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PAPER

DEFAIR 580/1/1 ReferenceU'554/1 /30 (34)

.tEaLASSIFICATION OF FILES

Reference :

A.

DI(AF)~~ 810 para 326.

In accordance '"ith Reference A, all folios, in all parts of Department of Air File series 580/1/1 are reclassified 'UNCLASSIFIED' with effect 7 I-iay 82 .

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~

~_.::-足

7 May 82

. A. PERSK:E) CAPT

AFIS


lOVE THIS SHEET FROM FILE

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TELEPHONE路

690- 550 EQUOTE ROYAL A USTRAliAN Alll FORCE

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Headquarters Support Command Victoria Barracks St Kilda Road ~LBOURNE SC1 VIC

5/6/Air 11 ( 551.)

uEc 196

Secretary DepartQent of Air nussell Offices CANBERRA ACT

SIGHTING OF UNUSUAL AERIAL PHENOMENA

Forwarded herewith are two reports of sighti ng of aerial objects at Cressy and Trevallyn, Tasmania , on the 27th and 29th of November 1960 .

Encl

i ng Commander Air Officer Commanding

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..., or obs rv r. .. Roy Stearnes . . •. . ................... . 9 Fullord Street , Tr e va l l yn.

\

ress Df Observer..... .•. • .• ~····· • • • ... . ~ Ca r penter Occupa~ion of uo~erver........ . . ····~~ ........ . Date anJ Ti 1 vl Ob ion (T.!..Ll"' g.1.Ven in ~4 ••our .: 29 2o2v h. - •••••••• • •• • • •••••

••o

•• , •••

2920~0 29~!>35 . Period Obs rv tl_. 1:mner of Obs rvat1on: (G~ve ~- -----s --· own :-o>s if possiDle , .Jr by mown lo.nJmarks, .:nd de.;c~t'J

or

5. 6.

in the obser vation) • • • • !'P.s.i !-.i !'! l. ~!. ?.b.s_e!:'.e!:-N·. hom_e f!ap ., .r.e!:. J!l0/ 809. Tas . 3tate , ..lap .. ~.. miles"' = 1 inch) Vi sual .observation ........• .

. .. ..... ................. .. .... .. ............. ...................... ................. . ~.

Where was object first observed, e . g. overhaad, comin a hill, over the horizon etc • • • . l~.s:t. !'Y.OF• •t.h_e, .t pp, p,f, ~!r!'""• .<! •J!..• ."o••tJi.e. f..n.s.t >. \~hat first attr acted observer s atteotaor. a.g. light o Lieht changi ng i n colour from blue to green ana r ed •

ht.

a.

.. •

0

.

.. . . . .. . . . . . . . . "" •

..

.,

CjO

0

,. • • ~ • • •

"

"

"' •

y

. . ..

Did object ::1ppear as o. light or as a definite object.

Light

····· ······ ···· ··· ······ 5· ····· .

10 .

"" · ·· · ••~>•••• · ·· .. •••• .. • I f there was more t i'lan O!le object , i1o1r many were tnnr , was othei:r:"lrorruation .

ne ou.;.y.

• • • • •• ••• • •••••• o ••• • • • ~ ••••o • ••~ • • • ••• • •• • ••••••~•••

11 .

Wh.J.t v1as the co1oul' of the l i ght or C·t> j cct . ft.s••a.b,oy,e,.

12.

\·/h1.t uas its apparent s hape •• !~~!1!-. f .r. ,l},g}l;t • • •• • , • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .. • • • c . . . . .. . . . . . . .

13.

0 .

~l ::ts any detail of structure obscrvabl~ • • Pf .• ••

.. •

..

e4

, •• . , ••

• • • • • • ••o•o • •o• • • • ••••• • • • • •e> •• • • ., ••• • ••• • • • • • • • • ••

14.

\las any method of pr opuls ion o bvious .• • ••N!>.... . ... . •

15.

\'las tnere any sound • • • • . J-lp, • •• •

16 c

He 1 g ht , orange 1 o f e 1 e~-at ~· on •• .Just above •• • •. .. •••ijorizon. • • • •••••••

17 .

Speed, or angular velocit y •• • ~i s i~ ~lp~l7. ••••••••

18.

St a t e any experlence Hhich enables obser 'T.Jr to be r o .. o 1 a bout the answers gi,ren t o 16 a nd 17. Uil

. ..... c • • • •

.. •

• ••

• • •"'O •• •• O• • • • •o • •OGfl '-' ••• • o• • •• • • • • •••• ••• • ••••• • ••••

Since i t is normally i mpossibl e to e.;t1mate the he • s tranbe object , it will usua l l y be be Jter to en e:wo the angle of eleva tion of the obJect , the o.ngl~ thro moved, and the time take n t oJo this,


-, .-;.

(Contd,)

R.eport on A.

uirection o1' fligat vith reference to lo.ndtur .s or

20.

ttl"' co:npo.sr. • • • •• ~t~~~o~rY.~P ~9r~z9nta~. P~~~~~rt~t~.~~?~ly,~~ vert~ca} plitne. id the obJect ~e· ~a on a straight path,devi ' or at all. As above "'

............................................ .....

21.

22 .

lto

n.ny trail of exhaust, vapour or light seen ••••

.~as

\.here did ooject disappea.L', e.g. i'l mid-air, bah n over the horizon.

Behind cloud periodically (2/8 3500 only cloud still in view ••••••••••••• t:-r:istence of nny physica:. cv:..derce Sllch as frag.ncnt' photographs, Ol.' other supporting cv idence. Nil

. .• . ;.,h·a~· o'b's'erv'er terminated call~

23.

••• •• •••• ••••r.tt• • •••••••••-.•••••• ••• •••••••••••••••

Weather con,litioJlS e:xperi_en_ced at: tinle (s) or obs l'\ Fine Vis . 35 miles 21 ~ 3500 , ~······· ·· ·""·······

~ion

s.

............. ............... ...

Location of :my air traffic in the vicinity at tile s i ghting .

Nil

• • • • • • • • • • • • • " . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . c • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •••• • •••• • •• •• • ••••o•••• ; ; •o•••••••••• • •••••.,••4•

26.

Loca t ion of

~ny

meteorologi cal stations in the gene

LT Aerodrome

••••••• • ••• •• • o • • • '-•••••o • • • •••• - ••• •••••• ••••••

27.

o

~d.litional inforC~ation •.•T.o.w_e.r. ~-~ -~~~e.~ .i.f. ,he••could see the

Any

light . He reported he could not . The observer reported ................. ...... .......................... . ""

....~~~ .~~&~~~~~~~~~~ .~~ -~~ -~1.~1.~..~~ .~~~~~ .~~~ .~~me ;ate the nearby stars , but was of a different colour • •

0 •• •

••• •• ••• •

fl • •

.. •

..

l.luestions 2 5, 26 and 27 to be ans\,tere.l by interro • tr J . ,t . Hahn.

A/ATC . Or . V. 29/11/60.

as


1•

2.

3. 4.

5. 6.

E . D. Mil.ls of oJO. rv Pans~ang!lr., ": 'll.tln:ss of observOJ ""~-cupatlon of bs lv~ Grazi.er

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Date and T.ir .,

J

Cre ssy

• I3C r':1. fi1

"""--~

gi.ren in

• ....

..... . .. f 7. .2210 Local . £Jov . ).960 Per iod of oL__ (s App rox . 3 minut es , blipki ng out a t pe riods . M~er of ObservJ.iOn : ( - - --~ _s if poss lP- , or b ~t'1C" "! 1~11 a-''s, and in ~1~ o s I ~t.J ~ • • • F_rom .C.res.sy visual si_gb,tiDft of }-ig_h t over Poatina sit uated on ·Yestern Tier s" - to west of observers position • .. .

...

...

~

7-

WV.ere • .s c bje ,.. ... fi"s':; olserved e.g ov .1... ~ '~ a hill o_v r t'"l ~.:o hori o.ls.. etc Ove~ Poatina approx. ~ooo feet above lights of town.

8.

What first attracted observeJ: ' s • , J:J...gt\'t. • " • • • • .• • e • • • • • • • • Did object appear as a l ight or

.. •

\1

to

t

9. 10.

f

;:u;ten1:.~o •• •

(\ Ill I) t

~s

6

e.g .

•••• t

J.~g1-.;

e • • • • \. " t •

orr •

I

a defi nite object •

• . . .L~t. o)'l]3... • ••• •• ••••• • • '"' • • '· .. . .. . ..... . ......... .. If there was mo.:.•e t 1an one ob j ect , ho r m:a.ny \>Tere ther was ~heir formation •

•• • p_n,e_.o.n?-·.Y.

• • Cl •

• ••• •

Ill . . .

.

.

0 • •

• ••• •••• •

~miJa~

11 •

What was the colour of the light or c bjc c t

12.

\ih'lt was its apparent sha pe •• • • • Q• • • • • •• ·

13.

.la s a ny detail of structure obs ~r-va bl ~:: .. ~Q

light .

aircraft landing

.... .

• • ••• • ••• •••••••• • •• • • • • ... c• •• •• •<' • •••.,eo ••

• •• • •• ••o•o••o•••• •• •••• •• •• c e e 'lt• •• ••

14.

vias a ny method of propuls !.on obvio._:

15 .

~las

No

l 6o

tner e any sound . • .F~1;. .aj,rCXA,f.t sound .\lfAich Qbserver stated could have been tractor or truck at distance . He i ght , or a ngle of elevatior • .

17.

Speed, or angul ar velocity

18.

Sta te a ny experience Hhich enables obserYe r to oe r e about t he a n S\'Iers given to 16 and 17.

Since it is normally impossi ole t o '3 :>tir:nte cne he· strange ob j ect ~ it will usually be be t er to enjeav the angle of lllevation of the obJt!Ct. the angle moved, and the time taker. todo t his.


·c.

(Cor.tr , )

.a ,.ec tion tht

o~· fli~ht ~i th referenc~

to lnndmarlts or point:::

............ ..... ... ...... ..... ......... ... .

t.

'

20 .

.Jid tile ooJect .1.·emain on a straibht path, dev L ta or at .L. •

e

... • • . St: eacly • . .. .. .. .. . .... . ... . ... . .. . . .... .... . ....

•as ..YlY ..ral.l of ex .·• t::;t, vapCT.lr or li ~ht

21.

22 .

~~ mi~-aic,

\!here d i d oojcct disappear, e . g . ov-3 t' e ~ :l~- o

2~.

frlgmett~:,

6xi stence ot: any physical ovi-d.encc s:.1ch as phot o~raphs , or other supporting evidence • •

I

NfJ... ••• . co .

Jenind

.... .......... ...

.F~~~d 9U~,19.~~~-~o~ttf9~:

23.

e'3 • •

. . . . . . . . . . "' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .

0

.. .

...... .

l·iea~h e ;- cort.J.iCi o ~s e ·.perienc~;;d a .. ti .!le (.;) or ooserv tion

25.

Locat ~ on

~Y

of

T.&11:

Sigl

traff ~c

ai r

i n the v icinity at the

26.

t•

27,

....

· · ~· · ·~~ ·· · · ·· ·· ·· · · ··· ·

Loc ~J.o.• 01 1 ~~ l'... t ... orolo~ical s t .tions in the gene Launceston Airpor t •

•••• 0

..

It! 0

•••·•••·•• ••••• • ••• • ••• • •'t••• • • "' ••• • • • c•• • • ••• - •• •

................ ... ....... ....

.;

l ~ •

1.. •

Any adlitional i nformation •.•••••••••• • • • ••••• • • • • • •

.. •

c

... .

.

.

.

.. .......... ... .

.

.

.

............. ..... ..... .... ...................... .. ... •

0 •

.

.

.... .

.. .

...... .

.. .

........ .

.

.

.

.. ........ .... .

..

~uestions

s .o.o •s

25,26 and 27 to oe a ns Ier e d

note :

by

i u t errogJ.t c

Star Venus s ho~Ting in po sition indicated . Cloud movement would account for blinking and fade out of light .


l"El拢PHONE路

. 690- 550 REPLY PLEASE QUOTE

Command 5/6/Air 11

VI C

2

Secreta.r:r Department of Air Russell Offices CANllE:'JiA ACT

SIGHTIHG OF IDWSUAL Ai:RU.L

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J)

PI:IENOMEliA

The attached reports (2) of unusual aerial phenomena seen at Campbell Town Tasmania have been received from the ~apartment .of Civil Aviation ~elbourne, and are forwarded for information

). t:

:.----

Encl

/

-

. v.:m.~

ng Co=~~ ~ r Air Officer Commanding ~~~


1 St. Canic:e Avenue, SAN>Y BAY. 11th Jamuzy 1961.

The Cocl:anding Officer, Tasmania Squadron, .Ur Training Corps, 8 Fi. t::.roy Place,

~· Dear Sir, As requested by Flt./Lt. &lith I fonta.rd. herewith a report of a aighting of a bright light in the slcy'. General: A bright light was observed in the sl<;y by 11\YSelf and my wife whilst driving on the Midlands Highivay near Oatlands on 5. 1. 61. ~:

Approximately 9. 36 a. ~ on Thursday, 5. 1.61.

Conditions: excellent.

Cloudless slcy' and very bright sunlight.

Visibility

lbsi tion of Sighting: Light was seen straight ahead of the car 'l"'hen driving up the hill on the Launoeston side of Oatlands, about 1 mile fran ths.t town. Bearing would therefore have been approx. zero. Elevation estimated at 20°. Nature or Light : The light was ohsened..a.&.a..i'Qint of light sor:-ewhat larger than Venus (say twice the diameter) and had a duration of about three

seconds. It seemed substantially stationary during the period. It aPf.eared suddenly and faded suddenly. No object could be seen in the sk;y v.hen the light disappeared. The JD&.i.n feature of the light was its startling brightness. The daylight was very strong and both my wife and Jcysel.f were wearing dark glasses. Even so the intensity of light appeal:'ed to be of the same order as that of the sun. Conclu sion: I f tre light v.•as reflected light fran a aircraft, then the aircraft was at such a distance as to be invisible in silhouette , and it must have been a remarkably strong reflection fran a large surface. I f it was from a light source of its own then the source wa::s very strong to show so brilliantly in ccndi tions of such bright sunlight. Yours faithfully,

:/1. ~ ,1 ~ (H. L . Paxton) Senior Engineer, TEE ~LLl!Cl'RIC COl!!aSSI01f.


Mrs.H.P . Hall Queen 1 s Street ,Campbell Town. Housewife. /3L "Y If

2

3

v

1645 EST . 1~

mins .

<..).

Campbell Town.

s.w.

4~ from vert~cal.

Quadrant

8

:>

1

Brightness 9

> •

White light.

lO

.. .....

-

t

r a.,

objuct

no.t

_.:tn,~

J.

e

0

One . f

>n

l'lt

CO vU

0

White

.t.

v

Spherical (Appeared like large thistledown ball) 1

"

..

..

No

"··

J

P~?p.,.

~

l .>

c.n

1'7

.,)

1

Jtclt3 D...lV

o;}o;;.,.

be;;

o..

so 1;)

ng~...l

ex

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-

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No

N.o

;l

of r

~

v t

e~

v~.::

O.C!'!

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As above Faster than Viscount

~h

Experienced observer of Satellite transits - ex Nurse and WAAF .


Due west.

Straight line, no waveing .

No

... '

To W.beh1nd bank of cloud. n

No

r o ..

• el.ttt

Cc. 1

Fine

25

small, amount clou~ weste.r.n. .horizon.

Loc t· ;

ght;

<I

.l

n

~.ne

vtcin

J

"None seen.

Loc t

ny

teo .,1 .,- c lJ. s t ...

'>11!" ~n

LT. 2"

<1-ny a

.. .

ObstU"ver was su.n bathing at the time .

Phoned in by G.Park.


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.eadquar ters Tasmani an Souad ron ~ Air !raining Corps RAAF

2. 7686

8 Fitzr oy Pl a ce HOBART

704/1/P1(.3A)

3rd December 1960

Department of Air Russell Offices C.VffiERLA

T

\;1 ~ ~,~\ l

REPORT ON BELIEVED SIGHTH G OF

A~~

UJI."'DE!i"'IFI !ID FLYI NG OB.JJ:;CT 8Y MRS ':' . A . .fr.'BSTER AND i-f!SS S . \oiEBSTER

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1• For.farded herewith, t\¥0 copies of a report by the Officer Co~anding, Headquarters Northern Fli ghts, Tasmanian Squadron Air Training Corps, Launceston Tasmania, on a believed sighting of an unidentified flying object by Mrs D. A. \o/ebster and her daughter Miss s. Webster , near Delmont Tasmania at appr o>..'i.mately 1630 hours on the I~ "" October 1960.

2. From the contents of the report and a telephone con·1ersa tion with Mrs Webster, the •.rri tar has formed the opinion that : (a)

Mrs and Miss Hebster are reliable witnesses .

( b)

Neither witness has previously made a sighting of an unidentified or similar flying object .

(c )

reither Witness has had any association with any unidentifi ed flying objects society or simila r organization.

(d)

The believed sighting was made against a background of a cloudless sky.

(e)

There were no other witnesses to the bel ieved s i ghting .

3. There a re inte r esting points of s~ilarity in t hiS believed sighting and that of the Brownings - so far as it rela t es to t he l a r ge object seen by them - at Cressy Tasmania on the 4th October 1960 . The points a r e : "'" e-~ ~f.."'s--

(a )

Each of the objects were of dull metallic col our and did not seem to reflect the sunlight .

... ~

(b)

An upward and out\'lard "socnething" projected from

(c )

!he objects were cigar shaped .

(f)

Each of the objects had no apparent means of propulsion .

( g)

Each of the objects moved slowly .

(h)

Eacn of the objects nove red .

"''"{I;.. C.,·- ~ .l c...\ t"IO..

o-1-•v..ol ~

'f,~,t

~

I •

V ~ · "f"<;

~·cl•"' L.,

~~ •1.•1 ... .J.t= .t ...~:­

s"'-;""":1 ... ~.._'"r

..,.,.-.);~.~

~-~

... "\~ .._~.~o,u., .

9 - ~~~'

-

'v~J-

..

....

1~' •

the end of eac. of the objects .


4.

In view o£ the Similar description given by both the l:ebsters and the Brownings o:t the object they believe they saw ~the £act that both pairs o:t witnesses can be conside~ed to be reliable, it is suggested that it would be unwise to dismiss the sightings as £igments of imagination or optical illusions •

• L . ITALL~R)

g Commander anding Officer

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_,eadquarters Northern Flights Tasmanian Squadron Air Training Corps RAAF

3 High Street LATTNCESTON

5/1/Air(1a)

25th November 1960

Co~anding Officer Tasmanian Squadron Air Training Corps

1• An UFO was sighted by both Mrs 't.e bster and her daughter as they were returning from school on ~ Odtober 1960 . The time was a pproximat ely 1630 hours . The object was s•en for a period of from 2 to 3 minutes. 2. At the time of sight ing both people were travell ing in the front seat of a 1958 Holden Sedan. Mrs Webster was driving. 3.

The weather was fine and there was not a cloud to be seen.

4. The object is reported to have been sighted moving from the left to the right of the observer s, ie, from the NNE to the SSW ~ver the house. ~ean position of sighting approximately ~1°47 S '~trr~·~ 5. Yrs W8oster first thought that it was an aircr~rt aPout to crash as it vas much lower than aircraft usually seen around that area, and it SPemed to be moving very slowly . Altit11de of the object vas estimated to be below 1 000 f Pet . The speed of the object was est imated to be a bout 50 mph and it then stopped moving and hovered- still 800 to 1 7 000 fe Pt . 6.

When the ob ject hovered Mrs Webster, still thinking it an aircraft, thought it was going to "fall out of the sky" and intended to ring the police and report the accident and s~on help .

'.:laS

7. The car was stopped and Miss Webster got out to seP better . She coT.mented that the object had no wings, Mrs Webster agreed •tit~ ~er but she said she had not noticed it until mentioned to her by her daughter. 8. Mrs Webster asked her daughter could she hear any motors Miss Webster said she could hear a noise like a car engine. Mrs Webster heard nothing as she wears a hearing aid . 9. The car was restarted and they were driving to another position for a bett er view when their view was interupted bJ a hedge (pine trees approximately 35' high) . 10. When the view was aga in clear (about 15 seconds later) the object had disappeared. 11 . The country in that area is very f l at and open vith tvo small hil ls aoproxi~ately five miles avay towards the South West .


CLASS!~n~ .

-~ 12.

Description of Ob1ect The object was about 30 feet long and about as high as a car (Rolden). ( b) It was cigar shaped with a round nose and a sloping tail (see diagram). (c) two objects protruded from the rear sides at an angle. (d) No markings ( bands or windows) were noticed by either onserver . ( <c>) The colour vas dull grey with the rear portion orange the orange vas not as bright as anti-collision paint The sun vas shining on the object at all times. But it was definately not silver or shining. It remained a dull grey colour . (f) The only disagreement between the two observers is with regard to the position where the orange colouring commenced. Miss Webster thimks i t started aft of the two protruding objects, while Mrs Webster thinks it started some distance ahead of these objects. (a)

13.

Opinion as to the reliability of these witnesses (a)

Mrs w~bster ' s attitude to the report 1n the Examiner of the UFO sighting by Reverend Browning of Cressy vas one of disbelief. However, she is firmly convinced that she sighted add watched an object as described in the text above. She seems a sensibl e and most reliable type of woman - not given to hysterics or the like. Also I would suggest that it was di fficult for her to admit having sighted and object after having discussed her disbelief of previous sightings so frPely with her friends.

(b)

Miss s. Webster (11 years) is particularly mature for her age and I believe that both witnesses are reliable 1n the main with the exception being the judgement of distances and ~ize .

(B.P.MULLOCK) Flying Officer Officer Commanding


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TElEPHONE:

IN REPLY i'UASE QUOTE

ROYA~

No.~......................._,.~路----

AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE

Resident RAAF Officer Tasmania

8 Fitzroy Place

2. 7616

HOBART

TAS,路lAtHA

19th November 1960

704/1/?1 (2A) Department of Air Russell Offices ~ANBERRA ACT

EUQUIRY INTO BELI l!:VED SIGHTING OF UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS BY THE REVEREND AND MRS LIONEL BRO~ffliNG NEAR CRESSY, TAS.1ANIA ON rHE 4 TH OCTOBER 1960 Your Signal A1331- 19th November 1960 1. On the 11th November 1960 the writer discussed with the Reveren4 and Mrs Lionel Bro\nLlng at their home at Cressy, Tasmania their believed sighting of unidentified flying objects near Cressy on the 4th October 1960. 2. As a result of the discussion with Mr and Mrs Browning and subsequent discussions with various other people the writer formed the follo\nng opinions on the believed sightings and associated matters . (a) Hr and r1rs Browning are stable, responsible and unexcitable individuals who would not perpetrate a hoax . (b) Mr and Mrs Browning are genuinely and firmly convinced that they sa,., actual objects . (c) Mr Bro\olning is enjoying the publicity and interest he is receiving as the result of his and his wife's believed sighting . Mrs Browning is not. (d) Mrs Browning is not a woman who would be influenced by her husband to believe she saw something which in fact she bad not seen. (e) As a result of the publicity given to the Brownings ' believed sighting, mild mass hysteria has set in at Cressy and surrounding areas and people are having hallucinati~ns - and for a while will continue to do so . (f) The loud explosions heard in the Cressy area since the Brownings ' believed sighting are the sounds of heavy rock blasting by the Hydro Electric Commission a t Poatina approximately ten (10) miles from Cressy. (g) A detailed investigation of believed sightings made by people in the Cressy and surrounding areas since the Brownings' believed sighting would be a major taslt and is not justified for the reason given at (e) and also for the reason that it would not determine exactly or even approximately, \<that if anything, the people believe they have seen.


3.

~closed

herewith are the following: _

(a) Statement by Mr Browning. (b) Statement by Mrs Browning. (c) Sketch .

(f) Copy of report filled in by Depart~ent of Civil Aviation Officer when Mr Browning reported believed sighting to Western Junction Airport . (g)

Report by Western Junction Airport Meteorological Section on weather conditions in the area at the time of the believed sighting .

&,;....)â&#x20AC;˘....,_...,...,..._ __

Encl(s)

G. L. WALLER) ing Co!llCander esident Air Force Officer Tasmania


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~

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1. Mr Brolming stated that at approximately 1810 hours on the 4th October 1960, he and his wife were standing in the dining room of their home and looking out through the window at a rainbow over so~e low bills approximately eight (8) miles to the east . The hills, the highest of which are approximately eight hundred (800) feet, were partly obscured by low cloud and rain . As they were looking at the scene, his wife drew his attention to a long cigar shaped object which was emerging from a rain squall . Tbe object was a dull greyish colour, had four or five vertical dark bands around its circumference and at regular intervals along its length and had what looked like a short aerial array which projected outwards and upward from the northern facing end of the object. The object seemed to be slightly lo~g~r ~an Viscount aiÂŁPra!.~which Mr Browning frequently sees flying in that area and he therefore estimated the object's length as aÂŁQut ong_h~ed (100) teet. The outline of the object was well defined and was e'len '!lore so a little later when it had as a background the tree covered slopes of a rain free area of the hills. Mr Browning estimated from landmarks below the object, that it was over the Panbanger Estate owned by the Hills family and was therefore approximately three and one half (3~) to four (4) miles distant. The object after emerging from the rain squall moved on an even keel in a northerly direction at an estimated speed of siXty to seventy (60-70) MPH and at a constant height of approximately four hundred (4oO) feet . His estimate of the speed of the object was made by comparing its rate of movement with that of Viscount aircraft which he has seen flying in the area and his estimate of the height of the object was by comparison with the height of the hills behind it. The object moved approximately one and a half miles (1~) north, also estimated by reference to land marks below it, and then abruptly stopped . !'f'ithin seconds, it was joined by five or six small saucer like objects which had emerged at high speed from the low cloud above and behind the cigar shaped object . The soall objects stationed themselves at positions around the cigar shaped object at a radius of about one half (~) of a mile and then , after an interval of several seconds the cigar shaped object accompanied by the smaller objects, abruptly reversed back towards and then into the rain squall from which it bad emerged. The reverse movement was at approximately the same speed and height as during its outward movement . In all, the cigar shaped object had been visible for approximately two (2) minutes and the small objects for approximately one (1) minute. Neither Mr nor Mrs Browning heard any unusual noise during the period of the sighting . 2. Br Bro\.fning and his wife watched the area for se,Teral minutes after the disappearance of the objects into the rain squall but there was no re- appearance . Mr Browning then telephoned the Control Tower at \-/estern Junction Airport and reported the sighting.

3.

Mr Browning stated that on the 9th October 1960 he gave a full report of his and his wife's sighting to the Launceston "Elxaminer" newspaper and per.ni tted an "Exarniner" photographer to photograph through the window of their dining room , the area over lofhich they had seen the flying objects . Also, a sketch of the objects to serve as a basis for artists impression of the objects to be superimposed on the photograph was made by Mrs Browning and given to the "3xa!Diner". The following day, the 10th October 1950, the report and the photograph with the artist's impression superimposed thereon, were published in the newspaper . Hr Browning stated that the published report, apart from having given the length of the cigar shaped object as three (300) instead of one hundred (100) feet and having stated that he (Mr Browning) knows of other witnesses to the sighting, ~ras accurate . He also stated that the artist's impressio:l superi~posed on the published photograph depicted fairly accJrately


the shape, size and a ppearance of the objects but they shoUld have been shown as being below and not above the skyline. 4. Mr Browning stated that since he made public his and his wife ' s sighting of the objectsi he has received several reports of believed sightings of f ying objects and has also received many reports of loud explosions . He himself heard such an e~plosion at 2130 on the 27th October 1960 and is of the Opinion that it was too close and loud to have been from an area about ten (10) miles distant where the Hydro Electric Commission does rock blasting . Mr Browning is of the opinion that the explosion he heard and probably those heard by other local residents are associated in some way with the flying objects seen by him and his wife .

5. Mr Browning stated that prior to his and his wife's sighting of the unidentified flying objects he had been sceptical about reports of such objects but now both he and his wife are convinced that such objects exist . He also stated that whereas pr ior to his and his wife ' s sighting he neither had interest in nor any association with Unidentified Flying Objects Societies but now be is both inter~dln and willing to be associated with such societies and has in fact accepted an invitation to give a talk on his and his wife ' s sighting to the Melbourne Unidentified Flyi ng Objects Society on the 16th November 1960.


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STAT3!-IE!fl' BY MRS BRO\'INING Hrs Browning stated that she agreed completely with the account of the sighting given by her husband with the exception that when watching the cigar shaped object she was - and is _ of the opinion that the projection at the northern end of the object was more like a propeller rotating in the vertical plane than like an aerial array as described by her husband . 1,

2. Mrs Browning stated that like her husband, sne had been sceptical of the reports of unidentified flying objects prior to her and her husband ' s sighting but now she feels compelled to believe in the existence of such objects . She further stated that she had not prior to the sighting , had any interest in or association with Unidentified Fly1ng Object Societies .


Na"!e of observer.

Rev. Lionel BRO\ffi!t!G .

Address of Observer.

The Rectory, Cressy.

Occuuation of Observer.

Minister of Church of England.

Date and Ti~e of Observation (TiMe given in 2~ hour •lock zonal time)

o4 1815 E.S.T. Period

f

Observntion (s) .

2 minutes.

Manner of Observ~tion; (Give details of own position by map reference if possible, or by known landmarks, and describe any equip~ent used in the observation) . Seen

fro~

Rectory Window by observer and wife .

