~· .~/:<.:~¥~

34 .

Comments .

~~~~T~O~~· 3~,. ~3· a~ Note

. -;>;-P. • •

.. 3,· to.

••

be.:~~::::~b;<~~:::::=::;~~;

Since it is normally i~possiolc ~o estimate the height and speed of a strange object it will usually be better to endeavour to determine the'angle of elevation of the object , the angle through which ~ t moved, and the time taken to do this .


f

OEJ-:c: ObS:SV:D

~PC3~ 0~ A-:~~: ,: ;.,

,.

,....._

2.

.t.ddre~s

of

3.

Occu. 'J.tior..

1)ate ar..d

1.

"t •

) ,.,.&.JA. vi,~...,

I' .I •

, ,.. •

..,$'

,. ., . e._,.,.

.H:l:nc of '~·..,ser·:er .,... • .. .. , . · · ...................... J..ge ••••..••• ~· c. · ~ r., ,., &...,:, .> 1

Ob::;~r-:er . . !-1>. .<'.t;~- .~'7<-, . . ~~'?'.'-.~ ... .. ..... . .. . . -...... e .::- ••••••••••••••••••••• ~;·'"" , ·~-< 7 .I -.. /..:"~/ .. J. o_ o·OS;.:~. ••••••••••••••• •• J>

~i:~e

or'

Obst)rv-o"t ~ o!l ~':i:11e

to be given in loc:ll tim<:)

""b6 (/': l'fl . ''· ,..,>L ~ -4•.-?, .......... . ...... . ....... .. ...... . ... ... ... .. ................ ...... . . ; - "\ f

5. 6.

,

-

.

.

(

..(.,...._.,~~'

)

(/...-~-~I

.i..lurat::.ot~ uf vo-.~e:::vut::.or: s .•. . • . ••.•••...•.. • ••.•... . ... . . . . . o~·m

Loc ...tion a..t Ti-_e of Sig.•tiug ( -1ins d!:!tails of ./ 01serYer::; 1.,. c-.,.... ,J, 0'/...J~ ~-,...,.. .tJOSitionbymaprcfer.::u~ .... bl or b k nown

A I ..._,(

• ~ •• ••• • ,

A l?i""'"f

t<A;,

")

••• " . • • • • • • • • •

!.1.. {~~'!.~":~

~""'

I

,._....,

• -""

• ••••• • •• ~-

• • • • • • • •

tJOSs~

~,

y

*.c.:~. :7.'-.. '!':'. .JJ."?.<: ; ... ~a~~~~~~~ .•.•• • •..•••..•

Co~1ditions at time(a) .of observrtion(s\) ... 4:r..': ... . .~~ ..cf~t · ?..~~~t: .. ~#~~ ~/. :":'~:-.

7.

\reatnt;r

•••

8.

Aids to Cbsuv:::.tion(s) .

•• • • • •

•••••••••••

••••

(::}-a-,crib-= at!..:· e1uip1110!lt used in the

... . . . ... ~-.~~1. .-:7."7'. -~~ - ....•... . ........ ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ... ..... . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . .. . S.

i'ihere "/CIS O~Jjcct first oos~r..r~::l , e,; o.·er:.ead, con:h:g from behind a hi ll , over the hor:.. zo~, etc .

. . - ~~-~~': .. J. !:1:\ . ./ ..... . ~~/~:-:- .. :-:1: .. ~~~ . -~ · :~ -~~-: ...... .. 10 .

\That f:..r"'t

attr~c:;c:d

ooservcr ' s e.ttenti or., eg light or noi::;..:: .

. . . . . . .~/. . ~ .... (. ~:- . .'.... ~.~:~~ . -~~~ ... ..... ................... .

11 .

Did ObJeCt appear ~sa l~ght or ~3 a defini to object . t;'_ I'C

,c..--,

•••••••••••••••••••••••••

12 .

t

•••

••

••

••

••

•••••••

••••••••

•••

I f t!lerc was !!lOl'e than one object, how many were there and wha;; wa:: their for "tion. "........

iP .... £'-

.. . ... . .... . .. .. ... . ...... I ......... . .. . ... . .... . .. ......... .. . . . . 6""".! L'-/- (./'< C"(_ , . . 1 3• dhE> t ·.·tes the C:>J.our ')f tl·•.: l:I.ght o:r obJect •..•. { .• . . .r. ••••••••

w~.s ~t" t snape ...... i-/cq ... .., appa ...'e!! . .... ../b-;r .......... . ... . . · · . · · .

14 •

':T11'"'t

15 .

Was any

1 G.

lhls uny r:ethod of propuls::or. o?vious ..... ~.::' ........... · • · · • •

17 .

'7as there ar.y sour..:l ......... . ... 1':'"': .......•....... . •. · • · · · · · · H · • , or engle o.~.~ ele\3tJ.o~ .."'II-? ..t-_,/,........, G /~.r 1-Y'-"•'"' .. 4... 1-~ . c::.e;t:., ..... r.·................ . .. ·~~ 1'.<~

1 B.

H . ....

detail of

s~r~.lcturc o!>s~r~;aole.

#<:>

. . . . . . . ... . ...... . . .

..

,.:

"· h~ ·/ :L, ·- • ..I.~.:: vpe..,c. , or a:-1gu1 ,_.r v-elOC1. ..-~· ../~ , . , •.... · .-... · · · · · "-'" · • •1':> · • ~.c • · • •"/..L.,c • f~,,.,

19 .

c:

20 .

•;,. S ·t '--

-

.... ~

ObJ" ecv... ~""~"'"4 ~ ... .,..., {/c -~~v-0 ...... - .:J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. ........... . ..... .


- 2-

~~e=e did object disappear , eg zid-a~ , behind a hi~l, ~•er t)1e horizon '""'!. . . . . .!Je . . ~-<--. .-.....c.f . ~..,. ,._,~, . . • . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24 .

. . . . .. . . .

25 .

... .

.

Zxistence of

~ny phys~cal

nhotobre~hs ,

or other

. . . .. .. . .

evidence sue. as frabrments, evidence .

sup:~ orting

,//~

. . ... . ..................... . ...................... . ... . "

/f..;.:,:;;~

..... &

26 .

na't<: you observed any unusual pheno".ena previously~n-~ . ~'

21 .

If so, give detsils of incident(s) . . . . .~ ...... . ......... .

·'I

. .. ..... . .... ..... . .... . . . . . . .., ...... ....... .. ' ....... ...... ... .... . 28 .

St3te ~ny experience which enables observer to be reasonably certair e.bout the a.nswez-s giYen to paras 18 and 19 .

"' "'·'~..7.': .~t:~ ~.--:, ..t":--:.: Af(.~ '.. :'..~: S .·.~-~ . -:~. ~~~ Jr~! . .X. , ;;:~ .': .~ .~~.e_ .~~ . . ~~.':":<: !. :~ . ~~(<;":'........ . . . . ... .

L

29 .

kr~

you :1 ucmber of phenooena?

ar.~- orga~isation

iz:terested in aerial.

.... ...... .... .... ......... .... .............. .... ... .... ...... ....... 30 .

Nar:le and nacr3ss o f

. t'H>n • organ~sn

k= •• •• • • • •••••• • ••••• • •••••••• •

. . . . .. ... . . . . . . ....... ....... ... .. ....... ........... ......... ... .. . "

32.

Locat ion of any air traffic i n the v i c i nity at th 3igutine;.

,!Vft.... .............. .. ... ..... ... ..... .... ..... ..... ..... .... ... ... . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .... . . . . . . , . .... . .. . ..... .. .. .... .. . .......... . • • ••••• •

"

"

"

"

"

"

Location of n~y meteoroloJical st~tior.s in the g~r.era~ are~ . ........... " . " . . . . . . . . . . .N .i t... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ .

33 .

. . .. . . .

34 .

. ..

Cot:ii!ents . J .C..-1.. ~~ . -::<?.

. ..

~.~~. ~ . ~.J(~

..~. ~.~.· ...~. ~ . :'?~t«':4. ~ .. ... ....... .

~~~~~~~-~~:· ~~-~~~-~~-~~-~~-~~:::::~:·::~::::::::~~~~ note ... Since it is nort:J.ally i_,..':>ssible to estimnte the height -:nd spe~d o::' a stra~e ooject, i't ·:.ill usu~lly be better to cndcqvot~ to determine t~e angle of elevation of the o~j.e~t 1 t::e c:r:tf':e th::.·oug.: w:uch it mov.;d nnd the time t,

>...:!: 't 0

0

tl:'.::.., .


'2_.\

RES T~I(Jl~D

- MEMORANDUM

Fo< use wilhin lhe AAN only Wtl ce ot print c/«<rly

OUR AlE

S.

RAAf FORH Al73 HAR 63

FROM

I')

I

/llt_q;

(!(J

3)

DATE

fJt>M MA "-1 J) ATTENTION

RefERENCES I

Jk ~ ~- ..k-k ftoAD ~ 0. ~ ~ ...-k~ UJ=AA ~ ~ . .

(o.)

SIGNATU~

PRINTED NAHE

A

C'~a=r-J

I RANK AND

fLTLI

APPOINTMENT

-.

Uf:

-'1M4W

{;,

I PHONE EXTN

Luv lcl..LO 3q 0 c.o .o . 9777


COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

TELEPHONE :

20 537

ROYAl AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

..:."'xt 50A

Puolic Relations v1fice Headquarters Operational Command , RA. .,:;5 :>ii r;k:;on -:o d

13/7/Air (30)

•. I:.:.J::RS ~v i:T l'

ITS

: 3tL Febru....ry 1967

Headquarters Operational Command Rlu'"

P~llUTH

JS'!'i

(Atte~tion :

lg Cdr Dick)

UUID.u.fTr::?LD :'LYING OBJ"'.C:::!TS

1. Enclosed is a selfexpl.anatory report by Mr P. rf. rlynes of /entt'10rth Falls relative to a UFO sightine;. n1en submitting the report to this office , ~r ~ynes gave into custody a roll of unexposed colour film. The report was retained pendin~ receipt of the processed films 1hich ,,ere thou.;ht to have been lost . However , "•r Hynes has advised that the films .;ere returneJ to him and are now in his possession.

2. The enclosed photographs .1ere forwarded to this o!'fice as substantiatin evidence of a UFO encour.ter by I.:r Jack Lol'd, oroprietor of JacK ' s Camera Store , 304 Liverpool Road, Ashfield , tTel No 716394) . r~ Lord said tn~ he experienced the phenomenom at a:pprox 2100 houl'$ on 19 NO'T 66 near (Ooktvood Cemetery. l.!r Lord approached this office immedi~tely prior to Christmas . He undertook to furnish this office wit!l the neg;.J.tives froo Hh.ic!:.. t"lese prints were made, but these have not been forthcoming .

3.

For.vru:ded for yotL. action.

~~~>j,

/mR,

r/'~~Y

(J . F . K.

iiLESf!I'l1H)

Squadron Leader Publi c Relations Officer


P. W. Hynee . 97 Siuclair Creacent. Wentworth Falla. N.s.~. 21.11. • 66

REPORT ON ILLUMINATED FLYING OBJECT SEEN AT ABOVE A.DllliESS AT 3.5 am to 3 .15 am ON ABOVE DATE . Awoke juet after 3am,while sleeping on eneloaed verandah which faoee North. Suddenly a star disappeared. I moved my head and it came into view again only to move behind window sill. Put on glasses for

bette~v~ew

object travelled

outside window. There was no noise and

from North to South. Went to front Gf house

and feoueaed 225mm

~ens

on camera loaded with 50 A.S.A. Perutz

colour film. I secured three open abutter ehots,keeping a proper star on the Tiew finder for comparison and letting the object travel accrose it.

The object was blue ooleured,but thrGugh the lens changed to silver and then intense white. There was a pulsating movement of the colour. The object

~eemed

to be a long way off and travelled

in a straight but faltering and zig-zagging manner. That is rlike a sieamograph needle. It seemed to be vibrating intensely and yawing like an aircraft geing into

"-

s~ng

wind. At one stage it stopped

for about a second when it seemed to go behind a patch ef cloud or emitted eomthing around it so that it became indiactinot but with a haze around it. My wife came out at this time and as I was expl,ining where it was it started to move off South again and she was able to spot it with unaided vision. A visitor also came out and was able to see it clearly without glasses.

I watched it for

5 to 10 minutes before it angled down sharply towards the Southern horizon. It had the appearance of being circular although I could not get an absolute outline with the lens I had. I have spent many nights on watch during the war,at sea,camped out, ae)P aircraft at nigbt,but it did not reeemale anything I have seen before. It was quite a distinctive and unusual occurrence.

g@um r\'1"<' ~..,. d&~v-VJ?x w..c; -~ ~o.n Te.Q,;w._~ :J N..P)J,A ~ f¥-

v... ·, -

<.~\W..

w :-.

~~ut.•!..

(

~

~c~t Q~

-~ -~- '-"


Direoto~to

of Air Force Intelliaance

FEJ '61 Hoo.dquartoro Support Co..-nr.and R.W'

Vioto1'ia

.:Ja.r:r.lcka

l!BLDOURllE

SC1

VIC UJUDEIITIFJZ':l li'LYIHG

OBJEQ~S

Tho nttachod l etter ;ra.s received from the Dop1'U't!llont of Civil Avi.c.tion. It ia forwarded to you for investieation in ncoordnnco with ourrent policy.

~

(: .â&#x20AC;˘ G. S. 'U...'illiiALL)

,inc CCI%Wlcler for Director of Air Force Intollisoncc


)

.SS.l Z

T r:- D A787 UFO INTEL REPORT PD OBJFCT SIGHTED BY -.; ST JOHN STR'l='F'T B~="LGIM, GARDJ:::NS TOwNSVILLt" AT l50)56Z

N?. G J HOLT C 1t

OJ;? 15 4 liZ F- B t!HIL- PASSf.NG'"R

?::; APP- AP.- _ L

NOU~.-A

)fi

rr:

CAR APPROX 30 Nl'i NORTH OF TVL

S ALL DARK OBFCT ROUGHLY TRIANGUlAR SHAPJ:: f".OVING FRON

- n H? ovrR cooK To .• FLIGHT L'"V- L (i\

~w

~ ~

"'~

\~/

~~-

318


I~

~~~.OF

r-{J

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL

~,;1

AVIATION_ ~....-""'~

Tol.oo\oow: 62 0131 T~AM-:"A.,..T.............._ ..

aox lll9

o.

"HEinY HOUSl!." 499 UTTL8 COW"NS STREET,

P.o.,

MEJ.IIOUllNB,

ClJ%AinM rn,Jn,

..~. . c.t . " ' aln.Y QVOTI

<...1./

,A

I

........ ..

•·u'!l·,OkAJ. DuH FOR

!'he

Secre;t~ry ,

.Jepar~t of Air,

.. ~RA .

ill~ID~oTIFIED

FLYU4G OBJECTS

Attached is a copy of a letter dated 12th January, 1967 frorr. •·l.l's . P. 6 . .::asey, Oak '/ale , Coolac, ••ew South Hales . This letter is referred for any action you consider necessary . le have no knowledge of any civil aircraft 2. the area at the relevant tL~e . ].

to you.

I have a'ivised

.;I'S.

move~ents

in

Casey uta.t 1 have referred !'ler letter

c I.


.c

0 p Y.

7.

De.:lr .:sir. l a ress t .is to yo!l as _ do not LilOV the .::orrect procedure l .m·.re been unable to identify a ..:...yin.,. ob ect! ..... ! ui -:ress; .,0 e ont ... " a elicotJter vas s:.ationed i .• t ..is area,? ..ootamundrn, oin some ort ~r ~urvcy; once or twice it returnel v~ence it c e late at a1&ht and ! ha~ no trouble in cnowi. by sit::ht ano:l. hearin.; tnat lt \:as inJ ed a helicopter . if any .

le are situated as the crov ~ie3 abolt six iles ~elow tie durrWljuc. O:un and due east of us is a ran~ of mountains called, ! believe, Barren Jack: they rise fro. the river wnicn is approximately one and a nalf niles 'ro1u our house . La~t nieht , 11tn ins~ . a~ about 10 . 30 ~ · . I watched vhat I tho\llht at first to be a helico~ter con.in., betwee- the • ...Us irectly towrds e. It appeare:! to be a brignt golo. bal..l. even vith tne o1nocw.ars, it \las a s cady olden ~ow without sound w~icn passed betv en us and the hill ~or mountain , it wvu.ld be regarjed as either) ani t.ten passed out of si ht behind the mountain - or hill- to reappear and be lost to sight behind some hign ground of .. .IrS .

If it was a helicopter why ~~e s~eady light and wny zoULdless! 1he ni nt w:::.~ still and the sr.J clear in t~t d.:.rection. H was not an aero. lane, I tough~ it movej ore quic~~y t~3n a helicopter . {hy do the roun:is of the ou:1tains at th t hour i~ a ·~:::.ze of lights. ... wou.d love to kn01.'!

(t.!'s . ) Pamela S. Casey

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R 0 Y A l AU ST R A ll A N A I R F0 RCE

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THEPHONE: 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COHHAND RAAF

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS路 ""AIRCOHHAND. MELBOURNE""

IN MP\.Y QUOTE

VICTORIA BARRACKS HEL80URNE SC1 VIC

5/G/~r( 3Q)

13 FEB 1957

UN- IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS

Forwarded herewith are reports on aerial sightings by the undermentioned,investigated by this Headquarters. L. BOARDMAN R. BELFORD R. STREET

9..._.l.aQ. l - l

'

~~'-c...... ~

~

..c. . L....

~ (L.B. BROWN)

Encl

Wing Commander For Air Officer Commanding


REPO.i:~

vP ~.I ....::. C.B.;.... C~ O:SSERV ED

.lif~/·· .i.. -. Bc;; .crr..-?'.k;~4>r?: ..... Age ..-?:~. :>bserver ... •.. .. U, .£{~~t;l'/. ?(,, .6!4"<·0/~=-t;",..Z:~. ~ w;_.

1.

Name of Ob.;;erve:- . . . ,

2.

Address of

3.

t ~Ot! · "" I..;CC"..lpa o.._

4.

Date a~d ~ime of Observa~ion {?~me ~o be given in local time)

o·oser.·- e~.,. . ••• • , • h~'r::J_ r-___,,;,,~~,.,n_, •·• ':f . 7)1?:1"/"?"'i-~...7 t... • , • • • • • • • • • • • • • r •• , •

. ~-;"(-~~~ ..-. .1.'?:-/.-?-:- ::76. . . .. {l_ ·.--1:9'. P: ~c. {_.:;,~./.7~-1") . .. ...• .....•.......... lJurati on of Obsenation~.. . .. . ·<1J1'P~~ ..

5.

}

. ~·:'~::; .......... .

observers Loc~:~tion at Time of S~ghting (Give details of own A .t 5 position by map reference 3 .•..... ? . ~ -.~.. ? • . C?~ .• ~ '1:: ·.· .. ': .. X .. ~":'"~7. .. ~ .~ i f poss1ble, or by known . :6. landm" ~·.("CJ) :>J

"?

*

•..._f II.~~~~(~'?'~. :-.1."!".c: ~ ~ .. ~ ............................. . .......... . Weather Conditions at tiffie~ of observation~ ........... .

7.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #.r: . .C'~<tt!,. .. P.Q · '· .:r,c.l .. ..................... . Aids to Observation(s) . (~escribe any equipment used in the A · observation)

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9.

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+

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t

t

t

t

t

t

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t

t

+

+

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t.

t

+

+

+

+

+

+

t

t

+

+

t

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•••••

\'there wa:;: object first observed, eg, overhead, com:!'!g fro 0 behind a hill, over the ho~~.zon, etc .

. . . . . 8. ~~'= ,;,~ . ?~-?: .~0.0. .. ~I.~~~~ .1;t?l.t"/t ..$.""( ~ ..•..... . .. . .....••..• ~""' 10 .

• •... 11 .

•hat firSt attracted observer ' s atte!'!tion, eg li&ht or noise . ~

tft;t-[t~ . •-+. ~~~f. ~~

'..;.11.1¥:{ •.7.

.~~<?, ,.q . l>!"jl?f. ~~r: . .. .. ' ........... .

Did object appear as a li.~ht or as a def::.nHe object .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FP.t-:~1:. f f. .l(;bf. .lt~cr-:. .~~~... f. .u.-«<!tn./n~~( . (4 ....... . .. . 12 .

If tnere was more than one ooject , how many were there , and who.t was their formation .

............... . .. .. ........... . ......... Cnc. ....... . ............ . . 13 .

What was the colour of tne light or obJect ... .tr/r/)(c.

14 .

"lihat was its apparent

15 .

Was any detail of structure observable ..... - ~~ ........... .