Wbere was ob1ect first observed , e .g. overhead, hill . oyer the horizon, etc .

c~~ing

from behind a

Approx 3 miles E. of bouse .

8,

What first attracted

observ~r's

attention e.g.

li~ht

or noise .

Sighting (no light - no noise) .

9,

Did object appear a s a light or as a definite object. No light - dull grey colour.

10. If there was more than one ob1ect , how 1any were tbPre. and what

was their Eigbt.

fo~ation.

No special

fo~ation .

11. Wbat was the colour of the light or object.

12. Wha,t

W§S !~s

Elongated but longer than an aircraft.

ag:earent s!la.oe.

13. Was a& deta!J. of

sttYC~re

obseiYable.

1 ~- Was !lni :nethod of p;tollulsion Qbv1o:g.s, 15. Was tuere an:£ so:ygd,

Dull grey objects.

Banded slightly-vertically No.

No.

16. Height . or angle of elevation.

~0

ft.

17. Speed, or n.ngular velocity, l{oved fast to the N, then paused and ~oved to the s . at slower speed .

liol""lal passe01;er nights, Reputation at Tobruk as good plane spotter . Since it is normally !,possible to csti~ate the height and speed of a strang~ object, it will usually be better to endeavour to dete~ine the angle of elevation of the object, the angle through whicb t "'oved, and the ti~e taken to do this . /2 .


2.

Report on Aerial Ob1ect Ubseryed (Contd) 19. D!rectton of f1ight with reference to the co pass. Hoved in line appro): li . E.

froe~

land~prks

or points ot

Gre$'sy to q. miles N. of Powranna i.e.

20. Did t.e o lect re ain on a strai!'.nt nath, deviAte or manoeuvre at all.

Straight path except that the objects joining the original ca:ne rr - var:ous directions . 21. Was any tra'l of exhaust , vapour or li,ht seen .

No.

22. \..'here eid object disappear . e . g.. in 1id-air, behind a hill'

over the horizon.

Disappeared in rain below cloud.

23. Existence of any phYsical evidence such as

fra~ents ,

or other snpportinl!: evidence.

photo P.ranhs ,

Nil. 2~ .

Weather conditions experienced at t11e (s} or observation (s) Past rain at Rectory, raining to East. Overcast.

25. Location of any air traffic sig' ting.

t.

the vicinity at the

ti~e

of

None k.lown . 26 . tocatioo of any meteorological stations in the general area. Launceston Airport. 27. Any additional info~ation. One o ject had airscrew on one end, but acting as a lift and not as forward propulsion. Ori~in~l object moved north, slowed as if to laJd, was joined by other objects, then ~oved South. Questions 25, 26 and 27 to be answered by interrogator.


METEOROLOGICAL SUMMARY.

AM

4 OCT 60

The 1500K surface chart showed a small closed depression over TasQania the centre ::tost likely being vicinity Great Lakes area . Front Zones extended east of Flinders Island/Eddystone/ St. Helens to south of Western Junction to centre , thence Southwards to west of Bruni Island. A second trough extended fro::t WY along Tiers to centre. Lt/mod. rain was experienced ahead of all fronts, however rain ~leared at LT after 1500K. However extensive build-ups and CB areas were associated with trough fro::~ \fY along Tiers during late afternoon. Thunderstorm act1vi ty ,.,as rttported from areas near the Tiers .


,

.

..

.. .

.

..REV .. .. .LIONEL . . . . BRO . .WNING .. . . . . . . . ,. . .. ..... . THE RECTORY CRESsr Address of' Obse rver . • • . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • • . . . • • . • • • • . • .. .MINISTER OF CHURCH OF ENGLAND Occupation of Obs erver • . • . • • • . . . • • . • . • • . . . . . . • . . .. . ..• , , , • •• Name of observer ..

1. 2.

3.

4.

Date and Time of Ob servation ( Time give n in 24 hour clock zonal 04-1815 E. S.T. t~

5.

Period of' Ob s ervation( s ) . . . . • • . • . • . . • . . . . • . • . • . • . . . . • . . . . ..

6.

Manner of Observation : (Give det ails of own po siti on o; ref'erence if' possib les or by known l andmarks s and de ~ ri ~e a ny equipment used in t he observation).

. . .. . . . .... . . ... .. .. . .... .... . .... . ... . . ..... ... .. . ..... . . .. . 2 1f!NS

SEEN FROM RECTORY WINDOW BY OBSERVER AND WIFE ........ ....... . ····· ······ ···· ···· ·· ·· .. .... . , ., .. ······ ·· ,

•••

e

o

0

I

e •

t

• •

e •

e

e •

t

t

•• e

t

o

,

t

•• •

•• e

• •

t

t

o

t

... ... ... .. .. .. . ... . . . .. . . . ....... . . . .... . .... ... .... . 7.

t

•• t

Where was object first ob &erved s e•e• overhead , coming from behi nd a hil l over the aor izon etc .

Approx 3 miles E ofhouse .......... ...' ............... ... ... ... ..... .. ... .. ... .... ....... .. .

8.

SIGHTilfG (NO LIGHT

- NO NOISE).

... . . . . ..... . .... ... , .. . .. . .. . . .. , .

.

~

9.

,

l i ;h t or noise .

.... .

······· · ··~· ·

Did object a ppear as o ligh t or as a defi ni te obj e c t •

• • • • • • • .I'fQ .:Y1Gl1'f.10.

e. ~ .

Waet fir s t attra cted observer ' s &ttention

.:trr;TL~vm. COLPUR....... . . . . . . . . .

If there was more t her- one obj ect , how many were t here, and what was their formatio n .

• • . • . . • . • • . • . • . • • • •:elG.ttl'. • . UP. S'I'l:CIJ.L. FJJ.RMA-TION. • • • • • • • • • • 11.

. DULL .GBEY OBJECTS . What was the colour of t he l1ght or object ..... .. ••.

12.

Whet was its a pparent shape • ELONGATED .. • .. • .. .., ..BUT .. • .LONGER .. .. .. •THAN . AN • • • • • •

13.

• • • •

• • •

• • •

• • • •

• •

• •

• • •

• • •

• •

• •

• • •

• •

• • •

• • •

r

• •

. •

~C

..

BANDED Was any detail of structure observable • •• • ••. • • .. .SLIGHTLY • ..•.. . •• •. .. VERTICALLY

...... .... ............... .... ... .. .

14. Was any method of propulsion obv ious 15.

Was there any sound

lf.O. . . . • . . . . . • • • .. . ... .

NO

400 FT 16.k.tr3eight, or angle of' elevation ••.•.. . . . . . . . . . • •.• · • · •• · · • • •

MOVEDFAST TO THE N. THEN PAUSED AND

17 .USpeed, or an~ul ar veloc i ty . M~'fED· fO• fHE" S'•• ~"r '!iO"i'I'E'.R 'S'P'EED .. • .. •

18.

State any e.x t=>erience which eneblee ob~erver to be reasonab l y certeir. abou t the a nsv;e r~:. ~ iven to lS and 17 .

TOBRUK . ...... .NORMAL ..... ..PASSENGER .. . .......FLIGHTS . ... . . .. -. ..REPUTATION ... .PLANE .......SPOTTER . ... . ..AS. ..GOOD .. . ..

._ Since it is normal l y i mpossible to esti~ate the ~ e1~ht and speed of a strange obj ect, i t wiL. usua l l y be be tter t o e ndeavour to determine the engle of' elevation of the obje ct, t he engle through whi ch i t move~ end the time t a ken to do this •

.. . ..

/~


- 2 ~ i. t

19.

on Aer()al

bject Obs erved

1.1

(Contcl.)

Direction of flight wi th reference to landmarks or pointE or the compass •

.~?~.~-~~. !R?~. ?~~~~~~ -~-~~~~~ -~ •.q~ .~q~~. ~~-~?~91 NE 20.

21. 22.

Did the object remain on a &trsi6ht path, deviate or mr.noell 'l!"e a t ell. STRAIGHT PA'l'H EXPECT THAT THE OBJECTS JOINIWG THE DRILL!RG CAKE • • • • • ' ' ':PROII" VUIOW l>nlf~rtfBS' • . ' ' • • ' • • ' • ' ' • ••. ' . ' ' .... . ' ' ' · · Was any trail of exhaust, vapour or light seen . . .• ~9 ... . . . . . . .

Where did object disappear, e.6. in mid-air , behind a hill, over the horizon. DISAPPEARED IN RAIN BELOW CLOUD ......... ............................ .... .. .......... ...........

Exis tence of any physical evidence such as graphs, or other supporting evidence .

fr agments~

photo -

NIIi .................... .... ........ ..... .... .. ............. .......

Weather conditions experienced at time(s) or observation( e) •

PAST RAIN AT RECTORY - RAINING TO a ••••••• • •••••• a •• • ••••

••

•••

f

•••

t

EAS~

- OVERCAST • a • a • • a

•• a • • • •

I

fl

a

0

••

e •

I

Location of any &ir trsfiic in the vicinity et the time of s l ,s:lting .

.... .... . .... .. .NOT ... .KNOWN . . . ... ................ .......... ..... .... .... ....... ....... .. .. . . ... ............................... . '

Loca tion of any meteorolo 0 i cal stations in the

~eneral

ar r .

.......... .......................... ... ................. ....... LAUNCESTON

ATRPOR~

ONE OBJECT HADAm SCREW ON ONE

Any additional inf'ormat ion • • . . . •••••• •• •.••••.•. . • ••..• . • •• • ••

............................................. . ..... ...... ...... ......................... ............... .... ....... " ......... . ......................................... . ....... ..............

END, BUT ACTING AS A LIFT AND NOT AS FORWARD PROPULSION •

ORIGINAL OBJECT MOVED NORTH, SLOWED AS IF TO LAND, WAS JOINED ._

BY OTHER OBJECTS, THEN liOVED SOU'l'H .

Questions 25s 26 and 27 to be answered by interrogator.

Not Signed


. ... MR G. PARK

Name of observer

3.

. -...•..•. . . .....• .. . . ..• .•• 117 LAWRENCE VALEROAD LAUNCESTON Address of Observer . • • • • • . • • . . . . . . . . • . • • . • • . • • • . • . • .• TELEVISION RESEARCH ALSO BASS AIR Occupation of Observer • . . • • • • . . . • • . • • • • • . . • • . • . . . • . . . ••• • • ••

s.

Date and Time of Observation (Ttme given in 24 hour clock zonal 2. 10. 60 1930 Loc a1 time} .. ' 10 min s . Period of Observation( s} . • . . ••.•• . .• . . ....•

2.

.... ........ . . . .. ............. .... .. .. . . ..... . .. ......... ... .

6.

Ma nner of Observation: (Give detai ls of own position by map reference if possibles or by known landmarks , and describe a ny e quipment used in the observation) . Sight i ng madefromSandbill - Launceston . no equipment used f or sighting

.......... . ... .. ........ ....... .. .. ......... ...... .. .. . .... .. ... .. . .... . . . . ... . . .. . .. ........ ...... ... .. ... . .. . . . ... ... ........ ... . .. . . ... . .. . ......................... "' ..

~.

7.

Where \vas object fir&t ob&erved , e • .:; . overhead , coming from behind a hill. over the norizon, e t c . Steady in position 5° above horizon due s outh of

..... ....... ... ... ................ ... ..... .. ...... .. ......... ... ..

8.

Launceston probablT to~ards Polar rerlons Wbet fi r st attracfe~ observer s ett e ~1on ~;~. li~nt or noise .

.. .... . . . . . ~}.611J;. • • • .. • • • • •• ~ . .. ~ • • . . . .

9.

Di d obj ect appear as a libnt or as a defiuite Object •

. . . . . . . . . . ~~P.~ .. 10.

If t ner e v1as more thar. one object, how many were there, and .vhat was t heir f ormation .

11.

•• . • •• 9~~.~~J~~~.~~~.t~8f~;r. .~u.~ .~R2~~~~.a~ l . 9~.4.~~~~~r.~~~t~ as 1:aaeou occurred Wha t was the col our of the l i ght or object ••••. .• . ••.• . . • • • •••• Crescent shaped, with full circle Whe t was its apparent shape •. . • .•••• .••.••• • •••• • •••••••••••. . very dim asin eclipse, with horns lighted •

12.

................. .. .... .. . . . .. . .. ... .. . .. .. .. .. . ..... ........ '

'

.

13.

Was any detail of s t ruc t ur e obse rvable •• .'!? .. . .. . . .•.•• . .

14.

Was any method of propulsion obvious • . • )!<? •• • • •. • • •. ••••• . ... •

15.

Wa s there any sound

...... ....... . .. ..... ........ ... .. ..... .

.. .....

......... ..............No . .. . . . .. . .. . . . . '

16.AR3e1ght, or angle of elevation •••~~-~~o~ . ~o~t~~~. h9!1~~ . . . . . an~ular

17 .liS peed, or 18.

velocity • • • • .. ... • .. . .

.zn+,

St ate any e;o.t'erience w'lic'l enablee ob~:erver to be reason&bly certain about the ans.vere ~ iven to lS and 17 • •

-

0

•••••••••

••

••••

••

••••

-** Since it is normally impossible to estimate the hei.;sht.

E,r.d spt>ed of a strange object it will usua!ly be better to ende&vour to determine the angle of elevation of the obJecl, the angle th~ough which it moved~ and the ti~e taken to do this •

•. . ••/ z


- 2 -

. ton Aerdal ~bject Observed 19.

(Conte.)

Dire c t ion of flight with reference to landmarks or t he compass . Object steady

~oints

of

................ ..... .... ...... ... . .. .. ... ... ......... ...... ..

20 .

Did the ob jec t rema i n on a 5trs i ght path, deviate or m6noeuvre at al l . steady

.... ............. ................................. ...... ... ....

21.

·•:as any trail of exhausts vapour or light seen ••• •.•• I!'? . . ... ..

22 .

Where did obje ct disappear; e . g. i n mi d - air, behind a hi ll over the hor izon. laded out in position first sighted

............ ..... ..... ..... .. ..... .. .. .... ... ... ........ ...... ..

23.

Ex istence of a ny phys i ca l e vidence suc h as fragments , photo graphs , or other supporti ng evidence •

. ... ...... ........ " ... ............... .... ...... .. ..... ...... ... .

24.

Weather cond i tions experienced at time(s) or observation(s) Fine - c1oudl ess

............ ................. ...... .... .. ...

25.

.... .... .. ....... .......... ...... ..

.. ........' . ...... ..... .. 26 .

~eneral

Loca t ion of any me t eorolo6i cal s ta t ions in the •

27.

o~

Location of any air tr&fiic in the vicir.ity at the time s l .:-;nt ing . Nil

••

••••

f

••

aree .

•••• ••

•••

. ' ....... ... .... .... ...... ...... . .. . ............... ... .... .. .. .... .................... . ... .. .... . ........ .................................. ................ . .. .

Any additional i nformation • •

e e e e •• e

f

t

e e • ••

t

e e e e

f

e e e e e e

e

f

e

f

f

e

t

e •• e e e

f

e

f

e •

t

e • e e

t

t

Questi ons 25 s 26 and 27 t o be answered by in t errogator.

Not sigm-d

I

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t

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t


-

F ~i'NG /OSiUCER'

EEN AT CRESSY

Mysterious ships in sky

"EXAMINER" 10/10/60

AN ANGLICAN minister and his wife, previously scepticaa about reports of visitors from other planets, are sure they have seen flying saucers and a mother ship. The Rev. Lionel Browning and Mrs. Browning, of Cressy, r evealed their experience yesterday although it ocurred on Tuesda y. "We did not soy anything about it befo re because we were reticent about re leasing such fontostic information," soid Mr. Browning. Other CrtuJ rtahtcncs ha\·e obJect bad ~ dull u. r~c.t eve He- ..nid 'Tilfl htp t~nu.N: Mr. Bf'O'Wnln;l dnaageo reported • ltl)•toriO<U, lrl«h<tn- <1\0Ugh tho :.elllnJ sun ,..,. In • porle<tiJ' -tratanl <II"'<LIOD rmauu ol>Jocl> q ' ll)luc""" ln~ explO.S:\On ou tbe aame1l'lf\tnlng on It to\\a.rcla Wn~m Ju.nctlon en. •bOut 30 fHl ~h <lL1lt\ l•'&ht 1 Re U.ld thl\t ooy nobr would •Attt>r •tboUt a tn1Dute or nhb • tlat Whlt.nl3r'l o.nd ~~~'-'~ tJD\'f". betn drowned bS' tbo M('J•dY n\()\'tD1rnt, the $hlp~tOP- round.t<l domr on top .. Mr. a.n Hra-------:-arownlna vottre "'lud. J,}ed to mld air. Ur b3Jd U1• obJtcU • looklng Hot throu«n lht roc- I Ho t.•llm~ted thai th• ob"ll ho\O..,.d above the Pan· 1res 1n c<>lour bull>t>rt oe> lory WIHdow at • f".llnbcnv. was trn.H:ll.J.n&' ;at I{"M UuU\ sha~tr Dtate. aboUt th~~ d.utlngulSbtns rra re lPietW"IO<I IS Mr. Bto..nlnc ~0 mpn lOll. . . . . ~) rai~ ll')ln<toc lhrc>Ugb lbe rectory He ""ld th•t p,-.,vlon I)' ho Wo ,. 0t 1>«1 tht stollonary I ..1ndo•• In the dlrC<Lia.• ot ~ b.lu1 beo:n ~I JAbot; r<PQdAl '-'•<.a lor abolll SO ,...,.,.u sltlhtlng An artist h:.. drun o . ftl'ln• ·•IKe<$. • ,ni •llfttt !lrYtr>l ht 1n tbt obJetts. rrom thf Brown- \ t n,...t 1 thou.cht thl' ''"'l'ht>n out ar the claod.s !hlP. ~ Jed b7 tni''" drscriptktua IIWd a Jk~ttb ob)r('t ta'cht bren ,...... abo\f! and brhlnd thr J.btp. ft\'-f' tn. r+nnnl lM tnU' b)· llrs.. Bnrli" tnc J traded h.aht 'bot Ul~ thine or &11C I..DUU dUo cau•co ~ be SilkS. Mrs. Brown.Jn.a: aid 6ht u•; ha4 too 1Qt.rb ul.J.•ba.c•.· bto at lf'trUic ~ -rtw- shiP did not ra. a &:!ef. c t:u-f.haPf'Cl ob'«t ...aid 7hev ea.me: too.rcb thf' to fttwn t.to...--. -:-c> ~ une1"Cf' trom • raln.a orrn. She .. And. St was certatniJ' no &hlp au:.. nat atoae:s 3lo.fpp1ng ,. &! tn. b lil"r ot U..

IJtct

H "dde n by

.._._a._

rr.;.,,....

'

"'""It

polnt~ U out 10 her huaband normal Aln.'r•h br!c:Dule It ., 0 al tM •~Ltr ~s:r.. Browr S c f"''\¥4Utt'd the Lr•nlltna btlow etaUtn; ~.. ""I Itt~~ ..n"UUU objr.th •t.sU6b• ob}f'C:l w .. h • r ~CI btl4 at Mr Oro~, said thM. th~ t'4 lhf'M.Wh~• ~.kJ.f' thrlr

a.nxtta 1"'-1' h "thlp' .,..., tnn1Ur. • ••J7-••s abouc 3(Kl r~... •he clocAG le\'cl . ,, lbtc Un.u·

• ~· .. ......... or rom aboUI tnll<$ 9;i&J' ta.\el\t ,. S, NC>tth 100 r Ol otT lho Jlr >W>J •

btolo•

o.u•lhu ..hlp

,u:...

•UIJin

t\.alt

toM t•ou•ft'd I •It ~tu.rr,C"d

Pft"d •

An!! ~

'*

k':

l ~

1

of ra .•n

11lliCI ,......

30

U('(!Ods.

"Radar devi ce" ••~ .. ,t

,,._,,\\·~·*~·~--------------~-----------


AN ANGLICAN ministe r and his wife, previously scepti cal about reports of visitors from other planets, are sure they have seen flying saucers and a mother ship. The R e v. Lio nel Browning a nd Mrs. Browning , of Cressy, revealed their experience yest e rday althoug h itocurred on Tuesday. " We did not say anything obout it before because we were reticent about re leasing s uch fantastic information," said Mr. Browning.

ttEXAMINER"

10/10/60

Ot

,t

f rt-par 1 tn1

bad dull u ,. c.... e1'en He · 1ld 'TI•f.t ..n.Jp •nUt<l tboug:h the -aetll... ~ S\w. -.a5 tr ~t "Perf~ 11 ·~ral"'ht dfft'CtlOD

et de.' ts have objee

C;n ,.

exp~:m

o1

01

rn. .:ue1•·

n:.e

same t hlnlng on lt..

to'A-an1A

Western

J ~&IK'Uun

He Aid that an:r nol."' woulcl •.•.nor aboUl " mtnute of otab• t.a"-e been c:l.NM1.n~ b.t the s-'t.·ady DlO\·~nu!nl Lbe &hlp ~lOP~ round~ dom~ on. t.w .. Sroo<Dllli ,..•~ t>lnd. l't"<l In mid lllr. lt~ oald lbo Ob)tcto "~ JoatblC tllSt lhrough tht rec~~ He a.Umsted th•t tbe ob· It ho\tred &bo\ e t.h,. Pan· ~t•Y 1n c:olour bu ». ,. lory 1l'1Mto"· a t a r.•lllbo•·· Jt-et •·u t..rQ.H:llln& •t lea t.baD sharper Elto.le, •boUt Ullce 1dlnt.n&ul:htn; . t ......

ll:bl..

4\l_ ..S.IO on ~1r--.na ~

..._

Tv.o$1•$'

-w.

( Pictu,..d 11 Mr Brownlfll 60 m.p.h. mlles away , _ po.nu ~ 11\rou~h ihe ....,torY Be aaJd !hat p~·lously M I watched lb• •tallonury ..-Indo~ lu tb• d1~L.l0f'lo of f.h• bad. beeD ':oiooC:rDUI:Jil AbouL f't'POI''l6: ~c.b)ilu;;t fOC' about. 30 ~.«oud.a, .. tJhtluJt An J~Mbt hu drt1'n ol lll1.nB sa~~~rs. rucm:..1Cd. Att~r JSt'Trl"tlJ ~ 'nl l In abe objects from 1~ 81'011'0" \l Om 1 lbo~;IJt tlu. "'tllen out O! th• cloud> t hiP, ,_.r.ompaoll'd by U1t saae Jntt• dC'SerlpllOft• and a tket.cb o bjed mt,eh l .hll''l': bttn rt• abo't: and brhinli the a.hlp, th·t trs. reo,:rr ed \.DP wuy LL m!n~ b;' :\tra. 8roll·llLtC J fr:att«< U;lu , but t b• Ullnr or Jl~ ~m•ll elL,.,• came ,,boottna he old Ml'll. Browntna m id 6ht """' bad too n>ucb sub,.lanoo," bt jot ICtTIOc spt..S ''Tho ~hlp did not manneu n .:rc)• clpr-abaped oblect said. ''Th~)· camt toward! th-' to telurn bec141l eo IJ\~ roes e":l em•a-;o ltoiTI a rainstorm. Sho "And It wau. a:ert.olnl1 no ship Ilk< nat otoneo &klpplltl wa• th•· toH «lion or the llh pOinttd 11 out to lit:r husband~ normal atrcraft becau~ It was i:IOiliJ tht "'at~r rn bt rOHtrrd Jn th"" rotn ch MrL Brownlns mea,urtd tM trovelllng below stnlUng •PH<~" "1.h• ..null ob)4'rh 'lotion· "It retumfd fa•t~r tllna t • ob)l'Ct wllh o 11e<dle bdd uti Mr :Browaung said !hat tile ~d lbr m.. b.. ld• ~hrlr )letd et wblcll It hlod •m•r.te< rm's ltngch ·~iihtp"" •wa$ tra\·elll.ng bo'O\\' t.a,~ oth rr -.htf1 MJt h ln a h~-t lt and \\115 cunt trom :>Jlbt at•

H ldden by rair•

I

:~~ ::: •,::~ 3: :::;"~:: 1 ~B I011d lolvell\1 tile tlmke. wn)· ''"~UIIIC north .. -~-~~~

aboUt

"Radar device" "'1'h•~rt

·t~

11bou1 tour ver-

tlal band\ otou: rbe t:tde

tt.e

obJtct~

'",r\t rh.e bow

et~d

of

or 1he- ,hlP

tl:'l,.re -.:a a rod j\1Ut11t out lU'h wbot •tetnfd l~ • small propeller ..,. oome r4cl&r deYice

on the tnd;' Mr. B:ownlro~t s:ald that the

an e

t' mllr

t••• .-~dtu.:·,

0

3~tecoods.'•

ra1n

./

/


Rectory

is besieged

EXAl'41 NER"

11/10/60


__ -...........___...................................

........................................

--..- · -····..- ..................

~f,~boFJIMII'. Jf BEPOBTS

OBJECT IN SKY A STRANGE object performed ma noeuvres in the sky last above Evandolo. ':r.hr pbf'nomrnon •:...• wll.. b} • l ••ur.nte-lon

nt'r>~

c-owP1t and lhrir '-On

m.a~:".!::~a.~"'bt"l; to

th~

c..ar

~tndo"'

•ue

1)vllt'd

tb~

rt'-

down """ 'Old lbr

lonnh .;iW

Plan~.

'"Tbtn ..ud4mlJ h "b.ot awa-1 fro_m t.u toward:> Po;....

lt'tO•

..... topptdi tbto C"Ar- and wt-

~hr.J WC'r~t trattlhn: atollC lbe £Ta.ocblt'-\\-t.. ltro Jurw:: tJon Jl4 toward UunC"~lon ¥1'b~a thf' obji:-ct w.u ,1£btC"d •• &JS p.m. "'My .oB lookf"d throdcb P1=rth :snd nlc1 bt ratbrr l•n!t tlcbt.

a fa0Jl1 one for an

wtndow

ll~hl wa•

1 aJJTf: ::;;.:,

Un:t..,

th;.:---;:u-:,':kd

..

lt ldt a white etoocl be· hJnd lt. Could Qn km • -.oTt of "n'POut tn.U...., Lbt" man b&lcL ;\ wroe:k a;o -ne £:lram .. lntr• pub1L~ta a d'ttaU~ •1or7 or a f't:'POri b1 lhe Bn.. Uone:l 'Brotmln.( IUl4 Ml"l. Urowufn.c. or Cfe:.,"':y, wbo ·~" obJecl'l lD. lbe sk:J'.

to br more lh:lo 1000 ff'f'l up It emitted a "brl; ht OJ'""'ftCe

U;bt.

.. lt a-ppto=lt:bed u~ at a tUI"'Jko 9«'d.. muC"b b.:.lt'r t.baQ s pbae. "-ThC'D wbeo tt w:a..~ onr· b~:a-d u ho~rt:d for aboot thl'l!f" mloutH. ~bt.f'e

.....~

wacc no not1e.

U

Quite """··

night

Conhnued Page 2

~. ............ . . .................................................................................... . ............................................... .. . ....... ..... . . . . 11........

"EXAMINER"

1 ?/10/60

rStranfet" object . • Continued from Page 1

1. T hr) <bled thai live

l4ln~

~~:~~4::Sav~~u~:,:!!~ ly .,.tt ('r..-."1· ThO man "ho told his "'1.0'1 to a rtPGrl.er b~t uJ.chL •~cl ht hil<l bMJI oc•pUCGI of

1'h<

'l(l orl•n .

·~ f"i 1.mp~~'C4 Bro~mlnr'• ..W•.

'11\'1'

b~llrvt ltto~t

:"~~n !;~~4

b)

~r.

hl._

dt-

otolu;.a:;:;!

'«n doullll: lht <UJ.

Brown.tJ11'1 lt4t'J. " llowrn:r, th~ tpl-t 1..f"f<

!\tr,

Ju'' ~o. ba·, pul mt fo a eomplrtcl)' dJttue.nl frame of mind.

No normal plane

no~a:';;:~~,f. b~~L:;~.

Vlyln•

~~.';'" ot~.J:!',.,.,~;<·~~••~

nn)

"'o p:a'-se.natr aeropb. nt~ t•ndrd •l Launtcston AJrpo-rt •bout Ole lime o l >l&hUnJ;.

"EXAMINER"

1?/10/60

I


REPORTS'itOF MORE LIGHTS JAM SWITCHBOARD· FURTHER REPORTS of objects in the sky flooded "The Examiner" switchboard last night.

Thr "~hUn~• rnn&ed trom brlaht .oter, mu.eb br!aJlter , ....,rtbtne 11/.e > toll oould be . een <low mO\·tn~ <lrcl., ol IIcht to than the e\entng tM muHtooloured <lr<los 01 ·~­

Three colours

l!lm·• bl*'d.

·we ~ at It throll;b blnoculan. lt bad ~ red bot· tom. was yellOW Ill the llllddl•.

t lf"t- t)dJd~ rKthTd the frlabl of Ut~Jr u,·n •bm ~· lurn1D.r 10 LauncHton ~fttr

and ~ em the lOP. .a tralnJoc run "l tbouRbt lor • while Tho ft• • .. or• Or111ld Ctar~.

tho Brian Catt~111ll. SlUT)' ~b­ cOkJur& mav ha\~ bleen eau111rd trt.\. Orumt Bro"&n and Hat- bv the !mo of th<O" bllloeul:ors. b-Jt I tater tr-lned Lh•m oo • """" Dutoe WhU.. rldtne neaz the Sym- oeazbr ~t llahl. and mons Plairu raring clrcull colou..ra ot thAt came through

U••

lh,., ••.., • Kl~ UCh' aboUt SOOrt abo\e tht t;rouud. Jus

than a mtle ,,,...}.•

CiPUl)'.

"It

~

sam«~

\\'estern

to go ~<>Ward a T1cr& an~ iJ

i';"'Ju..,U:,' tt ~~:"';/ni ~ the Tlerf, but dl<ap•

Stationary

1

0

~h1ncl

The oo; • •topped and watoh- J)I:Ated ~~eron aemn~ thHt. ed tbt ll~ht, .,hl<h lhoy d<· •·Jt looked •• tt.ouj[ll ol .scr1tl«f jl,3 larvc and ..:atlon· h.ild a SCN"t or a bll on oft~

uv Whtn the ob)t•·t otar!rd dl5-

I

!tldt, then on the othtr tJdt, lhtn ondtrneath."

D.fJPfltrlnC In tht! \Vt.st. t.he Th'! nl2ht "'')" \'ttl' cloudY. boY• k!h for nomr lt be1!JllPd and Ultrt v.·~re no &tars In Ult to lra\'tl nl .. '' fair ~peed.'' -Jl\•

•h•~,i:!14i<o•ht••n s ..ind•ll•, of 1'rf'\"aHyn

'-AW

or~nj:e

"Thtt

~am1u~r"

I

Over Gorge

A. wQJ.t13~ ln ~cO St, LaUJ\ce:..ton. Ald ~e had ~un .._~. btltrbl ~tu nbcwo the CBI.IIrRet Oortre obOrtly e.fttr 8 p.nt. cotrMpon· Mr D 0. S1mmoott, of Lfl\m-

an

IIIlht. lb\t- Jn tbt 'kl'• ,.'horttv olkr the <Y<h•h •~w lhtlr ohJrrl. at 8 p"'

d<nt at Avoco. Mr c. Dillon. ctuoo, sa• 11 ll&hl aom11 on ob)""lllhe ~~y <lbOUL 8.25 p ln-

<<1l0Tied •!~hUng

·~

~~~{~,l~· !:!~tl1. ~~~~ ~~,';:"u~ Pb':- -.c;~~~w::a ~:,.";;"i~ t!t~~~';: foro nlnt, ll \\a&

hlai.~

"' vtr)·

~

-

h.~

,.Ud.

Mr Simmons ,;o.ld

he

hod

..,.n ..~elUte. bofore. and nme

or l bem 1\od looked like lhls. John Berultt I 115 l. 01 P<rth, a.od h.s frlOI>d KO!th Barrett ct31. botb "'"' 1111 obl""~ m th~ v.ebtern >Icy at aboUt 8.1~ p.m.

Venus? .,n officer a·

~ r.t&UOO

thr MneorAt

l.ownentOO

AlrPOrt tmld laat ntabl thatthe object cou.l4 ha\ ~ beeD a plioihtt --IJ,rObablf \'enus.. Vmu• '91i'U down on the\Vutnu "1'1l!f'5, ~ the omcer. •nd t.he idea ot swo,xunlly cO<Ilcl ha\c be<ft Jl\<ft by

C\l,tTel'lta,. A4 could th.e ade..

a1T of

movemt:aL There dellllltelr .-aa a Cfftn clo9.- rroro tho p~u~er.. and

" EXAMINER"

18/10/60

l

'SAUCER' A BALLOON? Th~ nh tnv ob)f'C'& -.J&bt .. t'd own F." :anllb.le o" ~un • Qy ntcbt "•"' probablt a

\lt"AltlC'T b*.altncon \

U\f'nl

\u.a.lJon n~p.ut­ onlti.Jl "'-''d ,~tNdA)

( f\ll

ch.a1. ~ b~HO"n ••th •

aUa(h~d

-. .L"

t1"\~.41td

hsbt

about Ht thou;-ht It ..... almf"'t.t ~rr.

lbto

ttmf'

rti)Jrkd

t.:U.nly the- •JbJ· d

'\ffn bt •

Laun'-c'tou rantU~.


ANOTBEB 'FLYING SAUCER' REPORT A FURTHER REPORT of an unidentified object over Northern Tasmania has be'en given to " The Examine r" .

I

~IJ' John Jon. of Windsor st. ~{r Ion h·rt borne at9.10 p.m. Launc,....ton rtlra~~ hls ator)' to see bls td.etld "-Dd compare ..kn01llnR I mtcht be brand.~d notes.

I

'My lricnd rtm>rkcd. on • suddtn 0;l"h or 11cht ~ little to Ote south o( tht ~trllll~ • n crackpot~• ''1"he ~telUte reappeared "11le ~tt·Uir«" then dl!l1lppcarMr. Ion sat4 ht "., ,.atrhlnt further south 1130in and travel-~td..ft'Om a perlecll)• tl .. r •k~ • a sat<llllt ln e»bl' on Friday ltd past U1e ..nttb W•· ul<btd ocaln a\ • 30 nl~ht u•• clllna I rom \\e.&t 10 • n bild almOSI dlsapptattd p m. but tt did not *PP">r •

"'""'l.Y

ca 1.

:,

~t~~~m..:=w::U~ !l~~~·oJ: ;:ltdh~;t~~:·~~

~~~b:~' ~ ';,;in~/:'fo ~: di>traet<d by a shootJng star.

5

or ha\< rolltn to mth

k' and 1us 1tbout a ntlh the brtchtnts.!l ct \'enu•

"nt" tht

\\htrb ~•~ then \bible •

•"''lle

U.tt"Ul~~

•obble. · hr l l r. Jon

appnrtd to

1ld ....td

he then t boucb t that th« obJec t «M n • & a ,.at..tiUt":• ..I con ··c:-·e.d a wa,erley tde:nd and ~;~;~ ~lehtd tor lh!! object oo S..turday o}tlllL • "It app.,.rrd about 7 30 p.m -h•lt

•n

hour rarllcr than the

pro:vlouo nlahl It or"" eel the ky tn :!& tntnu·~~ a lHtle to

I

the south ot 1tb pre\ lou J cross ..

tnr.

\

..ll "a:. a rltar nl~ht 50 1 Jor R~at 15 mh1ut~ ..ttcr lht obJte' dl•app·llltd.

~"nSlf'd

Faint light "I W!tl· about

wh•n 1

movht~

aouth.

''At .-

to ~;o trt•·lde plrl<~d up • 1-•lnt lltthl olt1ldlly !rom norlb to fl'\lt" 1 1 wOuld ">OY U1C ~boUt 50.000 to 60,000

IIJh~ woo rttl hlfh

Allhouah the e•on

lno ••• sun, J tould d•te<:t 11.0 saund "1'h• llthl "'' ntually di""P· J'lotAfed Into the- h17~ • Mr ton

,.,d

" EXAMINER"

20/1 0/60


U. tO hO\'•·r Cot

sOD)t

chtk und \

then biOI\ It bUck In an en·

1

tlre19 dttf•·t•·nt. dlr~cuon? l:)_Qc~

lt. noL

·~····m

ntrun!lt

that "o ronny h;btlngtt 0\'t•r lh•· yova bU\'e Do' n and Bt'\' •'xPl•tnf_d aw:w b~· Mo-oa.lh"\1

r-XJ)l·r\!1 ;~..,-. ~·ln& Lhf\ l'lkn,~l. VtuU•. t•·lrnot<•d light ll'om

car

h,·~ull\ghl".

I

cold atr cut·

1'<111 •• plain hot ""· •pOt.o !><\·

Co~ Lht (\Jit·.I!S. Rtll'lO"~Ph•·rtc cU\"a-

dlt.lon•,

and

l"O

SOm•!

bJgb

ll)'lnC alrrrnlt

onf't I'll)'

98 P"r cr-nt. or

rh1

tepottJs- Of .tt-1J-httng• can tM c&-

pl•ln•d a.. •Y a.. b-•tne or • normnl. natural. h.lp~ntna.. aut ~hat or tht'! rt•m;~lnblg 1

c. nt..1 tL ~ W &•com.. ob,·tou,. to anyon• "tiling to do n Uttl• stUdy ar ~....<"atcb that th• craft hn.1·,. provtd to bo m;1.st· <"' ot Jn'I<Y t ••ollld bo ...mtna to "!&k my lll• on th• fact that no na11on on r).tth

Pt-'"1'

bM " l COilqUt>r.-d C:r.t.\'ltf If 1L had sur« l"f 1L ..--ould hil \"t!' b- •n ~1;-t-d uno s~nlcc a~ nn· oth•·r W'•-spon aptn.st. man· klnd.. tmtt.·~ci ot a Rrwltt; lO lt, rncldt'nt:llly. o\tr Lbe t~ t,;o ''"~ nlt\c:ft ~vrnl ndah· boUr~ and t ha'Vtt Tdtn~9Cd an

"ataniY • colour.d "•:.tclllto:'

p3.P.8J.ng ov,·rb• ad oo a two ..

* Flying Sir. -

*

bour orbit 'th" :mm~ at bt·ror,·) taktnc: 26 mt.nut•!.; to CO\'.. tb.. sky. J ION,

*

Launel!f!lon.

SIIUteTS

A CIVIl AvlatiOil D<>•

partll\tD~ outolal oll>t<:d r•· "t.h• olglltlna o! a 't).F.O. ncAr l!lVandAI" ..-<Ill

*

*

*

Ct·ntly

probubls u w•·atbcr balloon." 'l'h\lt blllloon Ul•·«Y W'lllld not loot a IO·y•nr-old. Did th•· wlbd blow 1~ u 0 to the lurnlly wbo observed 11, allow

11

EXA!-1INEB"

25/10/60


P. 2 -

THE EXAMINER. Wed .•

October

26. 1960

CIGIIB-SBIIPED OB.JECT SEEN SEVERAL PEOPLE last night reported seeing a cigarshaped object i" the sky in the North ond over the Midlands. A PVl> or tour huotera ai Patrner ·tan ntor C"rr-d~ ~· :a ob)rct nbout 200 lftl II'OIZI Ulo sround A mem· brr or the PVtr ...,a tbe ci>Jtct teemd to bo\er tor a In; mmutu befo,;f' rno"~nt otr ln a Dorlh-eu!tTiy dtr«tlon. •tr Ron ~ oc Cami>b<U l'woo. lAid Ulat b• hod _ , G loo>e ~ rlow 1n U>. •eat-

-

- - - -- - - -- - -

~~·If mOVJn~

ern IllY.

oas!trl1 pm.

mo\1~~~: In

CII=Uon

a nrmn-

about

s 4S

There ..... no now. llJid tbe cl>~t ...., m0\·1111 >lowly

" clca.r·•h•JO«< ob.k'ct - · IDOf"lnt "IOWIJ In Ute

~.ft

. , Dear ~Uaodo

..,.

~.

£.

Ed.,.rdli llnd hla •llf'. Mr. Ed,..ards ..,ld the objftt 'ft.mf'd to be tTA\-rUtnc ln A !IOUlh·tut.rty direction. ~>nd

n& About 3001L obOvo U.o 117011Dd. ·11 hO>erod t<>r oome ttme. tt

mado no nnt&e. and lhrre ~eem·

ed t.o be an OtanJ:e

llt<tu,•

-aid. II lllen moved oiJ tbo OM!.

he

to~·arcllo

A o.lmllar obJt'Ct wao aren 'Ill thf' ·~ ovtr llb<\ .. Earl~ 'n Ute tvenlng. I.A>rul· r....d

N'ldeot& reported llght.S

so tho uy. and o loud oxpJo. a p.m.

,Jon ahnrlly botor•

"EXAMINER"

26/10/60


&oases slaakea by explosioa A Joucl expl<lolan In the Cre&~;y-tonJio>rd area la4t r.l:ht <J>. ok bouoes and rnttkd .. so-

d '•• and doors.

Ruldea<& l"rr»rtt<l 111111 the <Xl>loelon toot place about ,,30 p.m_ TbJs Is lhe S«:ond txpi·>S!Do h<ard In this area 1n the

r.... dasa;

11

EXAlUNER"

I I

PM! /

28/10/60


J-4r.

Ocr ~9

/?6o

RESSY FEELS STRANGE .EFFECTS OF EXPLOSION EXTRAORDINARY sensations were felt by some Cressy residents before the mysterious explosion that rocked the district on Thursday night. One resident said " It seemed as though all the air in the room had been sucked out."

Another said "It felt as if there was pressure all round us. My ankles felt as if they were being pressed, but there was no wind at the time - i n fact it was very ~aim and quiet."

RepOrt.• to 'The Ex:untner" "Then came this terrtlic: ex- ~.._row. ropor-t.s of ~ \\·ere aU lllrcllar tn their I ploolon," liJr WOOd•ard bAld. lllrbomo obi"""' lD rll• Loatde>c:rlpUons or an eerie luU AI nrst be thought there may tDrd, Cre;ry_ Poat.llla o.ncl Ennlotr the explo61on bate ~ IUl air r,..,tcbter In 1 dl3tr.c:... Mr. J . :lfei<:Alre, or Crnsy, the .,..,. aod tho orange No al!kW .-.;>laD- tor SYJd that tht- <'Xl)lo&lon hapl)ftl· "•' from IC. f'Xbaus~but be rhto ot_h T ai.::b.'~ r:. or foe" lbe fd at ~2 mtnute& to 10. SltUnc afridM a,aillst thJ.a att~ pb_oa· e.'l'ttPoslo.n~ o · ~ Cr ~ ~ a.t homt' aiLer watchLnC • ttolr- nc tbro l.>e'partmr.ot or ClvU trt.rt tbb ..,,. ...._ ·.JW 1 gt..-en. vts.lon prQCr"'m.mt he ~'Ptt'lf'nc- \\'1.-ttJon at Lau.oc:c.stoa A!X'- _ _ od a pecutlar -...uon or o1r- port, les.noaa bet~ be h.,..d a \toA opot_,ao lor lhe clll\lou1lent oXJ)IC>'Ion. ment oald that Lll-.e had bi!Cn na..e wlndoW'J ~c.an~d to 3 aeport of an ewlOilon ln th~ nUl• and It ...,.u,. C•ll •• II I CteS:IY arra and the matttr U.e bouse ..,.. b•lnr hl...d orr .,-ould be ~ltd. to tbe il3 found.1Uon.s.-but lhtrc R.A .'\ F 'tf'A.1: only one explos;on." 3.1r. ThU •·as normal Pt«td~ ltr(('atfe ~id~ :ar aJJ rrporta ol .strange atgbt ... H• lhen uot onUidt and lnlt3. tb• "POk<SII>.l.O ""ld. lOJned 1115 nel.llbbollr>. Mr. and lJr. J o Roboon abo told or ~trs. T . Saltmars.h 11 p.t'CUUV $Ul$a'lon l)eto:re Ule • All that n could ~• lll'U R txplooton. t4dlrll! red cto..- to tb• aorlh·

••!')'

be-,

•"tt. and M..,. saum..,..h had been ou~•tdo a little tarltor und

I

they snw tho st•me reel retl<e· non. but larger," Mr, Mei<J.Ille llllld. As:!(ed 1! there '\t;ere en)" Slmt,

larlty b<lt"\\eeo Thul"'dllf n1Rht •

expl~n and L110<1e at th• Poll

tina. 1\yd,ro..electric proJe-ct.. be Wd .. Pedl:tU~ly not"

orange ball sa."'

an

Second time

Um•

u "'"" 1110 s.econd ln lr•., thnn ~ mooth tba• Mr Rob50D b•d been ""''ICID.tod •• lth pMnomcno In tb~ <llilr!Ct. s.vtrul wteu ngo !.!:. R<>bF-On told or IOU\1 r.xp1~lotv~. tOO loud t<l come rrom Po.. una. be ••Jd M'-' ,.,..."Mt -~'m" n• ,...,.. AArt\fl tlrn 1, nrJ thr Re\ . L B BrrJwntr ... ,.,., ~tra. B•o" '""" >ta.rth-d Au. r:•IIA "lth thcar

de.•,C'rlp.

0. \VOOd· tlon ut n !'l]~'t''-" t"blp aocoulotanUt>--~IOtll'td 1.,..,nhd h) ~h. tmt.all• r t.lll:o(.'3 AI·

Mr. e.n.c1 A1ra. K ,..-ard

llibtJ .w;

b.aU bove.rt.oa: aba\'t' the \\estern 1,., uln.: out. ot t.b~ :!lk,lo ancr o Tien :" Uttl~ ~ the south or atorm. Po.a.Una a.t. lhf" tlme the- r,;plo--Silt<'t' thton there harto bten Slo~w;o::~ nld lhr b-111 .-- - _,.femtd to sl&J tn the aa.me position but """Uocl and olln>nk

tn.~~

•1ft ROd t TatC'hed 1' ror a mlnutt' and a hull Clr' :a

Ul~~~ir. ~ml'd nther than mO\·fl

tn ro out ar.~.y. 1

lloOU1d IUC"!ite5.l Uuat H WU

20tl

!ee~.-~!"c:':,nth:, ~pPf'.ue"d

WC" b(')lh tell A "''"' Pf'i'YII.U ~A~llon a1 lf th..,... PR'Iour~ *II atof;snd u"'

",..

"EXAIHNER"

29/ 10/60


Prediction on Cressy explosion Mysterious explosions in the Cressy area, believed to be connected with the recent " flying .saucer" sighHng by the Rev. l ionel Browning, may continue for another year. This Ls tile optnlon ot tho P~Sldl'nt ot the VIOI4ttllJ\ Ply.,

l

Ina Saucn Resoarcl> Sode!y

l~-~~:~~lboume Lt... .,__ tlU$ on pre-

~rr.

belli!(

nous &lahtlnp'. IUld osptd3lly

Lbe obsrnattons In b""ew GuJ-. .... lAst r•ar by anotber Anallcan mlnLstrr. the Re' WUJJam B. ow...llo reportrd !bat bo IU'ld &e\"tral

n&theH W&td!M

alran~ Db)eel-5 In the >ty tor severou olabl.s. Tho SOdoty bv lnl1led Mr.

Bro•mln;) to recount

Ills &jght·

lnR when he \1sl~ the matnJ.and In<> few ..-eru. Ourtng b1s ~loll ,Mr Brownlnf wUI moet Mr. OIIL

ne cool. Hobart: Coal, clou•

11

EXAMINER 11

31/10/60


'Cressy heard B.E.C. blasts' THE H.E.C. ot Pootino carried out blasting operations ot 7 p.m . ond 10.40 p.m. lost Thur$doy, th e resident engineer (Mr. R. L. Ballantine) said lost night. :\lr. l)uJl.,htlnt! anld LhL$ ')\.'st before betulng Ule e:cplo· m1qht t'XPIAtn "h~· &o m-.n.r re-o- slon akltl\t!) tn the Creaa1: dl5trlct j Htt aleo -.;ntd t.hnt U\e.rD (\·•-" hrard Al\d ff'lt the

expiO.ton• on thAI

t.:it'(l$ nlgb~

of~~:,_ :~IC ~p~~~~O"a 0~:\g~:~~

!'tr. J 'lrt.cll't~. of Ctruv. <S.'tfd. howhfr, tb u b~ had rtH the- tlfKl.,. or •n esplo· S'un •l ,,...rc-l..toly 9.ltJ 1'.%1). He M1d ll(' had e:~p·rJent't'd n pe<UUilr w.nsa 1011 Qt atrl~·ness

= ----------=-:

eould

t.hr

I

s••

1n the GkY tollol\ltl~ 6Plos1on was R "/Jdl~

red glow"

)tr. BnUu.ru.tne sold th.at tll.e b1~$Un~ "a, not cartled. out iU. rqular tlmd e\ery nt~bt, UlOUI'b z:eoeraU a dU.1f'lt o!' 30fllb or geJl8nlt• wuo ~t oa nt LeaAt. efi'TY tour hou~ dur· lng the clay

Normal effects said the "•lrl~-.n=· ·~"" by ' \tet.colte "as con,Jstel'lt "ltb t.b., elfeet« uf blasUng. :n caruprt'SSioo and suction olr Yt • ' e.1 normally uccomJW>Ied unr Be

ft:ellng

1~ txl>IOSIGO

\\-'hen .Mr. Met.ealf• w 5

ast. .

ed "betllu he considered there '"" ans :afmDar1tY be,~A«n

TIIUrSd..Y night'~ exploofon and

those normally heard •• resu" bla.stlng apetOliOI\S 31 tho Poatlno hJdro...,lectrk projec • 1\e &ald. ••Detlnltely DOl.~ It was 1llso pointed out ,.... ~nlay !.hat llS Poe Uno blastin~ bad gooa on .1lmo.st e"'"fl"Y d:l)', Cft.S$!.· people "ho could hP:•t' the e:rplo>lons "'outd b< u>ed to thtm. lt ws• unlll<•t>• tll~t UleY should •tnrt h ..rlng Poa· Unn expl05.1ons t1U of o !\uddeD. \ ll.eglltdlllg the red renecuoa• :oeen 1n l.he U¥ lJI ~e la't week o Oepa"lrutnt of Cl\11 A•bUon SP"kee.man 6.>.1d W.t night that they '"were matt 1>tobably

or

\

1Aurorn Au.&tta.lls liKhl~·.:_

"EXAMINER"

1/11/60


TElEPt1t>NE:

690-550

I

Headquarters Support Command Victoria ~arrackS St Kilda Road VIC LIELBOURNE SC1

5/6/Air 11 (53A) Secretary Department of Air Russell Offices CMtBERRA ACT REPOrlT OF UN- IDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECT 1. Attached is a certified true copy of a report submitted by the crew of a OSAF JE- 57 aircraft operating at RAAF East Sale on 15th November 1960 .

hn

2. The pilot stated that , after sighting the object, he paid no further attention to it until he read a report in the hlelbourne "Sun" newspaper on Friday 18th November, which reported a similar sighting from the ground by a clergyman in Tasmania. 3. It is understood that t Amer can crew have s i nce returned to the USA .

/

~~

(D . T'..-:.RNON) er ) Wing Co

{"

. For Air Officer Commanding Encl


OPAR.\TING .LOC TICil ll 4080 ->TRAT \~ (S.l.C) UNI'i'li.D .::.TATJI.) AIR FORCi: East Sale , Victoria, Australia TO :

'ling Cor:zmander P-obey _u_; .ie.st Sale Victoria, Australia

On Tu..,sday morn-'"• 1<: love.1;ber 1960, approxilnatel,.- 1040LC1, wile fl.yi."'g

lission tr·\c~ , 15 mil~s north of Iaunceston, 1:'"" "'&vi.~ator, Captain ;; J . Ludlan,, U--F, call•d out an :Iircraft. approachi., t.o our lett srd 3iligHly low. Our altitude at this time was 40,000 feet, r• .. ot 350Knots ant! headin~ of 340 degrees . 1 spotted the object and imlr.ediately commented to Captain Ludlam that it ~3sn't an aircraft but looked rrore like a b:Illoon. lie juch~· 'ts e.ltitude to be approximately 35,000 feet, heading 140 degrees, and its speed extremely high . From previous experience I would say the closing ;rate to be in •xcess of SOO knots . i·le observed this object for 5-? seconds hefore it dis~>ppeared :.md"'r th .. left wing . Since it was unusual in aFpearanc~, I immediately banked to the left for another look, but neither of us could locate it . or

:1.

Do~d

The color of the object was rather translucent, sorne\4hat lik.. that of a "poached" egg. There was no sharp edges but rather fuzzy and untl.efined . The size was approximately ?0 feet in riameter, and it did not appear to heve any cepth.

D.::J. UJDI.Ah Captain, USAF

J~iFH

\'1 . IVlllS JR. Captain, USAF

i.-!H.-,"--t'lbis is a certified true copy of original statement .

~n;.!:,.~(/1/~L Captain, l.l.>AF


_.;::~~:/fhl!-~ Northern Flights "'-' Tasmanian Souadron Air Training Corps RAAF 3 ~Ugh Street LAUNCESTON

5'/1/Air(1a)

25th November 1960

Commanding Officer Tasmanian Sq·1adron Air Training Corps ier SettlemPnt

1. An UFO was sighted by both Mrs Webster and her daughter as they were returning from school on Tv(l.sO.O..'I "tl--.e. I'a-N-- Odtober 1960. ThP time was approximately 1630 hours. The object was seen for a period of from 2 to 3 minutes . 2. At the time of sighting both people were travelling in the front seat of a 1958 ijolden Sedan. ~~s Webster was driving .

3.

The weather was fine and there was not a cloud to be seen.

4. The object is reported to have be~n sighted moving from the left to the right of the observers, ie, from the N'"E to the SSH over the house . Mean position of sighting approximately lf1°1f!'s '4-rt~'E. 5. Mrs Hebster first thought that it was an aircraft about to crash as it was much lower than aircraft usually seen around that area , and it sPemed to bP moving very slowly . Altitude of the object was estimated to be below 1 ,ooo fPet . The speed of the object was estimated to be about 50 mph and it then stopped moving and hovered - still 800 to 1 ,ooo fe~t .

6. When thP object hovered Irs \•lebster, still thinking it •..ras an aircraft, thought it was going to "fall out of the sky" and intended to ring the police and report the accident and sum~on help .

7. The car was stopped and Miss \o/e bster got out to see better . She commented that the object had no wings, Mrs Webster agreed ~dt'i her but she said she had not noticed it until mentioned to her by her daughter . ~~s Webster asked her daughter could she hear any motors 8. Miss \olebster said she could hear a noise like a car engine . }l.rs \o/ebster heard nothing as she wears a hearing aid .

9. The car was res tarted and they were driving to another position for a better view when their view was interupted b¥ a ~edge (pine trees aoproximately 35' high) . 1O. \/hen thP vie~r was again clear (about 15 seconds later) the object had disaopeared . 11. The country in that area is very flat and open with two small hills a oproximately five miles away to,.,ards the South WPst .


12 .

Description of Oblect (a)

The object was about 30 feet long and about as high as a car ( qolden) . (b) It was cigar shaped with a round nose and a sloping tail (see diagram) . (c) two objects protruded from the rear Sides at an angle. (d) No markings ( ands or windows) were noticed by e ither onserver . (e ) Th~ colour was dull grey with the rear portion orange the orange was not as bright as anti - col lision paint The sun \o~as shining on the object at all times . But it '"as definately not s i lver or shining . It remained a dull grey colour . (f) The only disagreement between the two observers is '"ith regard to the position where the orange colouring commenced . Miss Webster thimks it star ted aft of the two protruding objects, while Mrs Webster thinks it started some distance ahead of these objects . 13 .

Opinion as to the reliability of these vritnesses (a)

Mrs W~bster's attitude to the report in the Examiner the UFO sighting by Rever Pnd Browning of Cressy was one of d isbelief . lio,.,eover, she is firmly convinced that she sighted arld watched an object as described in the text above . She seems a sensible and most reliable type of woman - not given to hysterics or the like . Also I would suggest that it was difficult for her to admit having sighted and object after having discussed her disbelief of pr evious sighting s so f r rPly with her ÂŁ r iends.

(b)

Miss s . Webste r ( 11 years) is particularly mature for her age and I believe that both witnesses a re reliablP in the main with the exception being the judgement of distances and size .

o~

(B . P.MULLOCK) Flying Officer Officer Commanding


(

-

...

-


-------,.,...

-G~ Oii:JISS 1:>

__ -- elM /lour-6

n

I

I

1•

I

0

l

i '

.

l~

evl> 1"-llo .... 'n'f' o,• ~

.( .-lflt.;.•o/)IIV'

.q,, .r

~....r.-IIV


TElEl'HONe: 1

IN

690- 550

&. .

hASe QUOTE

路No

Headquarters Support Command Victoria Barra cks >/"1:11' 1 ~ St Kilda Road l.rELBOURNE SC1 VIC 'f{F'

Secretary Department of Air Russell Offices CANBERRA ACT

1 a r; ov 1960

SIGHTING OF UNOS UAL AERIAL PHENOMONON

Forwarded herewith is a report by Mr K. G. Woodward of the sighting of an unusual~ phenonoma in Tasmania on 27th October , 1960. ~

1 .~~

&fL~:~:~der

Encl

For Air Officer Commanding


.· ._ .

Hr . K. G. 1·/ood\-mrd of ob- r.Je King Street , ~re ssy . ss of b;;er · or ob 3 •rv r . • Roa d Ga~er at Poa tina .

'

2.

3. 4. c:

~-

6.

Date

.

n

1. Ill \.r..:..GIU giV'•-11 .LU '-

u.)Ur C

r

... . .. ........

October

...... . ... .

2 ~Perioa oJ. v.... '.!:mner or Obser-l.ltion: (.;J.V- ----~~-" _. ~wn ll?SLtion if possiol, ~ .. ·~-- : ..,'1d.Cla .. _. " i.n the oh:: • • •) From home object appeared south of Poa tina . . ~ .. ..

..... ..... . . ........... ................ .. .. ........... ......... . . •

0

7.

Where \l'as object ,'iJ.;;:ot obsaftved, e . g . o•re,.lead, comw, a hill, Sta OV2f ~~ ~Qri~fo~. eb 10 onary 200 t. a t c. ove mountain

8.

\ihat first o.t~ractad observl3r's at.. ..ention e.g. ligl1t 1..1r

9.

Did object appear as a light or as a •lefinite object. Like beachball ••••••.•• c-•• a •• ., ... . •......... . ,. ••• • , .. ............. .

10.

If there ..as more t.1au one object 1 uo·..r l!lany Here ther was their formati on.

••••••• ••• ••• • ••••••• ~~~~~ . . . . .

(\

~~

.

.