16 .

'ias any t'lethod of t'ropulsion obvious .......

17.

Vias there ar.:y sound ......... . ... . ...... . ... l¥~tl'!-'... • ......•

18 .

19 .

height, or anJle cf eleva~ion ..... ~Cj?~~~ . . ~~~ ..........•.. -""PI', 0': s/1"9~/-'Y.. <dCre 'l'~a;n. ri4...-;. ~.. .,.. Spe~d, or an:;ular veloci-:::,· .Q . !1~ ~~1."'·"'~-. '?":L?1f . ~1'1¥/.l:l(e ...... .

20 .

Was the object stationar:1? . . . . . . . . . . . ....

21 ·

That was the direction of flight w1th r.:ference to landmarks or points of the compass ...

.... . . . shape ..... . /?f(~t. ~(/l_tbf..... . ...... .

.1/t: •............

/Yo . ............ .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D. '!~- . ~~'! f k .. .. ... .. ... ..... . ........ . . . . /2 .


22.

Did the object remair. on a

~ra~gat

path, deviate or

... . . . .. ~~~~~~·~~~ . ~~ . ~~~: ...... $-r:~j.?.~. ~'2.~ •••.•••.••••••.•••••. 23.

\',"as any trail of e;&.aus-:, vapcmr or l :. gh-c seen .. -:4<71.•?. .' ."'· 1-: . N'o

24 .

IThere d1d ob~cct disappear, eg in mid- air, behinda hill , over the hor1zon .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . /?.~&{~?.. ~1-?'..:::~.s ................ . ........ . Exister.cc of any plzys~cal ev~dence sue~ as fragments, photographs, or ~t .er supporting evidence .

25. ••

4

••••••••••••••••••••••••••

tV.'/ 1. •••••••.•• • •••••••••••.•.•••••••••

••

26.

Ha•re .i'OU observed any unusual pnenon:ena previously ... . 1.1:"<: •••

27 .

I f so, give details of incident(s) .. . ....... :-:-:-:-: ......... ..

28.

State o.ny experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to 1q and 1q .

••• •

,

.::.

• • • , • • • • "fl. 1 •

""2r / 4 • 4

~ !J 1 • -~.c;;r. ,.... ~ I

• "- • •

<':/:

• .{ •

~C'-.o:M>r/.t: ~ tf'~ • ,

r .-:;-p. ~ • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • •

Are you a member of any or~ar~sation interested in aeri al p!:enomena?

29 .

.......... . ....................... HP. ............... . . ............ . 30 .

!Tame and Address of org-;misa"tion .........--:-:-:-:-: ..... . .......•

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . f. ~ •• •.. ~ona • 1 ~n . ...r-orna+.. :!.or.. ......... /.~€ c ·-c;/.'+-"· L ~ ... ~ _,, ~"d. - / / ~~ , ..ny aaol .• ('!~ • • • -,.- • • • • t .... .

3 •• .

. . . ·'"f~7~:;t'l"rl'/.t:":~ . ~:f. . ~ . 'S~T.,/!/,"Y:~ ..~rt ,q , f?.~f. .C.('~~ . /: If. .e:C.t!J;q,::;C • . . . . s~{~/fr.(t:~ .t'f('e R t; f.'.t. $tP.f< . -?.f . -:q~ (1n6. .'¥'1/. «.$tr«//.». ~~. /lnj&t . . .. fi ,:J

~.

(

If --=:::: -

Jignature of .::Lser'Te;:L. ·' · . ~~----

~ocation of ar.y air traffic in the vicinity at the time of

32 .

sighting .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3J .

IJocation of any meteorological S"tations in the general area .

Note

Since it ~s norw~-ly imposs~ble ~o est1mate ~ne height and speed of a strar:ge object i<O will usually be bet~er "to endeavour to determine the'ansle of eleYation of 'th£ ObJect, the ang:e -;;brough .th:!.ch ~"t moved, and the tice taken to do this .


:rEPORT OF

A3.RI.~>.

O.&r~CT

OBSERV ~D

Ob:t..~:·ver .. ?~~!~ .":-1:~\:<!-~. ~~~ ...... Age ... f..~ .. .

1.

Nacc of

2.

Addrecs of Observer ..

3.

Occu!l::\t.:.on of Obsc:r•\rer . .' .

D~te ~nd ~ime of Obs€rvation

(Time to be given in loc~l tim~)

5.

Duration of Observ'ltion(s) .. .

~f.'-.c... . . .. ~. A·'H-~.~."?-... .

~ .~\~~. .~H~':" . ~·.~~~~~ . ')). ':-

~ • . . Q~r: . ............... . .. .

...... ...?.~q . 4'§>.... fr!c:~.. .~~ ..T~ ..'-?l ..... ............ .

6.

Oltserver s Loc.,.tion at Tiue of Si ghting (Give details of own ~-- .1 "Fc ~ 0-l . . _ position by m<!p referenc.:: ..• ~<iT'·~· ~~~ · •••o., •. . . ~-:-; J .r-.-.~ ... i f possible , or by known c;.,,,\

. ...... .

7.

~~. • . . • . . . . .•.. . • ...• . ..... . . la~l~~~-~~~~ .... . . .... ••. . .

Yveathcr Conditi ons at time(s) of observation( s) •.

~. :-... . .

.. ~. ~~. ~~ . . . -;-~~~~... ("~~c·8.

Ai ds to ObscrvE:tion(s) . ~~

(De'Scribe any e~uiprc.ent used in the observation)

................. ......... .. ..... ... ...... ........... ..... .......... .. . . . . . . .. . .. .. ...... . ..... .. ... ... . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 9.

';'!cere was object first obsar-~ec , eg o1er••ead, coruir.g from be:und a hi l l, over t!le hor izo;. , etc .

........~~~~~..~ . ~~~ x.eL~ .~~~.,. .~r

10 .

~"'-\- ~~ ~ c What fi!'st nttre.c:;ed observer ' s c.ttant i or:, eg light o!' noi 3.:: .

11.

Did~jcct a.t-~pear

12 .

If t nere was nore than one object , how many were t here and what wao thei r f ormati on .

... .. ..... k~~\.-::t~~~~fr~ .~.~~.~.~ ., ~s?. ~d AJ:~'t:D~ . . .:J.S a l i ght or as a definit~ object .

.............~~~ . ?~~~~r. ·)..~4...1-~..~r. ~ .. ~~. ~. . . -~~f~!~<:~~ .

13 .

l~~~}~..~ .h.~. ~~~~..~

~A. 1 ~c'- o...p~u..A._ ;tc Le"""'-~ ~Q-o-J ~~ <::.'o~e.<..t-

'.that was the colour 0f the light or objec t ...• !q...:--:-~ •••••••

~e'!lt sh::rp~ . .aw. ,~~. ~,~~ .~

14 .

w:lat wus its appa..

15 .

'7as any detail of str1--..cture obsl':r vable .

16 .

,f·:s nny

17 .

"ius there any sound .....• . .. . ........... ....

18.

neight , or angle of e.eH.tion •.....

19 .

Speed , or angulc.r velocit:' .........

20 .

·.rr~s

21 .

'Uh~t

met~1od

. ...!}."? ....

of propulsion o"?vious ..... . ..~~.......... · · .. .

t;l.~ ... . · · · · · · · · · ·

~... ~~ .}

the object

. .. .. .. · . ·

· · ··· ·· ·

~ ...~.~~. · · · · · · · ·

et~tior.."'ry ... . . .. .....~~......... · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

wo.s the direction of flight wittl reference to landmarks or JCintu the com~ass ...

o\

....~4. · ~·. :.!~~ .\?.~!". , ~.'W(k ~ .~ . ~ ... /2 .


-222 .

Did the object l'Cmuin on o straight pat.1, dcYiate o:r o.m:oeuS h '"t all'?

....... ...-. .. ..c-.~~-r: . ~- ~- ~ .. . .. . .. ..... .......... . 23 .

l'liols ::ny tr~.i.l of :.:xhaust, v_pour or li...;ht sean ... . No..>. .......

24 .

17nerc did object disspp:ar, eg mid-ali· , bec.ind a hill, over

the

horizo~~ -

.

.. A ,

~ <:'- Q....vv . ........... .. .. ......,-\..... .... ... .. ...... ....... ..... ... ... . .... ....

25 .

:C:xist.-:1.ce of ."l.ny physical evidence suci. as fra,;ment s~ !:'hotogra:?hS , or other sup~orting evi<.lenc e .

. . . . . . . . . •. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N.;;o . . . ..•...... .. .. . ........... . ... . .... 26 . Have: you observed any unusual phenomena pr eviously . .• N~ ..... 27 .

If so, give details of incident(s) . . .•• . •~/~ . • .. . ... . • ... . . •.

........ ..... ......... ..... . ................ . . ..... . . . . . ... .. . . .. . . .. 28 .

State ony exp.::rience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about th~ answc:·s g ivan to paras 18 a!'ld 19 .

....?~4.~~ . ~~ .~...~.~- ;~~: :~~.~ .~ ... . ~

·· ·· ~ ·· ··· ···· · ······ ··· ····· · · ·· · ·················· · · · · 29 .

···· ··

Are you ". ncl:lber of at::,· organisatio!: i·~.t erested in aerial

phenomena?

~ . ' .. .. ... ..... ...... ........ ....... .... .. ...... .... . ...... ...........

30 .

Name and address of

orga~-;.isation ... .. N { f\ ............... ... . .

. .. . .. . . . . . .. .. ..... .. ................ . .. . . ... ..... ..... .. ........ .. .. .

... . . . . . .. .. .... ..... ... . .. . . . . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . ........... .. . ... . . 33 .

Location of any metecrological st"!tions in t he g.:;r:crn.l '1r ea .

··· · ····· · ·· ·· · ·· ·· .. .. ~~~ .~~~. . : . . ..... . . . . . . .

34~ommer.ts . .f!~. ~. ~./.'=. .~_,_.«'~ .... .. .~~~~~~~. . .... -;?:.~ .

· ~~·~y~~/.if.-~1'~~~~~·. r~~~~

Si e;naturc

o~ Inta!':-ogrtor . ?~~

QUESTIONS 32, 33 and 3/t- to be an.swared by i nterrogator .

note .. . Sincc it is nor~qlly i~~ossible to estimate the height and s~ecd of a strange object, i t will usu~lly be bett~r t o endc~vour to determine t he angle of elevation of the ob ject the angle through which it moved ~nd the time t rk~n t o do t hic .

.J

~


1.

Name of Obs<:rve:;.· ...

K':'"': .~:~f:E:"!':" ................ J..c-e 0

1.; S ....... .

2.

Addr~ss

J,

Occupa-tion of

4.

D<>t e a .1d :' ir..~:: o_ o:,ser·~st:.o~ \ ~ime to be given in local tlme) ..J)tf(

of Obser·.rer .

.:2 !J

.J(:(c..:_. -!.r .... .,7~·/(1... 0'f~~~ ...... .

8 2 -,

-- ,

.............................................

5.

.

. . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.

0

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

"'- ·-at l.· 0"'.~ of Ob"er G~· . ...,U,L "' va~· .. 1on{ s ..JC2·l LY'.,."1>...·l· ·. . . . • . . ..5" . . • .;"' .7.-.-."v . . . ,r.•.•

.

•. , . . .

6. J(,.;....~

C'"'servf'r"' T,ocation at :':i-::e of Sighting (Give details of own sr Yrl/.1!'1 c.:.~d,./ Y..... ..,., iv£.#r positior; by Clap reference •• ..••.• •1. ·•..•..•.•.•.• , . • • • . . . . • . . . . . . . • • • . lJ. poss1 ble , or by knowr.

().1'7 ••

7.

!?'~-... .~::. .~~~~.~~~~:~' ... (.~ .. ~~. ~?) ~~~~~~:·~~~ ...... . ..... . "',,~a t her cond l.. t l.ons . . ( s ) o f ooservat1on . ( s ) ..-;=;,, , "d.tat t 1me . .. ": . . .. ..

1

. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . 8.

J..ias t o Obser vation(s' . \Describe any equi pment useu in the observ~ ti Ol')

....... .. ... . ..... .. ..... ,((,t,J.._ ... . . . . . ...•.... . ........ . .......... . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . g.

Where was object first observed, eg, overhead , co"":,..._; ~rom betind a hi ~l . nver the horizon, etc.

~t"._..,7•. !.·.·'!P.''.'',C', .~(-'~-?c:~./. .~. ~?.~ .-1f(."', .~).: . . !!"~'!, F.'-!f."'.'. (.v:'~ . .';;:~~:;-:{!:'': ?,t;c:::') 10 .

ihat ~ ~ o~ attr~~~eM obse~· er ' s ~t tention, eg l~gnt or no1ne .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-": :~~'".. .~.. ~1'!'1'::{·"':':.. .. .. ....... . ................. . 11.

Did obJect apra~-

-3 P ~~~~cor

as a definite obJect .

..........................-~-.~~i!r. a"'.'!'. .~f.!~~~':-:~!~':- . .1!-~~~::~.~.). 12 .

If there was core t han one object what w2s t t .e i r f .rl!lati on .

1

how many were there 1 a r.d

. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . .~ .. .c:.-:. ~- .. ~~~ .'/. ...... .. ... .... .... .......... . 13.

r.~·hat

14 .

0 · ~ " "'. .................. •"•'hat ·,·,as 1'ts apparent snape ............ .

15 .

Uas any deta:tl of structure observable ..... ( ! f... ......... .

, 6.

"ao · ;Y'c." ., a ,.,., ••;; me .... .. no d of propul s:ton ob Vl.ous ...................... .

17.

#:.Was there a.r.y sound ............................. ..······ ···

18 .

hel '"t , or an&~1 e o f . . ga

was the colour of tr..e light or

00.

ect t:.~!':'!:.'.;.: ."'.'f'!~'": ..

~ .... lor. · v ~ '"'" ~ e.:~.evn .......................

J

4

...:,;.z,.· · ·./. · ·

.,.e

·

,....,, ,.,'v

C' , ./ 3 Itt:> S pewad , or angular veloc::t...... z· .. I..'~/... .1. •••..••..••• · • • • • • · • • • • • •

20 .

'as the obJect sta~ionary? .......... . . ~ ~ .. . ............. .

21.

'That was the duection of fl::..ght w::tth refere!lce t o landmarks or p~ints of the compass ...

. .:7?\ ·;'.... ~.t?. ~ ... ! .". .. ~-"~J :.- •..•.••.••.•...•.••.•••• • .••••••••• • ••. . . . /2 .


-2-

th'-' ob icct remain on ., straight path, deviate or t nll? _..,., ~ / _<--,;..,~,.., r'' ,~,., .·.,,~ :~'•<'<~ r-Hc ?"'?,•~.-· ,~ T!ll:rv' -,:.J• · ~ v~.~........ . .. ; .. . ..... · · · · · · · . · ... . ........... .. ... . . ~ . ."'.-: Did

mCillOCU\JJ''

./

,,. c ~"' ,. ,.... u _• r,~

•• • •• • •• • /!1"1;';--

\'.'as any trail of exhaust, vapour or 1~ seen .... ·~ ... ,. 'JA '-'T •

Where did ob~ect disappear, eg in lllid-air, behinda hill over the tor~zon . '

.':~.?! ~-:: .~":'!... -~'?~~~~~ .. .'i:. ff.'.~ :'f!-. .. !~~ • • '.r-: .................... ,~,.. N ) ' " ef4.!,25 .

Existence of any physical ev2_de!'l.ce such as fragments, photographs, or other support~ng evidence .

..................................m.L: .. . ......................... . 26 .

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously ... ~~ .. .

27 .

I f so, give details of incident ( s) ........... .

2e. .

State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to f<l and G~ .

11!".1 .4-. ....... .

~a_,;J,e,q, .'. :<.. ~.~1'~(!':'-f. . .'1?>~ .. !'1:":!'':' -ff:•?:;: . : ~~1'f ................. . 1

29 .

Are you a member of any organisation i nterested in aer i al phenomena?

PU . ....... .......... .. ' ... ........................................... . 30 .

:iarne and Address of c-rganisatio:l ...... . .................... .

fr~ L-. .............................................................. ... .....

31 . •

Any additional inforo.ation .................... .. ........... . •

·· · ····· · ····························· ·

#

••••••

···· · ··· /)~; ···· · ···

Sigt1ature of Observer ..~ : . . . : . .. ..... . 32 .

Location of any air traffic i~ the vic i ni ty at the t i me of sighting . ttP¢:r IV' 'l-

... ............. ............ .. ... 1. ............... . .... .. ........ . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ,

33.

"

"

Location of any meteorological stations in the general area . L ;J..,N .:-z-tzrr 9>-/ .

················· x ···· ~ ··· · ····································· 34 .

Comments ....

- ~~~ .~~~~~ -·

··cf/'~ -- ~~~~~~~:--:-······ ·

. ja0."~~~~~ ··~· ~···· ~i-naturc ~

of

.

I~terrogator. ~~~~

Q'L3S'l'IONS 32, 33 and 34 to be answered by interroga'tor .

Since it is normally impossible to estimate the height and speed of a strange object i t will usu.ally be better to endea•1our to determine the' angle of elevation of the object , the angle through ~hich i~ moved, and the time taken to do this .


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ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE TREPHONE: 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND

RAAF TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: "A1RCOMMAND. MELBOURNE"

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

13 FEB 1967 of Air UN-IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS 1. Forwarded herewith are UFO sighting reports received from Department of Civil Aviation, Melbourne .

2. This Headquarters has nothing further to add to report No 1. Report No 2 is considered possibly to be sightings of satellites and it has not been possible to contact Mr O'LOUGHLIN to verify this.

~

(L.B. BROWN)

Encl

Wi ng Commander For Air Officer Commanding


..

. .

rvLr ········••••••••·•·•·••••••••·•••·············•••••·•••••••

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...

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••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

.

8C Obzvrver ••••••••••••·•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• or 0b3ervatirn (Tic~ :ive~ in '~ be~ c.ock zonul tioe)

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@

I

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······•••·•••··•·•·•···•·· .. ·•···••·····•••••···•·•·••··••····••·

rer rd b.

"r

v tio. (s) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

b~orvnti1n: (Give details of ewn position by cap reference !f r bJ kr.own landmarks, and describe any equi~er.~ used in the

,. . . •••••••••••••• ••••• ...-......w.J••'t'............. ~ t\. •.................:ii ....

~~~;-~V:.JU•••••••

···································~~····················· ··········~······

··•···••····················•·•·•·· ..•••....•..•.•.•..••.•.••.•.••.....•.•. ,

ere ~as ~bject first et r .. he t.r>rizon, tc •

7.

• • • • • • 1a... ~t

s.

ob~erved, e :• overhaad. cooing fro~ behind a hill,

•..••...·s:.•• -.; ..... :; •••....••••••••@....c.:r....

first ttr&ct

.:!? ............... .

Obz rver's att~nti~n e.g. light er n~ise.

•••••••·········•·······•·•••····· ···•··•·•···•····••·•···•···••····•··•••·

..

oj~ct ~ppoar as a light ~r as a definite cbject •

···································~~································ · ······ 10.

,, . 12.

If t.h r'l was ml're than cne "bject, hO'.:z r.w.n:y were th€1rn, and f rmati,n.

~hnt

\tas their

·······························••••>••••··················A················· :t

waa t 6~ co1~ur Gf th e lig ht

~ b. ct

c_

o Je

H ; J C' • :c • .. \ S •••··•·•••••••••••••••••••·••••••

~sits apparent shape ··-·····A··••••···~···••••••••·••••••••••••••••·

··································~········································· 13.

~a any etail of structure observable •••••••·•••••••···················· •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••u•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •

any nethod of propulsion obvie~ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••······•••

5.

s t ~re &nJ oound -···•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• le

r elevation •••••~~r~.~.~~~t~T.......................... .

~velocity •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •• •••

s.

\lhicb enables f'bserver to be reasonat-ly cert :..r. to 16 and 17.

C"

,. ······•·•·•·········•·•·············•··········· iopcssible to esticate th t us lly be bettor to object, the ar~lo t s

../2.

........


-~

'

2. R~p~rt ~n

(Contd).

Aerial Object Observed

1recti n ef fl1ght vith reference to iandnerka or

poi~ts

of the cocpass.

l ~ ·.r:• I"' t:.J T • •' • • •• • • • • • ..-. '• • ......,. • • • }'.~ •~)•..._,. • • • • • •l=:l• • e\1 ..r.e• • • • •""' ~-~ • •"it • •

Did

t~

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,.bjec1j rc:lS.in •m a straight f8th, deviate or onnocuvre at all.

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Was n

22.