• •

• •••"- c • ••••••o•• •

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 .. 0 • • • • • • • • ., •

What was the colour of the light or objecc

12 .

What was i~s Round

13.

•••• •

appare~t

15. 16.

17. 18.

0

th~~c dan~ en r e •

changed to blue ,

shape •••.•• . •••..••

•••••••••• ••••••• ,

••••••••••••

\as any detail of structure

IC'

... .

observable.~~

••••••••••o••o•••••••~•• ••••• •-•• ••••

14.

• • 0 4• v ..

• ••• 0 ••••••••• •• 0 •••••••• •• •

11.

"

........

.

. •• • •.•••••

. . ••••

~las any method of propt.lsion obvio:J.s.Not .~ut .c:J.oud of sparks visible ~las there any sound. ~o , .~~i;l it .di.sa_P.Pe.are.d t hel!; there was an explosion after about li mins . Height,or angle of elev~~ion. • ••.••• Nil Speed, or angular velocity ..

••• •

0

. . . . . . . . . . . ~ ••

State any experience \·lhich enables observe r to be rc about the ans•..IOL s given to 16 and 17. Army 6 years. •••"'O

v

O•• •• o••• •••• •"'••••••••••••••••

Since it is normally impossible to es~im3te the heib strange ObJect, i t \>I ill usually be better to endeavou. the angle of elevation of the object , the angle thr !!loved, and the time taken todo this.


~ f' 1 i ·~llt

ri th ref'erence to lnndlur .s or

t1onary

St._

............

20.

Vi~ ~•n ooJec~ rc~ln on~

&

••

••

•••

••••••••••

~th devi

1

straight

u.t

•••••

to or

r

Stationary

................... , ................. ... .

For a short time .ias nny tra ... l of ej:hau~t, va.po~r or li;ht se ,., ~arks wer e visible

21.

22.

\.1-te~c ''id ooject 01 .. ~ 1,.. 101J.4:.0J1

<lisappea:-, e.g

1~

id-air, beh

n~

l!

I

..... .... ..

Disappeared behind Hestern Tiers .

"

.t:xistence of any l)hyslcal evidence such as frug.nont~ photographs, Ol' other supporting evide:1cc •

23 .

. ,1{1,1,

2~.

25.

.

.

..... "

. . . . . . . . . . . . ') . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .,111 • • • • •

\veath~'-r conJltions experienced a .. tiu1e (s) or o ,,, .L Very clear over Cressy, two big clouds over Western Tiers 'trie" 'l 'fgnt 'was "s'lio"Jfrig" oeil.re"e"ri 'the" "c"rouds . Location Ol -ny air tr~f~ic ia t~e v:ci~. at the sighting.

...................... . . .......... ......... ....... •

26 .

..

$

• • "' •

.. •

..

:Oc~tJ.o~ o: 3ny ~e~eo:ological stations in the g~net Launceston Airport ••• c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . c ••

27.

1

Arry

ad.lition..al infor~:~ation ••••••••••••••••••••••

Nil .

•·•••·• ••• • •• • •••••••••c•••• •• •••••••••••••• •••••• ••••• o~ •• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••~~~•••••••

••••• o• •• •• ••" •••• • ••••••••• . . ••••••••~••••••••••••-·

~uestions 25,26 and 27 to be ans•rered oy interrocnt<


s~

ON'icer

~0 ~he

Jriniater

1. Herewith is a cov,y of a repor~ ot an unidentified tl11Dg object observed b;r the Reverend Lionel Browning of Cress;r, Tasmania. 2. l otion bAs been initiated to have this report investigated b;r the senior tlUF officer Hobart. A prel1.m.nar;y anal;rsis of the &Tailable information indicates that this sighting was- some form of natural phenomena asaoCiilf8cl trith the unss~tled wea~her condi tiona. You will recall that the g ng rRevereiiCI. llilliam Gill- in the -:Boia.D&i -area of llew Guinea, which also received wide publicit;r, was ver,r similar and occurred under almost identical weather oondi tiona. On that occasion, a.fter inveatiga tion, we concluded that the sighting& were either known planets seen throll8h fastmoving cloud, or natural phenOJDena. The notable dif:terenos between the reports is tha~ objects observed b;y the Reverend .Brownin8 were dull gre7 in colour, while thoae seen b;y the Reverend Gill were brightl.7 lit and, in 0118 case, allsgadl;r containsd humanoid beings.

YJ{ / fri Cdr

DJlVI(Opa)

. .._


00MMUNJC"'77UN

CENTRE 1 I NOV 1960

PBI Clll'ft'

AI 331

JW1D9r

nm:sriGJ.'l'B UllllBIITIIIED FLTilfO OBJE~ SIGHl'DlG CRESSY AREA 4

JlKPOJl'l'KI)

•ov

PD

:BY !BY LICJIKL BRO'II!rlNG CHIJBCH OP E!JGLJBD RECTC!tT CRESSf PD TOOR BEPOR'l'

SBOIJLD IJrCLODI (A) PERSC!UL IDBESSIOWS C1P IDl BRODD'G AD DETAILS OP BAtz:QROIJIJD (B) PIBYIOOS BXPERIIIICB BBliL PHBIICIIEIU (C) A.SSOCl.A'l'IOJrS 11'1!1 tJPO SOCIEfiES

(D) J1I'GL3 OOB BOlllZOW .dD l!IWlllfQ (1) IBA!1'HER COIDI'l!OJrS 111DJDER LIGli'!IIIliG :&"1'C (P) 91'AfiDI'i'fS Bf wnnssBS OfBBR THB VICARS WII'E (G) RotroH DIAGIWIS (B) An <7l'BER BLBJAI! JJBl'.tiL

Pl)

ATOID CO!I'fAC'f n'l'B PRBSS PD

DO NOT AGREB 'ro PROVIDB RESULTS

OP InES'l'ICJ.U'lCIIS PD POll HQSC 'l'HIS CO!D'IIIIlS m.mtK DAPl Jl-1 SO ORO 101655f:

-

:LASSIFIED LY

SQ!J LDR P.A. LAI'G

, 4-3di?.AV' 406

WOCDRC~


m:c ~FORT

-

/.f2A

OBST.;RVED

OB~CT

ON AERIAL

................

of Observer

Address of Observer • •• .• ~(,1(<4"'4"l · . fJ.or. "!f. . • !~'!"'."~~••• •Q. •..••. •.. ••

2.

Occupation of Observer ••• ••• • • f~~f~ ..... . ~~ T1~~

4.

observatior (Tine

a~

...... ....... .... ... ....

iven in 24 hour clocr. zonal time)

, . ~r... .1J :J~:J..S: .E_. {;(.... ~ .. .4! . :J( ~~OfJ. ,{.f.(. .. . . , , ...... , .. ..... , ... • 5.

Per.od of observation(S) ••• •• {tr.• 1f-Pf•• 1Pft.!'t~ • •• .~'!"'."· .S:"t':'.s • • ••• ••••••

6.

f..anner

of observa,.ion: (Give details cf o .• n position by map reference if possible, or by kno'm landmarks, and describe 1ny equipm~nt used in the observation) .

- .

4

,1''!Sf1~~~~, , , '11~1"~~4J'~, •••••

,

•••• •

.)a!-{ ~(.5,, !"f.IJ:'(t, 'f • • ., • " • • ,, • • ,,, •, • • • • • • • • • • • #

"" ,Wf't:.S,,.,

••••••• •• •

•••••

•••

••••• •••

•• •

• • • • • i.

... . . . . . . . . . .

...... .

•••• • •••••••••••• • ••••••••• •• • • • ••O ••• • •• l ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' • • • •

?.

··/here was object first observed, e . g. overhead , com1ng from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc • • • •~~~•• 'ftfo,r .... :'!P:~ ...

8.

'!fnat first attract-;d observer 1 s att ention , e . g. l.:.ght or noise. ••

9.

'

•••••••••• 0 •

IJ""'

•••

•• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••••• •

•• •• •••••••••••••• • ••••••••

Did object appear as a light or as a definite object . ~

10.

~'.1• ,0 ( • • ~'f-t"!~'o.~ • • ~- ...• • • •• •••••••••.••••••••

• ... • . . .• . .. • .•.• ~f'tr. . •.•. ~ .• ..••• • ••.••• • • •• .• • ••••• .• •• . .•••••••

If there was more than one object, hm'l !"'any -;1ere ther e , and nhat was their formation •

.......... ..... .

. . . • • . • . • • f't( ••• if~~- • •• .•••••.•••..• . ••••.• . • • ..•

.1as

~'lhat

1 3.

Was any detail of structure observ-able

t~e

,.11,,., ..................... ... 1-/f}llfr

colour of the lirht or object

11.

· · · ·· · ······--······ · · · ··· ·········· ·· ~ ··· "'· • •t • •············· ···· · ·

0 • •

• •

• •

• •

• •

............................ IVC

• •

• •

• ••• • •• • ••

......... .

14.

~/as

15 .

·:as t here any sound ...................... , . ~ 0• • •••••••••••••••••••••

16 •

XX

1? .

XX

18.

xx

any Method of propulsion obvious ; , •• •• • ;".". ••• • • •••••

11 Heieht , Or anele Of elevation • ••••• • • .¥f n·••·•• • ••••••• • •••• •••• .. 7. ••

S peed, or angular veloc1ty · I i} olfl •..•.. . T.·-• •

(,;j c/1:• · ' • .,•~"'• !f' 'ti~T •••••lf1Nt~#r'1 ~ • •••••.• ••••• • •• ·

' "'

State any experience nhich enables observer about the answers eiven to 16 and 17.

tv uc

reasonably certain

Since it is normally iopossible ~o estimate the h~i~ht and speed of a stranre object it will usually be ~Ptter to endeavour to determine the anrle of elevation of the object , the angle through which it moved 1 and the time tal<en to do t• is . - 1-


-2B_ ~ on aerial objact observed (contd , ).

1 9.

Direction of flight 11i th reference to landmarks or points of the compass,

•. 'YF.rr.•. •-r.::J•• ffl.5•7•• • • '!!':-. . •r: . . . ~Y'.'f.~"! . ~~.•i-1 ..•••.••.•...•• • . •••.•••• 20.

Did the object remain on a straight path, deviate or manoeuvre at all •

. . . . . . . . ~1!~ . .0 • ~"..Eff>••• '!1'!1'!c; •• . •. • . .• ..•• • .•.•••.•.••.•• •• ••••••••• 21 .

,;as any trail of exhaust, vapour or light seen ••••• ~~ ... . ........ .

22.

'.'/here did object di::appear, e . g . in mid-air, behind a hill, Gver the horizon • • • • • •• • • •• • • • • • • •• • • • •t fV• ••• ~'f•'f'~ .

23 .

..... .... ..

fll • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Existence of any physical evidence such as fragments, photographs , or other supporting evidence .

............................... ................... ................. '"eather conditlons experienced at time(s) or observation(s) ...... . /11/L.

24.

. . • . . f~~/1 .. ...• .. ... ... .. ..•.. .••...•.••......•.....•.•....•••...• 25,

Location of any air traffic in the vicinty at the time of sighting. •

t

• • •

t

t

1'/'L • • •

re •

t

t

• •

• •

• •

• •

e • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

................................................................... 26 .

Location of any meteo~ological stations in the general.area •••••••

••••••••••••• ••• •••• "!'.'-•• • , •••• ••••• •• • • •••• , ••••••••••••• • •• ••••••• 27 .

/!"! .. ff/'(l>f. • •'.C!-!'~":1~•• t?'t.~!~r. • •'!~f-:"{f•• •• ~Mr ,........,,...,~ ............... ···-· ............. •"''• ..r.it ......... ' ........... ......... -.-.·.... .

Any additional information •••• liS

..

dltt#Ht"

STAA.

.&fr"

1¥(1111;..

l/lf&.< T

liLT 'f'JME

.o.vo_ -

• •stlllflft •• f'f! 1:'1f • • ·"'fC"'.•·, .":1.~/'I'!Jt/j,. . • ••••• • • • • • • • •...• • • • .•••• •. • •• •

Questions 25 , 26 and 2? to be ans~ered by interrogator .

~ ....,~­

~~ ~

4wt.a4~"«'

AL

~ .,-k...., .) ~ ~

¥

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4/ADirectorate of Air Force Intellis-nce Depa%'111ct of Air Ru..ll ottio. . CUBBBR& ~CT

Rett ,S0/1/1(4U)

27th October 1960

Dear S1r,

'1'bank JOU tor 70ur telesram regardJ.ag the llighUng oÂŁ unidentified flJinB objeota in the vioinit7 of linton on 13th October 1960, and the otter to provida data1la.

2. ! would be srateflll i t JOU would complete the attached profoza and include anT additional i nformation that the other w1 tn....e misht be able to provide.

Kr. Da'rideoa, llciada Done, liD~,

QUD!SLUDâ&#x20AC;˘ Ut


TELEPHONE :

690- 550 COMMONWEALTH

IN 1\

OF

AUSTRALIA

:.EASE QUOTE

No

Headquarters Support Command Victoria Barracks S1; Kilda Road MELBOURNE SC1

VIC

OCT 1960

5/6/Air(44A) Secretary Department of Air Administrative Offices CANBERRA ACT

SIGHTING OF UNUSUAL AERIAL PHENOMENA Attached 路 are reports from Rev L. Browning and Park giving details of unusual. aerial. objects sighted at Tasmania early this month. 1.

Mr G.

2. The reports were received direct from the office ot the Department o~ Civil Aviation Melbourne .

I

rf'b-1.'.

/f-::::~fo'l-\.... /'./"'-.A ,-,

(D . VERNON)

Wi.ng Commander

Encl

For Air Officer Commanding

-


VICTORIA BARRACKS MELBOURNE VIC


X TELEPHONE.

...

74 1271 COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

~o/t(t

Headquarters Base 1 PEARCE A l RAAF

17th October 1960 The Secretary Department of Air Administr~tive Offices CANBERRA ACT

UNIDENTIFIED OBJECTS - SIGHTINGS 1. Attached is a copy of a report received by the Chief Commissioner of Police , Police Department , Perth ·•A , ancl forwarded to this Headquarters for information . 2. It is respectfully sugzested that any rePlies be made direct to the Commissioner of Police , copy to this Headquarters for infor.nation.

3. You are advised that in acknowledgement of this report the Chief Commissioner of Police has been advised that the report has been forwarded to Department of Air.

Encls

I

5/G/Air(5A)

v~? Group Captain Officer Commending


COPY Geor e Dall Reln~1ve

to:

K~dd

Winning

Sergeant 1649

Stran e li ht or object seen over Yallalong Station 90 miles from bullewa about the 18th Augus~, 1~60,

Insnector Sunter: I respectfully report tLAt I received a telephone mP.ssage at 7 , 30 om this morning from l;.r Eric FITZGERALD, the owner of Yallalo~ Station, to the effect thzt one of his employees, Leslie CLAYTON , hP~ seen a bright flashing object in the sky about 4 pm on the 19 . 8 . 60, and thought it was a meteorite, ··avelling from East to .eRt . He was unable to estimate the nei~ht or distance . ~r FITZGERALD said tnat Mr. Leslie KEYN~~. T ~ager of CUrbur Station , 160 miles north of MULLEWA, hAd also seen the phenomena , and I therefore contacted r~ KEYNES who set the time at 4 pm on the 13th August 1960 but who saw no light , but heard a noise like a cr~ck of thunder , and thought it was a jet travelling at such a speed that it broke the sound barrier , ~d left vapour streaks oehind it.

He v.as at the \laell Shearing Shed between Moogan Station and Yallalong Station , with his three native employees , Fred Hemet , Mantle Winmar and Michael Ryan, who all saw the streaks . Keynes was an officer in the RAAF during the war and is conversant with the aircraft etc . He said the streaks were very high, and thefobject appeared to be travellinz from East to West . Mr FITZGERALD , who holds a Pilot License , and owns hie own plane , 111formed me tnat he had made a survey by air of the StatiOJ frcm time to time in an effort to pick up any remains of a satellite if such was the object seen, or to locate a crater if the object was a meteor ite , and he ~as reporting the ~nstance in case it should prove of value to those it concerned . I thanked him for his interest , an,, a.iv~sed him that I v.ould submit a report on the matter , and that !te would be advl.sed should there be anythint to substantiate his belief as set out above . You may deem it advisable to convey this information to t he proper authorities in due course . Sgd

G. •• INNING .

SERGEANT 164-9


~.: :"

1 28 ,1. 21

COMMONWEALTH OF

1-!Et路tORANDffi1 for:

The Sec r etary , Department of Air , CANBERRA .

A.C .T.

UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECTS

Attached for your infor mation is a copy of the U. S. A. F . Report and Fact Sheet dated 21st July 7 1960 on the above sub ject , which we have r ece1ved f r om the Head of A. J . s . s .

l

41:.;--

Secretary .

~


J'uly 21, 1960

NO. 812-6o OXford 75131

FAJ::r SHBEl' .AIR :FORCE UFO REPORT

or: 173 sightiDgs of unidentified t1.y1ng objects or aerial. were reported to the USAF during the period l January to 30 June 1960. these 1,73 cases 139 have been analyzed and 34 are pendiDg. A total

phenCDena

or

Of tbt: 139 c!lSes ;;.n.~ed 51 were c::-..tegorized "Insuf'i'icient Evidence." these 51 ca.ses 37 ..;ere so c;拢egorized because there were no o.dditiorol witnesses. It 1.8 the Air Force policy to :lttempt to dete.nnine the probable C:lll&'! of these si.gbtiDgs. However in keepiDg witb good scient1f'ic practices they ore co.tegorized for sto.tisticnl purposes a.s "insufficient evidence. " To give tull credit to these particul:lr s1gbt1ngs would be CCIIZip:lrO.ble to o.cceptiDg a.s fo.ct the results of :lll experiment which va.s conducted only once.

or

I)Jrlng tbis same period for 1959 the number of sigbt1Dgs reported to tbe Air Force vas 175. Due to the fact thllt severul reports us\Ull.ly reach the Air FQrc:e ntter tbe end of a period, it is so.fe to O.S&\I!De tbo.t the 1 J::m - 30 June period of 196<> will slightly exceed tbo.t of 1959. Hoveve:r, the 173 cases for tbe first bo.lf of 196Q represents a sli~ decre<l.se :frcm the 189 cases reported to the Air Foree for the period 1 July through 31 December 1959. ~118 tbe period of this repOrt there were 41 cases reported from foreign

countries. East l!re:l.

The tnjority of these sigtrt1.ngs took place in the P:>.cific and :fur

It is o.ppa.rent tbo.t the public is tolting tbe report1Dg of unidentified ;lerial pbeOCIIIeM more seriously. nu-1ng this reporting period there vas only one 1nst::mce of an actuo.l hoo.x. The months of April Cllld June 1960 show a fairly lo.rge percentage of o.stronCIIIiccl s1ght1ogs . These large percenb8es can be attributed to the excessive meteor o.ctiv1ty in April and to the prox:im1ty of Jupiter in June. Its nearness resulted 1n ::m apparent brightness greater than that of a star of -2 . o mo.gn1 tude o.od the plo.net also appeared UDUBuo.lly large .

.

When categoriz1Dg sigtrtings路 of unident1f'ied o.erial phena~~ena the Air Force attempts to do so prim:lrily by association to a responsible object. I f the pl.nnet Venus wos detenlli.ned to bo.ve been the subject of a report the case i s categorized as an a.stronCIIIico.l &igtrtiDg. It should be noted tb:l.t 1n most inst/lDces tbe condition under vbicb ::m object i s seen is the real cause of the sighting :llld not the object itself. An example of this vould be o. sto.r or pl.o.net seen low on tbe borizon with the associo.ted refraction llDd di-trractioc patterns. 'Ibis brings to point the secondary method of c:ategoriziDg sigbtings. In same insto.ncea the evidence 1n a case will indicate the probable co.use aa a reflection, etc., but the responsible object mo.y not be as tracenb~e ns c.


pl '. or stru:. In these instances the cnses are categorized according to pr-.:rt:lll..bly cnuse. A third ~~~ethod is the ~tegorizing of those cases 'Which are determined to be illusions, prob::~bly resulting from over active im:lgin::~tions. Us~ these cases ::~re one witness sigbticgs and ult~tely ~ into the "insui'ficient evidence" category. There :ll"e still mo.ny sightings vhicb are due to the viewing of st::~rtllOÂŁ; =tur:ll objects for tbe first time; i.e. , fireb::.ll type meteors. In mo81( of these instances the object itself, coup1ed with the rel::~ti ve inexperience of the 'Witness, is the resulting cnuse of the sighting. It is significant to note the ad::lpta.tion of the pUblic to the s::~tellite e= o:f the spa.ce a.ge ::~s evidenced by only one s.::1tell1te being reported a.s an UFO during this period. The one s.::1tellite reported va.s the sto.rtllng re-entry of tbe Discoverer VIII on 7 lt!.rch 1960. To d::~te no report of unidentified o.eri:ll phenOlDenA gn~ oey indication of a. tbrea.t to the security of the united states, nor vere there indications that these phenomeno. were other tho.n no.tur:ll.

UFO Report Eva.lnntion - by Category and Percentwge Breakdown

1 J:mnn.ry 1960 - 30 June 1960 Astronomi.c:ll Aircro.f't

B:l.lloon *Insufficient ~to. Other (Birds, hoa.xes, seorch lights, etc. ) Satellites (Re-entry of Discoverer VIII) Un1dentified

52 7 6 51

37.41 5.04 4.31 36.70

19

13.67

1

.72 2.15

_ 3_ 173

lOOJ;

*'l'bis category includes 37 sightings (21.381>) reported by individu:lls =d in ench cllSe there were no supporting witness a.nd no ::lddition.:U iofonn:1tion or focts a.va.il:lble to :lllow n volld scientific ev.:lluotion of the sighting. Sight1Dgs of this 0:1ture must be discounted becaose of a total lack of supporting d::lta. . This in effect reduces the tot:ll number of ~ses for the period to only 136 vith 102 of these evnlnnted to d::lte . In the ca.se of the other 14 s1gjlt1ngs in the insufficient data category, oddtion.:U witnesses corobrated with sightings but did not provide sufficient data to allow o vulid conclusion. Percentages are strnight m.:l.thema.tica.l computations c::~rried out to only two places b:lsed upon totals :llld sub totals or categories . Therefore when worked in reverse they will not reflect the exact original tot:ll or sUb total. UFO cases or files ore not closed and should additional informctioo be obtnined at a later date, it can result in a solved case a.nd/or may change the category previously assigned to the individual sighting (as in the case of :1 previously unidentifien case being changed to tbe aircraft category) . This open and policy on all UFO f'iles results in minor changes from time to time in UFO category statistics. This also applies to individual reports subnitted after the fact. These continuing inputs account for additional minor ch=ges periodically 11hicb, of course, o.re not consistent with previously released fisW::!:,a,. -2-


The tot::U. number of sigbtirtgs reported to tbe United Staten Air 04?. 3re ~s follows: OBJECTS SIG!n'ED AND REPORTED YEAR

1947 1943 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

196<> (through 30 June)

F~ce

since

79

143

186

169 121

1501 425

429

4o4 773 1178

573 364

173 6523

Reporting, investig~tion, =lysis and eval.U!ltion procedures h::we improved considerable since tbe first sighting of unidentified flying object was made on 27 June 1947. The study and =lysis of reported sightings of UFO's is conducted by a selected scientific group under tbe su~~sion of the Air Force. Dr. J . Allen Hy'ru!k, Head of the Depo.rtment of Astronomy and D1 rector of the Observ:ltory at Northwestern University, is the Chief, Scientific Consult:lnt to the Air Force on the subject of Unidentified Flying Objects. The selected, qualified scientists, engineers, and other personnel involved in these analyses are completely objective and open minded m the subject of UFO' s. They apply scientific methods of eJromio.ation to :1.11 cases in reaching their conclusions . The attempted identification of the phenomenon observed generally must be derived from human impressions end interpretations because scientific devices or measurements are not :l.V:lilable . The data in the sigiJtings reported are almost invariably subjective in nature . However, no report is considered unsuit:J.b1e for study ~ categorization .

General categories of identification ure balloons, aircr:l.ft, astronomical, other, insufficient data, satellites and unidentified. Approximately 4,000 balloons nre released in the U. S. every do.y. There ;:).I"e two general types of balloons: veatber balloons and upper D.ir research balloons . Bru.loons vill V':lry from types 4 feet in d1~ter to large types 200 feet in di:lllleter. The !Dfljority released at night carry running lights which often contribute to vei rd or unusual appearances when observed at night . This also hold true when observed ne::~r dawn or sunset because of the effect o ; the slo.nt roys of tbe sun upon the b:llloon surfaces. The large balloons , i f caught in j et streams, :mny assume n ne::~r horizontal position when partinlly inflated, and lllOve with speeds of over 200 MPH . Large types m.:\Y be observed flattened on top. The effect of the latter t wo conditions con be st:J.rtling even to experienced pil ots. Many modern aircraft, pprt1cularly swept and delta wing types, under ad verse weather and sighting conditions are reported as unusual objects and/or "flying saucers." Wb.en observed at high ::~ltit\\des, reflecting sunlight off their surfaces, or when only their jet exhausts :J.re visible at night, aircraft can have appearances ranging from disc to rocltet in shape. Single j et bombers


nag multi-jet pods under their svept-baclt

bnve been reported :l.8 tlfOs or ~!saucers " in "V" fol:'IIIQtion . Vapor trail a vtll often o.ppear to glow Wi.tb fiery red or orange streaks when retleotiJJg sunlight. Arter burners are frequently reported :l.ll UFOe.

wi.cg.s

;'J

The astronc:mictll catesory includes b.H.8)Jt stars, planets, comets, mJteors, and other celesti:ll bodies. Wben observed throua)l bo.ze, light tog, or IIIOV1JJ8 clouds, the planets Venus, r.Brs, o.nd Jupiter bave q~n been re-ported o.s 'u.ll-

conventiont:U., moving objects. Attempts to observe astl'OIICIUI1ool. bodies tll:r'ougll band-held binocul.o.rs under adverse ak:y conditione bnve been a source of lllDliY UFO reports. ·~

Tbe "other" categpry includes reflections, searchlights, birds, kite~,

blimps, clouds, sun-dogs, spurious ra.do.r ind1ce.t1o~1 boo.xes, tirevorlt d1'pl:lys, tlo.res, :fi.rebt:U.ls, ice crystals,bolldes, etc., ns exnmples: large' Canc.dian geese flying low over o. city o.t night vitb street lights reflecting of'f' their bodies; seo.rchligbts plllying on sco.ttered clouds 1 o.ppeo.ring o.s moving disc -like ebnpres. The insufficient do.ta catesory includes a.ll siglrt:fngs where easantial or pertinent items of information are missing, JIIQk1ng it impossible to· form o. valid conclusion. These include corroboration of tbe sighting by an o.dditioMl witness; description of the size , shllpe or color or the object; direction o.nd cl.titude; e:mct time o.nd loco.tion; wi.nd veo.tber conditions, etc . Tbia co.tesory is not used o.s o. convenient wo.y to get rid of wbo.t migbt be referred to as "unidentified objects." However, 1f there is not an additional witness or if tbe do.ta received is insufficient or Ulll'elnted, the o.nalysts must then place that particular report 1n this catesory. 'lbe A1r Force needs cCII!plete 1.n1'orma.tion to reo.ch a vn.lid conclusion. Air Force otticials stressed the fact tbnt an observer should send a eaaplete report of o. bonn fide sighting to the neo.rest Air Force o.ctivity. There tbe report Will be pl'allptly forwarded to the proper oftice for ~ysis and evnluntion.

A sighting' is considered unidentified or ~ed when a report apparently conta.ins all the pertinent do.ta necessary to nonnal.ly rnJUeSt o.t least one volid hypothesis on the cause or explanntion of the sighti.n g but when the description of tbe object and its maneuvers cannot be correlated with o.ny knovn object or phenomenon. In its Project Blue Book Special Report f/14, rele:>.Sed in October 1955, the Air Force sboved that eval.Wlted sight1JJgs in .the unidentified category had been

reduced 'to 3 percent at tbnt time . Unidentified s1ght1ngs bad been 9 percent in 1953 and 1954 o.nd in previous years unidentified sightings bad run as high :1.8 20 percent. Project Blue Book Special Report 114, covered UFO investigations t'ran June 1947 to May 1955. Since that time, A1.r Force statistics show the percentage of unidentified sigbtings has been reduced to approximately 2 percent. Air Force conclusions for •the thirteen years of UFO sighting.s involving over 6,500 rep.>rts are: first, there is no endence tho.t unidentified si~tings were iDimica.l or hostile; second, thoro 1o no evidence that unidentified sig)'rtings were interpl.flne1;cry 8p(1Ce ship."'; third, there is no evidence that these unideat:11'1. ..i sightiiigs represented tect'.nological develoJIIlents or principles outside toto: rtlllge of our present do.y scientific knowledge; fourth, there is no evidence that ··t hese unidentified sightinge o.re a. tbreo.t to t".e security ...r tl:e

..

~

- .,. .

'

.. ..


â&#x20AC;˘

country; ::md t'1n!llly, no phyaica.l or materiel evidence, DOt even a mioute tragme of a so-c3.lled "fly1ng GD.Ucer" or space ship hils eve:ro been found . The Air Force emphasized t he belief' tlnt 1t more 1m:Ded1at.e detoJ.led obJective observational do.ta could have been obtoJ.oed on the unidentified or unexplained sightings, these , too, would have been explained satistoctorily. The Air Force , eu~signed tbe responsibility for the Air Defense of the united SUltes , vill continue to 1nvest1gnte nl.1. reports of unuoue.l oeria.l objects over the U. s. including objects that may become labeled unidentified Fly1ns Objects. The services of quol.if'ied scientists and technicians will continue to be utilized to investig:1te and ono.l.yze these reports, md periodic public otntements on the subject vi1l be made as warrnnted.