!hare did object disappear, e.g. h,rizor••

exhaust,

er light seen •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• i~

cic-s.ir, behind

11

hill,

t~ver

thtt

•••·•·•••··•··•·•··•····•····••···•·•···••········•••·•········•••·•···•••• ate~ce ~

23. 60

rtlne

any physical

ovidence such 11s fragments,

phot~gra.phs,

Ar other

evid.:~nce.

······••·•·•···••••···•••·•••··•············•••••·•·•····•••···•·········•• 24.

eatber c~diti~ns experienced at time (s} or observation (s) •

•.•........•...•• , .....•••.•.•.........•......•...•••••••..............•.•• 25.

~ati~ of • • • • • 4 -. ... ._ •

any air traffjc in

t~~ vici~ity

at the tice

~r sightir~.

...,...C ...... ..,......,.,_..' 'J.Q • a\.e..r.';Jl,l,.~1. • • •• •• • •• • • • • • • • • • •• • • •• •• •••• •• • • • • •

··············~····························································

26.

Location

~r

any

net~oroloeical

stations in the ger.era.l area •

••••• ;+ ••••~ •• :~~-~·-··~~~-······································~········ 27.

Any additi~nal inforcnti•n ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

..... ~~

..

~~-~I~J,~P ~~.l~~~

.............................•..•.........

··············-···························································· ~uestions

25, 26 and 27

t~

be answered

~ L~terrogator.


•e

,~

MEMORANDUM

For ..., wtdlto lilt RAN t>ftJr Wn~ Ot pnnt dmrly

OUII ALE

RAAF fORM A27) MAll 63

FIIOM

TO

DATt

ATTEHTION

SUBJECT

SIGNATURE

RANK AND APPOINTMENT

I

PHONE EXTN

c .o.o.

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The o~~icer,in Ct:arge, J . ~.o . Sigh~ings~ R:c;~I')XD AB 3.~;.::- .

3:C:t-!0:8 .

Dear Sir,

My h~sband and I travelled to tJdney last ~r~day, the 13th instant. via 'the Hu:ne :!igh~·ray' a!ld s O'llev:here oet;veer. 10. 30 p . ~ . and 11 p . m. about 20 miles ~r~s siie of Caxden, I dre"N my husband 's attention to vrha t apueared to be t\·!O red lights in the sky ahead of us . 'de at "'irst thought i~; a olane, though "''Y husband commented that a plane did not have t•.·:o red lights as '"e could see ahead of us . It ajpeared stationa ry, or possibly T.oving very slo•,tly - we apueared to approach it, ra tt:er than it us . ':Je were on a !la~; s':.retch of road, Hooded in oarts and cleared in others . !he traf~ic "Nas fairly light ~hough I do recall ca~s bec: nd 4S . 'lie •..:a tched for l)OSSi ely t',fO :ninuc.es from ti':e time I first sa•..: t.he lights ar.d -ny husband said "ti:at a-opears to be only about 500 fe et uo", tnough : don't k!!oH :nyse :!.f ho•..f he placed such a height .

:-Ie slo;.Ted \.!!e car, ·.,atc!'.i.I'_g -;:te u~ole -~~r.i::.e, a::d stouped .,hen \.he lights ·,.;ere jus~ abo.;,t d:..recc::.y over us . :-ry hus band got out of the car (at ~te sa:ne ti~e a ca~ drove pas\. us) and after a mo:nen"; or :.wo said he c:>uld not see an?thing . Hhen I went to sneal!: he <1..Ue-;:enad me ~or a rnoment. and then said he thought he could hear a very !aint sound oossibly like a jet in the distance, though he v;asn' t certain and with the car passing us, could have i~agined it . :le continued to look about for a 'llinute or t•,,o and then drove on . I kept my eyes to the sky for a while but \ve didn't see anything further .

':!e did •11onder abou-;; it, and in fact laue;hingly said ·. :e had sighted a "U. F . 0." and cons:. de red repo:--c.i!!g it at the Police Station .,,hen He arrived at Camden. :·!e didn't bother ho•11ever as ·,,e felt •.·le •,TOu.ld be laughed out, and didn'-;; thinK any!l'lore about i't um::il next rn:>rning ~·TC.en ,,e told '~~Y sister


-2••

had seen a "so:r,e"th.!.ng" . rot u!:tii ..e s.,_...,. ;;ne re')o:-t 'u ~er th'!l.t morning in the Telegra:Jh did ·.·:e ·-;on:!e: if indeed ·ve should haYe reported to so:::eo:c.e . '.·:e :-e::.t ·:e h:t-: see!: the sa:ne object as reported by ti:e -:... o uo lice:::e!"'. at or ~e'ir :· e·.tcastle, ~:nough certainly \·te !-~d !'.Dt see::. a:1y ligh~ sn.!.::.i::g towar ds the gro~nd . '119

?.o-...ever, the si:::i~ar.:.;;y b"'t··:.:en :;he desc::-io<:ic..r. of :.:.gt-cs and ti':e object ei tter s~-::.onE.ry o:- o::2.y just ::;o··.:.r.;, and ~r.e ~act ~hat my hus~a~d had sa.:.d .:.~ ao~eared about 500 :~ . uo, did make us feel ~e should renor-c .:.:;. :·le ca-::e bacv.: to :·:agga. ar::i 0:1 :-!o!'.:iay a~~ernoon (::fte~· :;e::.ling my e:noloyer - a ~oEc.!.-;or - -~to;.;.~ "i~" and or.. tis :-ecor.::~end­ ation) I called at tne .!agga Po_:.ce ti-cat:.on ar:d sooke to a loca 1 Sergeant. ~·li thout actually sayi!'.g a!':.y7.hing ;;o ~e, ::e gave me -::l:e impression that I 1.-1as a "~:ut" and in :'ac:. didn 1 ~ eve:: ask -:e any ~uestions - just lister:ed ~bile I -cried (without encourage ment) to exolain wha"t we had seen, ivithout a"''Oeari!'lg ~o be i~agining things . He d~d take my n~~e and address and said if anything further ca'lle up, he '.vould :nake a raport to the Camden Police Station. This I felt vms most odd, and 'Oossibly said just to "get rid of11 :ne so = le:'t feeling ratt:er stupid . I decided at that time not t.o do an:·tb..ing ::'urther as I 1 d again orobably be treated as silly, but on 7.entioning it to another chao in our .:'ir:n ;rho had read a furtner article on the ::e-;.rcastle sighting in one oi the Sunday napers , he told me that that sighting •..ras in your hands, and suggested I t.vrite .

'tlhether you too ivill -:hinn 'ne odd I don't .:<no•.vl. but a"least I feel we did see so:netr~ng unus~al and that l s~ould reoort to someone. Yo~rs ~aith:'ully,

... ~gL:.g' (JuC.ith

~oo-..es) .


iiame of observ('r .. ~J?~~ .R<?O~~~. &:. ~S!3~~.. ~ 231 Kincaid Street WAGGA WAGGA Adnr ess of o. ~e:rvc-r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .

1.

2.

... ...... .. .

P.h\.hE . . . '

J.

Oc cura tion ot oLser\•e::- .. ~:P~c;>;r~~. ?t. ~<;>~~?~ ~o::~ . . . . . . . . . . . •

4.

Date and tirTJc of observation .~ ~~~??

.. ~7~w77~.~? · ~o.&:.~1~ . . . . Apuroximately two minute s. Durat i cn. of ouservatlon ..... : . . .... .... ... . ... . .... .. . . .

5.

Obse n e.c )ocati mat ti·ne: t· sigbtiug .. On_~~~.~~~~~~?. a~?ut 20 miles south of CAMDEN.

6.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .

?.

We.:lt her conditio·~s 'lt •

8.

0

••

••

••

0

0

0

••

0

De s cribe ::my :•i 1 q•1i1 :er t .... ..,er:l ir the o'bservaTior .... . . No aids or equipment mentioned in observer 's

..

9.

ime of observ tion .. . ~.o:t. .s:ta.:t ~!i.• .... .

.... ............. ....... ...... .............. ... .. .

"i~tt·~;;

0

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...

. . . . . .

0

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• • •

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0

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Where \'; as object first ob ..W!'ve1? (e;., over.!:e'-d , corning f r ::m behind a r.il' . "'. C.:' t'-'e "" ri ::;"'.::) . Ahead of observer's car. •

..

10 . i7h~ T fir::~; stt~"'c ... c: obPcr ··er ' s ~·tn:~ior:.? no ise ) . Two red lights • •

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0

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..........

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0.

,

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11 . Did obj ec• Jppelr ,sa light or as~ defi ni te ob j ect ? .•.. . .. Only described as two red lights. 0

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..... . .. . .... .. .. ... . ...... .... .... 12 . If there

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than one obj ec-:;: -

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now mc.ny :u?rr:: there>? ..... ... ...

( b)

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~(~ .. . ... .. .. ........• •

what formation wer e they? .. ....

-~~~ ... ....... .

. . .. ·

13 . ~,".h.a t w;;s the colcur of "the ligft-;; or object? ... -~~~~ ...... .

1'.. • W.:3 l t vas ~~s o _ ? shape. • dis 3p .lrent vh.o.pc . . -.A~parently ....... ....no..... . . . cernedo . . • .•• v

15 .

, ? not. . tructurc observaule . . .Appare~tly . ... . . ......... Mr ROOTES thinks he may cf prop1 sioJ"' obvious? ... . .. . . . .. . ..... . faint sound possibly like jeto

'h s ar.y deta i l of

16 . Was ~~Y . ~th~

have

he ~rd

~

H:!:.STRI CJ.'.ED

. . /'?.


/ , ~

W::.~s

7.

"''See rara 16o

. ... ....... ' .......................... .

t!1ere ar:;; sou..'ld?

18.

What v.af i."L. ho..:Lht? (or o.r.g::.e of e::.~:v~tior:) .. ~PP~?~~. ~??: ~GL

.9 .

olhiJt w~s it~ np~eo?

elod i;y) . ~~~~~??~!Yi. ? ~. ~?ving very slo"'f y. 'ias th~ ohj ct '- t>ticr.s.ry? . !3~~ .1~.· ..... . ...... ....... .... . .

2~" .

'1pl ~.....

(or

f:.i.:r.-

l•hat '<•le thE: dirc~tiiJ!1 cf

· 1.

or t:oint.., of

th~

co:np~sa?

\,itt. rt'fcrcnce to :!.and:-.l:lrk-;

. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .See . . . .19. .•. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Did tnc object ramin on a ·"'"t!'a!,:;ht p1th. 'ieviate, or

22 .

manoeuvre ot lll? No manoeuvres described f

23 .

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v:..pour, or liGl1t seen? ........ . . . .

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Apparently not • •

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24 .

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( eg, in I'lid- ::tir, behind a hi 11 1

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De you 1moY1 of .m:,· p!:. s'!.cr..: evidencE? (such a9 trsg-::ents, pnotographs, or othc r su.npo!'-;; 1n~- cvi de.. cc)

No • •

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my unus •~..!. pher :;men.! p~~vious:y·. .~~ .... .

2• .

,qave you o'o..;erv

27 .

If so, give brief detYils c!

Q

inciden~

(c) ..... . ...... . ... . . .

N/A

28.

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State 3ny cxr~rience wnich enables observer to be reasonoo~y cert9in .bout tnc ~~-wer~ eive~ to 18 ~nd 19 . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . ..• ~!f.C. . . . . .... . . . ......................... .

29 .

you~

•ry crgl~iz.ticn i trrcsted in aeria 1 "[lher.omer.'l? ...... . ... ~/!C.... ..... . .......................... .

30 .

N~me

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member

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.:..ny ':lddi tion l _ "Lorn "..io:'l !. Lc.h .!"S::!. "S ~o th~: sighting . Observer st~tes that Telegraph rep orted similar sighting by two policemen in the ~Z~CAS?LE are~ • •••••

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33 .

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34 .

o th t the fo:lol.-illg plsncns or .':ljc.. • s1; t·s ..,.t•tion cf +b :>ky ~n -;;h +i:rt" · - .. . .. .. .... .. t

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b~~n ~n ~~c

at tlL time . 36 .

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reported

The St te Ob_erv·.. tory in the !"' 3!'1?.:;t capi t12- : i ty ..... ft'irms h'1t e"i a: pheno en:l 1n ~.hat proticn of -;;l.o;> sky nt tr.e tim~ · ~rc. ............. . ....... (-.::omet, ':!"teori'tc sho,er, etc) .

oth€r r~l.c•:ant rGn:r.rks ,eJ

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. . . . . . . . .

38 .

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re~carch b~lloons)

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o7oo '-""'

~"<f.(,.~{- .-4-(.U 4.~ RESTRICTED t~.,:__ /u.-.lt-)1-!t«&iJf!LIGDICE - REPORT OF ,,

0ci ka-41\..;t,_

AERIAL

OIDECT OBSERVED

(}~~,(Operational Command ASI 3/A/5)

.

PART l - REPORT BY OBSERVER ~

'K/A/S

1.

Name of observer •.•.•••••••• • • ••• · · ·····~· ·· ·····AGE ••. :-....•

2.

Address of observer • • •

3.

'(//.l./.'!jj.I:I.Ci7{. ..... ~~~J#.i?i'. V) ..••. 0

.(l:t/tr.!-!{'fi4Jf..( S:~. .~. ~,!..oNE ..C:t.a It/J ~'::,. Occupation of observer •••••••• •1.[9••.• .•~.••... ,., ... ..... .

4.

Date and time of observation .... /JP.:f.f.J:..~

...~/f!:/. •• ~7. ..... .

5.

Duration of observat.ion •.•• /.

6.

Observer~location at time of sighting ••••••• • ·· ·· ·············•

~~••••••• • •• .••••.••••..•

•... . .. (f Y.1. (I:H;Ur{ .ti-11. ••• •&.-r.'.t.~

..• ........................

Weather conditions at time of obser.vation ••••••••••••..••••.••••

NM' L~ ....................... .................................. ........

a.

Describe any aids or equipment used in the observation ••••.•••••

. t<~~··~············; .......... ... .. ......... .

.......................................................·......... . 9.

10.

Where was object first observed? hi~ hill , over the ho~zon) .

..... ~~y(.#.:l-!..~u,. ~\!!·~·vj'· ...... t:~'::d_;) .. . What first ~ttr,cted obOt~;r's attention? (es , light or noise) •

.!J.~f:... ..~~· ..... :r7t::~~ti· .~1-.

«--f.·~· ;j ... ~p. 7 ••

11,

(eg , overhead, coming from be(/ d-ff 'Vf.t ·' \

Di~broot

. :.........t ~If..~~. '.. .

nppeor "" a light or as a defini+.• .t:;o•?·. ........ ..

..fl'rff1.~ ..~ .. d!-:1~. r "· .. ~~..... . . ................................................................ -------1~.

12. If there was more than one object :-

(a) (b)

how many were there? •• .• ••.•••.•.•• ·~·. • • • • • · • · • • • • • in what formation were they? ••••••••••••••••••••••··· · ····

13. Vlhat was the: colour of the light or object? •.•

/91.. ~~ ... /

./ ./ 14. What was its apparent shape? ••••• ••• ••.••••••••••••••••• . ••• .•. •

..

~

~

15. Was any detail of structure observable? ••••·•••••••••••••• ••••• RESTRICTED

.•.

.. .,

I

,•

••• I 2


'. RESTRICTED - 2-

!'Itt.;~~~ ~? ~: ~tL . .::. ti.: ·:[; .. {tdy. ~ tr:hf.~:.~~~"" .

l6.

Was any method of pro

17.

\Yas t here. any sound?..A

18 .

What was its height? (or angle of elevation) ••••• ,'~C(~~(.~ 1

19.

What was its speed? (or angular velocity) •••

20.

Wa s the object stationary? , •••••N,Q .

21 .

What was the di rection of flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compass? f\1

f0.1·· ·:'.Aff:':~.·....

,,, •••• ,.,, ••••• , • •• • . • • • •••

Avnw. c.fh:... . r~o .. ... ~tw•• P ••• .fi?'IJ .~· . .. .l~k/!.. ... . .:f:~ .. c

1 . :<e.~1.1.c.,.J. 1 :y~L ................. . ....... .. ........ ·'·~).~·

22.

~~d~~ obje ct rem~n on a str aight pa~~~;eviato, or manoeuvre

23.

Was any trail of exhau st, vapour, or light s een? • ••••••••••• ·•

24 .

Where did ob.ject disa ppear? ( eg , i~ mi d- a ir, behind a hill, over the hori zon ) A

............ fl.~ ..~~.w ~............................... .

.................ttfrf~1~~... ~).0-: ,o;;J .... ... ... ........ .

25.

Do you know of any physical evidence? ( such as fragments , photographs, or ot her supporting evidence )

N\k

Q,~

26.

~:::·~::·:~::~:~· :~~·:~~:::~· ~~:~:~:~:·~~::::~:~~~ · ~~~~~~~~~:

27.