\

Tbe Air Force Inspector Geoerol 'e Brief, do.ted 24 December 1959, contllined a notice to oJ..l. unit CamDa.oders tmt UFO reports are serious business since they are vitally involved in the Air Force 'a air defense mission. Tbis Brief stressed that Commanders are responsible for seeing thot UFO sighttngs are investi~ted Qlld evalunted quickly, thoroughly o.nd accurately. Tbe Brief referred to Air Force Regulation 200-2 concerning unidentified flying objects vhich outlines the Air Force's obligation to keep the public adequately inton~~ed on this subject 1llld olso stresses the fact toot UFO sighting reports are not to be clo.ssif'ied. I f an UFO report is classified i t is clnssified for other l'easons tbQil the UFO sighting itself. The Air Force is charged by DllllY private UFO groups with possession of classifi¡ed information vhlcb concludes or proves that opoce ships fran other plrulets exist o.nd are visiting our atmotrphere . Nothing could be further from the truth. The Air Force possesses no info=tion, classified or unclassified, vhich proves this contention. Many ind1vidunls associated vith these private UFO organizations are self-appointed authorities on UFOs and consider themselves entitled to be unofficial o.dvisors to the united States Air Force Intelligence Community. Since they a::-e not charged under law with these responsibilities it vould he entirely una.ppropriate a.nd even dangerous at times to exercise tbe Intelligence syste.m in order to give them, or tbeir organizations, :my notoriety or publicity. It is an interesting fo.ct that mooi; of these ind1v1dunls fail to recognize the tact toot there is such a thing as leg1tmate classified security inf'ormo.tion. For the past thirteen years these groups have repeatedly stated that their orglmizstions possess documented evidence proving the existence of stnce ships from other planets. However, vhen asked as patriotic citiz..e ns to deliver this evidence to the United States Air Force or other government agencies they have refused to do so. The obvious conclusion is toot they do not possess this inf'ormation or evidence proving the existence of apace ships . From tilDe to tilile the Air Force bas been asked the cost of conducting the UFO progr3111. It is impossible to estimate the exact amount of f'unds expended by the Ai:- Force in investignting reported sigbtings of' unidentified flying objects because in addition to the entire facilities of the Aerospace Technical Intelligence Center, the entire facil ities of the nation's scientific and technical CO!!IIIUil1ty are at tbe d16pos:ll of the evaluntors, and the degree of use varies with each case. Also, investigation in the field can involve 1nd1 vidunl Air Force bo.se personnel and special investigative units and again, in these instances the :llllOunt of time expended and the n\DDber of persoanel assigned to a specific sighting vill vary with each case.

Erro -5-


p.C.A.

Sydney to Canberra

D. T.O . 042339

Captain James (VBECD) at 21000' 041046Z ~pprox) sighted s pectacular falling star direction travelling to SSW appeared on bearing 280° from Pt Lookout (CoN's Harbour and Kempsey) .

Altitude est

50 - 10 thousand fest much lower than previous sighting& of tbia nature .

Colour bright light green head to vivid white tail.

Size much larger than any crew member had previously seen, particularly before disintegration.

Ill·'-

..Q ~- .

~ r..Mc.J... .l.

I)H,F

~...1.-.. ~ ~ - !..<>

~

....

··,;I!

--~·~"f~~. '

. ,\"

• :t_1 ~ 1'1'-.


THEPHO,

690-550

IN II.EPLY PlEASE QUO TE

No. _ _ _ _ __

Beadq~arters

Support Command

RAAF

Victoria Barracks St Ililda Road !lEL:BOURNE SC1 VIC

Secretary Department of Air Administrative Offices CANBERRA ACT

SIGHTING OF UNUSU.AL AERIAL PHENOMENA

__

Attached is a reBort by Captain L . 'Nilson, Airline Pilot , concerning an unusual aerial object sighted on 26th June 196~.

\...

i Encl/

f-

L

'

j~

D. VERNON) . Wing Commalider For Air Officer Commanding


A?PENDIX TO HQSC 5/6/AIR(42a 1 d

,1J1T ON aERLT. OBJECT

!.

OB:>~I!YID2

1•

Name of observer . ~ 1P:r••.•l.. , . j1.I.I.S9N. ••• • • ••• • ••• • ••• • •••• • ••••• • •••••• • •• •• ~

2.

Address of Observer .••.• 1 .~~/.V.'! . ~.'l.·.\. ~.qJ& . ~·I].... ~~!".·.. . ..... . . . ...... . .. .

3.

Occupati on of Observer • • . ~II!.~}{ •. ~:1; .... 9::'•..••. .. •. •. .. .. .. •. . . •. •••.. . ..•••

4.

Date and Time of Observation (Time "'iven in 24 hour clock zonal time}

re

. ..... . . ?9/!5/.qQ ...Qt} ?;1. •~~?TP.lt••••••••••••••• • •• . •••• • •• •• •••.••••• • •••• • •• 5.

Period of Observation(s) •• 4 . • .I;Q~ ••5.• :;~s::;;••••••• • •••••• • ••••••• • ••••••••••••

6.

hrumer of Observation (Give details of own position by map reference i f possible , or by known landmarks, and descri be any equiument used in the observat1on) .

• • . • • • • J;~;~rs>;;. tc. AA-::t.:r••11 :>rs>;; . ~VI'..•.••••...••.•..••..•.•.....•.••.••••.••

............................................................................ ............................................................... ............. 7.

~ere was object f irst observed, e . g . overhead, coming f r om behind a hill, over the hori zon, etc . 0

•.•••.••-9f, F.\l} • • •a.~ . F.P.~ ·• • 9J.q . • . /.r:ql!l , !-/.C. . :-..~~<?Y!!.•~ ~?-•• ~~ . ~!l.s. L ~!. A~~. 8.

Jhat first attracted observer's attention , e . g . lieht or noise , •.••••••l;~p)...qli ~PJ\ . r ~.t.tl.!! P?••E; ~ . ?.f• .': :' NVi'~;I ." •• •••••••.•• •• • • • •. ....• •• • ••

9.

Did object app' ..J.r

!lS

• • • • • • • • ~:J • •fl . l }..s.ll

10 .

a li ht or as a defini t.., object •

t . .. .............. ... ............ . .. .. .................. .

If there was more than one object, how many were theiW, a nd what w:~.s their formation • • • • • • • • • ~ p,o.~~f • .i.trl. ;t.i.s,J, tY••1:11t: !1. !.~ . 9 '[I.e••• •• • ••.•••••••• ••• •••••••••••••••

11 . 12 .

~/bat wa s tho colour of the light or oi:Jj oct ~!'l~.~~ . ~P..q~{l.t.z:~ .;· .i.~lL !>.l.u;~ ~. ; ed and [reen edges l;}}at was its apparent shape ... ... ... ~}P.e•• c:'J..l.~ . ~.t.. ... . ....... .. ........ .

........................................................................ .... 13.

Was any detail of stracturo observable ••••• ~f•••• . •.•. .. • . • . • ••• .•.•.....• •

............................................................................ 14.

Was any method of propulsion obvious •••~~ •••••.•••••••• •• .•• • •••••••.•.•••

: 5.

.;as tnorc nny sound .... . ~ ?• . ••. . •• ••••••.•• ,

• , .... . . . ....... .. ..... . ... • • ..

0

16 .++ Hei ght, or angl 17 . ++ Speed 18 .

of elevat-ion . !'P?.X:<?:C• .'~~ ••• •~«:":~ .t.e.~ . !'?.~':~ . :..~ ......... .

_ ,, , or o.n 6 .,..nr '"

't l!uch slo er th~n no. al 1et~or . oc1. y •.......••.. . .•.• . •..•..•.•.•.... · •• · • • • · · • · • · · • •

State a ny o qJOricnco which enables obscrv ...r to be reasonably certain 'lbout tho answer s given to 16 ~nn 17 •

·........ ...... ...... ........ .......... .. .

++

• . . . . . . • P.t:t~«: rY.~ ~~~P. .~!· . ~-~ ~-:~r.s. Since it is norm~y impossible to ost~~tc tho hoight and s~oed of a scrango obj ect, it wU1 usually- be;. bett•Jr to endc. wour to u<'tcrmino he ~ 1 lo ol' ol evntior o:' tt obj •ct , thw mgle "hrou,.rh \lhich i t move d, 1nct th timo taken to do this . ·· · ·· ·· · 2/


- 2 Reoor t on Aqlial Obiect Observed 19 .

(Cont ' d)

Direction of flight with r oforonco to landmarks or points of the compass . 0

nerL t. :'..\~ . ~ 20.

. ~, t!;t .

\ .~

.r.<PS • • .'~Q ••

.a.t1£lS!, • •.••••••••• • ••••••• •

Did the object remain on a straight path, dov i ato or m."Ulocuvre at all,

........StrJ. ....i....'It.....Atl,. ..... ............................................. . any

tr.:1il of oxhaust , vapour or light s e en L~;Jl.~ . ~r.~.i. L .. .. . . .... .

21.

:las

22 .

.,'horo did object disappear, e . g . in mid-air, behind a hill , over the horizon •

. . . . . Io.t.o.. 23,

P. ~~ tt. P.~::~ : •........ . ....•.•. . .•...•. .. •.•.•.• . . •. . .•.•.•

....xistcnce of any physicu supporting evidence •

phovogr~phs ,

vid nee such as fragments ,

or other

• ,.•~:r_, • •• • •• • •••••••• •••••••• • • ••••••••••••• ••• ••••• • ••••• ••••••••••••••• 24.

•<ca.thc.r conditi ons oxporionced at time(s) or obscrvation(s)

. P).q~ .l.l.e.~ ~ ..-. .J~ :-.\ •. r~P.r: . :?..~~ ~r,i , ~f! : . .... . ....... . ........ . .. .. . . . 25.

Location of ;my air tnffic i n tho vicinity at the tim"' of sighting •

.•.o..other ........kno~n ......../c..•.................................................. •

26.

• •

• •

!t • • • • • • • • •

••

Locati on o f :my :noteorologic.ll stations i n tho gcnor'\J. aroa .

..LT..•..................................................... ............... ........................................................................ ........................................................................ ........................................................................

Questions 2 5, 26 nnd 27 to be 3Jlswcrcd by interrogator •

........ .... ... ....... ...


690- 550

I'! 1'1

"

..

-

')..<: ~~le7_...,~/t/d ,.. ..... -

..

,......_,.....,..._ .. ... ..,a!..)1. .

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA IN REPLY PLEASE QUOTE ROYAL AUSTRALIAN All\ FOI\CE

No.. _ _ _ _ __

Eeadquarters -~~po.t Cou~~nd

~

Victoria Barracks St Kilda Road L!ELBOU?.NE SC 1 VIC

2 9J.UN~ Secretary Department of Air Administrative Offices CAN:BERRA ACT

SIGHTING OF UNUSUAL AERhL PH.ENQf,:ENA

Forwarded is a report by Captain James Kemp, Ansett-ANA pilot , regarding the sighting of an unusual aerial object on 13th June, 1960 .

~ER*'

ng Com.mander ~

Air Officer Coomanding


~CSJJ.~dix-

t o

HQSC 5/6/Air Ft 2(40A )

2 9 I~N 1960

~~~It ~.(~~VED 1.

.-came of observer •• • . ·""1r., ..'\":"\S. :;~m.JL~ .QI:~'! .(~). . . . . ... .. .. . ... . .. .... .. .. .

2,

Address of Observer .•CV.-:. \1\:::.~t:t: .-~ ·.1!•..'! -:. • • • •••••• • •••••••• • ••••• ••• • • •••••• • •

3.

Occupation of Observer • • •·\:l,l;J.:I.rl~ -~~J.Q\ ••••••••••• • •••••••••. • ••••••••.• •• ••

4.

Date and Time of Observation (Time given in

24 hour clock zonal time)

• • •••••• ••• • •••••••••• .:C~Plf: .:l. JQ<l~Q ••• ,J,~g . . .....•. . ... . .•....•. • . . . . ....... •

5.

Period of Observation(s) • ••4 .(~~ - ~q~~ .Q~{q~~ -~~~~~e .q~j~~~~ .. .....•••••

6.

l·.anner of Observation : (Give details of own position by m:1p reference if possible , or by known landmarks, and describe any e quiur.tent used in the observation) • Visual observation •Y crew (3) - flashin~ red liP,ht and .................................................... .........................

. . • • • .. • • • • .. • .. • . .. . . voi~fJ . li~l:rli . l21i!IJW<! . . . . ............ . . . .. .. . ......... . . .

............................................................................ 7.

IVhere was object fir st observed, e . g . overhead, comin:'! from behind a hill, over the horizon, etc.

8.

lfuat first attracted obsrrvcr 1 s attention, e . g .

li~ht

or noise •

.. • • • .. • ~~WP.g. 1'PA ,l..i.,gP.t.. NlA. ImP. >4\.i.t.e. .l..iJY\t, .. .. . ...... . .. ....... . . .. . .

9.

Did object appear ns a li~ht or as a defini te object,

. .... .... . . .... ... ... . A ;IJ.gtl.tp•••.••• •• • •• • •• • • ••••• • • • .• •••••.••••••••••••• 10 .

I f ther e was more than one object, how many were formati on •

the~ 1 and

vmat was the i r

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . .. . . . Pt>~. JQls>m ••••• •• •• •••••• • •••••• •• •••••••••••••• ••• •• • 11 .

..!hat was tho colour of the light or object l.I:PA .~)• .Ar.<\ .l.loC~:V.e. ,J.i.gilt

12 .

,.:'!Ut was its apparent shape •••• J~t. .}Ql~ ••••••••••• , ••• •••••••••••••••• ••

............ ... ........................................................... . ._

13 .

~las any detail of structure observable •• Jl.Cl~ .~Cli\T\ •••••••••• • • ••• • •• • ••••••

............ .............................. ..................................

14.

Was any method of propulsion obvious • • • J~ ,. , ..... , •.• .••.••.•. • ••.•.• . •. •

, 5.

w~s there acy sound ....• . .. . • ....•...•...--:: ••••• .• • .• ...• . ...•..•• ... •.•••• •

16. ++ Height, or angla of ch:var.ion ..~QQQ .~ ....QEtJ.Q'i ,-; , .1.~'!1\ -~~ , ). -~~Q .. ......... . 17. ++ Spct~d , or ll11gulnr v

18 .

++

ocity • • •fV}\ • •~~ .~q ..•-: ,l, \f!i:lt:~ .~J.\g' .t:l..V: ,J.q~Ett; •• . ••••••

Stato nny experience which ·nablcs observwr to bo ruasonably certain about tho answer s given to 16 ~nd 17 •

• • •• • • • • •• • • •• • • •• • • • • •1\/.C( .ti~"(i.l!'\fi5.qq ,~qqj,J}~ql}1j .~11'! .!l\1,q1j -~~t;:¥lll<l'l·• ••• •.• • Sineo it i s normally impossible to estimate the hoight and spood of a strange object;, it will usually bo batt('r to endc:wour to clot onnino the angle of elevation of the object, th o mgle throusb 11hich i t move d, .n~ tho time t.a\r.~.:n to do thi& .


.. - 2 -

(Cont 1d)

·"!boort on Agtial Object Observed 19.

Direction of flight with refe rence to landmarks or points of the compass •

. . ..~.. ~:~.. Y.~...i?P:>~. ,tp, !1--:. :-. r;<, Jlp;orpf-.-. ?-.s 20 .

p~~.th,

.Jid t ho object remain on a straight

?~."r~!!.s:• . .. . ..••... • . ••

deviate or manoeuvre at all.

....lal,intained ................VAR .....Track ............................................. . !.fii'G

........................

21.

.Jas any t r:1il of exhaust, vapour or light seen

22 •

•.mar.. did object disappear, .. . g . in mid-air, behind o. hill , ove r the horizon • • • • J.p. &:J.PAA ~. f,~. P.PUPPf!•• l'!W••• . ••• ••• •••.••• ••. ••••• •• • ••••• • ••• •••••

2J,

~xistcncc

of any physical ._vid nee such as fragc<.nts , photogr--.phs , or other supporting evidence .

... ..... .............................................................. . 24.

•leather conditions ~:xocricnccd at ti'lC(s) or obs;:.rva.tion(s)

••• YJ.:!!W-. !!PP?-Jt-)..Q"[l,S, JJPt-}.}.. ]7.,, f.?. P-!!U!'fl!!>. ~.· •• •• ••••••••• • ••••••••• • •• 25.

.:~ir

Location of o.ny

tr3l'fic in the vicinity at tho ti••lL of sighting •

• • • J.. rJs-. fF-7. ;.;>. 1r:-s;J<.. •• .3P. Prn~~.s•• r1-. •• :-. }., !-IP. :'. ?-7••••. •••• •••• •• •.•• ~£) •• PtPt. !VP•.cYJ).)• •z•.•.•.•••••..• •..••••.••••••••

. . • l.fJ./t~. Pll. PJ'J. PW.. 26.

Location of any l!ll.Jtoorologic1.l stD.tions in the guncro.l area •

. . . :1.-. •~w:t..... ...... . .. . .. .. . ....... . ... · .. .. . · · · ·. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · .. 27 ,

Any add itional informo.tion ••• • P'Pfl.d}(. J'I)..I.J\. Jl.,f..••fl.,'f,. J>t~t).o/IP, p.,t, l'PK •••••

• • • U..v... ~ Pi>J... J.~Cflt.e9-. no. N.c. »TP.OTP.,e, • ••• •••••••••••••••••••• ••• ••• e

I. I

I

e

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

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I

I

I

.

I

I

.

I

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I

I

I* I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

e

I

I. 1

I

I

I

Questions 25, 26

an~

I

27 to be

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I* I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

e •

I

I

e

I

I

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I

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I. I. I

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1

I

1

I

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I

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I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I. I

•. •

I

I

xns~~rcd by

I

I

I

interrogator •

........ ....... ..........


/ lo

A USTRALI AN E M BASSY ,

rfflv CICitltr .\""

WASH I N G TO N , D.C.

9/6/25(7A)

4t Y.arch, 1960

Director of Air Force IntP.lligence, Department of Air , C.C'BFRH . Sighting~

of Unidentified Flying

Obj~cts

Enclospd herewith is a copy of corrPspondence received from t be U . ~ . A . F . in answer to a request for comment on AustraliaD rPoorte of 11 flying saucers" . The~e Au~tralian r Poorts were forwarded by Denartment of Defence under cover of memorandum W. lSJ/59 of 16tr December 1959, ~na contained detailed individual renorts by observers in N"''oo Guinea and islands of the 4ustralian territory there . At thP r~"quest of th" Head , A.J . S. S. , these r"Ports wera forwardPd to the Aer ospace Technical IntPlligence rentr~ for Pvaluation . 2. It i~ felt tnat becau~ .. of Praviou~ly PXOTP~qpd intArest in mattPrq pPrtaining to IT .F .O's, in oarticular a n .0 . lPtter froJL Wing Comman-ler Burn dated 26th "ovell'ber 1959, that if tr.e~e commPnts could be r"lated to th" orjginal raoort~ they roay provp of ~ome use within n . A . ~ . r .

~eo(tj; /) ',? r;~

C.H. Spurg,.on Wing Coll\1118J1der

RAAF

Intelli~encP R~ores.,ntative


~ H•A • A

THIS PAGE IS REPRODUCED FROM A BADLY FADED OR ILLEGIBLE SOURCE. SCANNING THIS ITEM AT A HIGHER RESOLUTION WILL NOT IMPROVE ITS LEGIBILTY. --~


THIS PAGE IS REPRODUCED FROM A BADLY FADED OR ILLEGIBLE SOURCE. SCANNING THIS ITEM AT A HIGHER RESOLUTION WILL NOT IMPROVE ITS LEGIBILTY.

l


THIS PAGE IS REPRODUCED FROM A BADLY FADED OR ILLEGIBLE SOURCE. SCANNING THIS ITEM AT A HIGHER RESOLUTION WILL NOT IMPROVE ITS LEGIBILTY.


RE?CRT ON AERL\L OBJ""CT CR ... ~::D .Dou.<:lna SCOO'T .. FJ-.ederic.< ................................. ....... ........

Name l"lf nbserver 2.

Address ?f' Cbserver • ,1~ . ~T!1f. ,..~..a~·. •1.1\;q_~~~ ~ .¥. . !C'!. . ..• . .. • • .• • •. • . . ••

3.

;0'"' •.m re!U Occupatioa of Observer •. .

4.

Date

~nd Ti~e

?6th .

..

"' " " " '

" ••·

·

..

~··It"'''

•• ••

•• •

-

(Clerical) "

•• •••• •• ••• •

....

••• ;

•• •

••

iven in 24 hour clock zonal time )

Ti 1e: 1... 1

arol:: 1Ci60

... t'il . . . . .

(Ti~e

of observation

::,.., -v mt

ub_

"l • • • • • • • • • • • •

hours

. .. .... . . .

'l t l'l· · · · ~· · • -t •••• • ·· · ······· ·

5.

Pe!"iod of observation(S) •. ..1F:-l~ •8 !lS:':~a••.. . ••... . .. . •. • .. . • . • . .•.••

6.

l anner of ob!;erva+ion: (Give details 01 ..:>~,n position by map reference if possible, or by kno'Wn landmarks, and describe any e~uip~ent used in the observation). ~s ~- ;chin~ vapour ~rails of jet aircraft which wns travell1 ~ in ~astP~ Y .

.

.

.

.

.

. . . . . . . .. C' . . . . . . .

"l.. . .. .

··· · ~······#

. . . . . ··· ···················

· · •• Dl>l~ · ..t , PQJ;~fu~ ~ 11 be!!.rin of 130° • • •• iU~q,ct;~.Q:g •v•a;».o tt.f •tr • A·1. •on " ••••• c • • It • • •• • • • • • • • • •••

• • ••

..... ....... ........... ..... .... ...... .,.,, .........,, ................. . 7.

ahere was object first observed, e.g . overhead, com1ng from behind a hill , over the horizon , etc. :\bou+ 10° from 'lcrtica.l. • •• • .: ,, \ •• • • • •n• •• • ••• c .. ,•• • ••• • • • •• • • • • • • • • ••••••• • •••• •••••••••

8.

Vfuat fir st attracted obs e rver 1 s attention, e . g . l1ght or noise • • • • • •~~p~l(:

t l"~ •

:PT' .~.!.

trai 1 1nd movt)d

9.

Did object

a~p&ar

p-. 1' ,1;, ~~ 1;c_r, f'\·, • P~Je,c,t, Cf~ •\

<.~.nder

N~ ..;t~: ,IT.o;:':: .~1. :'~ · • •f'f.

it .

as a lirnt or as a definite object •

• , • , .lla:'fin.i. t..,.c. obj~t . , • . " ..... .... . , ..•••• • • .. , •• • • , .• • • • • . ••• , •.. • • • • •• •

10.

If there as more than one object, how nany were there, and \l'hat was their formation .

• "• ••<:.'\~. ~!J'\Y. • " • • • • • .. . 12,

• 0 •

0 •

••••••• •

............. .............. ..

',Vhat was 1 ts apparent shape • • • J:lphconClll. •••• •• • • • • • •• • • ••••• • ••• • ••• • • o • •• • • ••• • ..

1 3.

••• ••• • • • • • • • ••• • ••• • •••~ • • •• •• ••••• •••••• ,• • • • •• • •• ••

VIas any de tail of structure observable ••~OJ'!~ •• -.e~ , ••• •• • • •••• • •••••• •• c.o oC> • •••• •• • • •• •• • •• • •••••• • • • ••••• c• ••••• •' • • ••••• • •• ••• •• • •••• •

any •.ethod of propulsion obvious ;;iF ••!Qwrrh ••• • • •• • ••• •• •••• • ••

14.

\!as

1 5.

·/as there any sound .. .VJ"..-

r

.ws::r

0

t:,t. 'PAf\;:,~·· . , ... .. c.

••••••••• ••• ••••••••

17 . xx Speed, or angular velocity , .5/.f.;I';J. Jv>.o,tp ••••• • • , • • •• • • •••••••••••••

18.

State any experience \'lhich enables observer t-:l be r"asonably cert11in about the ans19ers <'iven to 16 and 17.

xx

Since it is normally impossible to estimote the heir,ht and speed of a stranre object it will usually be better to endeavour to determine the anrle of elevation of the object, tho snr;.le through 11hich i t moved, and the time ta~en to do this.

~~· p

-1 -


- 2-

R~ on aerial 19.

object observed

(~L).

Direction of flight <1i th raference to landmarks or points of the colilpass •

• . • •. .1.3P~ •....•... ...•.• . ..•. •.. • •..... • .. .•.• ..• • .•••.• . ..••••• ••• 20 .

Did the object remain on a straight path, deviate or manoeuvre at all •

. . . . . .~.:ffiq~t. ~C!~h•.•. •••••••••••••• • ~ .••.•.• •• ••• ••••• •••••• ••••••••• · t seen ..... ,ro. . . .......... .. . fias any tral.·1 of e.xh aus t , vapour or 1·1.gn

21 .

22.

Where d'd obJect disapr,>ear, e .g . in mid - air, behind a hill, over tt':e horizon •

. . . . . .~.s:. ~.of-: . '!r. ~ ~. ~i.~;~~... .... ...... . ... ..... . . . ....... ........... . 23.

~.xistence of any phvsical evidence such os or other supporting evidence .

fr~g~bnts,

photographs ,

........................................................... ........ ···ea ther condi t!ons experienced at time ( s) or observation( s) ...... . ................................................................... :'il

24.

?ine and cleor,

25.

Location of any air traffic in the vicinty at the time of sight ing . •

I

I I

I

I

I

I 11 I

I

I

I

I

I

I I

I

I

I

I

I I

I

I

I

I I

I

I

I

I •

e • • • •

I

I

I

I

e •

I

I

I

I

• •

I

I

I

I

e

I

I

I I

I 1

I 1

.•••.•••.•....•.•..••.•...•................. ... .....••.•• .••.•••..• 26.

Location

27.

Any additional information •••••••••• • ••• •• ••••••••••••••••••••••••

01 ar.y

meteorological stations in the general area • • •••••

lllftl l••····· ·· ········ ··· ······ ············ ·······················

•··•••·••··•••••••••·••··· ···•·•··············· ·····• ···• •·••···••• ..••.•.•••.•.•.•...••........•....•............. .•.. .... .. ... •.••• •

........... .. ............................................ ......... .,

Questions 25, 26 and 2? to be ans·1e!'ed by ir.terrogator .

. .·

._. .·:.1 ••

~..

-:..-:


• .

-

fN R.I:P\.Y Quem:

128.1. 21

' CoMMONWEALTH OF A USTRALIA DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE CANBERRA, A.C.T

R196U MEMORANDUM fors

The Secretary, Department of Air, CANBERRA . A.C.T • REPORTS OF SIGBTINGS OF FLYING OBJECTS

Reference is made to our memorandum No. 128.1.21 of 8th March, 1960 and subsequent correspondence.

••••

2. The Bead of the Australiaq J oint Services Staff in Washington has now forwarded evaluations of the above reports by the Aerospace Technical Intelligence Center, Dayton, Ohio. A copy of the evaluat i ons is attached for your information.

r~~Secretary.


Tll.e information presented in tllie report ie too ek:etchy to allov a aoWid concl~aion. hom the intorm&Uon prortded by Mr. benett, aeallllliua that hie h&D4 is approximately four incbee wide, and vas held approximately 18 inches avay from hie eyes; at the mdn1p•m distance of 500 teet (the etated altitude of the object) this object vould have been 106.3 teet loll8. Mr, benet t' • accOWit leads us to believe the object was Jalch further avay and therefore oorreapolldiagly J.arser. Probable explanations ot tbie a18bt1ag are that i t vas a lara• search l1811t ehlllill8 on a cloud, or a reflection of some other lisbt source on the ground, lUAe 1958 - Bishop Doyle (Sideia) Tll.e intonation is not sutticie.at to allow a bave bee.a r esponsible tor this s18ht1ng. Oot~v

a~aation

as to

~at

oou.l4

1958 - (Bishop Doyle)

The information is not suttioient to allow positive idantitioat1on. Rovner. thle object vas definitely not a &atellite. R>eaible cau.ae tor both these a18htings is an aircraft. May-lune

13 - (Bishop Doyle)

Both theae eishtings vera probably caused by very brignt meteor• (fireball class), The description of these objects and the high rates of apeed tend to aubetant1ate the conclusions.

'Zl

rune

8:JO P.M. (Bienop Doyle)

.&.t this bour Venus vaa just belov the hori:r.oD to the northwest and at a

stellar -gnitude of -4.0. It is qUite probable that the cause of thls a~tias vas retraction just prior to the setting of the planet .

24 Mtq 1959 - Mr. R. C. Orvill, Mr. R. L. 5mith (Balliora)

••ar

To \he west of the vitnesses at 1900 ho>urs vas tb.e Sirius, Jlla8Xlitu4e -1.6. This star vas appro:rl:mately 15° above the h.ori'l;Oil, about an hour before setting. It is probable that this bright star, vith possible retraction before settins, vas reapoll41ble for •bis sighting.

'Zl-28 l.me 1959 - F<. 1.., Smith, ft.

c...

Orvir.

It is quite probable that the planet VeDus, ~1~n a~soe1ated retractioD at eettins vas tbe cause or this report. Tne wltness 1nd~cates tb&t the object eou.ld not nave beet. V011ua because UeTOA .blys le.~or ~he planet wae seeD &Dd vas higher and tur;her to tb~ south th&.a the slgbted object (uewa.ias sam& time). liDtil &bolt 4-5 1u.l.lo ¥en~a' aprarent 1110t1on was tow.rd the south and incre&sing 1U l!lllgle of ele •tiou. Tbe general


•--l~ioa t•4e k lM.io&te \bat Ve~~U waa reapon.eible tor this ~U.... a. .... - U -.. tor \kat ot Biahop Do7le 011 27 1U.De. tM •Jen 91.wM • Mr. llld.t~ at 0050 oa 6 .T\11;1 C&JUlOt be 4etermined. ,.._ tlae aftll&\~ t.ater.aUoa.

.......................

tM ,..SU~ .t all lawn aahUUea wv. ob.ecke4 tor the 4atea or - . . . ~tiap, . - U ... &etenalAecl tbat ~ ot t'beae aiptinga vas

2 .aHINGTC>fl, ('. C.


DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE CANBERRA. A.C.T.

14 MAR1960

HEHOJA!:ntn.

ror :

'!'he Secretary, Jepartment of Air,

C.-u. BER.':\A •

A • C• T ,

!,EPORTS OF S IGilTINGS OF FLYING OBJ'..:CTS

~

(\ ,., Jnf'.~T. :/ ] ~13 ~ ..z$?n

/ ' ... o/'3

Reference ~s made to our memorandum N .12&.1. 21 of 8th Harch, 1960, concerning the aoave matter .

2. The Head of the Australian Joint Services Staff in London has .forwarded the text of: a reply received by the Air Hinistry from the Bristol University, which reads as follo·.-~s : "Clearly the authors of the various reports have seen an or.ject of consid.e!'able size, having a definite s~~pe - and perhaps even colour. I see there is no refe~ence to any noise , while the apparent size suggests that the object was within a fe~ niles . As you lmo...,, our 'Iork entails flying very large plastic balloons ~;hich sometimes give rise to accounts o~ strange flying objects. Such a balloon ~Jould be of the right size and shape 7 hut •rould not move rapidly in the manner descr~bed in the reports . lfe have no kno•;ledge of any agency conducting such experiments near the latitude of Port Horesby. It is dif:ficult for us to comment further ;rithout kno\dedge of the amount of activity by conventional aircraft in this area" .

r s eit-.~ c ~ e t q

r

v


I.Jrt IUPLY

OUOl~

1 28 . 1 . 21

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE CANBERRA, A.C.T.

: 8 MAF â&#x20AC;˘ ., L.,,.,

~

!ID'(TM for :

The Sec!'et.:try , Denartment of Air , .~.d.ioinistrative BUilding , CANBERHA .

A .C .T .

REPORTS CF SIGffi'INGS OF FLYING

cBJ'.cX:T~

Attached is a copy of memorandum No.58126 of 4th August , 1959 with enclosures from the ~apartment of Territories. 2. We referred the ~bove matter to the Heads of the Australian Joint Services Staffs in London and ashington for any interpretation of the reported phenomena which they could obtain from the United Kingdom or United ~tates authorities .

3.

The comments furnished by United Kingdom authorities are contained in the attached memor~um of l~th February , 1960 from the Head of AJSS in London and these may be or interest to you . 4. \ye have not yet heard from ~.Jashington but ,..,ill let you know should any information of interest be received .

~J.-r Secretary .


J

~ .H10

CA"t-NI\4 VO.t'

"""tTO•to

DEPARTMENT OF TERRITORIES,

Canberra,

-

~

•nc:~

AU G ,.).

The ;:iecr·ctury , D~:: · r tmL.nt o · De ·ence, 1"\ .

.,

• ... .

i{e;. v. "~D o:ii J:.TLJ!, 0£.-' 1.': l-·~ '!.'E·'l~!J ''1.'fiNG ..>~JJo:t.:T ;-i'~' Htb~lA;.lA. • : Ur -=. BAY DI .::r_::~.I_CT 1 . • 1':<1 TOHY OF t· ~

'h

.

.n1,D 1-.r:. I r,.; ·r~ .c.A.

(Your ~er~rence 1~8 . 1 . 1(~1))

...

l:'n.rt.h~::r tu r.zy rneruoranaum 5d/2f. o: l t th .T•l.!ll~ , 1~'\a, "~""tP•rii nc: the ab,.,ve subject , I attach t'or your ini''>rmatlon co_.~es of' c rrcs1out'ience rece tly r~cerved Irom the Ad'1inrstt•ator or· ha!'Ua 1:111d ~'ew Guinea .

Conie.> o~ thj s rne;Jorandu·n <~no attachrnnt.s have also heen l'o.•war ter.1 to the Depart;me.rts or Air' Ji Vil Av1est1on a1ro l'lutror,oJ. Jeve.!.oprn.;:nt res ec':ively, and to the l:Otronon.-lesl th Scienti1'u:: and Industrlal f<.~.Jearch Ora.,. iz•.l t on .

ret: /C. c<a-~ ../~ ".:.:.

(C . H. Lamhe"t) ~ o~cr~tar~ ·

..])S ~~ J\""'1

c.-.~......e. \...V ·- '


D.;nJ~:~ rtmeut

t-oe t

of the Admir.L;tr &tor

r.iore.:~by

22nd .Tuly, 19"i9.

Tie Secr.:tary , Deuarunent o~ ~err1t oc i es,

c..J. !E..'{itA.

Ref'e1•ence i a made to rny m.:unorHndum AD . 93/5/2 of Jrd June,

19~9 .

2. ·.iri tten re •orts of the occurrence referred to in tr e above raerno:randum have been received t·rom two Nsti ve A!"f'airs of'f'icers, !.iessrs. R. G•. Orl9in 1:1nd t . L . Smith. '"1-)e::Je re!_)orts are e !"'.CL aed as At taci"!mel' "t3 1 an,.t 2. 1Ar . E . ~ver~ett of ~a!larai h.~.; a Vt;n he :U • .s<;ric1J"marai, a n account of' another "..;i Q;htinp" in

3.

C:~rnmuJsioner . t ~e

rollowin~ 11

terms : -

On the night of' the 2~th June , I was at

GIWA about ei ... ht miles b elow Raniara in

Gooder.011<7h Bay. I had just 1 i -;tene<l to the eve •.in"' news thrd "hetwee!' 7 . 1 5pnEni 7 . ~'' :" · m. weJ'+ outside . I saw ar object "'PPt'onch • f'nrn a north to north-easterly nu•t::ction , <ii'!<~~P.~ and thP.r, hover in r.he sky about 500 feet up . It 1'1&3 at an a1.~1e ot' tibour Lt50 uo rro"l me ana wh8ll I s: annP.ti my hand ont i.u· !'roJit; r>f' rne to ~:~ea.; r"e it , my h~:~n·~ si-Jielded ~bout h~:olf of' it from view with -he rernaininrr ··~r t Vl.Sihle . I t seeme d to rne t.• be abnut ,:;, lPet lont-, It had +r,e silhou~.::tte of a "~'''!""'er f'oott-.1'111 , 'iDt'i had a kin~ or rin,., arounn it with qh~ 1t · 'l)nT' semi - oomeo uorthole::t vi~i"hle in t ht• ;irJe rhat 1 c o,;ln •iee : A ...,1,.,.,., w H; comin"' f'rom theae ! ortholes. It. remained hoverina r'or about r·onr mi nu tes tmd t.llen r'lisatma r .:::rl Nl!"jrUy ln "~ snuT.herlv r'liP•:lction . '1' •e -fnll owin'"' 1110rr.inu I went. across to a v iJ..lare i 1at he ow ~OI-\:IITAT ~nd '"her~;: the nat.ived ~::!kt:i 1'1·' _!I h~l1 se::e a the 'new Americul Air -;' reP. ' -t:hHt h<trl a! ,~,H·eil the previous evenino;" ,

L• The f'oll . win,. re ort ht< ;~ bt:eu :t'ur:.isroP.r'i hy Ris,..op lloyle of' t.re toruan G~t1 holic 'is::~ion Ht titdein :-

In .fnne, 1';1'Jij, traere cflr>le f't•om a " <:ioutr,t::rly direction a ronno object ~:~hnut the size of' the moon uale blue ir· colour :lnrl emi ttinz lloht hrlrrhter -than the rnoonU aht . 80e1nt:d to hover in the sky at about AS hiP'h as the ..1oon , ovel' the J.:ission prope!·ty. .....1 ter about l·l.ve minutes it moved ir1 a no,•tht:r•ly direct1on and disa~1eared in mid-s«y. (d ·en by riv~ senior 3c 1ool boys a~ the ::~arne t.ime) ,


-

2 -

About l:H~ Oct;""'er o.· e.:."'lV HoYt:n~er 1••50, on t"'O evenin"';:; about 7 o'clock e. U.t'ht abo t. tn~ "':.ze of' "' !'ior t .>1.:.r , ~.~ 1 te 1r. colotlr, '11 ved 1i.,..1 ucro.s.s the .~e3tern .s}cy • ror<1 r • " · to o:. . " Or. tho..: ~eccn:t occ .,,;ion thl! l.1. ht wad 1 o • ._n .:;~ant itu+ ' <:<:r • 1 tc ~ Ls.; . or. tnti o!:t' 'it ,. ~<"llur int I''lal:, of' ~-t'>f'nt t•vo <~ec<' n "ls . 'i'hj .s J,~her.oru~nrJn \•Fls ol-serve J oy J t•m••t::r or the ,..~ ti1e r::~, ~rot.hera "" v:,.,tl. ca3 H lt•·,.,.e n11nhe• or ac~-'nol c"'ild ,.e n On~ Sot:tH•nay in '!11y this year 11 larrre ~reer ellr trcal nhject N~d ~~~· b, rlne

::~~nPoJ. ho~:a .

a tar

~ • ,.. ·~ov~cl

"/8.;1 ·J•Jen v or,..,.er· trJB" a ,... , i "11 v.

I ..

On June 1 ; th

'trlj:3 ,•re'lr tt &l>Cint ,:: , 1'i !' · '11 · rooy.:; J!l''' so e l!ptical obie~t ~:~hont.the sL:~:e of' a I'aot'l-.all , a .Pl' etty ""een colour t'i.;tCe very !'ast l:U ,d l o w ~:~ct·oas the .C:;,.stern alcy tOWRt'd~ the l'orth E·~st .

+::1

•.v

Olll

At ti . jO p . m. on Jw1e 2/th thio year two ot· the Bro thers saw a lar..,e !'iery ohject about h!jl1' tne sl<;e of' a full moon in the .ve~te ...•n s.icy rnovin.., slowl y ei tiler down the ,'(,,.stern sky or a wuy x·rom • he o. se!'vers in A .~d-erly airection. At one ats~e tiP obj~ct o, wr ici tr.e li ant was appearino- t c, diminsh to a !;in1•oint, Sl!ddenly glower! ,,r; ""htly aaain. It turned blLle net' re f'~nally ai sa1 ,;;ea ri n~r. The whole 1 henom~r.on lasted about ter. m1nutes''.

~ncl sed as Attacbmer,ts 3 and L are !'e orts of further siphtin~a r eceived f'rom '•essrs . Orwi n ana1 '=i'nl th .

s.

At one stsrre , the Harl)our ·~aster at clamal"ai .v~:~a inclined tc the bel~ef' that it wa, the i>1>1uet Venus Vlt 1 cl wa.; he ; n,., seen. lie atated that this t·l H'et so•:'letimes h~s tr•tl hat>i t of erni ttina "!Jlue , O"reer ~l•t'l ''t!rl •'!ashe:~ or 11 cot t , and Also th~t li.17ht rer'J•actlon t111e try te r'"!•''ltllre ct'l"''CS in thtl l:l tlltOt:J!·here Pi ves the i .npression of the ula1 et rnovl n .... 'r'ow~vo::r , the l.>ia•rict Ot'f'ir.er fiB::> r~ce• tly ... t 1-\flf'inr•• r•n•l lil::ICliJ.;ed fhi" m t~er '•'.;onlllly w1th :,.;r , IJrwin 'Jl•tl oiltr;~r l'tlOpl e t.lttl"~ Wfl() h:~ve :; r•j ... ~•1 tm•.se Objt>t:1 $ ' 'lr<l I •• 1.:3 inc ll l H.d ln U •l hell~.:!' ti J'"t t;•.,: ,,; .&l .. , t n'"'d ill' ·· rwt tr) hE: di Sllll->JE:ti ll"h tly ur•ll tht~t . lJ r'•oct , Slllll<!t l ''•"' H.r 11 '"'M •tnrt aa :ve t IIJtJ<nown WI.I.J • •·uly o• .;t;!' VP."l uri n"' <"'if' • ~ •tr.:J 1 Cl n•:rl 11, l.he l'•, Ot' itn" Q!: l'lc:,..1'3 . 'r't':! li • srr•to.:t .:o111l•.::l·sior•H' .,tJ'/:.J tl~:~t 1!1'. o,•w ' n uJ~N/ot he • •3.Ve ,., 1 1.1 ;~.&"~~ .. o " llP..'.I b O' ' C'IL' t'" ' c:•·J 11 tH'l~ •!Uti,~ convJ. n ~~d t a t tlley Hl'<" no• .J 17) t,J.Jt• til*"' 11 • "'t v"C tiU~ 11 •

6.

i. IJ J.J

h~o::l'

'L'ne le.,.tonJJ "<.:J't

f'lllly

Att Ot' tht> , e

l)•rr1ct;.-H• .

J.Ji i'O r;1~:•i

l't o~.v

"

t'ti '.;

nf! Ot• •,w ,

(D . • "' rt'")!p

(L

ttncl mcnt,;)

.•r, ' ~

• t: ., "r


B11h IH, t B.<\

I

,,J \ .

,..i

ct. lll'r'i ce ,

' !1lne ~ay D! H."'ict .

Ui'·I i))·: ~:. r:'T•:n

••...YI. (}

(.. . ~··' .i "·;D "(l)'l ,.._ r o\ Jot. ..;..,y L- ;:,',;.'<{ __"!' - - - - - - - - - - -

On the nit:Yht ot' l:itm1ay thf.:l ?• th 1 •Y, 1 : "9 . l ·va:i :>ittinR on tht:: Vo:H'u ldah or' tll.l' honoe 11, co.qr,ry '?ith '" · 'LL . Smith, Cadet 1-at.rol o~f'icer . 'Phc nlcrht V/'J, vr~r\0 clear '\<itll I;(')

cloud s at.cl rnun.v

..;tt~r·;;~ .

1 not.t.c~d a t>Brt.lcu.l rly 'brl,..ht l1crht ricrh in ::.he

s ky to .. !'\~ ;vest o!' Buniara . A.. :'ira,. 1 thouart -,,~;~ .. _ t ., " . '1'/e he~· a briaht atar but the ohject berHn tc m~ve iu nn er~at1c uir'"::ct:on to the south west , T e object .vn, .1 ·,• si?hted 1t 1 900 hours 1:11.·1 ;v:l..; unaer con.::.ta nt oh.iC::r'VHtion •::-o 1 "'•<.or, tlme . ·r e i'ir.st tirne it wa.s .sin::.ted i• aJpe"""~d - t:- he e.n1 ttin~ a .,l'i "''lt blue li"rt . 4.::; i t 1'<!<7~ 1 t" mov., ;; wsrds t.he .:;ouch west, ao:netiml:!~ t'&!-·id.ly did ;:>O·'l•;:!tlme:J OJ!lv ·erce!.t:'J'hly it cht'ln~>cd colotlra t: •o; t blue to b ri.,.ht ..,.r•et:n n o t:l.t:::n c.tao WC'Ill.r1 be

term in •. ted by a.11 Ol'an P'e l'lash. mhe come t'rom th€: bot:tom the ot'lject .

or

c110 n(I'Jllrr

l i ooh r.s

1:1

1 eF.l rt:cl ·.o

At 2015 hours , ·,r· .t:t' i:luin,.,. k~Jlt llrt•t~r clo~e obaervation, ~he o~ject fi nally n s~:~ruehrea in anuth- ae.s·erly Oi1'ec-:;ion. It w~s not oo.:;sihle with the nuked eye t) iJete.:o"'i. ne or Ue object 1:1n 1t Jio r..ot t3ve t.he l •. ~r·g~'&!""<.:e o" a St<.1 r o_• ,,J~ttori te . : t S.£ f'P.&•·~d, ,• tht:: J at~:~nc.::, :.::~ 'o;: !1 re""u.l 1r ~ ha ~ b• t 1~~ ~ize cvulc no~ ~e es i1u~ed, t1.e

.sha~e

(»~a)

,"( , r , U.rww .


Sub-District Office, Bani are, Milne Bay District, T.P. & N. G•

.

~·)

17th June, 1959.

UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECT SIGHTED FROM 'BAl•IARA - M. R. D.

On the night of SU.t'lday the 2l..!tb May, 1959, an apparently unidentified flying object was siqhted ~om Babiara . 'l'he t'oll owi~ description of' the object is as accurl'!te as possible to my observations. At 1900 QrB., on the said date, an object was sighted, hi~h in the sky in a westerly direction from Baniare. In the first instance 1 t was stationary. The predominatinq colour of' li~ht emitting ~om the object was of a brilliant irridesce nt blue . Soon after first si~htinP the object, it commenced to descent erratically in a south- westerly direction ; sometimes quite rs ~idly end at other times almost cominu to a halt . During these movements, the blue colour would change for an in$tant to a bri~ht ~reen , terminated by an oran~e flash . The::1e colour$ appeared to come from a lower position on the object - as if from its base. a

The object c ompletely dia, ppeared from view, in direction at 2015 hrs .

south -we~terly

(Spd)

R.L.

Smith


31-1 - IJ/11

uth July, 1959. The District Com:ni~sioner , /Ulne Bay District , ... A.JffiAl .

SIGHTING 0"' F.uYII<G OBJECT -

BAHA'~A

{eference is msde to my radio~ram 6 or 29th June , 1959 and your 17-2-4/1 34 of 30th June, 1959, t o the Asciiatant Administrat or, co!-Y of' same beinu minuted to this office . The followinq report based on the siqhtl.nQ'S of' ~.1rs . R. G. Orwin and l.le s sra . R. G. Orwin and R. L. Smith is s1hmitted for your infor111ation . On Saturday 27th June , 1959 , at 19!10 hou~a ~w . ~ . L. Smith noticed a briPht white s~heri cal l i ~ht NNW f rom Ban iara ~nd hi~h in the sky. It appeare~ to be netween ban~ 9 tho1aard r·ee+ frnm "the <>round. Both t.!r . and Mrs . Orwin also saw this ob j ect after Mr . timith nrew t heir atte t1o~ to i t . 'l're objec+. remained .:ltstionary 1'or some t ime ru.d tl e .• slowly heaar 'TiovinP. across the sky i n a weat.e t'ly direction. It had the a 1•pe arance of' a " s parkler" wl-)ich is commonly used in f'i ,.eiVO!"k displ ays . Also arcs of li~ht e nanating f'rom the object aroea~"eCI +o be blotted ou t a t re~ar intervals . n p,reen li.,.bt alsr ~""'ear ed at r ecrular ir.tet'vals at v ar.~.ous 11o1nts of the objec t. There Qid not appea r to he a~v ~e finite order in the a •peararce of this liaht. Tre object looked as thourrh it had 3 r~o hase or that a red gl ow was or ~qinatin~ .~. rom i~s ha se • .11.t t lte time ot' siP,htinp and wtd.le the ob~ect was under o ·'servation there we re many stars present ~:~nd t ew cl o\1ds in the area where the object was to he seen. There was a definite reflected glow on the fe w clouos in the area 11re1 the ohject 11aosed in close proximity t o them. It was '1131" not~cea tl"et there was a ref1.ection like:: t1 hearn ol 1117ht or the wa tet' between the mainland a nd 7.he ~~l and and t nis em~'la ted !'rom the object . In contrast the reflection o! the star <~ in the .,,.t~ r, whic h .vas ver.; smooth, were similar 'to pin )Jointa ol"ly . As the object slowly moved across a,,•d dow!" · ards in a westerly direct~on it ~Vas K:ept nnder !'c-nstant ohserva-~'.on . "'"n'!l tie wharr it was then seen tha+ trere wt~s whq• '~"t ·3red t' he~ t'Clund bronze coloured dioc hel ow a1 d t('l t•·e T'l<'~ t o" t hP " i<'ht l11~ht . As the li,.h+. mover'l S') ntr. this tiisc kee"'ini'T th<" same "!stAnce, about 500 t o 100•')f't,each time . 'T'his W'id ·'t~"s• rot lcf'~ flt 20?.5 hours . The briR~ t li~ht and disc ho+r fi nally cloud low in the western horiz o~ st ?01J~ ~ou~s .

1so p nred h~~tn~

On Snnnay 2oth at 182"1 ho,rs t"o hr1 ~r+ licoh ··, o -ain seen by r·lr . ant'! Hrs. Orwin . It & 1Jpo!!s rer'l 1 n t hP s.ct·~e na • 1 <'n a, or the pr evious ntrrht al thouah i. t was not as hri "l't 8t f •3t . A 2 )01 hours the bri11 1t l11'7ht moven at ,.ret•t s. eeo ::oll"r>"' re ..i8!'1e track: t:I S 1 he reVl.O US O~"ht b11t l.O A rnin11tt> cnverar1 t:he .;i<i"le rjj ::1 tar ce tt had tak.:ln halt •Jn hour to cover !Jl'~vtously . "'~e li ... ht =>t::came ver;, brill'ht durinp thi.:l ra~ ul ,ov1;3·nen a::~ cl ts r flect1o n on the ;:;ea. IeuropptlCl about I:,JQO- n~et durinro t' e -e" od a. 1 f rom my o:vinion ~ t look:ect as thou11h it was c-oiw;r to 1 th~ nort h we'=lt oi' t nt~ sttttion or. t he maln.J.an~ . Tl e li1'1ht. wa.,; :eeut unde r o •)::~e rva tion tiur1n11 th"' r upid movemel"t nr1 'lr . Ort.in ron t.o the w~ art' I'or "this puryose . It 9l owed ut a cl re <1eined in the weiltern


- 2 -

sky and remained thereuntil it slowly rj i Sd • tlPArerl ucrain low on the horizon at 2115 hours . The bron2:e dis<' wnJ aguin 31.,.hten in the same rela t1ve .-osition s::~ +he nioht be1'ore . Mr . Smith was present with lJr . Orwin to keey ti-e briO'ht licrht under observation trom 2005 rours until it disa~peared. This office Iss been Advised thRt thp pla~et Verus couln expected t o be seen rrom •re sta~ion in al,proximqtP.ly t.he sa~e direction as the bri pht liq;ht was 1'irst seen. liowevP.r t.ht: llli~et Venus was seen onthe 4th July, 1c5q by my3~1r qnd The N~v~l Intelli~ence Officer who wa~:~ visi tin~ the d1 strict, and from 1 ta eighting I am of t te opi nion that it was not t.he bricrht li~ht ~een previously as this li11ht wa<t much lower than Venus »nd more to the north or the 90S i t ion or Venus .

be

Forwarded for your information, ,lease . (St>d)

H. Orwin

a/A~s istant

Diatrict Officer .


' I

Sub- District O~fice , Baniara , Hilne Bay Distr .ct. 7th July,

195~.

As stated in the attached report, the ori~inal object was night si.t <hted from the 4th July onwards. The planet Venus ho·never was visible. D\>ri:J.g the early evening of Monday the 6th ot' July, I watched t'or the original object hetweefl the times of its previous appearances. The planet Venus was vis ible at this time only. However, I awoke durinP' the ni~ht at 0050 hrs,, happened to look at the skY a nd noti~ed a very bright light, On o~serving this liqht more closely, I was convinced that it was the same one as aeen between the 27th of .Tune end the 3rd of July. Venus was not visible. The object appeared to be lower in the sky thap on previous occasions and closer to the point o~ observation. The hronze was not evident on this occaston. After watchin" it for fifteen minutes, and object like a fallinq star seemed to come f rom near the base of the object and shoot earthward a• a tremel'doua speed eno at about forty five degrees to the ~round. After about rive more minutes this procedure was re~ated by an~ther similar object, but this one went to the other side . It is realized of course that these objects could have been shooting stars, and could have come f1•om sorne distance behind the ohject. After observin~ the object for almost an hour, it moved away in a similar 11 rection to be!'ore (westerly) al thoup:h when :first siphted it wa:; more to the south than on previous occasions. F,.,rwaraed ±'or your inl·ormation please.

(tiP'd) Cudat

R.L. timith

~trol

Orficer.


OFfiCE OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIAN JOINT SERVICES STAFF, AUSTitALIA HOUSE. STIIANO,

,._ .... llRL4'f/ 1960 19/112 ~lut

16th

Peb~uary

1960

lONOON, W.C.J

&a.ore tary ,

~t ~£

491'.

Defence,

REPORTS OF SIGHTING OF FLYING OBJECTS

rhe Air Ktbistry replied as £ollows:-

•z

am directed to reg~et that the investigations, 1n two instances, were inconclusive; you will understand the difficulty of long range study. Boweyer, the Air Ministry remains open minded upon this subject, and although not wishing to dismiss tbe reports as the results of imaginative obse~vati on, •~111 tee1e that there i s a natural exolanation for ~ eyente as bas been the ease in 95%- of the reports zoeee1Yed. The other 5% were inconclusive because of lae!t ~ inf'orroation." excep~

~ ·. fie Air Ministry state that they would be pleased to rece1Ye any fUture reports for examination . ~

!be Director of t he Meteor Section, The British AstroAssociation, has re pli ed in the fol lowing sense :-

~oal

" •• .A further reason for the delay has been the

difficulty of checking the reports in question, whi ch has proved to be an unprofitable task . "The only r eports which could feasibly rar er to meteor s are thole o£ 'one Saturday in May ' a nd June 1 3 t h ., in para 3 of the report of D. M. CLELAND, and i n t hese two cases I 11h1nk the identification is quite cer tain. The other two objects referred t o in this par agraph could very well be meteors but £or the ir dur ation : 5 minutes and 10 minutes res pectivel y . No r'leteor £light is visible to a given observer £or more than a mat~er o£ seconds, half a minut e woul d be quite exceptional . Unless the duration has been ~rossly ~xag~erated which is not unli~e ly - the objects could not h~ve been meteors . "Tbe remaining repor ts qui te de!'ini tely do not re!'er to meteors or anything like them. The dw•a tions are obviously too great and the movements are most unmeteoric . In £ac t I cannot reconcile the desct•iotions with any known c~lestial phenomenon, and can only assume that t hey are either wildly innccurate, deli erately fa ls ~i ed, or a~e bona-fide reports of known or unknown objects o£ terrestrial origin. The

2 2FEB 1960

2.


•/ •

-2-

\> inclusion or estimates or size and height that cannot possibly mean anything unless the re~l nature or the object is known casts a shadow or doubt, but I shall have to leave you to assess that ror yourselr. "I am sorry that I cannot be more hel,!>rul on this occasion, but wemore mustuse:ful. hope that ruture enouiries will yield something " ·

5.

The Royal Greenwich Observa tory z•eplied as .f'oUows:"The only possible astronomical exPlanation ot these various reports would be that they v1ere o1' the nlanet Venus, which at this time was very bri~ht and visible in the direction indicated in some or the r~ports . However , some of the observers at least apoear to h. ve been awareeXplanation. o:f this possibility and so this seems an unlikely "Little reliance can be put on the speed, si ze and height quoted in such reports due to lack o:f comparison scales - ' about as high as the moon ' means absolutely nothing. "With so many independent reports in a .fairly short time it seems obvious that someth.inp unusual 1·1as observed but I am a:fraid that the only comment we can give is that astronomi cal."the phenomena was almost certainly not

Captain !'or Air Vice l.!arshal Head , Australian Joint Services Stat!'


~- ) r ... -.-.- -

-

.... -~

.£;t£-_.- 'l-)>v/t('~c{Jv}

IXY 550

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRAUA IN REPlY PUASE Q UOTE No

Headquarters Support Command RAAF

Victoria Barracks St Kilda Road t:ELBOURNE SC1 VIC 5/6/Air( 38A

Secretary Department of Air Administrative Offices CANBERRA ACT

- 4 FEB 1960

SIGHTING OF AN UNUSUAL AERIAL OBJECT 1. Forwarded herewith is a report of sighting of an unusual aerial object at Newstead Launceston, by R.R. LlcQuestin. 2. The report was received at this Headquarters from the Department of Civil Aviation ::elbourne who stated that, although the date of observation is not shown on the report , it would be about the 23rd January, 1960.

( 7"' c... ? .....

--A------

(E . B. COURTNEY) Group Captain For Air Officer Commanding

Encl/

/

-


~....NHT Oil ~LJ. OBJECT Ofl.,~1!!@2

obcervor .•• R..::J • •~tresT!l1 . • •••..•.• . •.•••.•.• • • ••..• • . •. •.••• • •••••

2.

-~c!d:-~ss

J..

Occupation of Observer . • •• • . .•••.• •• ••.• • .. •••• • ••••••••••.. • • , • .••• • •••••

4.

D~te and Time of Cbservation (Time given in 24 hour clock zomJ. time)

of Observer

.•. • } .KeJzyQ.R.Street, .Uewte~, .W\I.Ql;Oet9~ . . . •• . ..•.•.

••• O)~OQ.SSf• •••••• . • •• • • ••••• • ••• • •• • ••• •• ••. • ••• ••• ••• • •.•• • • , • •••• • • • 5.

PnriCX: of Obscr ration( s) • ••• • C"J:ltilmoU&: • •• •. • ••• •• • • .•••• • •••• , • , • • ••• , ••• ,

~.

:·u·~:er 01.' Ol;~·ro.vaticn (Gi ·e details of Clr.l p~sition by map rcrerenco if FS:I.ib;<::, b:· !a.:>•.m. la.udrulrks 1 and describe My equionent:. u:,ed in the obsorvatlo"l) •

. ............

..... . .... . . . .

~

•• .,., ••• ::: · · · · · · · .. · · · ··., .. , .... ..... . ..... ., . . . ... < .. ,. • • •••• •• ••

0

• ••• ""' • "'" ••• - ""•••e•• "•l:ter • " ••• • •••., •• •••"'•" ••• ••••••• •• • • •••• • ••• • • • • • •

7.

"le:n 1?-..:: objcc'· fl""&~ .bs ••;.::d: e . g . cnerl1ead, '('"'.;ne fr:n behind a hill, o'7er th '""•t'.i?-.:1 '3tc .

8.

..'!-.at

fi•·~t

attr:1ctcd observer ' s attention, e .g. llg ti' or :loi'lo ,

.. ~~- ......................... ....... .... ................ ... .......... 9.

iv .

objrc~ e,pca:: as a li~'lt

Jici

If there ;·,s mo::-' ..~lfln ot.c

fo-:-'lt :on .

or as

o'Jjec~,

'!.

."' ...

., .

~.~ut ~·J.s

12.

··'h..'l'·

~ns

tho

c~:i..onr

its aorarJr.t

...... ,. .. ........ , .... 13.

lis,,;

fl' ;

r" •r\::.·• o"

14 .

v.''l:: 'lny n<"+hod.

15 .

I:J.s

th,..~·.,

n 17

:-h~pc

o"'

.

.

.

.. ., .

.

...

~

................ ' ..... , .

• • !'- .

.

.. .

........ .

uh..t w.,s t<,,)ir

.

..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.. .

~ J.l.tlht. ...... ...... . .. .

••. • • ,No:t:.~ • ••••••••••••• •••• •• • ••••

···"'1·~····· · ·

. . . ... ,. . ~ ..... . ,,. . .,. , .......... ,........ ... ,. ... .....

te

:.lb;·1cl :rc obSCIT'\blo .Nil,,. , ••• •• ..... • •• • " • , . • . • •, • • ••

.... .. ... ..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . n. .... . .

.. ...... "

of the light or object

"

t~1e t";lln·.:

he" m.:t"'y 1-'e::-c.

• • • XJd.n. l.ightA.. . . .••••••• •.

11.

c'Jje.::'~ •

definite

~

....... . . . . ........... ~'" ""

..

~.,

... , ...... ,. ... .. . .. . . ..

~

.. .

oropuJ.sicn ob-icua • • .• J{Q. ••.••••• •• ••••••• • ••• ' • •• • • • ••••

~Ol'L'll

.. •

• .. •

• . • .. • . • • • .. •

l'{Q • • .. ..... ., • • ••• • ••••••• • • •

16. • > H.; igh<,. or c:nzlc Q:.' r .Lc,·o. tio:1 ... .... , •.•.••• ,2,Q0

17. H

s,~o1, ~,.

18.

State nny oxpcricnco w!'dch <"''ablcs obsc':'Tur ..o tho lll'l'3;•·r!l give!'! to 16 and "!.7

nn;·- ... - ··.

• · :; . .... •..•...•

. -.

.3.Q~ • .,

........ ..... .. ..

.UO\dng .abo .t .slol"Zl.Y .011!U: .st..

~~

............... ......... ................... ..... ......

'"'C~.,..,,,.. · • va.J.n

~Qil.!U'ds

A.bc ;t,

·-- ............... . . . .. .

~ "~~ ., , ....... ,_ Sine !.v is no•'lllo.'llly impossible to ost.i.:ra~c tho ;!'J:'..gh'!; o.nd sp od of n str~gc object, ,;., ~ wm l'sunlly bo b~ttor to ondc:tvuur '"o <mtcrcinc the anglo of elcv:J.tio!l of th0 cbj<'ct, th;: 1'lglo throug.~ ~;hie~ i t ,..,ovod 1nri. tho tia:o • <i.:cn to do thi:; . 1

. . .... .. 2/


- 2 -

fieport on ggJial Objeet Observed 19.

(Cont'd)

Direction of flight with rcfcronce to landmarks or points of th._ compass •

• • • Y.-mAA ~P.V. AA .c.el\.t'J:!3• .0.'1!31'. At.-. H.O~. 20 .

........................

Did the object r.:;main on a straight p..<tth, deviate or manoeuvre at ell• . • i\A }A):}••••.•• • •• · • .•

............................................. .

21.

was any tr~il of e~ust , vapour or light seen

22.

,b.Jra did object disappear, e . g . in mid-sir, behind a hill , over tho horizon •

••• •• • •••• ••• •••• ••• ••••

• • • • • A1:i;i..l.l_ .t;;)J.et:.e. .'WlL ~w.r. .rft..t.~ ••....••.• . • .• ••.•.•••.• • •. •• •••• 23.

.wcistence of any physic.:U supportin~ evidence . J~

24.

~.:vid~nco

such as i"ragments , photogmphs , or other

•••••• •• •• • •••.••••••••••••• • • • ••••••• • •• •• • •••• • •• ••• • ••• ••• ••••• •••

J~~thcr conditions ~xocriunccd at ti~(s) or obscrvation(s)

•• F.l.A~ .6/.S. .!l~\q _qq._ .ll¥.~ )_qqq .-. .¥-W.~ -~ .. ... .......•.• .•. •... ..•• 25.

Location of :my air tnffic in the vicinity (lt the ti..... of sighting •

....

.•• •.....••.... .. ........ ............... .......... ....•..... •.•• ....••. ......•..•...•.....•....... .......... .... .••.....•. .••.•..•.•.••• ~

26.

Lo~tion

27.

a~ additional information ••• ••• •• • ••••• • • •• ••• • • • •••• •• •••• •••••• •• •••

of :my mcteorologic:ll stations in the gcn ·m.l area.

•··· ••···· •············ ·········••····•·· ··· ·····•···•••··· ··•··•·•• ·•·• •. ....•... ..•..................... ..•.. ....•...•.....•. ...... ........••• Questions 25, 26 :mr' 27 to be mswcr-..d by int.-rrogator.


PRIME MINISTER ' S

59/6733

(8({1-

e Secretary , epartment or Air ,

~ For 1nrormation and aey couments .

-路 ~c.~~(P.J .......!;unt1ng Secretar

~I


ROYAL AUSTRAUAN AIR FORCE No.

Headquarters Operational Command RAAF

PENRITH

1\'l

NSW

2 0 OCT 1959

5/2/l Air(62A) The secretary Department of Air Administrative Building CANBERRA ACT

REPORTS ON AERIAL SIGHTING Attached hereto is a copy of a report received from Headquarters RAAF Base Darwin relating to an unidentified flying object.

/f/

/~,~ ~v _);.-.J~ (U.J. J.:OORE)

~ling

r

Commander For Air Officer Commanding


-----------------------~-~.

c

0 p

y Headquarters RAAF Base DAR路.:n~

NT

lst October , 1959

as . 5/6/A1r(32A) Headquarters Operational Command RAAF

pENRITH

1Vl

NS1';

UNUSUAL AERIAL SIGHTING 1. Following is a report received through Overseas Telecommunications Centre from Mr . Carter of t.~andorah, describing an unusual aerial sighting on 24th and 25th September, 1959:" A large object 80-100 feet ,,.as seen at 1830 hours on 24th September 1959, between Mandorah and Doctors Cully. It was a large black shallo\V object just above or close to the surface travelling at an approximate speed of 80 - 90 miles per hour. The object shot up towards Delissaville Creek. A green verey light shot off from the water in a direction east ~r north fro~ Mandorah, after the object was seen . At 0715 hours on 25th September 1959 the same object was seen again off Mandorah and shot up Middle Arm." 2. No confirmatory reports have been received from other people \vho may have sighted this object.

Submitted for your information. Sgd. (H.~. PEPPER) Flying Officer for Officer Commanding


MXY 550

IN 1\EPLY PLEASE QUOTE

Command No••- -- - - -

,.~.")~ S ,. _

5/ 6/Air(34A)

\

'

~

•'5.~'\

. ~.._\,\~ ~' ~\#J.~ '

j

· ctoria Barracks Kilda Road l!OURNE SC1 VIC

3 0~7 1£59

/

Secretary Department of Air Administrative Buildings CANBERRA ACT SIGHTING OF UNUSUAL AERIAL OBJECT The attached report of the sighting of an aerial object 60 miles south of Wonthaggi was received from Department of Civil ~~iation, Melbourne.

1.

2. The observer is an Ansett/ANA Airline pilot and it is noted that the report is not signed nor has the date of observation been stated but it would be about the 12th October , 1959·

JL . f

(;~

Grottp Captain vFor Air Officer Commanding Encl "


,

,, .P.J1lT ON AERI..!. OBJECT

OB:..~JiVED

... .-. . ............ ' ... .... ..... ............. ................ .

1.

name or observer

2.

Address of Observer . .~. :-•.• • . • .•• , • , • , •••.•••••••.•.••••• • .. •• . .•• ••••• • •.• .

3.

Occupation of Observer • • •. . •• .••-.-.-•...• .•••••...•• •.• .• . ••.. . • •.•••.• .•. .••

4.

Date and Time of Observation (Tilr.e given in

24

hour clock zonal time)

• •• • •••• • • J •• •• •• ••• & • "' ••••••• • •· ~· · • • • ••••• • •• • ••••••••• • •••••••••• • •••••••

5.

Per..:.oJ of Observation( s) • •• .• • •.• • .-•••••••• •• ••••••••••.•••• • •• • ••• • ••• • ••••

6.

Han:.:"l:' c-f' Observation

(Give details of own position by map reference if possible, or by known landmarks 1 and describe any equip!!lent used in t.he observation) • •

.,.. . ~. ,. . . . . . . . ~ -·· · ,. . . . . . . .,. •

• • " ..

~

• • • .. .. ... • • •

• •

., •

• - . . . . . . . . . .--.

.. ..... .

. . . . . . . . . . . . ..... .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . f< .

• . . . . . .;; . . .. f ..... " :-.. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . "" . I ' • • • • ;--,. . . . .. .. .

.

.

.-.

: -•

•••••• •

........

. .... ... .................. ............. ..... . . ... ..... . ... .,. .. . ... ....·~·"'... . . ...... -..;__

~

7.

._

Where was object first observed, e.g. overhead, coming f rom. behind:.a hill, ®er the ho!"Uon., etc. •' I

• • • •••

8.

~~t

., e "e • • • -•• ••••••••• • ••t• • • • ••• • ••• • •••• • •• • •• • • • ••• ••••••••••••••• • • •

first attracted

" • • • " • • .. " • c • • It • • • •

9.

. .

....

li ~ht

cr as a definite objoct •

-.! ~ .......,.\#. • • • . . ..... ... ... . . . ' .. . . ... ....... ........ . .... ..... .

If there wns more for.:. ... ion •

~han

one objecc, how many were

. .... . . ,. . . . . . . . . . ... . . ... - ... ""J ... ·..

11 .

lfuat

~·:J.s

12,