If so , give brief deta ils of incident ( s) •••••••

~~~•• • •••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

t

••••

................................................................ 28 .

State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably c ertain about the answers given to 18 and 19.

N~ ................................................................

29 .

Are you a member of any organization inter e st ed i n a er ial phen-

30 .

Name and addr e s s of or gani sati on •••• • • ••• • •••• • • • • • • •• • ••••••••

NM -1t.~ omena? •••••• ••• ••. •• .• ..•••.•••• • .••••• • •.• . .. • · • • • • • • • · · • • · · • •

... ................ ..... .... -~!~ ................... .......... ..


"'

RESTRICTED

- 3PART 2 - tmiT EVALUATION

)2,

The f ollowing military aircraft were in the vicinity of the repor ted UFO position at the time 1Aircraft type , • •• , . ,.,

t{j!-:.. ,.!!/!.'(.~,, .. '!:.if.--.,,,.,, ..,

Readi~ . .. . .... . .. . .

. .. .•. •T

Height .. .. . .

• •• . . • " •••.• •T ....... , •••... , . • , .T

• •••

~.,000

ft ••••••• •• • • ,ooo rt

Speed ••••••• • , • • • . • •• • • •• K • •••••• , , ••••• • •••• •K. •• •• • , • , • ••• , , ••, .K

33.

The following civil aircraft ware in the Vicinity of the reported UFO position at the tim~~ ~

/!(rl.:..'1:!-!(~/~~ .. ,q~/:.~'::t.... ~. ~!tf1Ji1. erl'-~ Heading<;?.~ j fP.. ..,., T,.,, , , • • • • ,.,,, •• ,, ., . T., . ,, , • • , , • , , • , , , , ,T

Aircraft t ype .

Hei ght •••~~{?.:?~ • • •• ,ooo ft • • •• •• •••• • • • •• ,ooo f t • • ••• • • ••••• ,ooo rt Spe:ed •• • , ••• -;"••• •• ••• • • •• , X •••• ... . ~ • •• , • , , , , • , .K •• • , • • • , , • • •• , , . K

)4 ,

Calculations show t ha t the following planets or major stare wer e in that portion of the sky at t he t ime : - • •• • • •• •• ••• • • ••• •• ••• • •

......................................................... . .... 35.

A meteor ol ogical balloon was released from , ,

tf;(~~..Z and

at • •

could have bean in the r e ported UFO

posi tion at t he time .

)6 .

C.~i-d.~f); ?..

/Yo--l{}f.. mi..J ~~-''7:,,-~L..r·/~ ~ l ~ ,,

~P

7

r~·

t~

(l..o.c I

~

The State Obser vatory in t he near est capital cit y affirms that

;~io~ ~~~U~th~e were

~'UA..<V'""'. . . ,.·"·-(......c:m~~~~er, £;~";.;1

0

11/6(!)

remarkl{j( eg about sate~s, #ckJ's~ .................................................

................' ................................................. . )8 ,

Ther e is conclusive evidence that the object reported was • •• ••• • ••• ····· · ··· ··· · · ~· · · ·· · · · ······ · ·· · · ·· ··· · · ·· · ·········· ·· ··· ·· · · ··· ·

40.

~~1[~~~.. .. .... (Uni~) ......f::.;A,Jk,.~, .~£t~Jx•-·) ~'A1ff /fli~~ L J7 .......'/1• .~ ...(Date) .......t.41...if.............. (Rank)

I RESTRICTED


___ 3/P./5)

.....'<:'T ..

Nume of observer . .. ~~~~~ . ~!?~....

2.

Address of observer .-;-; .. ~-:-':'~ . ~~.fo::t;~ • • -~~~J?~I ... . ~ . . ....... . .. . .

I •

. ..

· • · • • • • • ••••••• AGE • • r.-·•..•.•

• • • • • • • · • . . · • · •..• · • . · .•. • •.•..••.. • • •• • .PHONE • •• -: • • • • •• • . • ••••

Occup.ation of cbso::rver .. ·1 9~ . -::-. • \'fl'f ••• •• •• •• ••• • •••••••••••••••• • • ~.

Do.tc and tlml.! of observation .. . ?;~\' .. ~J.+.

5.

Duration of observation . . . . . . 9Q . $eC Q~

6.

Observers locotion at time of sighting . ~~~ ~ g~ . ~~ - ~Q;{y , ........ .

77 ... . ... . .. . ........ .

$ •. . . . ••... . • . • • . . . . . . .. .•

... . .. . .... . .. . . . . . ... . . . ... .... . . . . . . . . .. . . ... . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . .. . 7.

•lea'tner conc::.tl.ons

::!t tin-: of

:.bst::rvation ... 1·d

J : · •v-. $ .• 'l t ..... . .

.. .. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . h'lZ •

8.

Describe n.ny ~.... {iS or equip:n..::nt used in

tll~

. ...... .

observation ..•.. . .. ..

• • • •~t~~~1-;>.-.~ . ~ . ...'h . ~"It .G . G~P.:':~$~ . •.•...•.... . .....•.•.•.•.•...•.

.. n~rc was oov~;.c11 t::.!"st obser vt::d? D. ~ill ,

nind

nver

th~

0 ':m b"'"'r· at. . ..,. ~ ~ ~ ,,

-:t0° ab

(eg , cverhead , comir.g f !"o::t be-

horizon) .

, ../ , , , , , , ,c: , , , , , , , , , , , ""1 '~ , ...,

l.'A:J-~'PP.T

t

1r . Nh:':l.t firsv a tr::1cted obs~rver ' s attention?

. •. •. . . . . . .

J. ~~I'J

. •:t: .. .. . c: ...:r:t: <::~

.Q~

n {J .:> a

"'"" · · ~"'"..-... , \ r;...;...l ..... ~ • - , . ~ ... w..,

. wQ

• .,•6 U l • • • •'

t.~r3 .

(eg , light or nc; i seJ .

.e e ........... . .. . ............ . .

.. . . . .. . . ........ ... .... . . . . ... . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. .. 1.

tin

nt- j~ c-+,

...,ppc'l:r '\s a

J. igh'~

or o.s a defini-I;A objao":;? ..•. • ......

- - '""' ...................... ............................ ................. sec~.1o.s

1 2 . If there was more timn one (a)

(b) 13 . Vlhat 14 •

-

"'~"t l'fuu.

ooj~ct: -

how r.~n.ny wcr.:: the!"e? ...... . . / .·: ... · •.• ·. •. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · i!'l what forr;.ation w~::re -;;h~y? •• : ••••• ••••••• • • • • • • • • • · • · · · • 'J'!

th_ colour of the light. or object? ......•.•..t;e... . . . • .

was

~

t n •~ I=par..,r... - s.ha p~ ?. .. -S1.milar ... ... . . to . · . ". · s· ·a· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

RE~T'RICTE:D

.. ./2


RESTRICTED - 2-

16.

..... ..................... :-o ... .. ....... ... ...... ... . . .

Was any method of pr opulsion obvious? ,'/as there any soured?

~·o

'-

e

e

e

e

e

e

e

e

e

I

e

I

e

e

:a.

ilhat was its l!eight? (or aq;le of elevation) .

19.

·,;hat was its speed? (or angular velocity)!'•• ~.~ .1 • • . •?·- • ;-,. .. .... . .. .

20 .

Was the object stationary? . .......• . .•. . . ..... . ... . . . ..........

21.

,fhat .'las tl1e direction of flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compass?

:a

~c

.3 ••• ; . )':~ •• . ;~~?,1 • . ~

•J

-r-

1r

0

• . ,., ;J , . n l" .

22 .

t>!' . , .

Did thw ~bject remain on a straight path , d~viatc , or ~~no~uvre nt all? he~ained

on

strai~ht

·ath

···················· · · · ··· · ·-··· ~ · · ······· ··· ············ · ····· 23 .

Was ony trail of exhaust, vapour, or light seen? . .. ~~0 ...•.. . .•

.......... .... .... ... . . .. ......... ...... .... ..... .... ....... .. '

24 .

i'1here did object a2sappear? (eg , in mid- air , behind a hill , ov~r the horizon) • •••••••• -1. • • J:: ~:r~Q. . ~ ..

25 .

. b;;i~(:: •••••• • •••••••••• • • • •••••• • ••••••••

Do you lmow of any physicnl evidence? (such as fragments, photc graphs , or other supporting evidence)

.......... ! c . . . .. . ...... ... . ... .. ....... .. . .................... .

26 .

27 .

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previou~ly? .~ ~e . ~~.r. • .. (..., If so , give bri~f details of incident(s) . 4~ •• , v . a . ~ . t ......... . I,

{J • • •

!1~ ~~, • ·· . . ·.- ~ . ~·.. ~~-... -.e~cn·ioeo . a OQve . v, . l cr. . ~·as . tro . &a. t" .r.& •••••• v .r ~cal 1:, descending 11 shooting sta... 11 •

28 .

St"'te ony experience w•• ich enables observer to be reasonably ubout th~ aumvers given to 18 and 19 .

c~rtnin

•lc..T. statec., Lut observer a,.pears to OUl~l

29 .

Are you o omel',Zl!"

30 .

u """ Vt: si :~· · ~ · ., ··• · r,. ! :··· ··· ·· ········· ··············· · · ·· · ······

~emb~r uf

•• ••

:.t.J . .... ~a-11.9

any

org~nization

interested in aericl phen-

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ••• •• • • •• • • • • •• • • ••• ••• ••• •

:iamc und O;l.udrcss uf organis:::.tion . . ..:V."• .... ... ....• • •. · · · · · · · · •

........ .... ....... ......... ...... ....... ............ . ... ....... 31.

f.Jly

o.ctu~

iomu. :!..nfort'.ntion v1r.ic!l rela'tes to the

. . . . . . . . • . • . . . . ~~~ . ~e;~ . -: :.t\~

.~

.~

::~l(;.lting .

... "'~~!": :i;n "* . ~ ,t11. .. ... ... . . ~ ... . ...... .

. . .. .... ..--.......................... ... . . ....... . ........ . ........ . . . . . . . .. . . . . ...... ........ ..... .... ..... ......... ............. .

.. .

~

'

RESTRICTLD

. . ./3


32 .

'The following cilitaz:,- airc:raf"t -:vere in <;be vicinity of -;be reported UFO pos1tio, a"t ~he •ima :-

Headiru:r . •. • . ... . • . . .•. . •.. ... T Heip-bt .. ............. , 000 ft

•••• •• •.•.•.• T • .••••• • •••..••. , . T

............. , 000 ft ........... , 000 ft

Speed .. .••.• . • . . . . •. . .... K • • ••• . • •••••• • •••••• K ••• • • ••••••••• , •• •• K 33 .

The follo1·.i.ng civil aircraft were UFO position at the time :-

1n

the vicinity of tho repor•ed

scuettl.leu LlOYe J..ll"'' Ai rcre ft t ype . ... .. .•·......... . . . . . .... . ....e1. . ~.s . .. '.novvn . . , .. . ..o.t• •• Yl'-• • • Heading •...•..• . • .. .• . T • . .. • .. •.. . •• ...••. •• • T • •..•...• , •. •• • .. . •T

Height ..... .... . . .... , 000 ft .. ... .. ........ , 000 ft .. .... . ..... , 000 ft Speed . .•••• • •••.•...• ..•. •K . ..• • •• . ••. • • •• , ••. • K • •• , • • • • •.••••• •K

34 .

Calculations s~o"l thao the fo:lowing planets or major stars were in that portion of the sky at ~he time:- •• :-.'~~ . . • .~.-•• ~ ., J..!il •• l".-. , •" led -=- ~ II ~ t J S ....:.c.-:~ a~d ..... - .tVl. . :a t: ..... • _c~ • - at . __ . :s..~. b .... c...__. ••• • ....s .4- ~ , t.4~!'_,__ A!le . •.~,...,. ~'"" . t;::...--~ ~,. •• , • ••• •

35 .

h

meteorolo ·:..cal balloon ·Nas released frcm ••••• ::...... ~ ..... ~·., ••••• • • L ... .::..o+ "t .. • ~... . . . z..aM couldJhave been in the reporten UFO oJ

pos1tton at the time .

36 .

The State Observatory in the near~st capital city affirms that :'!erial phenomena ir. tha-; portion of the sky at •he time were tJY s. ..l..i..oee bs£.J·' "t r~ · ~ . ....-..r.L..t:..o;...l/ .. (comet, meteorite shower, etc) .

37 .

hny other relevant remarks (eg about satelites , rockets , :rosi3arch ballonns) ••• ... C.C.l.l~~· .l .f:IV~ . ~Eoe . ~• ."L l t ~1.'.. , •• ·:. ~~;:...... 1.-:: e . ....... ....... <t-- J. . ,c . ~ •• 1 ,t~..--:.-..J, .

38 .

,.Q , Q:;}:;. . 1 r

r •

~ . r;.) • .

. ...... . . .. . .. 'ISs •• .;w ..

There is conclusive evidence that the object reported ~.~ .

: ;:c.'!;ij ,_ t .·. . ._ ... . •~:~r;r:q~ ?.... -.r:~ ....

·. · •

....... , ................. .. .

.... ...... ........................ .. ....... " ..................... . '

39 .

The obJeCt reported could hav;: been . !"l-. .... : ..:1. ....-. • • ,. ... ~ . .. ,, .. ,.\-.

f1,..,r • ' • ,., ' ' I ¥"' ,. . , ' ' ' ....... ' ~ ' ro~ ' ' ' ... e e ,. . 0 P. 0 . , ' ' • ' ' ' ' · ' ' ' ' .. ...!. .. ,..,.r;"" ' !' ' ' ,..,. '

40 .

ra.

.

es - -

l:-

-

'

/Jv

~' •

'._ • ' ~ ' ~ ' ·. ' s• • •

c ,

Thu cause lor likelv ca~eJ of th3 sighting canno• be dutorm~n - · S:tdney Un1 ~

~E;~o;l .:~·:rr.tl!.. ~ .••.•~ .. ':'13.~ • • (Unit)

: ....... IJ ~ ~~ ..J .. ~-,. . • .t • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • (Date}

RESTRICTED

........... ~· ,., .-; ..... ,. ..... ., .,; . . . •\Rank)

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THIS PAGE IS REPRODUCED FROM A BADLY FADED OR ILLEGIBLE SOURCE. SCANNING THIS ITEM AT A HIGHER RESOLUTION WILL NOT IMPROVE ITS LEGIBILTY.

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ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FOR CE TELEPHONE: 690550

- --

~--..-'

HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND

AAAF TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: ''AIRCOMMAND, MELBOURNE"

IN t\fPI.Y QUOTt

pA-f \.

VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

5/..P/Air( 28)

3 1 JAN 1907

Secret y Depa ment of Air R sell Offices ANBERRA ACT

UN- IDENT IFIED FLYING OBJECTS Your 580/1/1 Pt6(36) 6 Dec 1966

1. The reports mentioned in your letter quoted above were referred to Queensland Squadron ATC for comments. 2. The reply by the Investigating Officer in question indicates that in each of the cases, he was unable to make an assessment of the sightings other than to describe them as astronomical phenomenon. The Investigating Officer contacted both Department of Civil Aviation and the Commonwealth Meteorological Bureau to ascertain the likelihood that the sightings could be related to either aircraft or meteorological balloons. In each case the Departments could not suggest anY possible explanation.

3. It is regretted that the findings of the two investi gat ions should be so inconclusive but the Investigating Officer is completely at a loss to determine the nature of the flying objects sights. This Headquarters has nothing to add to this report.

L

(L.B. BROWN) Wing Commander For Air Officer Commanding


InvestigBting Oificer• Comments UFO Report 21JAN67

1. After discussin! the incident • ith the two observers I believe the re~ort submitted in good f9 ith. The observers iLpressed ae as being •normal' people and no in ication~ of any religoue, mental, or other in$tability was apparent. 2. AS far as can be ascertained, no military aircraft or activity could have resulted in this rei,Ort . 3, The only aircraft known to be anywhere near the vicinity were five individual light aircraft operating on "local" flights from the Royal Newcastle Aero Club airfield at Rutllerforrl. No further detail s of the positions of these aircarft at the ti-.e of the sightin! can be obtained .

4. I enq ired at the Maitland Technical College and the Mai tland YMCA as to the possibility of a youth rocket club or simil ar activity but no such club is known to exist in the area. 5. Having suspected a tualfunction of the Iiaitland NDB of being th~ cause of the noise reported in conjunction with the u70 I enquired as to the reported serviceability of this aid. DCA advise the aic was fully service~ble at the time of the report and is currently ser-vice 1-ble.

6. I am unable to offer any ft~her evidence to suggest a likely cause of either the noise or UFO.

..

/~~::.::

fo

jV

(J .1 . ELLIS)

Flight Lieutenant


RESTRICTED JNTELLIGENCE - REPORT OF AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED

(Opcr~tional Co~~nd ASI 3/A/5)

PART l - REPORT BY OBSERVER 1•

2.

Name of observer J.:z:s. A·..1\o.'l:\~r.s.~r\ ~ ~o.t),e.IJ• . . •.. . . . .. . . . AGE • •• • •••• • 1 :.. s C. r c r:r ~ tL~ , .•.t,_;l 1• t>:t) .i Address of obsGrver 2t. !.t.JJ.rJ.q:. ...".t.:ce•.-.-~ • • )._r.)'j. K.u.r4:.i. •• • •• • •• • • • ••• .

• ••• ,N,e,w_ .~o.U;t.l\ .\'~a)..e.s• •• ....• • •.•. . •• • . ••••. PHONE .•. . . . ... .-... .. . . 3.

Occupation of observeiS . ..~o.~s.e.v~i.~e.s..•.••. • . • . . .• . . ..••• .. . ....•.

4,

Date and ti,nc of

5.

Duration of observation . .a):J~.r,o;x,i!IJ..af.,e)..y, ,op,e, ]Il).pp..t,e• •••••••.•••• •. •

6.

Observers l ocat i on 'lt time of sighting D.r.i.v.ill£. il.l.0ll.$. .til.e, ~.o~. ...•

7.

,b.e,t.w,e.ep, "f.\u.r.r.i• •K.UF.r.i. ,a;.n,d. Jl1.a.i;t.l,ap,d, .('If..c.Cp,_r:f;)'IY. ,d;r,i;v~. ~.i.(ll.t,ing ~ a.s. r..aue in t£:e v .ic:.~ 1 ty of f,' ai tland P."DE Weather c('\ndi tions a t t i m" of 0bservation Y.e;ry, P.o.:t. ;>;lJ]• .ClPlldll!ss.

bservation 2,1,JNf.6.7• • )j,e,t .w.e.elJ. .1,0,1,5, .-• .1.0.10. }l.oJJ.r.a. •.

•(c,o.n,f,i ,r p,eP,., .b7. Jpy,e,s.t ,ipt'J,,ipf!,. .o.f.f,i.c,e;r) •.• • •• ••• • •. • . .•.••• • , • • •...•

8.

Describe any aids or equipmen"!; usetl in the observation . •• • . .. . ..

.O?.j.e_c~• •s.e!!P. :~.i;tp, ~.eP.. !-Y~. fJ.PP.. !3'J;P.-P&e. P..O.if3~. ~e~;rtl. •. • • . . . • .. ... .

. .. .... .......... . .. . . .. . . ... ... . . . . . . .. ... . .. . ... . . . .. . . ... . .. .. 9.

-;:::0re was object first observed? hind a hill , over the horizon) .

(eg , overhead, coming from be-

~~~~. ~~~. ~~~~~~! 1 ~~b.~~PF9~~. !r9P~. ~~P~Pf~~~).ppj~p~( . paseed. ~n)

~ronu or car anu c i~ eu rapidly away to observers left Rutherford 10. What first attracted observer's att e ntion? (eg , light or noise).

~. Yf!'f''1. ~?!-~-~. ~~. ~~~~:·~·~r~f.~?-. !"H!'l. 1!!!9-~9~Pll~T{lPJ.~ . YPi ~~~. s~~tuetl ••

:?. r~~~. :~~. ~~r. .<~?. r~~l-~. nH'f9-) . . . ..... . .. ...... . . .. .... . ... . . 11 . I'~.n. o'hj c!d