~~~t

was its apparunt shape

$- . . . .

13.

l·!aq

,.. .~

....... .

.. "

• ••••• •

the~,and

what was their

... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

the colour of the light or object

......... ,.."'

"""lj...

attention, e . g . light or noise .

..,l.l, • • • • • • • • • • • • e • " • • • " • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ' • • • • •

Did objecc appear as a • .. • • .. • .. "!. .. . . .

10.

obs~rver 1 s

......................... . ..... .

..... .. . ... ... ... ... " ................. ........... . ~

·· · ······· ·~ ·············· ·· · · ···· · ····· ··· ·····

dota.:J. of structure obsorvablo .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . ....... . . . . ... . ... · · · •

. .... ,.,. . .. ,. ..... ........ ... ,. ... - .......................................... . 14.

~fr:ts arw mothod of px·opulsion obvious .•• . • ••• • ••••• . •. • •• •..•••••• • • • • · • • • · •

15.

.4n s thcr~... any sotl.nd ... .. " .. .... , .... , • . ... .. .. .... ... ... .. "' , • • . ... • •• . •. . · • • • · • · · · · • • •

16. ++ Hcig1 ~: or angle of clevntiotl •• . :::, ~~ ·· ........ • • .. .... r

17. ++ Speed, or a ng -- · ·· 18.

.............. . .., ................... ,. ............. .

Stc.to nny expcrict1Ce which enables obscrvvr to b( reasonably certain ~bout ~-e ~ns·~~~ ~~vcn to 16 ~nn 17· ~··•

++

.. . . . . . ....... • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

...... ,, . e •• •••••f'' ••• l't • ••

, •• ,.. , .. .

•• • • • • · ~• •••• • • •-•••••• •• • •

•••• • ••••••••

SincJ 11:. is no:rm'\lly impos~ible to ont.imote the heiGht o.nd spood of a strongc cbj.,.ct, i t will \lSltAlly bo bctt,,r to ondo::wour to tlotcrmino tho o.nglc of elev . t .• n o.l th< object, thv mgle through ,•hich it movod, a..n<i th·J time ~"l...:Cn • .., C:e thi., .

.. ... .. . 2./


- 2 Report on Aciial Obie ct Observed

(Cont'd)

19.

Direction of flight with r o forenco to landmarkc or points of tho compass •

20 .

Did the obj e ct remain on a straight p..a. th, deviate or manoeuvre a t all.

.... ........................................... ........................ .

......................... ............................................. .

........................

21 .

•~as nny tro.il of exhaust, vapour or light see n

22 .

.v'horo did object disappear, e . g . in mid-air, bohind n hill , over the hori7Jon •

23 .

,_,Jdstonce of any physical supportin~ evidence •

........................................................................ ~ovid<:ncc

such as fragments , photogrephs, or other

........................................................................

24. llc3thcr conditions eXPCrknced at ti "Je(s) or

obs~rvation(s)

... ............................................................. ........ 25 .

Location of any a ir traffic in the vicini ty a t the

tim~

of s i ghting •

....................................... .................................. 26.

Loc~tion

27.

A.ny adcli t ional information .. . ... .. ..... ..... .. .................... • • • · • •

of any mcteorologi C31 stations in tho general area.

......................... ... ............................................ ........................................................................ ........................................................................ Questions 25, 26 and 27 to

!)<;

answer- d by interrogator •

................. ........


I The thm"""R"'»

Rig!lt Honore:>J.e

.~ . l.i .

House ot Representatives, C!llBERRJ. • .A.C.T.

Menzies , ':: . H. ,

~ . L .,

U.H.R.,

November 25th, 1969

Dear Mr. Menzies, Tbe enclosed report describes a series o! recent, tactual sishtinge ot unidentified !lying objects (UPO•e) seen over .!lew Guinea. The principal witness is the Reverend Patber Gill, a J'OUDg .Anglican priest who has spent more than eight yeare in the Territo17 on llli881 on work. There are thirty- eisht corroborative witnesses. Tbe observers saw the UP'O •e on more than one occasion. e n two consecutive days the crstt hovered above them !or several hours at an altitude of approximately 460 1 • Pather Gill is adamant that he and hie fri ends observed humanoid beings aboard the croft. One possible explanation emerging from the evidence ie that the New Guinea UFO 'e are the secret w£ apons of a foreign power, in which case an infringement of Australian · terri to rial jurisdiction has occurred. This possibility has already been adumbrated to the Directorate of Air Force Intelligence by the Victorian Plying Saucer Research Society but in ita reply to the Society dated October 15th (nearly !our months a!ter the sisht1nge occurred) the Directorate claims to have carried out no investigations into the incidents.

·1

We teel strongly that an investigation eb.ould ~ aade into a matter ot euch vi tal concern to the security ot .luatrolia. .A frank report should be made to the Australian people . Should you desire any further into~stion perta1ning to the lew Guinea sigbtinge or to the UPO enigma senerall~ 1 may we reapeottully offer our utmost co-operation 1a U8hnJ18 70\l• Yours truly, J.P. Stone, Hon. President, AuatX"Blion Plying Saucer Research Society, 22 JJortboote Street, .Kilburn, South .Australia.

s. Seers, Bon. President, Queensland Plying Saucer Research Bureau, P.O. Box 111, Borth Quay, Brisbane, Qld. (Mrs.) E.P. Haynes, B.A., Dip, s.s., Bon • .Aotizlg President, Tasmanian Plying Saucer Research Sooiety, i Roalrn Avenue, Ungston Beach, Tas . Dr. II. Li.ndtner,

Ron. President, OPO Investigation Centre of 1'f. S.W., »!o. Box 1120, G.P.o., Sydney, N.s.w.

·

P.B. •orr1e , LL.B.,

Boll. Preeldent, Viotorial Plying Sauoer Reeearob Soo1etJ, 100 Colliu Street, Melbourne, iliotoria.

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-THE VICTORIAN FLYING SAUCER

~SEARCH

SOCIETY.

P . 0 •. Box 32 , Toorak. ~U:LBOURNE . Vic .

A11 STRALL\.

THE REVEREND WILLIAM B. GILL ' S REi'ORTS OF UFO ACTIVITY

OVER BOIARAI ANGLICAlt MI SGION' AND VICINITY, PAPUANEW cunn:::t.--;J:'959.

Introduction to the Boi anai Re por ts . The reports descr ibed in th~ following pages constitute the moat remarkable testimony of ~~tenoive UFO ac t i vity reported to civilian inve et ·<.gator s in the entir e his t ory of UPO research . The sightings are unique in that, for thP first time, credible witnesses have reported t he presence of humanoid beings aes ocia t ed w ~~h U•~•s. One important aRpec t of the Boianai incidents i s t hat the UPO's were ob:Jerved clooely by the witnesses for a total period of some hours ; accordin,l y , the reports should be examined exhaustively for soMe clue as to the nature anc origin of the craft , and for poes1ble points of corre la~ion with other credible reports .

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BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS OF FATHER GILL , TH.E PRINCIPAL WITNESS:

Aged 31 years. Married with two children. Educated Trinity Grammar School , Melbourne, and St.Francie Collee;e, Brisbane. Ordained priest of the Anglican Church. Licentiat e in Theology. A qualified teacher, he completed over eight years of service as a missionary in New Guinea. FATHER GILL'S RELIABILITY AS WITNESS :

VPSRS invee~igators found Father Gill at all times cooperative and obviously deeply interested in UFO 'e and the implications of their presence . Prior to hie e1ght~us be discounted the possibility of their existence as manned craft, He exhibits an impressive scholarly detacbme~ and hie objectivity is evident 1n reading the report whicl1·. follows within. Father Gill still remains reluctant t t.· speculate as to the origin or precise nature of t he UFO'e a~ lecst, until he has bad an opportunity to complete some research into the subject .

THE

COPw~OBORATIVE

WITNESSES :

These numbered up to a total of 38 persons during t he principal s ightillge at Boianai, 27 of whom signed the original statement examined by VPSRS investigators. The witnesses were all Papuan natives, several of wbom were educated teachers and medical a ssistants . BACKGROUND TO THE PRINCIPAL SIGHTINGS:

The Boianai eight1ll8S climaxed a relatively abort but remarkably acute period of UFO activity 1n the vicinity o! eastern New Guinea. UPO• s were observed by both Papuan natives and Europe~s . Sightinge were reported by educated Papuans and by totally illiterate natives relatively untouched by western civilisation and quite ignorant of "flying saucers".

\


Introduction

(continued)

TYPES OF UFO SIGHTED AT BOIANAI AND RANGE OF AERODYNAf, I C

PERroRMANCE:

Large, manned craft with el aborate eupe r etruct·lre an smaller apparently r emote- controlled discs with no apparent protuberances . T~es:

Performance: Hovering, pendulum swinging, tremendous spurts of speed. The manned UFO obs rved on J une 27th was seen to erose the Bay at Boianai (a ppr Jximately 30 miles wide ) in l ese than a ee~ond. Even allowing f or t he admitted inaccur ncy o! such a calculation made by scientific laymen the range o! the UPOe' performance is staggeriil8 , The reported changes of colour and light intensity are especially interesting ,

EVALUATION OF THB BOIANAI SIGHTINGS : !tis submitted that th e foll owing propositions ma ·1 be cited as established by these sightinge :1,

2.

The principal witness is veracious and psychologica ' ly stable. This is admitted l y a subjective impressi oll gained by investigators, but is supported by the bal ance of probabilities arising from a consideration of tht witness's professional standing and training. The Legion of corroborative witnesse s supplies eupport1Il8 tes timony o! an objective nature. The Boianai UPO•s are not psychological phenomena. ;he undoubted psychological element present in some UFO sightings has been demons trated by Jung in his recent treatise, However, the limits of operation of this factor are still undeflncd and it would appeal a r bitrary to relegate the Boianai sightings to the category of mass hallucination. The reader is especially referred to Pather Gill's prefatory remarks within.

3, The Doianai UF0 1 e are demonstrably not ele~trioal phenomena, meteors, birds, conventional air-craft, and cannot reasonably be attributed to any of the gamut of accumstomed physical rationalisations. 4,

The Boianai liFO's are advanc ed craft , manned by human.oid beings, capable of a fant as tic range of aerodynamic performance.

5.

The Boianai sightings do not PROVE ipso facto that the UPO•s are non-terrestrial spaceships ; they indicate a strong LIKELIHOOD that they are such.

s·.

liFO researchers need no longer enquire as to the !~ o! the UPO's but only as to their ORIGIN .

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REPORT ON UN IDENTIFIED FLYING OBBCPS

Boianai, Territory of Papua and New Guine a , 1959 By W. B. Gill at Boiana1 14/7/59

INTRODUCTION. These reports o! observations together wi th releva~t material combine to describe with fair accuracy what i3 thought to have been a series of activites in the sky at n1ght3 over and near Boianai by U.F . O. •s . Main recordill&S were made on the evenings of June 21st , 26th and 27th . As chief observer and sole re~o rder and reporter of the Boianai phenomena on thoee dates (at Boianai) I would now hesitate to re-st ate without fUrther long consideration backed by scientific investigation any opinions or theories as expressed in my personal letters hastily written in that period and which are included in this present material . The value (personal) lies in their subjectiv eness against what I hope is objective observational data , and in the complete change of mind from scepticism to the conviction that the UPO •a as observed by me cannot be explained awe;y in t t>nne o! natural pheno~ena in the light of past knowledge and experien::e. Consideration to the following possible !actors, however, cannot be overlooked if this paper is t o have any valae at all ae an attempted objective record. 1,

Hallucination Sketches in the body of the r eport may be figment of imagination or hallucination . Hallucination may havo been experienced simultaneously by the 27 eye -witness~s who se nBIIIes appear on the signature list . 2.

S~geation

as an influence to "witnesses" may have been undue influence by suggestion o! a European observer over a less sopheeticated or inexpel·ienced native body; there may have been influence caused by Jubservienoe o! the native body of "witnesses" towards the European observer. 3,

T~re

Illusion

It is possible that "freak" atmospheric conditions or

eubjectiveneee on the part of the observer (e) r esulted in a mis-interpretation of natural phenomena. 4,

Unreliable Observers Inexperience in astronomical observation . IFnor~nce regarding such natural phenomena ae fal ling stare , meteors, comets, electrical disturbances in the atmosphere; the appearance and usual movements of these .


-. ~

,

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the following relevant f actJ con~c~·nins:: the con:Ju,·t:i.ng of th! main par't of the observation and exe<-"ltion of procedure in guthe!· ~ng ev1dence end writing the rero~t: 1. The sketch of the! UFO on r~r,e :. l'f tht r.:;: • tt was drawn by It is important i.'"l one Papuan obse!""Ver St ephen C111 r.;oi . significant detail from later slcf tchef' . The "ur.derside'' is described by him and drawn as showinr. fou:r "black e:pots" . These markings are replaced in 5\ "~"q•wnt descriptions and drawings by what appeared to be f,}q~ st r aight legE< or stands pointing diagonally downwards from the "base" of th<J IJFO . Can it bo asoomed therefore that sug~estion play~d no part in respect of this detall upon ohe minds of observers in subsequent sight! ngs when all, including Jtepilen G. · ~oi , i:tdepen 1ently thought they saw "legs" , though descriptions of the gen •ral shape of the whole "object'' we re 1n feeL rmch the 9ame? 2.

Drawing up of the report we.s coliductcd in the followint; w y: (a) On the night of June r6th i~~ ~di ate ly fol lvwing the d:sappearance of the l1FO throU€h cloud , 38 witnesses were brougot together into a well- lir,hted room . (b) On separate sheets of pape r three observers , namely IVilliBll Gill, Annnins Rara'tP. and Stephen Gill /t!oi , dre • what they tholl8ht they saw . ~ach worked in separate parts of the r oom . Then the sketch~s were compared and it was found that each r t-sembleJ the o ther diffe ri·~g only i n size of drawing. (c) Representatives of grOUJ'IS who th ought t hey observed "m<n" on the UFO wrote their signatur~3 unde r the respective beadi ngs (see pager ). (d) All observers were briefly address ed by the r eporter ar.j given the opportunity of Sifni ng a paper stating that a UFO as described in the sketches was seen by them. It was ,pointed out that they rnwt be truthful and sign onl • i1' they believed that they s:tw the UFO as represented b 1 the three drawings. 27 observers of a t otal of 38 voluntarily signed . {e) The data (1) on page ~ of the report is a copy of the original recorded during the ac;ual time of observation by the reporter. (f) Diagrams on T'n&e 8 were ml\de by the reporter ano s11 ned voluntarily under the same c0nditicns as descr1bed in ~t- . (d) except that the s1gnature~ are representl\tlved o~ groups only . (g) The sketches on page l ! were made as pert cf a written statement by the Rev•d . D. Duri e , Acting Princ ipal ~ f St . Aidan ' s College, Dogura. This s tatement was d~nwn up by him a few minutes after the observa~i on . (h) The UPO•a described on page 9 arc eignificantly different in appearance from any previously described , NOTE : The reporter not being a mathematician has attempted eatimates of size and distances. It is suggasted that the measurements should not be reRard ed as indisputable.

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- 3

In this respect, as r .:sul t of f11rther practice vri th hand-r ~asâ&#x20AC;˘.Jre­ ment as noted on page 8 o f th~ report , the reporter has tc ~en the liberty of making alte ration to ori~1nal d~ta . The HA~ >PAN which originally read as 6 inc'1¡:s new reads as five inche ~ . Other estimated measurements ~~~O'-tld therefore 1::-e ad~usted accordingly.

(sgd) Willin~ B. Gill


- 4 -

Dear David , Have a look at thi~ P.x~rao rdinary d~ta. I am nl~ost convinced about the "visi tation'' th..:ory . There hrtve been r lit-e a number of reports over the oonths , from reliabl<> witnes&c! . The peculiar thing about these most recent reports is thnt the ~ · s seem to be stationary at Boian~i or ·o travel from Boianai . The Mt. Pudi vicinity seems to ba tha hovering area . r myself ~aw a stationary white light twicl! on the oame night on April 9th . but in a different place each tJ.me. I believe yo;r students h ve also sighted one over Boianai. The A. :. . o ., Bob •.,].1;,1 P.nd '.! r. Gl ver have all seen it, or similar on~o on different occasions - gain , over Boianai, although I t hink the nnninra peopJ.e said they watched it travel across the sky from nu~ direction. . I should th1nk that this is the first time that the "snuccr" has been identifie as Juch. I do not doubt the exi stence of these "things " ( . ndeed I cannot now that I have seen one for mvself) but my simple mind

still requires scien tific evidence before I can accept the romouter-space- theory . I am inclined to belJ.eve th'lt probsbl,. many UPO •s are more likely soma form of electric phenomena- or perhaps something brought about by the atom bomb exp~osio ns , etc . That Stephen should actually make out a saucer could be the work of the unconscious mind ns it is very likely that at some ~1me he has seen 1llustrations of some kind in a m aga~i ne , or it j 1 very possible that saucers do exist , but it is only a 50/50 ch on~e that thet are not earth made , still less that they should c•rry men (more likely radio controlled) , and 1t is still unproven thlt they are solids. It i s all too diffic ult to und -rstnnd f o r me; I orefer to wait for some bright boy to c:ltch one to be exhibited i1 Nartin Square. Please r eturn this report as I have no copy and I want flor . to have it . Yours , Doubting William .

RE?ORT 0 ?; UFO 3IGHTING

Place : Boianai . Time : 1 a .m. Sunday , 21st June , 1959 . Weather Conditions : Patches of l ow cloud , otherwise clear. Name of Observer: Stephen Moi,

Moonlight .

T~acher .

Description: (as told to W.B. Gill by the observer

23/6/5~

at BoianAi .

On coming out of the house at one o 'clock on Slnday morning (21st June) I saw a bright light (white) s1lently coming out of the sky from a point about a quarter of a mile out to .aa, slightly west of the Bo1anai atat:l,on. It descended from ,qhat seemed a great height and I watched it for the space of about th•ee minutes moving and descending eastward s and parallel to the coast. It stopped at a point a little to the east of the station an- at a hei~t of about three hundred feet . There 1t remained stationa1·y for


- 5 -

perhapl'! half ::1 minute m·l r · ro.~ ...ll;r i~;;<.·r•Ja.~<tn i:1 brilli .nee until the shape of 1n invert"'d zru.~er f•nul·~ be .li:lc:t'rne·l , wh; h was tilted .sl i~;ntly l'ackward.;; w1 tl: piP'' of t h · tJn, u v1sibl c The ob joc L then moved upwar dt' ar.d d 1 snpr e!u·ed !':·om Vlcw 1n to the c cuds . When firs t sigh· ed , 1 tho~.<;;ht it to hwe betln a 1 ght similar to t hose ·J r oprad by · ~lanes •lunr.g the w•u· . ? .· .