nppoo.:!" n~ n light o::-: an ~ defini+,~ objao~? . 9t~~fY~f~.

~~~. ~~ . '!"~~ . ~. ~~H~~~~. 9?: ~~~ ., , ~9"tV~YH . !ill~P . r·n~i~~ . for . tl~tfil.H • •.

??:?. '!"~r~ . ~.~~~~f~.~?~f¥~~~.~~.~9 . 9f9~~~~~~ ,. ~t~~ •. ~~~ •. ... . .. .. 12 . If there was more than one object: (a)

(b)

13 . Vlhat

nI

A

how many were there? • • ..•. . ••. . • . • . ••• • · · · · • · • · · · · · • · • · · · · in ·;1hat formation were ~;hey? . ... • . • . • '!!./..~ .. • · · · · · · • • · · · · · w~s the: colour of the light or object? . ~:riltbt .~ilve::r . . .

14 . ·.v.r...at was its apparent shape'? .lHF,i~ .. }J.~p~rJ••• ••• •• •• •• ••• • • • • • • • · · • 15 . das ::my do tail of structure observabl e? '119 , . QNec;:t .rcove4 . t~<. . • . • rapidly . RESTRICTED

. . ./2


RESTRICTED -2-

16.

Was any method of propulsion obvious? J'\q ..•••.•.. , , ... . ....... .

17 .

,'/as there any sound?

18 .

What was, i -+:s heigP,t? (or a~l~ ?f. elevation)({'~ )\E\e.d. .~a.~~ ...'Qv.t apparert .. ;y epproxu1ately 5~ uutl.ally then climbed very rapidly \'/hat was its speed? (or angular velocity) • . , . . ... .. . ".v.e.x:y.Al.Bh" Confused, but lioth observers agree it was very fast .:. 11dee.d . ·· Was the object stationary? ........ • J'\q •. .. . .. .. . ... . . ... . ......

19. 20 .

21.

23.

,1.C: .•• • •• •• . • . • •.•••• ••.• . • •

What was tlle direction of flight with referenc e to landmarks or points of the compass? .-\EEZ: 'P~~a~~~J.Y. ,1);o)ll

22 .

.o\~ . ~O.X: .O.tl~l'f~:i.qtl

J\\.\t:t::i. .N.DA .~:i.\e. .t.o. .I\v.tAe.r.f:qr.t\ ••••••••• • ••. . • .

Did the object remain on a straight path , deviate , or manoeuvre o.t all? .::Q~J?:Q~C\ ,~1.~&1t.J..Y. .B;l:! .:i.t . .qr.o.s.<J, eA .t;x:o;r, .r,d,gb.t , ,t.o, .l.e..f.t. ;tll.e.n .c.tU'.v.e.d. • . upward into a steep climb. Was any tra il of exhaust , vapour , or light seen? ••. P:A • , • .. • • ,

......... ... ....... ........ ... ... ....... ..... .......... ......... 24 .

vn1ere did object disappear? (eg, in mid- air , behind a hill , over the llori:>or..) .~.

25 .

JII.i,d,-.a).,r,,, .a.P.J!.e,a,r.e,d. ~.o••c..l.iJJ.b. FPA ;b,o;t.h. p;bs.erY£;rA ;vaJ;.ch.eJ. un;t.iJ., out of s ight . Do you know of any physical evidence? (such as fragments , photographs, or other supporting evidence) ... . ... • .... , . . . . ... .. ..... ~P. • . . . . . ................. . .. . .... .. . No . 1 ?

26 .

Have you observed any unusual phenomen& prev1ouu y . ••.••.. . ••••

27 .

If so , give brief details of incident(s) •• . • ••

~. (. ~ . •••• • .•..•.

.. .................. ... ... . . . . . . . .. . . .... . . .. ... . ...... ...... .. ~

28 .

f

••••

f

•••

••••••

State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certain ubout the answers given tb 18 and 19 . In relation to Mirage aircraft observed in area •

............ . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . ... . . .... . ... . . . ..... . ...... . . .. ...

29 .

Are you n rr~ember of ':'ny organization interested in aerial phenomena? . . ............ ~9 . ... . ... .. .. . .. .. · . . · · · · · · • · · · · • · · · · · · · · ·

30 .

Name and address of organisntion • .• • •• JS .I. . 1.1. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

............. ...... ... .. .... ... ... ...... ..... ..... ... .... ....... 31.

J..ny additional inform£-tion v.hich rela,;es to the sigLting . The so .nd coDlence<i abot;.t t n..ile ef Jr·e Kurri NDB anu built

u~

to.;. . v xiiUi.after.1-~ . Ii:iies : .. .~his . :i.~ . nb~~t .th~ .~~~t . v~h~;~ .th~ . ~~~:1~~~

.. ~~~ . ~~q~ 1 • • • ~~~ - ~Q~Q . t~e~ . continued . to . ce~~eas& · . . ...

driven by the observers . . . ..... .. .. ... . .. , .. , .. ......... .... ...... ..... ...... ... .... ... .

over the next f our tenth

~ile

RESTRICTED

. . . /3


~/ . - 3 ?AFC 2 - L~IT? EVALUAT!ON

The follo~.'ini; oil i tary aircrcn~""; ~re in -.;he vicinity of the reported LTO pos1tic~ at "he time : -

32 .

l!!f: .............. ........ ..... .... ... .

Aircraft t;rpe •..••..••..

Headir . ....• . ... . . ... ...... •T

••• • •• •• •• • • • T •••. •••• • • •.••••• • T

Height .. .. . ... ....... . 1 000 f't

... ....... ... , 000 ft . .......... , 000 ft

Speed •• •• , , ••• . •• • , ••••.• K ••• •• • •• •••• • • •••••• K ••••••••• • •••• •• •• •K

33.

The following civil aircraft were in the vicinity of the reported UFO position at the time : -

See Investigatin! offi cers report

Aircraft type •.•.•••.•.•• , .••. • • , •• •• • • • , • •••• , . •• •••••••.••• • . • Heading •••. • •••• • ••••• T • • •••••••.. ••• ••••• • •• T ••• , • ••••• • .•••• , ••T Height • •.•••••..••••. ,ooo f't . ••••• • • .•••••. , 000 ft •••••••• • ••. , 000 ft Speed ... .. .. . ...... . ....... K ••••• ••• •••••• , •• ,. ,K ••• • •• ,, ••••• , •• K )4 .

Calculat1ons sho,1 that the fo~lol'ling pl anets or major stars ware in ttat portion of the sky at ~he time: - • . ••• • •••• •••.•••••••••• ·~n "

35 .

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a meteorological balloon was re l eased f rom . , •..•. f'!~'h ...• , •.•...•

at • .. .•• •• .• z and could have been in the reported uro positlon at the time .

36 .

The State Observatory i n the nearest capital city affirms that aerial pheno~ena in that por"ion of the sky at the time were

. .... .NIL. ........... (comet, meteorite shower, etc) .

37 .

An· other relevant remarks (eg about satelites , r ockets , research ballonns) . . .•.•••••. • .•..••••..••..•.••. • . • ••••• · • . • · • • • • •

See Inve stigating officers report •

38 .

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There is conclusive evidenc e that the object reported I

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.......................... ..... .. ................................ . '

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39 .

The obJect reported cou.ld have been .. • • . •.. . r./.A .. ............ . . f

40 .

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Th~ causu \Or .dl<cly cause, of th.:: sightir.g _c:n~~~nc.d .

...~~~,

.. ... .t~?. ?.~ .~~~.~ ::'?~... .. .. (!!nit)

k.. ....~: .~: .. ~ff.1.~

. ,.,

•••••

, (J:aroo)

••· · ·.~~~~•.~~~!A~~. J.~~?, ..(Date) ' .. ... .. ; ~.~~; .. :~~?:.~~~:. (Rank)

I


da VS

s"'; •eJ

es on e~ observeu £r m t e n ere O!" -n'S a "willy - Ni.Ll " l l + n "l cons1 er b.e amount of apers and d~st at ~ rubb eh ti area . This " i l l - illy" was of hi h intens ... y . They tated h t t e s wit lif+, wha• a eared to b a ensonab r e sheet f l~st~c ~nd hold it suspended some feet off the trrotmd until ... he l::1stlc · s nuddenly sue ed ur nto the alr at a great hel ht Rt a very fast rnte . d ection of t .e plastic was towa.1·ds the urri ri rea from lJai t~and . It · s R 1 ' s th ory tt. 1.. tr 1 sh€ t of plastic .vas the same s1lvery ob; ect th·t h~ 1 diet saw which is the suoject of this report .

rt.,~~ 1J .61

Squauron ....e!'l.er Aa.min SO


ROYAL AU STRALIAN AI R TELEPHONE : 690550 HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND RAAF VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: "AIRCOMMAND, MELBOURNE"

5/ 6/ Air( 27 ) IN k£1't.T QUOTE

.31 jAN 1967

Secretary Depart nt of Air Rus 1 Offices C ERRA ACT

SIGHTING UN- IDENTIFIED FLYING

OBJECT

Your 580/1/ 1(35) 6 December 66 Fo~varded is a report by Flt Lt J. ~c QUEEN who carried out an inves tigation into the s ighting of This Hea da UFO at Won Wron by Mrs Beryl JEFFS . quarters has nothing t o add to t he report.

~_j Encl

/

(L. B. BROWN) Wi ng Commander For Air Of f icer Commanding


1. This report dc:.is l--ith a'tt clled atatements by .ro, Bez-yl J effGo 2. D..lrine. the inter"li<;:il' ";i:.e W-.tneea g :ve the .:. • esoion o1" bein unsure of her facts; :. '!.i ';;tls eccentric e1.d had a oc!,1a that o.he wao not s. l~cr . 3o The llitneao -=neu peroc-~'llly l::r. n.nd ..t·s. • Trntford whose "sightins" is the s ject of s previous i:woatieetion na. mey have been influer.oed by listenint: ~o -them . She had .:J.so read of ne"~.'S'P:l.Per reports of f'ly<_ng S<>Ucera. 4. The uitneas 11as cor.·.rinced. that abe had see!l a "i'lying ~cet" or "Rusoian sp cenhip" and imd nwB!:ened her huobcnd. He told her 1t o only tho moon c.nd they h· d both gone to bed. Her ht3b<ntd he.o recently h.-d a b:i:ec.kdo::n .

5· IA1e to the uncertainty of the date 31ld time, no dei'ini te int rr. tic:n con be ol:.teined on :lanet movements, houever, I feel ccrt in some natural phenomena s•.1~ ·;..s the moor. distorted perhapo by cloud wac oboerved. o.

1:o defi nite &pla.>tation can be given for her previous ai hting t1:o yeers ago .

~ ~~

.. lFl !7...~:: ............... Lt J . t

l.c~ecn)


tEf'uR'I'

0~'

N o of Observer.

Aal.IAL O!JECT OBSERVED

J ro. .Dar.Yl J Ett:t.i'S

2.

Address of Cbael'Ver.

).

Occupation of Observer.

ACE.

49

Won Iron Via TRARALCON. Housewife.

Dote end tioo o Co 3l'Vstion.5 . Approximstely two months GBO onrly hcuro of com in • 5. prOXimately five li'.inutes." Observer 1 a house. ').., . r ~~ ....... ~~<..,c. .....,.-.. Weather Conditione at time of Observation. Clear.

s.

Aids to Cbservation.

Nil .

Hhere lias the object first observed..

Over trees east of the bouse.

10.

What first attracted observer ' s atte "t.ion.

11.

Did object appear cs a light or es n definite object . object.

12.

If there was more than one object , now mony was their formation. Nor ap~lic~ble.

1).

What was the colour of the light.

14.

What was its

Wes any dotai

appare~'lt

~1ere

Definite

there, ancl

Elliptical.

shape.

fas any method of propulsion ~bvious.

No. Iio.

l1o. ~. TKA..

rur

18.

He4;ht, or angle of elev;?.tion.

19.

Speed, or angular velocl"vy.

20.

Was the object stationary.

21 .

What was the direction of fl.ight uith reference to landmarks or points of the compass. Not applicable.

22.

~rhat

Yellow light.

of structure observable.

las there any sound.

Bright light.

W.o.{

Uil. Stationary .

l>id the object remain on n straight path, deviate or rnnneouvre at all .

Uo.

Wne any trail of exhaust , vapour or libbt seen.

No.

24.

i1here did object disappear.

25.

Existence of any phyeica.l evidence such as frE~g~~~ents, photographs, or other supporting evidence. liil .

Unkno,m.

Rave you observed cny unusual phenomena previously. 27.

Yes.

If so, give detPiled of inc.ide ts. Approximately two years Q80 !l!l object vas seen by a .:rello': light •.nd heard by a 11 beep bee." ncise

'llh!.ch appeared from the ;est and descended in apJrOxi.mutely the s!UI!e spot as the first obJect. ~hl.s also occurred in the early hours of the corning and l:::. obse::.-veo. for abou-. three mnutes. 28. 29.

State any experience \:hich etlable observer to be reasonably corbin about the ans•..rera given to 18 and 19. Hone. Are you r. member of eny orgar.ization interested in aerial phmoma1c.

No.

. •./2


2

-

-

R&me end Address of Orgr!'.i.u.:tio-_.

31 ·

Any z:.ddi tion:ll info!'m;l.tion.

Not applioable.

"one •

................fZ.?iJ.. .... !.-~~ 7 \,:3ignature of Observer)


r

E-,T

. ~ EMORANDUM

For .,.. '"''"''" llle RNF .,.,., Wntc « P<i"t dcorfr

RAAF FORM A27l MAR 6)

RE'FU.ENCES

TO

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RANK AND APPOINTMENT

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c.o.o. 0771


~39 THE AUSTRALIAN NA TIONAL LINE

M V~$. PORT

II L.Alffi ..l3.0GA ·.~

......... ....... ... ... .....

..'...tl!l.ds.tonc...

15th. January 1Q67

The conuna.ndinr: Officer, Operation~l Comm~nd ,

Th<' q"v"l At''5tralian Ail' Force , pt'N'""'TTH , t.fJoW SO!.iT HU 'S .

Dcnr Sil' ,

- mGDBtfl'Il:'rD '"L,-r;m uB.TECTS - ~o . 1 2 . 66 . Please find enclosed repo•·t s for your consideration and ne~essory actjon, cf ~ sighting o~ nnidentified fl r· ~ objects , siphted at ot.."i'5 ~"Str.>rn Austral·ian Time on the 30'"'1. "Cemh~r 10M6,_ ivhil~ the ves~,.,l t-'"'"' wr.st of Pipon Islnnd in pl"sit:i.on Lat . 14°0tl 'S Lon~ . 1440?9 'E and steerin~ a true Course of 117°. I \·ra s• not on the bridge at the time nnd did not sec the phenomcnon , hoHcv~r the ~orres Rtr• i ts Pilot ~·1nt~·in Cartf'lr , the Cl,ief O+'ficer ~-rr . Bayly f tnd the look- out man G.Thomson A.B. ne not t11e ima.gineti ve t,·pes and I strongly rei"Ol'lm"'n 1 that the :i.r r ~" Do r ts be fully inves t i!!.:tted o • '!'here is one noint that I Hould lilce to brine to your attention , 11hich j s not included in the renorts of Captain cart er a.ud l.U.· . B2.yly; is ttwt Captain C~rter observed on the vessel 1 s Radar Set evidence of another radar set being used t:itb-ln the r ange of the ship 1 s seto ...,his is not U..'lisual on the fl.us t rali'll1 co~s t , and thP. vessel is usu:!.lly sighted vithin the next t'iro hours . On this occatior.. no other vessel was si hted . The Ship ' s t:lotda Set .is a Kelvin Ru~hes '.farine ~9.dar Set, type 14, and operats on a ,·ave length of 12 em . I · ;ould be oblidge j f you · ;ould let mP. l:no' • i"' tbis s ighting is classifieci. or not, as I ·vould li~0. to pass this i n fo r mation on to thP. Lines rews ::lheet " ALL II.MIDS " as an item of 1nt 0rest . RA :-srr.~n.G

Yours

f~i+~ully ,

(~.) M..fu:;TER ,


s.s."' 38 THI AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL LINE

M V.Ji)G. •

.LAKE.. R>GA!' ·········································

PORT

REPORT OF SIGHTING OF UN.IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS AT 0455 .It 30.12.66. !Y. llro A.G.BAU.Y Chief Officer.

- -

0

At 0455 CIID Fri&a..r 30th. December 1966, in postion 14 08' S 144° 29 • B on a course 117 (True1Speed 11 Knots. The lookout reported lights in the sky, about 2 points a.bai"t the starboard beam, I went to the starboard wing of the bridge, with Capta:i.n R.T. Carter, Torres Straits Pilot, and observed three horizontal rows of lights, 2 points abai"t the beaa, whioh were moving in the same direction as the ship, and parallel to the horizon, and at an angle to it of 15 degrees. There· were about four groups of lights, eaoh in a. vee formation, eaoh group consisted of three blobs of light with a. thin penoil line of ligbt tn.:U.ing astern from eaoh light. The other groups ware in t he sa.me f ormation a.a the lea.ding group and in line astern. Eaoh group just keeping olea.r of the pencil line of lights of the group e.haa.d, The wea.ther was fine and clear with brokenl low level, fine waa.tt.r Cumulus cloud, whioh obscured part of the fonnation a.t times but never oo11pletely. The fonna.tion was finally obscured by cloud when four points on the starboard bow, I had these lights in sight for something like 20 secondB from two point8 aba.ft the starboard beam (227°(T) ) to four points on the starboard bow ( 16J true). The colour of £Us forma.tion of lights , when I first observed qm {a.pprox. true bear~ 227 ) was white, but viewed thro~ glasses ,between true bearings of 174 and 162° a.ppeared to be a dull blue gra;s with e. susp•sion

of indigo.! ha.ve estimated that it took the formation twenty(20} seoond.s to alter the bearing 67° My impressions of the fonnation is set out below, C>'-----

0'-------

.01------

01--- --

0

-

!2!..1tov /..~ L~BAYLY. ) -.£H-~ OFFICER,

-

OL~------

Lt,Crd. R. A.N.V.R.


·.

s.s. 38 THI AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL LINE

On lloa.rd

M.V.JI.l

II

LAKE .l!OGA" ........................_. ············

................ -..............-...

PORT

REPORT OF SI GHTING OF UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS AT 6455 K, 30.12.66 - B.t! CAPTAIN R.T.CARTER, QUEilfSLANDCOAST.§ AND TORRES STRAITS Pl..LOT

At o455 E.A.S.T. in position Lat. 14°08' S Long. 144°29"E, off Pipon Islmd and on a. true course of 117°, the bridge look-out reported to the o.o.w. at

an WlUSUal pheDOliiOil& appearing from the sw quadrant, I the went out to the a starboard wing of the bridge and saw what a.ppeard to be brilliant white cirou.la.r lights massed in a uniform formation moving from west to east at a tremendous speed. Angle from m:y sighting would be approximately 40° and this entire mass appeared to travel parallel to the observers horizon until\. obsiUred lU cloud and completely disappeared. The time factor for m:y sighting would be approximately 15 seconds, however I was the last of 3 to see these objects. The formation was •• V R shaped and there oould have been 3 to 5 $ shapes in each. Making four in line ahead like thus :-

o---

o--o- - -

o-- -

o---

o-- - -

o- --

o- - -

o~ --

o - --

o---

o- -6-- - -

o- - -

o- - -

o-- -

~--

o--..::>---

o---

Eaoh object trailed an exhaust like flame and every U.F.O. behind tbii leading formation seemed to take station clear of this "exhaust".

( R. T.CAR'l'ER.) QI.JEENSLAHD COASTa AND ToRRES STRAITS PILOT.


·. ~

THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL LINE

MV.jU. ·~ ..

WE

0

~

. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PORT

RBil>RT OF SIGHTING OF UNIDEN'l'IFIED FLYING OBJECTS AT 6455k 30.12.66 §ishted br G.!mCiiSON Able Se811l8D llrid.ga Lookout 040(}:0500. At about 0450 1 .Maw what 1 thought was a rocket rising above the borizcn about 6 points abaft the starboard beam. I watched for e.}x)u1t a minute aDd • saw that the lights were forming into lines. 1 reported the sighting to the Chie:f Officer, who came out to the wing of the bridge, with the Pilot, by this time, the front lights were made up of groups of smaller lights, with several single lights trailing astern. Th~ There were several groups of lights abreast of the front light. Set out below is how the lights looked to me:First sightine:-

~~

I

4 Points abaft the beam:-

Abeam t• ~

-

-

.A,•

I

.. '-.~, I

-t••

:.

-

-

-

2. Points on the Bow :-

'

'

. '-

(G. TH<IlSON) ABLE SE.W.AH


II

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S - .. i C T E D fl92 I :LLLIG='c: RE?OTIT 07 A:RI!.L

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Si\)HTED BY .... A'iJ •.RS R001:S

;:r l GAILJ ST:?::ET l.P.G:;A

~31

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COPV


(0 For 11110 within the AAA1 0<1/y Wr/~ or print cleorly

41tM EMORANDUM

OUk FILE

~jt&i//1/Jl,j

1\.V.F FOI\H Al7l HAR 63

F11.011

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'.tl.:!

· · · · · · · · · . . ... .

Heading . . . . . . . . . . . . 'l' . . . • . . . . . . . ':' . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • . . :1

Height . . .......... ,oon ft . ..... . .. ,ooc ft .. . ...... ,000 ft Speed .. ..• .... . .. . . . . ... .. K ..... . . ..... . K............. • .. • . •

34 ·

v tr. 't -che folJ.o·:;ir:g planets c·· major st .1"' portit."' of tL "'' ·· 9+ t!'!c time: - . .. . .......... .

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The St 1 te Observ·l tory in the !"• .;~rc ~t c::o.pi t1:. city . ffirms t:: . t acri.al phenom" ..'l in that protion of tho ~kv '1t tb.. tir.lt' ·. r (cc~ct,

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PA.INT£0 NAME

A.ANK AND APP01t-.H1ENT

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Cl\IIL:AN LOCATt-!J ;:-•. ST

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~OUTh"/IST

WITROUT ChMJGING COURS

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ON Cli~C'Klt (, ES!>FNOON TO~·•R CONTROLLVRS RFPOFcT A S.AT Ll! itl SJ>J~

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VlOtr~ -\ D INI.i PD R•PORT

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FOLLOwS


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MEMORANDUM

Fo, .....,cbJ"tltcAANonlt

OUR ALE

Wt1tt ot pruu c.learlt

RAAF FORM Al73 MAR 63

DATE

116? TO

Dltft

ATTENTlON

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5.

Duration of

E- .

Observers location at time of s i ghting •. , . 7/l.t:-.( (~( .. ~

2.

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obs~rvat i on

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<lea"t.her conditions at time of observation .. f . . .c• ••• ~~('-.. :~ 1• ~-. c:.~-

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1- 1l.1:..;

S.

Describe any aids or

~

v

equi~mec~

observa~ion

used i n the

.•• ... . . ..

. . . . . .. . . .... .. . . . .J}lt3Cf>r. . . .. . . .. . . .T£ . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . .. . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . .... ... .. ....... . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . ....~.:rc v1as object .!'irst observed? hind :1 hill , '• ~r th... :..oriz.on) .

( eg , overhead, co~r.ing from be::-

. . . . . . . . . . . . . (.c...' !~/!'!9. .. t=;1t;f':l. .. IY.t.:'i":-'.• TH¢ .. f.t-(IY. •..•.•..... . . (~g ,

10 . li'na"t first attracted observer ' s a+tcntion?

light or no i se) .

........... .r:: .'.~. ; ... ~!~ . . !~ 'I ..Tf!.~ P.".~ ~ ~ ~~.................... . . . . ... . . . . . ... .. . ......... .... .... ....... .......... .. ........ . '

11 . Din obj

'

"".!'pe"".r .... 9

H"";

l!.

l igh"" ~,. as

fl.

def i ni +e o h je o~ ? ... . . . .. . .•

. . . . ' .. .. ...... ·'· .~r: . . ·'·~t:ff • •. ?'.'~ :;-...t.:-:;c:: r. ......... ............ .... . •

1"'2 . I_ ther<.: \>al;l

(a) (b)

13 . 14 . 15 .

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••••••••••••••

object. -

!YH. ....... ·.···- ··

!:.ow ::tan;i "C:!re there? • • . . • . . ... . ....•. in what forraa-vion w~r~ tl . .::,· ? . .. , •• • • , • ;v~rl.

, , . ..... . ... ... . Wh~t W::l.<> th(. co lou= of the lig!l-:. or obj..:ct? . ~'f.ilJ?A/. ( . .Cfl?.tf_Y. Wha."t was ~ts appnNn"t shape? . ..... . • . . ( ~ .~ ~~~9. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · lias any oct'lil of stru.c-turc observable? .... . ... . N . · · · · · · · · · · · RE~TRICTED

... /2


RES::'RICTED

- 2-

16 .

Was any method of propulsion obvious? .•...•..•. · '- ••... . .. .. ....

17 .

,'/as --:here

18 .

Wh:lt was its heigh-.;? \Or argle o:: eleva~ion) •. ~~!

19.

.~hat \'las its speed? (or a!:gtllar velocity) . .•. . :; . ~ .. .. ~.. . ..... . . .

20 .

Was the object sta;;ior:a.ry·: ............•....... ~ .<: ••• • •.• . ••••••

21 .

a.w

scu.nd? . . . . . .

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .~. ( ..

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f

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.. ~': . ~~~ .... . !"';.•'!'"'

.mat was the direc'tion of of the compass?

points

flig_~t

with reference to landmarks or

• A ' ~ r ~ .....,_. T/j .. . . .. ... .... ..I ........ .. .. .. ...... .$c." ........... ..... .... ....... . 1.

~

22 .

Did

tn~

object remein on a straight path ,

d~viato ,

or

m~nocuvre

o.t all ?

.......... ..... . . . .. . . . . .. P>T.~~~'.li!t ( . . . f(t;ft/. ............ . ..... . 23.

,1fh .. ... . .. . . . . . ... .. . . .. . . . . . . . . ...... ... .. . .. . . . . ..

Was any trail of exhaust, vapour , or light seen? ••.•

.............. ..... 24 .

Where did object disappear? (eg , in mid- air, behind a hill , ovGr the horizon) _:_:"~$- r 1\ fi.1l{) ~ .~D f)., :3 !:) S "~._.::t,;=c..l .. :\

. . ... . ....... ..... . ...... .... ....... .......... ... ........ .

25 .

Do you kno~; of any physical evidence? (such as fragments , photogr~phs , or ot~~~ supporting evidence)

............... .. ..... ............ ... ........ ................... 26 .

Have you obsE:rved any unusual phenomena previou~ly? .•...\":? .•••

27 .

If so , give

bri~f det~ils

,

I

'

of incident(s} .•.•• .• •. ~ .. ~ : •.•....••

............ . ......... . ... . . . . . . . . . . ..... .. . . ... .. . ..... . . . .. ... . .. .. ........... . ... . . .. . .. . . ... ..... . . . . . . . .. . ... . . . . .. . .. .. . . . 28 .

State nny experience w".ich enables observer to b~ reasonably ccrtnin ubout the answers given to 18 and 19 . '~r=o 2 f:- II 6 .. • •5.::;= . • r . • • •.A/,Y·v . •_• ~m-=~ . • .. . .. r .· . . . ..... .. .. • • •. • . • . • .... • .. • . ... • ... .

t

29 .

Are you a :'lembcr of c.ny org::..nization interested in aeri:;;.l phenomer"-a? ••••••.•••.••..• . .•.~C:

30 .

.. .. .. .. . .. ...... . ....... .. ...... .

!Tame and :1ddress uf organis::-.tion .. .. . .• . tY.fl/

.... ........... · · .

. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

31.

Ar!y aauJ.tion;;u .:..nfomrtion uhich re::..ates to the sighting .

• • • • • • • • • • ~ f_ !f • • • • :-:.Y.• • f;/f. ~:.~ •~ • • •~)(! !.£::1?.

• • •; I: • ( /. ,(

~. • • • • • •

... .................... .... ................... ......... ........ ...... . . . . . .... ..... . .. . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . .. . . . RESTRICTED

. . . /3


lUSTR!CTE'D

- 3 -

32 .

aircraf~

The follcring mili;ar:•

u?Q

reporte~

were in the vic1nity of the the t ima : -

pGS~ tio~ a~

I l-t.ircraft t iTe · . ... ... . . •I• . . .... . . . . •. ..... . ... . ...... . . . .. . . . . . ...

!ieadl..

. . . . . . .7

... ... .... .. . . T . .• . • . . . . . .... .. . . T

Height • .•. . . . • . . . . . . • . , 000 f t

... . . ... . . ... , 000 ft . . .. .• .• . .. , 000

Speed . •.... . . • ... • •. . .... K ••• • • • • •• ••• • •• ••••• K •••••• •• • , • • ••• • •• •K

33 .

The following civil aircraft were in the vicinity of the reponed

UFO position

~t

the time : -

Aircraft typ-e: ... . . .. .. .. .fl.

.. ~- . . •... . . ....... .. , . , . ...... ...... . ,

Heading .. . . . . . . , , .. . , .T . . .. • .. .• . , ••• • •• . ... . T . .. • .. .... . ... . .. , .T Hei ght • • ••• • • • ..• • .• . , 000 ft ... . ....... • ... , 000 ft •• • ...•••••• , 000 SJ)eed • . .••• • , • • .•• • ••..•• •K • ••. • , • . , ., ••••• , • •• K • • , • . • , •..•. , • .• K

34 .

Calculations sho··1 that the following planets or major stars .';ere in that r~r~ion of the sky at the time :- • .••• • • • • .••.. • • • .• •• • • .

'v•T 3~ .

,

., ,.. ""

meteorolo0~cal

h

balloon was released from . • • •~ • . .•.•. • . • •• • ••..•

at •... • .• • .. z and could have been i n the position at the

36 .

UFO

reporte~

ti~a .

The State Observatory in the ne"-r-~st capit:ll c i ty affirms that aerial phenomena in tha:; portion of the sky at the t i me were

..•. ~!"••. • ••. . .. .• •... (comet, meteorite shower, etc ) .

3i .

Any other rol~vant remarks (eg about satel ites , rockets , roe.:~arch oa: loo ns) .• ..... • .1<. ( ?-• • ••• • •• • • • •••••• • .••••• • ••• • •••• • • • • •

38 .

,

.

. . ...

.

.

.

....

.

0

••

'

•••••••••

•••

,

••

•••

•••••••

Thor~ is conclusive evidence that the objec t reported was •• •• •. • •••

-

~ ~( ... -~ ···· ···· ······ ······················-··· ···· ······················· •••••• •• •

.39 .

The

ODJeClO

t •••• •

•••••••••••••• •

••• •

•••• •

•••• •

•• • •

•••• • ••• •

••• • •• •

reported could ha-.re been . .. ... : ....-;';' .. ........... . .. ..

.

. .................. .. ........... ............. ..................... ?he ~usc (or likely cause , of t~ s~g=ti~€ c3nnot be d e tc~1nca .

40 .

--;,

....... .. ..J?~~ ......... .. .. (Unit) 2

· . . · ........• . . , , . .. . .. .. .. . . (Dat-e )

RZSTRICTED

. • :-. ,. .. , . ... ... ..... . ... . ... (Nan:e)

. . .": ...•. . . . .. . . . . • ........ . ('Ra.nk)


(Cper~~ivna: Corr~nd ~sr 3/P/5)

F.2': : -

R3PO~,...

BY OBSERVER

observ~r ... { . ~ . . ~ • :!f1.1.'1 ~~I)... { ' . • •.••.••..•. AGE . • ~ 0... .

1•

!fame of

2.

.i.ddress of observ .. r

) .

Occupat~on Oi

obs.;rver ..•-..... . ..... . ...... ... . . . . ~·'· ........ . .

4.

Dat~

of

5.

Duration of observations ..

6.

Observers location at time of s i ghting

-~-. G.B ~ P.J1 .l: 9.":J.\': .l? }.E.: ~ \.\l;: .. . ....... . . .. .

t

. ... ... . ... ~F.~1 .. f.~ !'1 A~~~ l·~"\~~~4. 9.~· :>.l.le ... . . e.n·l t1mc

cbs~rvations/~!~)1:'J ~~~~-~~;.'.9:5J)9.s.c.,~999:>!9~P.-L--, .'.>:".".-::] ,q -~ . . ........•. .. ... .. ... . .

Jl?.t. ~ . ~ ... .

. .. ......... ....... ...... , ......... .... .... .. .......... ....... .. . cona~ ti"r.s at ti:::1~ ~.-f observation 'J:~ .~ ~~.-:'. '?>~ -~~ ..~..S.'-J::r? N .t:?) : ...... .. .... . ....... . .... . .. . ....... .

7.

(/eatner

8.

Describe "YlY "'leis or

<:::q'<~t~m.... n~ used ir. the observat i on ~-~ . -:t:{)~ .:+.. k~~.L;~~'--?. . . . .. ............ . ... . .. . ... .. ......... .

. .. ........ .... . . . ... . . .. . ... . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . ... . .. .. . . . .. . . ...

9.

lo!!~rc wo.z ""~ ... c't !'irs-;; observed?

hind :t Lill ,

o-.~:r

(eg , over head , coming f r om be -

the hori zon) .

-~~ - .. ~.. \-~.~~.~~)s~ . . ... .. .................. .

1 0 . r/h'l;; firs:t a tracted observer ' s attention?

(eg , l i ght or no i se) .

..- ~:; .l .'..... ..... ... .. ............... ..... .............. .... 11 .

~~~. ~~~ :!~~. ~~~::~. ~~ . ~. ~.~~~~. ~~. ~~ . ~ . ~~~~~~ ~~. ~~~~~~~ ~l~j:

Lt:

·~················ · ············· · ·········· · ···· · ··········

.................. ............. ..... ............ .......... ....... 12 . If tn.. rc (a) (b}

was more than one object: -

~.::s<:-. ·~· ... ............ .. ... . . .

how many were there? •. i?'l. Hhe.t fortmtion wero:: tt.~y? .. ........................... .

1) . .//hat •-s th

COlour cf tho lig."

14 . ".Ynat was

a. par..t,t

15 . 'ltas

~'!l.'J

1t ..

S!l.aP-

d-."v 1 ... of c .... ruc~c

• •

O<

,:t•cr (&:\~r..o;\.A.<l;a,.>:>. ••

~.t; .... . ~ .... . . . · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

oos~.;rvabl.:?

.. ~ ~........ . .... . . ... .

. . . 12


RES7RI CTE:>

- 2-

16.

F.~s

-

.las there any

,

~

( .

pro~sion obvious? . ~.~ •......••. . ... . .. .. .. sound? . ~ .C. .......... . ......... . . . . ...... . ...... .

any method of

l~ei.ght?

;.8 .

flho.t was its

1~.

,'fhat was its speed? (or a.'lg..<lar

20 .

• t Was t .ne ob Jec

21 .

1fuat ,yas tile direction of points of th~ compass?

t ..

eleva~:ion) A.>. ~ o:-. ~~~ velocity)~. t~:'. .":-. ~'\.\.~~~:-. ..

(or ang2.e of

. ? \ ~ s ~..atl.onary. J':l ••• • .••••••••.•••.•••• • •••••.••.•.• fl~ght

with reference to landmarks or

:r~4~ .{~..\\~ .~ .~~~. ~~............ .. . 22.

Did tu... Jbject remain on a str aight path , devio.tc , or manoeuvre n t a.ll ?

.>.~~¥. ..~. . ~:--:~........................................ .

23.

Was any trail of exho.ust , vo.pour , or light seen? ~. ~•...•....•

....................... ...... ., ..... ..... .. .................... . 24 .

n1.ere aid ooject disappear? \Cg , in ffiid- air , behi nd a hill , over th~orizon)

.~.~- -- · ~.. ~ .. >. ~J?.~. ~-::1 .. ....................... .

25 .

p~ysical

Lo you r.ao·:; of Any gr~phs ,

ev:.dence? ( su.ch as fragr.tents , photoevidence)

supportir~

or other

.~.~ ........ .... ..... ....... .... .. ... ... ........ .. .......... . '

'

'i g.p, . • . •• .

26 .

Hnvt:: you observed any unusual phenomena prev-iou:J1y? .

27 .

· b r1e · f d ev~l·1 sor 1nc1 . . d ent <s > : •..•.... ..A.~ ...... . I i' -so , glve

~

s~

~- ~~~~- .~.~~~ -4~-~ :~. ~"\

+-lLJJ_

........... .

.. .......... ................... .. ............................... 28 .

State rmy cxpcri~nce w_1ich enables observer to be reasonably ccrtr.1.in · bott thu answers ~i ven to 18 and 19 . _. _

~.~~~.·... ~. ~p;tt~\~ . ~ --t ·~~~ .. ~~ ..... .

29 .

~

Arc you

a... ·Jbcr of any o!'ganization interested in aerial p.r;.cn-

O!'lcna? •• ~. ~- ••...•..• . ...•...•.•.... . ....•• . ..•...•••...•. • ..• 30 .

:ia.mc and mi.drcss of organisc.tion .......... ... . . .....•....... · .. f

f

t

f.

t

f

f

t

If

t

f

t

If

tIt

I

t

t

f

I.

I

If

t

I

I

tt

t

t

0'

t

t

t

t

I

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t

It

f

If

t

t

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I

If

It

If

I

I

Iff

tIft

f

t

I

If

tI

t

Iff

t

0

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t

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f

f

f

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t

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f

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RESTRICTLD

Itt

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f

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.. ./3

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- 3-

32.

The follo'ring cili ta~r airc:ra!'t "~>ere in the 1ricini ty of the reported L?O pos~·ion a~ the t~e : .... '"""' l ·. \ Al· rcra.:-• • w w,J .r ..... • I~ .. • ... . ....... , • •.••..••••• , •.••. , . , • .. • , .. . . . , !!eadi., • .•.•.•. . . . • . . ••• ... 7

• • ••• • • • • •• • •T •• • • ••• • • •••• • •••• T

.... .. ... . ... ,ooo ft .. . ........ , 000 ft

Heip:ht .. .......... . .. ,000 ft

Speed •• • • ••. ...•..••..•. •K ... .. .. .. .. . ...... . . •K •.. • •.• . ••.....••. • K

33 .

The follo1·riw civil aircraft were in the vicij~ ;:, ~r-~d UFO position at the time :- As WE$1 P'II'16\..E J _!.~S.~~

t~~~~:.~~~·~·'·~}9!o.~~ Headinr •. .S. ~

....... .T .. . .. . .. . . . . . .. . ... . . . T ... . .. ........•... . T

Height • ••••• •• .• • • . .• ,ooo SJ)eed • . \,t:::'t~.~

rt .. . ... •.... . ... ,ooo

ft ••••••••.... ,ooo ft

. .•.•. .K •.•• • ••.•••••••••••• K •.••••• • ..•.••• •r:

Calculations sbo·.v that the follomng planets or major stars ·:;ere in that portion of the sky at the time:- . •.••. • . • .••.••••. • •. • ••

............. ......N~~ ........... ...................... ..... . .... 35 .

.h

from . ~.~.~':-:-.. • •

mo"teorological balloon was released

at •.• • •••.•• z and could have been in the reported UFO posi:ion at "tne time .

36 .

The State Observatory i n the nearest capital city affirms that nerial phenomena in tha~ por~ion of the sky at the time were ..•. • • • . . .•..•• • ..••• (comet, meteorite shower, etc) ,

37 .

Any other r·Jl ·~nt ff/ma~ (eg about ~atelit13s rockef.~ -JI ~ research ballonns) ;/h;. , . ~~ .SA<.~~ ~f· · · · · · .~~ ·

..

~~ .#,-'1J.k\,~;., ~~~:r.~.. ~.c.t.~.zc. ~~ .~ .~ 38.

~t~~

The object reported could have been •.••.•.• . . . .. • ..•.•• • ••• • • · • • • • ••

40 .

t

f

t

t

f

t

f

The caus.,

t

t.

t

\Or

f

t

t

t

t

f

t

t

t

f

t

..

t

t

f

f

t

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f

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f

f

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I

f

f

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f

t

t

f

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f

f

f

f

f

f

t

f

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f

f

h.kcly causeJ of th'J sightillb canno1. be de•o:rm1.ncr! ,

~.\.... · '· .~ . ~ ~~·'· • .•.•.• . • (Unit) ...~~ J?.~ .S...4>.~ ...... ... (Date)

•.

f

.S..\~. ~-t~ .... . fJ:-':~1 .\ .... .......... ....

amo) Rank)

f


03..:-::::: 033l?.7Z:;

:1ame cf o·oscrvt'lr .t.'~?.~ ."... Ji~.c..J!f-:-.C:':"F.!-f. . . c$.~ Y.~ '1.. ... .GE ••1:9 ...

1 I '

.

3.

.~ .1; .... ??~~- . ..;>"!: ... . . :-: . f ..... :-....... . .. . . .... ./. ;( f1.Y, . . ........ · .......... . .. . .... f'HONE ..~~~ . ~ ~. <:9. .... . Occupati on of observer .t:".~~''::e: ~ . [<-:~ .~": . ~f{. ~ ~~ ..-. 1-.i:·.<;'J>t-~ /i./tt;otVifJ

4.

Dat;c and hr:le of cbserv ation • . . ?.9j.~<!l.·? .~ . :i!... ( .3.C: . "?>.£.<: . 4? .

5.

Dur a't i on o:r observation ..

6.

O bse r·1 ~rs locati on at t i me of

2.

Addr e s s of observer

!=!~55)

rR'?~ ... '1-.C? •. /.<: .. ~.c.••• ~. ~-~~.":/.~ ••• • • li r 5~19 sigilting • .•.•....•.. ."·r.t --: . . . -r~~ ..... . .. .

• •':~•• 7 • • •'?.~'?.'?

7.

... ~~~ . /:?. ~~ ·.. ..~4:?.~ . :~ .... /.4:.'1: if.9 ..~ ... ... . ifee.t n e:r cona~ tior:.s at t ime of observa ti on :?~.~ . ! . .':~C:"?~ . . J?:- ~. .. . .'::;'!"?. . ~ .r• •~. ~ ~':-:J~ ~ ~r... ~~~~:--:~~.?. . ~?.~c:::r.~ ..?':.-:: ;~~;z.~ -r~'-Y

8.

Descr ibe :my aids or equi pmen <C ..1 s ed in th~ observat i o.1 ......... .

. . /$~ . .~ ..~ ~ .~ .s..-. .t?c:.': ..~~.''. '{.. f.'':~ .. ?"~~ . .1'?.':~--~ . . . f. ~~ ..~~ c:s ................. .. ...... .............. .. .. ......... .. ' ..... .... . 9.

u h~;; rc \'o'llS OCJ¥Cli • .L::"o't

observed?

( eg , ov er head I c or:i r..g fr om bt:-

hind a bi 11 1 ~v~r +~£ horiznn ) . fV.5tr.J6' t'ii>O~"'e. /101" 1:<oA/ e

t

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1 0 . ,/hut firs·r. o. tr"lct~u obs"'rvar' s att on't i on?

I

t

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(eg , light or noi se ) •

. •. ,{ .G:~.r:... ( :~-:' ~. •. ~/.). . •.. ... .. •. • •• ••• ... . .. •••.... •.. •••. f

I

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l l . Did obj ct "'.ppc:.:r n ~ ~ l i gh-t or D.s a defi n i+ a oh jao":? .••.•.....• /'"IA~S'r •

I

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1 2 . ! f l.nt:ro

(a) ( 'o) 1 3 • V•'ho;: t

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7""'•1,-

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W:l.w

f

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L'lurt:

t1.an one

objuc"t; -

!'!.ow n::my wr.;re ther e? . .S~~ '?. ~~ ': . .~·-= in •·o'lll.O. · t f OTTL~ ti on Vlt:.ro::. - .,.. vAf::J.? • • • • V. • ••

.... .

~ w~s tu~;;

. ,_ _ or colour of Lh .. _c- ,_ 1g!1v

.

->• • • (

t .. ~ . . .s.)... .

1 •1-••••"" • • ••• ' • •c. • •

~• ~• 77r • ..

• I•

,., • I••••• • ••.• ••• •

OuJ..:Ct :

c, ,. . ......'R.. . . .

. ... . . £.•. t9 -; .~. . .Gt, • .:at wo.s its nppo.r~;;n..• sna.pt:: . . . •1E· . . .I . . . . . . 'O t

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RES~RICTZD

- 2-

16 .

~~-

c

17 .

Was any method of propulsion obvious? .....,.. /} • ..... :P ·. . s· · ·.: · £.'11(. c 1'las there any som:d?

18.

What was its height?

19.

'•ihat was its speed? (or ar.gular velocity) .:~:- .:·.~ . ~ . . . . ...... . . .

20 .

/las the object stationary?

21.

Hhat was the direction of f ::. ight with reference to landmarks or points of tht: compass? ')f"/11~ rr~~'i).;o c. /17° 7 ~ 0''!>-T£cT.~ "'o;,: ~ 5£. 1 -o

·~ ·

-;

......... .................. .................. <. \Or ar~e o: elevation) . . ..~ .. -:-?.. :~~.... . . 0

• • • • • • • • '-11 •

b'

·s·r · · · · · · · · ~

J

I' 0 ............ ......... ... ...... .......

••••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••••••• • •••••••••••• • •••••

22.

Did tn~ object remain on a str aight path , deviate , or m~noeuvre o.t all?

23 .

Yl as any t ra1'1

"~ t , ex!~us

of

"'P v~_our ,

· ht seen?. -rN,_../ or 1 1g ..... 7J</'I·<.-._tK<: . .......•

I < ... t: 01L16#7 ~H. 0/>"7'~<:1 l(t::PT (.(~H·~ or: e:. ... c .. , "'r-l?oi'IT., ••••••••••••..••• • • . • 1 . . .. . • .••.•••. . .•.• . •••• . ..• ..••.••..... .

24 .

ovhere did otjcct disappear? (eg , in mid- air , behind a hill , over the horizon)

• ~ . ~ .: . : ~ •• <;'~ •• 25 .

~:?!>. . ~-:>: . I ... ~~-=."':~'!. . <!.':C:: P. .... . . . ... . . . . .

you lclo·;: of any physical ev.:!..dence? (such as f r agments , photographs , or other supporting evidence)

.i.Jo

........ ... . ., ............ .......... .................. ........ ... (

.

1 y ?. .........•.• /'lc

26 •

, Hav~ you ob se1~e d any unusua1 pnenomena

27 .

If so , give brief details of incident(s) .•. . . ~J!r

28 .

State any cxpcri~nce w .. i ch enables observer ~o be reasonably corto.in ubout th ... answers given to 1 8 and 19 . cr: C!':)A. /{/'ltv t.ll\)

prev1ou~

......... .... .

. . . ...... ....... . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . ........ .. . .. . .. ... . . . . . .. . . . . . . ....... ... . . . .... .. . . . . .... . . .. . . . .. . . . ... . .. . . .. . . . . ... . . . • ! : ~ 7f.~ ~ ~ ~'7~·f: 7. , ..~ :n:~ 1.~ ~ ,

, ,

~~f'! '!! .~.~ .T.O. /!-.{c.~~~(. , f;>:f .' .<'.c~ • , • /

29 .

Ar~

30 .

Harr.c ai1u address of organis~tion ...•~ . •'-: .•. . . . ....•........ . ..•

you u r.tl.!wDcr of any o:!'g.:mization interested in aerial phcn" \/(.., omena~ .... . ....... . ... . . .......... . ... .. ... . . . . ..... . . . ....... .

31.

p

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.

...

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.

.....

.

...

.

.

.

.

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.

....

.

.....

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...

.

,,!-...ich relates to the 3ighting.

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11

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o"" ~ "fc-..::: ;jh'u".> ~ '"...... ....... /~ 1/. o"<< / ............................... ........... . ,,..c.-... .....

-

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'-'

RESTRICT:SD

... /3


R!S'I'RICTSD

- 3-

32 .

The followir.g mili -;.ary ai:rcra:'-;. .-ere in <:he vicinity of the reported L?O pos~-;.ion a+ ~he ~~e · Aircraft tY):e •..•.... / . ~ ~ . . . , .•• ....•..•• .. .••.. . . . .. . . . . Headit" • • . • . . • • . . . .

. . . .. . . . T

•• •• •• • . • •• • . T • . • • • • ••.• • . . • • • • • T

Height • . •. . • . •..... . • . , 000 ft

..• .••.• . . ... , 000 ft .. . . . •• . ..• , 000 ft

Speed . ••• • .. . , . . ..• . ....• K •• •• •• •• •••• • •• • • •• • K ••••••• • • • • • •••••• • K

33 .

The following civil aircraft were in the vicinity of the reported UFO position at the oime : 0 si".Rify "?£t!!.!C ;-.L 7

7M'Ie

. i't..£ ... lA ff TL B c f!. .5t~.--"(y~, vt , I~ o -fl( ~s A1.rcraft tyPe • •• • • ••.• •. ••• • •• • •••• . •• • • ••. • • ••• • ••.•..•• • .. . • • . ~ • , P.~ • ,.OLJA'-1' .c"A'O~I SN/P . 1 ;P > rr~"''c - . t'licJ...., )t''> y f Head 1nv • • . • . ...• , .••.. ~.•. , .•• • .. ••• • •• 1 . . . . T • •. • .......••.••. . . T Height • •.•••. •• ....•• , 000 ft ••• • •• • • • .• • ••• , 000 ft • •.•..••. • .. , 000 ft Speed . . ••.•• , , • .• .• .• ..••• K • ••• • • , .• • •. . .. •• • • •K ••• , • .••.••.• , . . r..

34 .

Calcula tiona sno·v that the following planets or major stars wer'!! in that portion of the sky at uhe time:- • . ...• . . • .. • .. • . .• .• •. . •

........................I ... ......... ................ ..... . ... . , 1tL

A meteorolosical balloon was released from . .. . . , .. , •.... • . ... .. . .

35 .

at •..••• .. . . Z and could have been in the reporten UFO position at the time .

The State Obeerva~ory in the nearest capital city affirms that aerial phenomena i¥ tr~~ poroion of the sky at the time were

36 .

t/~.. 4:4-~'!:"fP....(comet , 37 .

~n

other rol~vant remarks (eg ~bout satelites , ~ockets, rnsearch balloons) .. ...• • . .. . •• .. • . • .•.. . . • . •• . ..•. • . · • • · · • · • · · • · • • ...... .

38 .

meteorite shower, etc) .

.. .

.

'

••• •• ••• •

IV~ ~h?m.c/1//' •••• •• ••• •

••••• •• •

41

••• •• •

•• •• •• •••••• •

Thore i5 conclusive evidence that the object reported was •• • • • •••• •

/~ £1~ ... ....................... ......j),,./('4/ ... .. . ............. , ... ..... ... ... . "

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The object reported could na·;e been ..• . .... ... . •. .•• . • • · · • • • • · • • • • l>~.f!'l?nv ~:'

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.. .... .3!?-. f!Jfl!-!"-rl• .1?fo7.•• •••• (Da-.a)

. .. ~~~- ?FF~~~r......... .. trta.nk)

RE:>TRICTED

#


CMB/CI19

Ct/lO

TOR

30011&'Z

FROM MAST£R 1 LAKE BO~A 1 TO NAVY CANRERRA

~AIR_~

DAT£a

30 DEC 66

TELEGRAM SIGHTED UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS 29185'Z lN 1406 SOUTH 14409 EAS1 HEADING EASTSOUTH£AST SUPERSONIC SPEED ANCL£ OF

SIGHT 15 DECREES AND PARALLEL TO HORIZON FOUR CROUPS IN VEE FORMATION LINE ASTERN EACH OBJECT CIRCULAR AND SHOWING LICHT STREAM AST£RN.

THREE OBSERVERS REPORTS FOLLOWING

tNM SEC FASEC ASNS

DeNS

~ DOFO DOFP DNAP DPR RECS

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V)

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A 224 September, 1958 l

,.Of'WI

ROYAL

F Slg\ 52

FOR

~M CEN SIGNALS USE

PRECEDENCE-ACTION

AUSTRALIAN

MESSAGE

PRECEDENCE -INFO DEFERRED

AIR

FORCE

FORM ~-

DATE- TIME GROUP

No

SJb:'路'

MESSAGE INSTRUCTIONS

FROM

PREFI

TO

SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

GR

IORIGINATOR'S NUMBER INFO

L "

l

,_,

0

L u'L

OFFICE TIM E SYSTEM Operuor

TEL No.

RELEASING OFFICERS SIGNATURE AANK


/ "'A 224 r S.pt.,..b_ , 1958)

ROYAL

, sts• s2

AUSTRALIAN

MESSAGE

AIR

FORCE

FORM

No

FOR . M CEN SIGNALS USE

---

PRECEDE NCE-ACTION

PRECEDENCE -INFO DEFERRED

DATE- TIME GROUP

MESSAGE INSTRUCTIONS

FROM

PREFI

TO

SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

GR

ORIGINATOR'S NUMBER

INFO

Page fOP.

~r R

of DATE

DRAFTERS NAME

W£lU MPI.IES TO

OFFICE

TEL No.

pages TIME

DATE

TIME

SYSTEM

RElEASING OFFICERS SIGNATURE


EMORANDUM

Fot ~ae w•lhm U..: AAN' only WtJCt' or tmru c;eorlr

OU R flU

~ ~

RAAF FORM Aln MAR 6l FI\OH

I /.

f;rt AIRJ (76)

DATE

22 D;;c bb

..A..I!Y~~try &a ..eA~u,cL,

~r;tg_cl

~-------------------------------------------------------

c:Jil ,

7

PRINTED NAME

A. C-R.EErJ

RANK AND APPOINTMENT

fi..TL-T

c~ .vIt:Lt.. o

r;;:;QNE EXTN


'I J

Pl Co

Sub,.ec r

·!nide ificd Flyi

~&.d,

Ob~cc ts .

Dear Si-r, Hnl'lY thar.ks for

o~ letter dated 2/11/66 to l<hich the above :::-G!ere1 ce

a:pplies .

s-; ce last 1.rritirn to ~rou I have been :fortunate enou,;h to soe ma.cy' more Ul'os. In feet I have set 1.1p a Bl'lall band of 1 sk.y- ;ratchera 1 whose :~.· aports come tn 10 ~or confirmatio end clecr~ng from a r.uccor of places i the I>Ie tropoli tan aroa. Some of these people are now technical types , fo ... ~unately . 'lbcsc u!'os in+erc!lt m.e .:;rea tly and I ha•1e recently been commi ssio .ed blf Hon 1itz Publications Inc . P+y. Ltd . to \ll'i te a book on the

~ubject .

t:y question now is, ma;,· ! quote ~roll' t:he info.:;Jla ion oupplied 2/1 1/66 , in J:lV book? Al oo, is there an o"f'icial vir:~~ held by th.:L:"':e~D.-:::p-=ar =::-:e:-::t:--:-c-;:.r Air or ~e !t .A.A. F. on he subject of u!'os? I understa."ld that l.fr . . -; . R013Ei "'S pub' ished st.,.te o11t on he matter is no~ ac ually clessod a"' tho officio.l a ttitude . I~ tris so ? Following your request fo-· news of ar.,.v fur her si :htin "'S , I am a the mOI:Ient COI!l!'ilir"" a l i st of si?htillgs seen since ey l<>st sulnissions . These uill be forwarde to D.A.F. I . Vi" ro . 1 Control & Reportinc: Unit , Brookvale . I hope they cey be o soce usc . I tlish •o em:::-ess my thanks to rou for ·our intere:::t to date .

$v~~AR.Y ~ 1'\~>J

{7.1\/I:N ~'/

Abbi11:.~S.

c.

MRI B ~B.;:R..IS () R.O hl?p f'ti-Ri 1 lo ~e. P.>A\..~ ~t40M I <.-Mj

Sccurry ,.J 8:fl.12.vMty 1C\b ~

! 1~(1I AI"' APPT. 1 IMI1. 0u lllf1E~ L UI! , v~~,

Milo-

OATE

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7

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""'-----=---

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE TELEPHONE: 690SSO

THEGAAPHIC ADDRESS: "AIRCOMMAND, MELBOURNE"

5/6/Air( 20) IN ui'I.Y

/

HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMMAND

RMF VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE SC1 VIC

ouon

1~

REPORT

I

ON UFO

orr- 1966

SIGHTINGS

1. Attached herewith is a report on an un-identified flying sightin6· The report consists of -

(a) Pro-forma (b) Sketch (c) Iuap. 2. It is considered that this s ighting was of a commercial DC- 4 aircraft en route Adelaide-Llelbo\U'ne which landed at Essendon at 2102 hours lo~al. This~ting does not pose a threat to the security of stralia~

'A{a-v~ :V •.B. CANNON) 77ing Commander For Air Officer Commanding Encl

( 3)


REPORT OF AERIAlJ O::BJECT OBSERVED 1.

NatLe of ObserveJ.' .4: ~. !.~>!'?'!~.~&f 1-.'':7. ~ . t:(f~ ) . ... J,JP .

2.

Addresn of Observer . ..

J.

Occupation of Observer . . . . ~.~ . .. ... .... . .. .. . ... . ... •

4.

D· · e "'Ad T~1e of Observation (Time to be given in local time)

ff.J..

~~~>.,qf!{V.Jf.'~. )'\(( .L. .£..-':1. ~.~/f ... ~~ . .

. ~.~>f..~. !?M-. . . .~.. ~ .. . -:2.~ .~ .!lor.~~~~::~~

.. ...... .... ..... .

Duration of Observation(s) . . . .. .~ . ~"":~ .'-<:: .. . ..... . ...... .

5.

Observers Location at :'ime of Sighting (Give details of own ~4;'e M,f' 1!'-Hc.fc~..J ~ositio~ by map reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . ~f poss~ble, or by known /'

o.

w~ ().";. ~ ..'~ .~~~~ . ~~": ~ .c.r. .V/.• ~ ~~~~.~ . ~>;~. 1.t:'!'~~ . }f.?~~?~~~~ t:F. •~ ~~~ :~~~ t~o~~~ Weather Conditions at time(s) of observation(s) ........... .

1.

ea-R-:". ~.). ~':":":~ .1. -!'.~ .. ~ .~. ~. ~-4 .h:~ ,;.;·-:·:>.. .. . B.

Aids to Observation( s) . (Describe any equipment used in t11e

. . /l(r-.. t-!<4~. . .-.. ;-::y.,.-<:--f.<-.. ~%':.~~< ~~.- ..~ .. -f.-: : .. ~.~~~¥~~~~

..<:"r... ~~~~ ..~'..:-~..~:'..~ .( ~~~~:-:z 7.7-:~ .~ :~:r./) . 9.

'.'ihere was object first observed, eg, overhead, ber.ind a hill, over the horizon, etc. c..dd ?LVvJ.I.. .

com~ng

from

. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . at~racted

1ihat firSt

10.

observer ' s attention, eg lit;ht or noise .

......~/':'( .~ ..~.. ~~ ··········· · ··············· · ·

~ ~ : ....... ~~~~. ~~~~~~.~~. ~. ~~~~~. ~~. ~~. ~. ~~~~~~~~. ~~~~~~~······ If there was more than one object, how many were there, and what was their formation .

12 . •

/VD . •

..

0

••••••••••••••••••

13.

What was the colour of the light or object . ..

14 .

Vlhat was its apparent shape . . .... . (t~

15 .

Was any detail of structure observable . . . .

18 .

r. .'{!' ~ ~. ~ . . . . . • . . . . . • • :'\:"q . .•......•..••

:ias any method of propulsion obvious . . ... . IV~ . . ....

16 . 17 .

...!t:-.~4-~! ....

.

/

t;as there any

w.AAI.. .......+ ~...........,

. .... .. . sound ...... /Y.~......... ..... ... .. . · · · ·: · · · · · · ~} ,.__ ~ - ~ ...,._ :L: ' -1- ~c..c..L

height, or angle of elevation . . .. ~ . .~ . . ..... · .... . an~:,-u1 ar

. . ... . .... tvf~.,..~... ve 1 oc:t:J;y . .. ..~"r' . . . , ..(l., . , . . . .. . . . . . .. .

19 . ;

S pe_"'d , or

20 .

Was the object stat~onary? ... . ~ . .. . . . . . . . ... ... . . . .. · ·. · ·· \'/hat was the direction of flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compa&s .. . S .E I!

M)f'l.

r

.c..J

flo,.. cl cd..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : .A,.:.; . ·,.t:;t;. .~;..<,

1-/...1.

i!..

. A.

(Ac.

~ f tA IU~l . . · P-~~.f. ~...1.. L.... ALI -~ - ?f·~- , - - -

1 <t:tx {(,

1'

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-2-

~id the obaect remEin on a strai~Lt p~th, deviate or

22 .

• u10euvrc at

ll" .

'~.~. ~'7.~':': .I.~. ~ .. ~.J.'?~! ~ ~·.~ .. t~:c~~ ......... .... .... ..... . 23 .

\'las any trail of exhat'ist, va-pour o:r light seen .... ft!q ... • .•.

24.

·:.'here did object disappear, eg in mid-air, bebinda hill , over thE:: uor_zon .

-c.t ... ............. ·'v}ri) ........................................ ............. . 25 .

Existence of any physical evidence such as fragments, ~ho•ogr~phs, or other supporting evidence .

1'1 .............................. ....... .... ........... . ..... ........... Oft/4.

26 .

.:lave you observed any unusual phenorr:ena previously .... . tl'!' . . .

27 .

I f so, give details of incident(s) ... :-: ................... ..

28.

State any experience which enables observer to be reasonably certai n about the answers given to 1~ and 1q .

#

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Are ~ou a member of ar~ or5anisation interested in aeri al phenonena?

29.

.............f./.c.• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • :~ame ar..d Address of organisatio!'l . ...-:-: ............ . .. . ..... .

30 .

. . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . 31 . · 1 ~n · ... Or::J.!" t ~Or.. · iA 4..u .... .J. -Is i~•• • r..A·ny a ddi ...v~On<!. ............... 1~/ •••••••••••••• .&>

,

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{;~ :1.~..£:1.':':.~'f..~.. ~..'2 ~ ·~~.. : .......... . Signature of Obser..rer ...~ :~~...... .

32.

Location of any air traffic i n the vi c i nity at t he t i me of

~~~~~ ~~~: ~t Yfl:-.1~1 . :~ .. A~~;j((-:~ ..~~~ f(r.s;.~~:·/'(.o.~ -1--:. (*-:'f:.: ./!1..~ .--:~. ~~?'!'(~~~· •••••• • •

•••

•••••

~~ ~c.;- ~~

{

~ ~a.-4</--.....b

A:Jj

~

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Loca~n of Rfiy meteorologi cal stations/i«the general arifa .

33.

"';~: .... .~~~~~~~~~,:~~~~...;; ;~ : :;_; :~ .j(t!-:..~·~.Jt. ~~. . ~~ ..~.. : . .. . ~

···~~··········································

... . .

Signature of Interrogato~r~~~~~~~ -------Qu'ESTIONS 32, 33 and 34- to be answered by interrogator .

Since it is normally inpossible to estimate the height and speed of a strange object it will usually be better to er.dea.vour to determine the' angle of elevation of the object , the angle through ·Nhich it moved, and the time taken to do this .


WORLD AERONAUTICAL CHART RAAF 1 : 1,000,000

ELEVATIONS IN FEET

--

ELEVATIONS IN FEET

lambert ~nformal Conic Projection Standard Parallels 36• 40' and 39" 20'


I

I I I I

I I I (

39'

I

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10

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ELEVA T IO N S Compiled and drawn by Divisron or Nat,onal Mapp1ng Department or Nat\ona l Deve lopment. Canberra. ACT. DI'CM~bi!r 19!">4 RtwiSed Stlp\~mb•r 1963 &~• No 12:>

Consult NOTAMs. fl•&htlntormeuon Publtear•on 1nd fliP tor lateSl inlormlliOn affecting lhl chart

THIS IS A LARGE FORMAT DOCUMENT WHICH WILL NOT BE LEGIBLE IF SCANNED. IF YOU WISH TO OBTAIN A COPY OF THE DOCUMENT PLEASE SEND YOUR REQUEST TO REF@ NAA.GOV.AU

MAGNCTIC VARIATION 1960

IN FEET

HAMILTON

(3469)

4th Edit1on April 1964

40'


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DALGETY AND NEW ZEALAND LOAN LIMITED 1 MALOP STREET, GEELONG Consult us for all requirements in connection with

WOOL

STOCK

\

PROPERTY MERCHANDISE I

.., .., «::M

INSURANCE SEEDS

CHANNEL I TV6 ON ~II DAY NIGHT AT 1 .55 P.M. OUR ~TOCK aEPg&

,_0.

-...

TRAVEL


ROYAl TEJ.ÂŁPHONE: 69 OSSO

TELEGRAPHIC A.DORESS: "'A.IRCOMMA.NO MELBOURNE

HEADQUA.IlTEI\S SUPPORT COMMA.ND

/

RMF VICTORIA. BA.RRA.CKS MELBOURNE SCI VIC

~

' 1966

REPORT uN A:RIAL OBJ3CT 1. Attached is a report of a sighting of an aerial object. It is considered that the object sighted was in the nature of ball lightning or a plasma and is directly attributable to the severa electrical storm which was raging at the time. 2.

~his

sighting poses no threat to the security of

Australia.

ri{~J

.fin6 Commander For Air Officer Commanding

.Encl I

L\..~~Y')\WN\\,.... 7,1

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REPORT OF AL'RIA • OBJ L:t.:r Nellie of Observer....--:T?~tV.v.if(<.

1.

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J.ddress of Obcerver . .~3 .S,Ifk".t!(-F: ..fl..~.i:4'. /:-.f "/'I'<'~ U M •ca..~c- C. 'r;.~/t'f,(;A,',,".,'I-,,i/.; j 0 P_h. Gccupe.tion of Jbserver .Kif!ll. F.>hr~. R.~~r:Y.' .... . .. ~.~.o.'?~'"!7~: ~, ~C;/b

4.

D!'\t.e l;lnd Ti Je o" Observation (Time to be given in local time

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5. 6.

Observers Location at T::.me of Sighting (Give details of own f/ICf(!)f{lll :positio~ by map reference

£ 1 /doAI tl ~I(/

.. ~· ~·. ~· .. ·.·... ·;'l~h ·H~~·. ~·: .. ;.· ~~;;;,;tv;)f ~~!~~~5e,5;.; ~1,;nown. . F.i.'d, .. .13J.!ff. .......... /Jp, ''- . ~~7......•.• . ¥.-!..... ............... Weather Conditions at time~) of observation(,.s1 . (~1<¥-

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Aids to Oqservation(s) . (Describe any equipment used in the

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·;;here was object firs-v observed, eg, overnead, com:.ng from behind a hi.1.l, o·1e;:o the J:..or~zon, etc .

. . . . /~·1~~A:9'..~l;<.tJ,/1:1. . /7.~~!"(1. .~~t{ll:f/f~A(•..• .• .. • •.•..••..•.•.......•. 10 .

"/hat first attrncted observer's atten'tion, eg light or noise .

•LVJ1!>. /J.AI . /;J~(1J(t'/. A1 V. . .t.'f'!Pf/.V. . (/?~~If. /·(t~c.ktlv. r,, .1/. tlti./.IJ'. /Pit~ fP~VA v. /.11'/o / b~nf u/,~"' I .fnN < D.fi!!c+ /lv sky 1

11 .

Did object appear as a li~ht or as a definite object .

. . . . . .Of-JP.c.I:. Pflj?~rJC.KIFd .lr?.8 .{'f#l. {W.I.It .$/qc*. P.iJJ/J."~ .4(1!J:S. ,Cj1/, n,~ 12 .

If there was more than one object, how many were there , and what was their formation .

. . . . . . . . . . . .{?'l(ft:tfQ-.lf7ft?44~,.......0.4/y . .t?~F.. P.fJF.t. 1........... . 14 .

What was th~ col om; of the ligh.t or object . t?.K./l1N7F.:~IP, . fJ,tr~ flt!IIJ ~4f Wr'16 l'III/F/I'#Ji:f7¥<¥ M'tl- C~M'/d'j'..fi~ !fi~.I!Pf.f. Ylhat was its apparent shape . . I?.0.4~<y~f . . ........ . .... . ..•.. ·•

15 .

Was any detail of structure observable . .AV.o.

16 .

Nas any method of propulsion obvious ... A"" . .........

13 .

•.•.••.•••••..••

18 .

· ··· ··· Was there any sound . (l!tl~c!./f?.t: ~~~".~ ~~~~(. '?":-':;;/. . ~ ~~':'~:'.St6.R.., Height, or angle of el eva'!>ion .. Jfs. p!=:l? ./!:1f. (~1J.n;c h,:tl

19 .

Speed, or angular ·.relocit:; . . . . . . .... . . . . .... · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·

20 .

Was the object stationary? .. &"!'..

21 .

What was the direction of flight w1.th re.~.erence to landmarks or 1 vints of tne com~~ss . . .

17 .

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22 .

Did the obJect remain on a straight path, devi'lt• or mauoeuv1·e at all? . : ..... .... .. ............ .tlJ_j.R~ .f. .. !?~JJ.f(Jt4'r?.l. .t.-1' . . s.lx~Jd: .

23 .

\'/as "' 'f}i; tr1i

oi exl";.dt.St, vapour

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disap;:'ear, eg in mid- air, be i nda hi .~.,

. .. . . . . . .&=JJ,~// . Jta.u."((lft.lf ..Pt~-t(/.4:_ ... ... ........................ . 25 .

Existence of any physical evidence such as fra!:,'1!lents, photographs, or other supporting evidence .

. . . . . . . . , ;f,~! .......... ......................... . .................. .

.-<t: ... .

26 .

Have you observed any unusual phenomena previously ..

27.

If so, give details of

28.

State :lny experience whi ch enables observer to be reasonably certain about the answers given to 1q and HJ .

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incident(s)~ .......

.. .... . . . ...... .

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I(Nl'uJ/~~t.."' It/ Tlfl...., 6GN...?CI1-/·~~ 7&. ~RHj)J, t>/ -1/o..:n _ Are you a member of any organisation interested · n ae~~ ~~

fHI 1/N--f?Mf"H'I-;:-

29.

phenomena?

......... . A(~ .... ................................................. . 30.

and Address of organisalJion . ................... . ...... .

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....... ~~ ............................................ , ... . {_'JL 1f:IJVftfr,f,~ a-!' J{ .IT·ql . . ./tiJ~ Y'I~ •• ••• /1. •• • ~' •• •• • . . .~,.~ . fl1jJ/s. :/e. fi.OJ?/1111./.;.. fftr~ . /?J1.t.dX . liNd P.l. ./1. A11lt.h .1-P.IQ FJ(. ~l.ft f?td: /ftt:~S .b.t=.1b.t.L fJrf: f(t?~~"(~~~!~'!~ .~ f~. ~';1~ &.4~ .~(" .<; ~7 A!&-

31 .

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Skv tlAJt.:: ~"kl s~c- 11 PM~A. ~n.~ Pb.w6.'"' -/"Jt6.::-Y~l/~"' ()RA'MI'lfJ...~ h9id:. d ~ f lJ Si,Jla \_ure of Observer .. • ~1:'-.r-':t!l-: Iff ,ur 7i~ IS ~t,lt--.;'IJf E<.t>H lhl / vlr/t<tJAt &IRI #qt~hii't .~~-'--'-.:...:...+'-'-;...;...-7---'32.

Locat ion of any air traffic in the vic i nity at he t i me of sighting . •...... ..... ..•.... ... ..•.••~(tf. . .. . ....... .. ........................ . . •

..

..

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33.

Location of any meteorological stations in the general area .

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~~~~~. ~~ . ~~~.4~ Si~nature of Interrogator . QUESTIONS 32, 33 and 34 to be answered by interrogator . 1Tote.

~~ ­

Since it is normally impossible to est~mate the height and speed of a strange object it will usually be better to endeavour to determine the'an6le of elevation of the object , the angle through which it moved, and the time taken to do this .


E ILDON DI STRICT MAP


EILDON TOWNSHIP

ALEXANDRA

The town ship of Eildon wa s built initially to house workers employed on the dam project. Pla nning was on similar lines to those used in the layout of housing for the Tennessee Valle y Authority, U.S.A.

Situated on the Goulburn River, Alexandra is a prosp e rous farming township with a population of 2,300. It was known in the hecti c gold rush days as Red Gate Diggings.

The township, with its p resen t p opu lation o f over 2, 000, is on the right bank of the Goulburn River, o n a slope surrounde d by timbered hills. Its electrical power is taken from the loca l power station while its reticulated household water comes ini tially from the ma in storage system but first passes through treatment and settling tanks and is chlo rinated.

MANSFIELD

Main attractions of the town are the la ke wall and spillway, boat harbours views from MI. Pinninger a nd Easts Lookout. ' Ei ldon is 87 mi les from Me lbou rne via the Maroondah Highway to Taggerty, then Thornton and the Goulburn Va lley Highway. Mileages from Ei ldon to some places of int e res t are Al exandra 16 Buxton 23 Ja mie son 38 Man sfie ld via Alexandra 59 Mansfi e ld via Jamieson 59 Me rton 36 Mt. Buller 89 Rubicon 15 Snobs Cre ek Hatchery 7 Tagg e rty 16 Tho rnton 8

The centre of a large grazing district Mansfie ld is a lso the gateway to a we alth of scenic attractions, including Mt. Buller. The present site of the town was from 1841 a vast sheep station, however, in 185 1 the area was surveyed and three years later the first land sold. A monument in the ma in s treet honours policemen who were killed during a hunt for memb e rs o f the notorious Kelly gang.

JAMIESON Jamieson, an attractive old mining township at the confluence of the Goulburn and Jamieson Rivers, has a population of 139. In th e gold ru sh doys it had fourteen hotels and two breweries. Cobb & Co . Coac hes in th ose distant times left Jamieson for Melbourne each morning. Th e fa re the re and ba ck in flve days being the equivalent of $5. Among the many b e autiful trees growing in the streets is a huge spanish chestnut plante d in 1876.

FRASER NATIONAL PARK Abutting the western sid e of Lake Eildon is Fraser National Park, which cove rs an ilrea of 6,000 acres. Views from the high ridg es within the Park are magnificent, looking across to the high pe aks of the Vi ctorian Alps o r down wooded hillsides to the long still-wate r reaches of th e La ke. This Pa rk wa:; form e rly two grazing properties. Bolte Bay, Colle r Bay and Stone Bay where once contented cattle grazed are fast b ecoming tourist a ttractio ns. Within the more inaccessible parts of the Park, kangaroos and o ther native fauna can be seen. Shooting and domestic animals are totally prohibited in th e p ark .

SNOBS CREEK FISH HATCHERY A short distance off the Thornton to Eildon road, 7 mile s from Thornton, is the fascinating fish hatchery which is open for inspe cti on daily be tween 路 10 a .m. and 4 p.m. excepting Good Friday. Feeding tim e is 3 .30 p.m. The sto ck fish eat nearly one ton of food each week during the summe r months. When the flsh are feeding it is often possible to see large numbe rs of tr~ut leaping trom the water. Auslr.Jiian Rainbow Trovt origin<~lly came .from ~alifo.rnl~, U.S.A., to New Zealand whence trout eggs were i.n troduced mto V1 c:tona Ill the 1880's. Eggs are now shipped back to Amen ca b ecause ours are free of certain flsh diseases found there. A short dist.Jn ce .Jbove the Hatchery one can find the Snobs Creek Falls.

Note :-

The track between Licola and Jamieson is on ly tr.Jfficab le for four.wheel -

drive vehicles.


EILDON

ANo

LAKE EILDON The Goulburn, Victoria 's lc~rgesl river, rises on the northern slopes of Mt Matlock near Woods Poin t in the Great Dividing Rc~nge. Fed by a mountai~ous catchment .1rea of 1,50JO ~quare mdileB~· <~~d supplemented by the waters of the Delatite, Howqua, am1eson cJn 1g R1vers, th e Goulburn winds its WilY northw<~rds and flows into the Murrc~y River which reilches th e sec~ in South Auslrilliil. The first person to consider using the wc~ter of the Goulburn Rive r for irrig•tion wc~s appc~rently <1 Mr. R. H. Thorne, a P<~rli<~menl<~ry candid<~te some 110 ye<~rs ago. He advoc•led using War.1nga Swamp as a storage in 1856. In 1860 and <~gain in 1880, considera tion was given to developing a Waranga reservoir but it w<~s not until 1902 lhdl Waranga began to take shape. At this stage a need was seen to dam the Goulburn nearer to its head Welters whereupon the Sugarloaf site, Idler to be known <Is Eildon, was chosen. The original Eildon Reservoir was designed to hold 306,000 acre feel but by 1938 this proved to be in adequate to provide the needs of expanding i1 rigation projects in northern Victoria. Greater contro l and conserva tion ne ar the headwa ters of the primary Waterway was demanded. On June 15, 1951, work was commenced on the constru ction of tn e new Eildon Dam. A few sta tistics will ind icate the result of the four years ' effort that followed .1nd which resulted in Lake Eiidon as we know it today . Embankment: 260 ft. high, 3,225 ft. io ng, earth and rockfill, 13,300,000 cu. yds. L<~ke: Shoreline 320 miles, capacity 2~ million acre feet, maximum depth 250 feet. Power output .lvailable: 136,000 kilowatts. Men employed: Over 1,600. Pl<~nl <~nd construction equipment v<~lue: $7 million. Total cost: $52 million. lake 6fdon can now be said to serve four main purposes - irrigation, power production, flood mitigation, and recreation. While the lake's three first-mentioned functions go along quietly, efficiently and in Victoria's interest, the fourth function, that of catering for the individual tastes in recreation are ~xpan~ing. Fishing, swimming, water skiing, and boating are becoming mcreasmgly popular.

DISTRICT 3. All boats m~~t kee~ 100 yards from the tempera ture sou nding buoy anchored m1 way etween the point of MI. Suga rloaf c~nd Rennie Inlet. 4 . All boats must keep 100 yards from the in take tower .11 the western end of the dam .

5. lake Eildon foreshore general~y- Except in procl<~imed de ces-s lanes and areas t:xduded from publi c use, the waters of Lake Eildon for an off-~hore d.istance of 200. ft. from the edge of the water ell any pc~rf1cular l1me- Three m1les an hour speed limit. Movement of boats parallel to the shore in the foreshore zone _ Th ree miles an hour speed limit. Control is by the Motor Boat Police.

Constructed launching ramps for boats are available ut Eildon Boat Harbour, Jerusalem Creek, Goughs Bay, Bonnie Doon, and at Coller Bay in the Fraser Na tio n.JI Park. launching of boats may also be ca rri e d ou t via sections of the many o ld roads which were flooded by the lake in the Munsfleld a nd Jamieson areas.

SURROUNDING TOWNS AND POINTS OF INTEREST MT. BULLER Thirty miles east of Mansfield is the snow resort of MI. Buller which rises 5, 934 ft. above sea leve l. Beyond Mirimbah, 20 miles from Mansfield, a winding gravel road leads to the Alpin e Village. In winter the road is snow- ploughed as far as the parking area. The stale of the surface varies with the weather and occasionally cha ins are required. A fee is charged for roadside parking on a daily and weekly basis. Four-wheel drive transport conveys skiers to the village. Mt. Buller is usually covered by a good depth of snow from June to October. The terrain is varied and offers excelle nt slopes for all grades of skiers, with cleared ru ns of up to 1,300 vertical feet. Five establishments provid e public accommodation and a general store and Post Office stocks fresh food, grocery lines, ski equipment, liquid gas, and provides telephone and postal services.

Boating Control

BUXTON

Bo~ti.ng .on the fake is controlle d by th e S.R. & W .S.C. which has erected speed hm1t s1gns at th e entrances o f vanous . . bays and estuanes. The following rul es must be observed: 1 · The spillway entrance is prohibited for public use at all times.

This small township is very prettily situated on the Achcron River near its junction with the Steavenson River. A road from Buxton whi ch beco.mes Keppels lane, lea ds to the southern end of the Cathedral Range.

2. The pondage lake is closed to boating a.nd swimming and can be used only for bank fishing.

RUBICON In the area about 4 miles south of Thornton is oh e of the o ldest hydroe lectri c projects in Victoria. It consists of several small dams and the Rub icon _.er station. Nearby there are opportunities for flsh ing .


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Plasmas generated by electric disch arge during a thunder· storm near Los Alamos, N.M .. (above. left) show characteristic shapes attnbuted to • unidentified flying objects." The 5·min. <-xposu re was made by S. J. Buchsbaum of Bell Telephone

Laboratories and B. T. Matthias of the University of California. Photograph (above. center) contrasts unident ifoed flying object (left) and moon (nght). The. object shows the characterostics of plasma triggered by corona discharge on an electric power

AVIONICS

Many UFOs Are Identified as Plasmas By Philip J. Klass W nshinj!t on- H.undreds o£ "unidentified !lying objects'' exhibit characteristics that clearly identify them as plasmas. ln most cases they arc plasmas of ion· ized air, somct1mes containing charged dust particles. A few may be vortices of tiny chart:ed ice particles. Their erratic behavior is that of a mass of charged particles. attracted to other objects \\ ith unlike charge. repelled b)' those \\ ith the same polarity. These characteri~ti~ do not substantiate claims of "intelligent control." But data sifted from tbe numerous UFO sightings could provide valuable insights onto both atmospheric and plasm3 physics by showing that nature occasionally achieves what present-day theory finds impossible to explain fully. The data could. for example, increase knowledge of the basic mechanisms involved in thunderstorms and tornado generation and propagation. It might even advance the understanding of plasma containment for fusion power use. The lack of a full scientific theory to explain all aspects of the several forms of plasma observed in UFOs stems in part from the complex inter54

actions that occur in plasma physics and atmospheric electrics, both involved in the phenomena. Few if any scientists working in either field have interested themselves in UFOs enough to analyze the hundreds of sightings in detail, so far ns can be determined. On Aug. 22. AvtATIO~ WEEK & SPACE TECHNOLOGY (p. 48) advanced a theory that many low-altitude UFOs were a form of ball lightning (plasma). al~o called kugelblitz. that is generated by lightning or by corona discharge along h1gh-voltage power lines under appropriate conditions. The idea was prompted by numerous UFO sightings observed on or ncar high-tension lines, especially at Exeter, N. H .. last year, and the remarkable similarity of their characteristics to those reported for some kugclblitz sightings. Since then. it has been learned that a mathematical model advanced by two Yeshiva University scientiSts to explain one form of ball lightning confirms the possibility that such objects could be generated by power line corona. Subsequent analysis of many additional UFO reports provides added evidence in support of the initial theory and reveals that high-altitude UFOs also exhibit the plasma ~ngcrprint.

These could be created by electric discharge between clouds or between Invisible layers of charged dust/icc particles. Occasional daylight sightings of what have been reported as well-structured or silhouette<! objects arc explainable as plasmas that give the illusion of metal structure. possibly due to whirling charged dust or ice particles. These conclusions stem from analysis of reports collected by the Nattonal Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena ( Nicap). a private organization whose official view is that UFOs ar~ "manifestations of extraterrestrial life." The 746 sightings selected by Nicap for the report, "The UFO Evidence." arc called its "most reliable and significant." If. as Nicap contends. the sightins~ in thi~ report show strong evidence that UFOs are extraterrestrial m origin. they ~hould provide the toughest posSible hurdle for the alternative explanation that UFOs are merely one of several forms of plasma. For this reason the following analysis uses Nicap UFO sighting data exclusively. All obscrva· ttons and quotations cited below nrc from the Nicap report, unless otherwise indicated.

Aviation Weak & Spoce Technology. Octobor 3, 1966


line. It was photographed kug£lbfitz, or ball lightning, Commoss10o's Brookhaven above, nght. The laboratory

near Beaver, Pa. A man·made generated by the Atomic Energy National Laboratory, is shown used a radio frequency of about

While Nocap ~ighting~ do not provode any <ignificnnt e• idencc of c~tr:ltcrrc~­ trial vi\ltors. they do provide a wealth of ob:>ervatoon' on phenomena that ~co­ entists arc struggling to undcr<tand in the field~ of pla,ma and atmosphenc ph)sics. Of more than a dozen ~peciali,ts in the.-,e field' COntacted by A VIATIO" WEeK & SI'ACE TtcHNOLOGY. not one indicaled proor mterest in UFOs 'uffi· coent to ju.aify a det:uled 'tudy of reponed 'ightongs. General!} the}' do'· mi ...sed the phenomena as "the worJ.. or crackpots." as one phrased 11. This could C\plain why the plasma fingerprint of UFOs was not spoiled earlier hy most scienll~t~. But the marked somilarity had been noted hy other~. 1\tore than a year ago. the president or a small company in Medfield, Mas•. that produce< radoo frequency inductoon furnaces oh,crvcd lhat occa,ion<~lly a spark di,chargc would form onto a ball of ionized air. These c~hibited extended liretimes. The company. Radio Frequency Corp .. usc' ::1 radio frequency exciter operating at 75 me. that feed' an aluminum hox mca<unng approximately 8 ft. cubed who~e dimen,ion\ make it a tuned cavit}' at this frequency. Fred Manwaring. RFC'< pr~idcnt, says that usong this tuned cavity "we can produce halls of ionized aor that will last all day. if you want. "so long a~ the RF power remains on .. Quite unknowengl} the company had demon~trated clcment5 of a theory advanced in 19SS AvietiOI'I Week & Space

r.

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75 rnc. produced by an. lnductoon oven built by Radio Fre· quency Corp. Diameter of the luminous plasma is about 8 on. The experiments indicate that 'metastable forms of notrogen and oxygen molecules are onvolved In the phenomena.

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..J >0 Two photos above show same scene near Santa Ana. Calif Upper photo was taken by Rex Heflin, a former policeman, who saod the obJCCl silhouetted agaonst the sky was about 30 lt. across and nearly 700 ft from camera. USAF analysts saod the ObJect was 1·3 ft. across and only a lew feet away. Orogonal Polaroid pront has been lost. For companson. the lower photo shows an automobile about 200 ft. away.

Tt'Chnology, October 3, 1966

55


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lw ICI A~·~tlcnu.:oan P~•~·r I K.lpii\R ''' cxpl:nn the IMilhltu•n o>l 1>"11 li~ht­ non)!. ''\\\• '"'"'-" not h.on"oc.opp,·d t>y "'""' lc.tgc," l\l,on\\ ,uont: mtldc,t