Underneath t he Sfluc~r 1 saw l'lb'>ut four round bl ac, s pots . ( sgd ) C:t e phen Gill /.lo1 (OBSt:"'VER)

!lOTE : All t his 1nf r oma tion was vol unteered wi thout any mowl edge Ol""previous Slghtine •. of UF'O ' s by !?teph en , nnd when que~tion.ed afterwards , Stephen Moi clOl::lcc never to have henrd of •· flying saucer s " . I usk~ d hi:n i f \.: was :t lti t.: ;wr~o t he shf!pe ' " the o bj ec t was like WI inv<) r t..,d ~'auc ur and w :~.- not , f or inst .ne e , the shape of n plate , or lik~;; a " s ixpence•'' , or " l ike '' l tll". He was quite c~rtoin in h i ~ mir.1 th t it wns more like e sauc ~r t han anyhti ng else . ( sgd ) \H lliBJ:J B. Gill (:tEPORTER)

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Anglican Miss.on , Boianai.

f:7/6/S9 Dear David ,

Life is s trange , isn ' t i t ? Ye s t erday I wrote you a letter , (which I s till inte nd stnd1ng you) expressing opilions re the UFO •s Now, l eas than 24 hours l a ter I have charged my vi ews somewhat , Las t n1ght w~ at Boianai exper 1enced alout 4 hours of UFO activi ty, and there is no do ub t .vhntsoever t l 'lt they are handled by be ings of s ooe kind . At t1mes i t was abso1..ttely breathtaking . Here is t he report . Pl eas e pass it r ound , but great car e must be taken as I have n o other , and thi s , 11~ ~ the one I made out r e Stephen , will be s ent t o Nor . I would E.)preciate it if you could send the lot back as soon as pose . Cheer s , Convinced Bill P . S. Do you think P . Mor~sby should know about this?


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( N. Cruttwell is at presen~ 1n t he Daga country and will no \ be returning h~me until 16th J uly at earliest . ) I f people t h i n < it worth while, I will s tand cost of a radio cor.versat i~n of rou care to make out a comprehensive repon fr om the ma t erial on ay behalf !l It •s interesting Terri tor y news if nothing else . IV . B . G .

26/6/59

U.F. O. DATA

~

~ (p .m. )

Patches 6,45 of low oloud 1 clear over 6,50 Dogura and Menapi 6.52

6. 55

Sighted bright white light from front direction N. W. Call Stephen and Eric - Langford . Stephen arrive s . Confirce not star like other night . Coming closer , not so bright . Coming down 500 ft? , orange? , dee • yellow? Send Eric to call people . One object on top , move - man? Now three men - moving , glowing , doing somt!thing on deck . Gone.

7 . 00

Men 1 & 2 agaiu,

7 . 04

Gone again.

Cloud ceil-7.10 ing covered sky c, 2000•

Man 1 , 3 , 4 , 2 (appeared in that order . ) Thin elct . blue spot light . Men gone, spot light still there .

7 , 12

Men 1 & 2 appeared - blue light.

7 . 20

Spot light off, men go .

7 . 20

UFO goes througb cloud .

Clear sky 8.28 here , heavy cloud over Dogura . 8,29 Clouds !orating again

Boianai

(1 )

8,35 7

UFO seen by me overhead .

Call station peoJ'le . Appeared to descend, get bigger . Not so big, but seemed nearer than before ,

Second seen over sea - hovering at times . Another over Wadobuna village . Another to the east .

a.5o

Big one stationary and l ar ger - the original (?) Others coming and going through clouds . .As they des cend through cloud , light reflected like large halo ont ' cloud - no more than 2000', probably less . All UFO•a very clear - satell1tes? ''Mother" ship still large , clear , stationary.

9. 05

Nos. 2 , 3,4 gone .

Clouds patchy


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9 . 20 9 . 30 !'.46

'':.lotl:c!'" t:"ne act·c.ss -"C"1 tcwa:·d3 G .va white, ~ed , ~lue, gc-ae .

Overheaci v . F . O .

re-appear::~,

is hc-v t•ing .

10 . 00

Still there, s•a•ionary .

10 . 10

Hoverin, , Pc-ne behinti clrol4d .

10 . 30

Very high , h -,vet·if16 1.n .:lear patc-h ,.,f sky be tween c- l ouds .

10 . 50

Very cn·rc;ai't , ne sign ef U. F .0 .

11. 4

Heavy J;ai n. 1 Q A.

!!!

Data sheet of observatic>n ,..f l .F . O •a 6 . 15- 11.4 p .m. 26/6/59 . (Sgd . )

William

R~ ugh sketch e f 0 .2 .0 . na it appeared fr om Dosition of observati:)n . · ; '

n.

~ill .

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l - 4 men ,. lear y seen , appea ·ed in this

crder at 7 . 10 p . m. from wai st up)

"men" 1 llumins · ed •.

A~arancea

l and 2

o·f men at ? . 00 ~

-Ylriiiam B. Gill Stephen Gill Mc-1 Ananias Rarata Ness i e Moi Appearance A ot' men £!!1,9_)_~t shaft at 7 . 10 ~""· L_ -~~ ~d_[]:£!i:_t]l_aj;__c>T_d_!l:r:r--Wil.ha'11

a.

Gill .

Stephen Gill Moi Ananas Rarata Appearnnces of men l and t and light shaft a~ ~·~

William B. Gill -

Stephen Gill Moi Ananias Rarata This pa?er d r awn up and sisned by chief ol>ser\' rs at ? . 30 p.m. 26/6/59 .


,

olt . lfuanua I .._ \ \ '

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Mt . Pudi

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Diat~ce from Mt . Pudi t ' coas t 4-5 miles.

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~Positions of U.F . O•e obs erved from Ni oanai Station at 8 . ~8 p . m. and 9. 15 p.m . 26/6/59 . (Sgd . ) IV1ll1nm B. Gill Stephen Gill Moi . WEATHER

VARIABLE SKY - SCATTERED CLOUDS to CIEAR AT f'IRST , BECOMI NG OVERCAST A !!~ER 10 . 10 p.m. APPHOX. HEIGHT OF CLOUDS - 2 , 000 ft .

NOTE . Thi s determined by relationship o f clouds tc hignest po int visible of oountnins. As U.F . O•s were often bel ow (under) clouds and tneir glow gave e f t a wide h·llo of ligh't r eflected on clouds, it follows th:tt U. F. O•s de·.-ended to below 2,000 ft . The first sigh ti ng ov er the sea seemed not more than iOO ft . above the water a t. time s . Size of U. F.O. " A" (acros s) (as nppeurod) PUll RAND: sPAN at arm •s leJ'l&th (8 inches) when U.P. O•s a t cl osest .

C• l , ur . Dull yellow- perhapa pale or ange) except ~/ when ~~ving , then ' ' "HJ £ very bright . When finall y moved away at gren• speed at 9 . 30 - co:our L' f= 0 ohall8ed from thin white to dee~ red , then to blue-green . A rough sketch of U. P.O. as observed between 6 . 55 p.m . ru.d 7 . 22 p.m. by 38 witnesse s at Boianai , T. P . & N.G. , Friday Z6- t -R9 , This sketch i a u reasonable reproduction of U.F.O . whi rh waR clearly visible an~ mostly Rtationary for ~5 minutes . (Sgd . ) Will iam D. Gill , Priest 11 St ephen Gi ll Moi - Teacher 11 Eric I<odaware - Schoolboy .

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00 NOTE

~ad li

SIZES of U. F .O' e "'('ii:SappeRred) "E" about i" a r roes

panels

of bright "windows" on near edge.

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"

"-" d·eep a l' r oss .

Four of the five O. F.O's seen in the s~y at the one time between a.ta p.m. and 9.15 p.m . (asthey appeared. "B" was direfl tly overhead . ) , (Sgd . ) Will i am B. Gill - Prio 3t Stephen Gill Moi - Teal'her " Eri r Kodawara - Schoolboy.

"

BOIANAI. Saturday, 27/6/59. Large U.F .O. first signted by Annie Laurie at ~ p .m. tn apparently same position as l ast nigh t (26/ 6/ 59) only seem·~d a little smaller, when W.B.G. saw it at 6. 02 p . m. I oal l1d Ananiaa and several others a.nQ we st ood in t he open to wat"h it. Although the sun had set it was quite light for the following 15 minutes. We wat~hed figures appear on top !our ot them - no doubt that they are human. f easibly tbl same objsl'lt that I took to "tie the "Mother" ship last night. Two smaller U.F .O's were seen at the same time, stationary. One above the hills west another overhead , On the largE one two of the figures seemed to be doing something near the centre of the deck - were occas ionally bending over and rt1Aing their arms as though ad lusting or " setting up" some thing t :1.ot visible) , One figure seemed to be standing l ooking down at us (a group of about a dozen) . I s tre tched my arm above ~y head and waved to our sUrprise t he figure did the s ame . Ananias waved b.-th arms over his head then the t wo outsid t figures did the same. .A.nanias and self began waving our arms and all four now seemed to wave ba~k. Ther e seemed to be no doubt that our movement s were answer ed . A!l-m!qs ion boys made audible gasps (of eot her joy or eurprise pcr hap • both) ,


I

\

- 10As dark was beginning tn ~ lnse in , I sent Eric Kod wara fl'lr a tor• h and dire ~ ted a series of long dashes toward :. the U.F . O, After a minute or two ., f this , the U.F.O . appSJently acknowledged by making several wavering motions ba~k anr forth . Waving by us was repeated and this followed by nore fla f'!lee of tor~h, then the U.F.O. began slowly to beoome bigger, a~paren t­ ly coming in our d irection . It ceaaed after perhap s half a minute and oame on no further. After a further two or three minutes the figures apparently lost interest in us for t1ey disappeared "below" dec-k . f..t 6 . ::!5 p . m. two figures re-appeared to carr~ on with whatever they were doing be:ore the interruption(?) , The blue spot light came on for 'few seconds twice in suecession . · The two other U. F .0 1 a remained stati onary and high up higher than lat>t night (?) - smaller than last night . 6,30 p.m . I went to dinner . ? .00 p .m. No . 1 U.F.O. still present bu1;, appeared ermewhat smaller - ebservers go to ~huroh for Even~ong .

7.45 p .m. Evensong over and sky • loud eoveredvisibility V. L. 10. 40 p.m . A terrific explosion just outsi de the Mi~~on House , Nothing s~en . Could have been an electrical atmospheri• explosi• n as whole sky ove r•ast . At ll . OS a few drops of rain. This may or may not have something to do with U.F.O. The explosion seemed to be just outside the wind ~w­ NOT ordinary thunderfllap - but a penetrating 1 earsrlittin, · 1 explosion . It woke up people on the station. SUNDAY -

28- 6-69.

To sign of U.P .O. 6 p.m. 6.45 very

hi8h , 1 but only U.P.O. practically overhead - slightly north· •learly distinguishable due to hovering. .

7 . 30 p.m . Same U. F .O. -moved to southern r • stti•n but still more or lese overhead. 9 , 10 l.m.

3 U.F.0 1 a in almost straigh t line - all high ,

elcy o ear.

11 , 00 p.m. 8 U. F.0 1 s - . thi s the greatest number yet seen at one time. One f a irly low, but ex. ept for occasional have·, no activity seen on board. · Appr ox . po&ition .

COAS

r

X oa s c Rvc~ .

/-

(

--.......__

MT • NUANUA )

........

----


\ - ll -

To bed <l!ld U. r ·'·' 's still there .

--------MONDAY I 29-6...~~~A .M . Roof examined. No a~-par~nt ~ign of rnark or der. ~ , vibi ,.h one might expect ai'ter last night's noise .

--------A.M. Boianai . 30-6-59 .

Dear David ,

U.F .O, -

Have

b~en having i'urth er experiences nightly vith

~ounted 1

large and 7 small over Saturday night, l large and : small Sunday night, l large and ·~ small Monday night.

Believe i t or not, .'\nanias, Mlssion boys and elf exchanged hand signals (befcr._ dark S•Hurday) V1.l tn the occupants of the "mother" ship n l.ittlo:: after c.' p . m. Th re ieno doubt that she Ot' CUpl.ed by At la~st -l men . ..\ssw 1.ng that men are the same size as ;.;ver~ge of earth, I have wo1 ICed 01Jt size of the ship - Top 'tie.. k" - :::o' diameter ) the "11 1ther" Bottom "de~k" - roughly 35 • ) shir. Distan .. e of operations,

theref~re ,

havefeet. been, at highest altitude 450

:,~00

As

feet ;

we have sighted,

lowe~t

altitud

That's all for now, .must nwny on patrol . Yours, Bill .

P.s . No "h1lman" activity has Y<!t t-een observed on smallel U. F.O•s , whi• h seem to be c!i sks r.atho:>r than sauc-e1's. Unidenti.fie:l Fl,vinf OhN• ts. Date, t.londay 6th JuJ.y, 1959 . At shout 8.40 p . m. T notirod a white g low thr~ugh the cloud , similar to that ,.aused by the moon . Posi•ion North West - a few degrees above ~ub~~auna Point 'the Point is about 3 miles from the College, . The flow changed to a brl.lliMt spot of white llght . It descended and moved a little to th~ South . The brillian·e faded to a glow ana then to a faint glimmer . After 5 minutes it glowed again brilliantly and moved i~ n circular motion (see sket,.h) anticlockwise . Then it move· further south ~d down until it bename obscured by the Point


,•. I

1~

of land at

.-

9.oo

-

\

p . m.

Through th~ binocul3rs I nvt~ced t c 01our and sheped like , d _ :,: . 1 to be or~e 11 This wa::; observ~d by ~.~!':> . --.. Gill an d more than ten Coll~~~ ·-- !"l.(!"l«: , m~n .

l•lovcment:

., ."li!V.

~ . !liU:lJ , R v

~ · 1i ·

Guba!'launa Point .

B:ly .

PAPER SIGNED BY IIIAJORITY: OF '.YIT~1E SSES A~ 1- 45 p .m:' 26/6/M .

Signatures of WITNESSES OF U. F . O. Observed on the n!fht of 26th June 19q~ )JO!Ai\J 1. ?:.Eu,\ . William B . Gill

Dulcie Fred , Guyoro Po - Tenchcr Ilma Violet Io1·cre - Teacher

Er i f' Kodawara Ida Mary Giriabo - Tea ~her Love Dnisy Kol:.tt."la - MeJil' al As.:~iotant

A~~ie Laurie Bo~ew~ - Medi cal Mil ton Bor=ruu. l.mos Nud:1i R-u-o -:.e Ananias Rnr~~a - TcRcher Lily Davis !,:.ni•.arn Annie G-race Y:.weige Mauri • e Sangford Totinnawai

Ronald W. K. Daisy Ponewew, Nurst Mary Gtmauln Jane Raratn

Fr ank Gunuala Randolph Cill Nessie Moi

J<aw~ewa

Stephen Gill Moi - Tencher

Kipling Guveropa - Tea"her Montague T1.luwarunan1 Car son Kivaue Ce• il Tyonai

A~sistnnt


9th .:uly

1~5 !:'

_Lnst night I went cut 01 my hou.:>e betwc.:n 11.:.'10 nd midnlght and I sa•v "\ l:-ri!_'!l t "b..?::!..rn of 1 igh t shinin,r ,,..1 f\B the sea near the shore and t' "\rnllel to the beach . The light was whi<~ ~ n,1 it lit un YI"\Ves of the e a . I thought i t wn::> cor.ung f1 1;1 a t>o"..t tutd . o I returned to the house. I h~ord no noigc .

(D,·d . )

Kingsfcn-rl Dibeln , Teacher ,

n0~urn .

. It is reported thnt Richard , TeactHn· , was dazzle l by a bright white light in ni :ht of July 8th (nbout midr _ght) . No per sonal statement has b ~en ,;aken rrom him b~· .na . Richard lives on the be.:lch b0lvw Doguro. ?latc'\u . It is said that he describe s tha light as ori~inatin~ ir the direction of Guvanayba Poin~ "lnd that it lit up th~ cJast line beyond Wednu . The boat Kekaha (?) was at Wed au wharf on the e\·eni116 of July 9th . If this information interests ~·ou 1. t r mlj be worth che ,.king on the movement and a• tid. ty of th:- t boat then. Gubanauna Point i s ::.·oughly 4 miles west of We:lau wharf.

------------


Cocmand

VIC 5/6/Air{36A)

Secretary Department of Air Administrative Buildings

CANBERRA

ACT

SIGHTING OF UNUSUAL AERIAL OBJECT Fo~varded herewith are two reports of sighting of unusual aerial objects as follows:

(a) By Capt i4cDougall on 11th November 1959 at 0220 EST 2 minutes south of Rosebud enroute Melbourne-Launceston (b) By News Rooms - Radio Station 3BO Bendigo on 11th November 0945-1700 EST .

(tJ.' jDOWLIN

)

Grou'p--e'aptain For Air Officer Commanding


\· 1.

~~e of observer ..~~~~~:.~~9 . ~~~~~g~ . ~ .. ...... ... ... . ............•.

2.

Address of Observer -~eq • • •••• • •• • •••••• • •• •• • • • • •••• • •• • • • • •• • • ••• • ••• •

3.

Occupation of Observer ••...•..•• • • . •.. • .•..••••. • . . • ••• • •••. . ••••• • .•.•••••

4.

Date and Time of Obs&rvation (Time given in 24 hour clock zonal time)

:1?:~:1?:~-?~ ••• ~lt~ .:. ~?<?'? .: .. .... .. ................ .... .. ..•.......... .. ......• 5. 6.

Per iod of Observation( s) .. ~? .:. H~? . '!" . .... ........... . . . .. .. ......... . .. . (Give details of own position by map reference if l·:anner of' Observation possible , or by known landmarks, and describe a ny eqUi,..,r.tent used in the observation) . area. .Observed .........by ...many .....people .......in...the ....Bendigo .. ......................................... . ..................................... .. ...................................... ................................................. ...........................

7.

Where was object f irst observed, e . g . overhead, coming f rom behind a hill , over the horizon, etc .

-~~ ~ -~ .~c::~ .t:~If - ~~~.$<?~ ................ . ....... . ... . .... . . . ..... . ... . . 8.

...'hat first attracted obscrvar's attention, e . g . light or noise •

................................................... .......................... 9.

Did object appear

~s

a li {ht or as a definite object •

.

. ....... .......................... ...................................... ... 1C .

If there was more than ono object , how m.::my 1.1ere the N!, o.nd what was their fonnation •

.~ . C?~~t;c:t:~ .. . ... .. ... . .. . ....... . . . ... .. ... .. .. . ... . ...... ... . . ...... . . . .. . 11 .

~fuat was tho colour of the l ight or obj e ct

.~ . •• •• •• . ••.•••••• • • • •••

12.

r;lla.t was its apparent shape ..... ...... . ... . . . . . . .... . ....... . ........ . .. . .. .

13 .

~'las any d~. tail of str•.1ctur,.., observable ...•. . . • • • .. . .•...•.•...• •. •.•. . . .. .•

... ... ...... ... ............ ............. ........................................ ....... ........ ...... ....... .. . ................ ........ .... .....................

14.

15 .

Jas any nethod of propulsion obvious • ·• •••••• •• • • • • •· ··· · ·••• • ••••• •• •·••• las ther" any sound

.... ... ................ ...................................

16.++ Height, or an3l~ of L l~vo. t ion .~~~~ .~ .~ ~····· · •• •••• ·•• • •••••••• • • •

17 •++ Speed, or anguln.r v~ ocity -~~~ .~~~~ .~ .Df:l.~~ .<!'!%:¥!~~~~~ .c:F: .~~l!C:~""ft!-R<?n. 18 .

++

State any e -pcricnce which cno.bl cs ob:.~r'l_r to ba ruasonably certain about the a nswers gi ven to 16 4nd 17 .

•· ·····••· ··· ····•· ••· ..... ..... ............ ....... .. .... ... .......... ..... . .

Since it is norm~ly impossi blo to estimate th hvi;ht nd ·pood of ~ strango object, i t will. usually bo butter to "ndc:wour to dotorminu thr 11nglo of olev&.tior. of l:.h" obj ct, tho nngl throu::h 11hich it rnov~d, .nrl tho till!o taken to do this .

. ....... 2/


t - 2 -

~ ~....)ort

on Aeti. aLQQ.i§.ct OQ~orv·e d

(Cent 1 d)

19.

Diroction of flight with reference to landmarks or points of the compass .

20 .

Did the obje ct remain on a straight pP.th, deviato or m..'Ulocuvre at all.

..................................... .......... ....................... .

9~~'09~?-:ti-$l!l. !ll'Pf~: . to. -!DH-~!1••••••••• •• ••• •••••••••• •••• •• •••• •• ••••

........................

21.

(·las any trail of cxluust, vapour or light s een

22 .

·•'h.:lro did obje ct disappear, o . g . in mid-air, behind a h ill, over tho horizon.

~Pff~~- p:~. f199. ;. ~~P. ~:m. :4~~-p~~. ~~- J;~:. :PJt!':•.... ... •. .. .•..• . .. .. 2J.

~stcncc of any physical supporting evidence •

~vid

nco such as fragments ,

pbotogr~phs ,

or other

................ ........................................................

24.

...:ather conditions e::rooria nced '\t tbe(s) or obs ... rvati on(s)

........................................ ................................ 25 .

Location of :my air tnffic in tho vicinity a t the ti." of sighting •

.................................. ...................................... 26.

loc:,?.tion of

~ny

meteorological st..'\tions in tho general a rea .

~::. ~!'! !"-?~~...... .. . ..... .... . ............. . ... ..... .... . ... .. . . . . ('

be of an immense size. Size Slld colour ch,anging. • e e e e e e e e e e e e e • e e e. e e e * e • e e e e e • e e. e e e e e • • e * e • e e e' e

e

I

e e • e • e e e e • e e e e e e • • • e

•••••••••••• , •••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • ••• •• •• ••• ••• .,.$ Questions 25, 26 anr' 27 to be answer..:d by interr ogator •

.........................


.

~ OB-;1~

,,. P.Jl1T ON ri.ERL.J. OBJJ:l.T

1 . .. ...~ une of observer •..~tAm .MG. ;Q<B.t~ ••• ••••••• • ~·A·A·•. .. . . .•. •...• . • ...

2.

J. 4.

, ••

C/- T. A.A. Essendon. Address of Observer •••••.• •• ••••••• ••••• • • •••• • • •• • • • • • • • • · • •• • •••• • •• • • • •• Airline Pilot Occupation of Observer • •• .•••••••••• • .•.•••••.• . ••• • •• • • • ••. • •• • • ••••.••••• Date and Time of Observation (Time ~iven in 24 hour clock zonal time) 11th Novomber, 1959 0220

.. .. .. ............................... .... ... ...................... ..........

5. 6.

4 minutes Period of Observation ( s) • •••••••••• • ••••• • •• • •••••••.•••••••• ••• • • , ••• • • • ••

harmer of Observation : (Give details of own position by map reference if possible , or by !mown landmarks, and describe any equi'OI:lent used in the observation) • A/C was positioned 2 minutes south of Rosebud enroute Melbourne to

··············· ··················· , ......................................... , ....Launceston ..........•.............................................................. .......................................................................... .. 7.

Where ~~s object first observed, e . g . overhead, comin~ f rom behind a hill, over the horizon, etc . Flash was in direction of Southern Cross constellation •

..............................' ................................................

8.

.·1bat first attracted observer's attention, Light •

l

. g . li!::ht or noise .

.....................' ........................ ...............................

9.

10 .

Did object appc·ar ns a li?,ht or as a definite object. Brilliant blue f lash •

.......................... ..................................................

If there was more than one object, formation •

hmo~ many

wero theze, nnd what

K'\S

their

.... ............. . .. .... .. ... ...................... .......................... :Blue

11 .

~fu~t

12 .

..llla.t was it.s appa.r~nt shape . .... . .. . ..................... .. ....... . ..... . .. .

13 •

Wa s any d·tail Fl~sh left blue trail to southern o o f s t ructurc observable • •••• • • • •••••••• • •••••••••••• • • . ••••• horizon which disappeared after 4 minutes.

14.

Was any method of propulsion obvious •• ~. • • •••. .• ••••... • •.• •••• •• • ••••.•••

15.

·-las there any sound ... ;:,.,.,., .... .... , • • , . ................... ... ....... ..

was the colour of the light or object

............................................................ .......... ..... "

··· ·· · · ····· · · · r ······~ · · ····· · · ·· ··· · ··········· · · ···· · · · ··· · ········· · ····

16. ++ Height, or ~nglc of cl~vntion ••• ~, •••• •• •••••••• , •••• ••••••• •• • • ••• , , , ,\,,. 17 , ++ Speed, ""• ~~ "n~•,n- v. """ 1:5~· 18.

++

OC

itY • • • •. • • • ' ~ • •. • •. • • •·

111

•, •

~~

,

•• •

••

. 1•' • I

'

• • • • •

State a~ o:~rience which enables obsorv~r to bo reasonably certain about tho answers eivon to 16 and 17 •

.....................................,................ ,, ........ ·····--·······

Sinco it is normally impos3iblr to o3timatc tho hbi~t 1nd soood ~f s s~r~gc object, it will usua.lly be be:tt. r to cnde:lvour to determine tno anglo of elc~-ation o~ the object, thv mgle: throus:h 1~hich 1t mov<ld, nnrl tho time taken to do this .

. ....... 4.'


- 2 -

~port

on Aotial Ob!ect OQsorvod

(Cont'd)

19.

Direction of flight with reference to

20 .

Did the object r emain on a straight path, deviate or manoeuvre at all.

landmark~

or points of the compass .

............................................... ....... ....... ......... .

• • • • • • • • • • • r. • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• B.W.e. .t.r.e.U. • • •• ••••••••

21 .

Iotas any t r .:til of omaust , vapour or light seen

22 .

.vborc did object disappear, o . g. in mid-air, behind

o.

hill , ov r tho horizon.

over southern horizon ........................................................................ 23 .

~stence of any phys ic~ supporting evidence •

evid ~nco

such as f ragments ,

photogr~phs ,

or other

............. .................................... ..... ............... . '

.,

24. noathcr conditions cxocri onced

~t tL10(s) or obscrvation(s)

.....Fine .....nil ....cloud .....•............... ......................................

25 .

Location of a:ny "l.ir tr:lffic in tho vicinity at the tiu... of sighting .

Nil ................................................. ......................... .

........................................................................ 26 .

Locati on of any m0toorologi c-'\J. st.'ltions in the gcncrtU. area . • • • JlL,

.11

..L!1 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .. • • •

. ~ltsbt - ....... .. . ... ... .. . .. ... .... .... ............. . . .... . ...... . . .. .. .

............................. .........................................."' .........................................................................

Questi ons 25, 26 and 27 to be

~swerod by

interrogator •

..... ... .. ..... . . .. ..... .. -


CONFlWrnTIAL reuft.toNe: Penri th 2331 IN RE" No.

, ~~

f:,....O f} , ..,d L--

I

'ft~Ttjutlo/

') ,.,-r&..../...

EASE QUOTE

1

7

/

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR fORCE

Headquarters Home Command

RAAF PENRITH

l'n

NS ll

2 .; SEP 1~:~9

5/2/1 Air(60A) Secretary Department of Air Administrative Buildin, CANBERRA ACT

RF~ORTS

ON

AERIA~

SIGHTING

Attached hereto are copies of reports received from Headquarters RAAF Base Darwin and RAAF Provost Service , NSW Section, Sydnel' relating to unidentified flyinc objects. I f.~

J~~IJl~~

( J. UOORE) W 路 c Commander For Air Officer Commandin,

Attachs .

CO~NTIAt --------~~------------~--~--


Headquarters

RAAF Base

DARWIN

BS 5/6/Air(JlA)

NT

2nd September, 1959

Headquarters Home Command

RAAF f.ENRITH

liV

NS\V

UNUยงUAL

AERIAL SIGHTINg

1. Forwarded herewith is a copy of a report received from Mr1959. . McKay, concerninc an aerial object sighted on 30th August 2.

This report forwarded for your consideration.

Sed (B.A . PEPPER) Flying Officer for Officer Commanding


An object was first sighted at approximately 20 from the horizontal, falling earthwards at an angle of 4' degrees from south of east. de~rees

DESCRIPTION

Deep red centre with white flame surrounding, leevine a trail of black smoke, and at final sichting approximately five degrees from the horizontal, it glowed white and disappeared from view in a direction due east of the observers. SKY CONDITION

Checked with meteorological section, gave cirrus with a visibility of 20 miles. The track cut throueh the cirrus was completely visible for ten minutes after siehting before the smoke of trail started to dissipate, and up to 30 minutes after sighting the angle of descent was clearly visible in the highest cloud layers, but the lower levels bad broken up into straight lines following the cloud pattern.

ESTIMATED DISTANCE Estimated distance from the observers of the final sighting was approximately 12 to 1' miles. ESTILIATED SIZE From point of observation, the old control to"er of Darwin Airport is visible and the size of the object including the white glo" was approximately half the size of the top of the control tower, i.e . , the water reservoir. An attempt was made to get a compass reading from the Danish ship discharging at the Wharf , but this was unsuccessful. Later, a position fix was taken by map and confirmed other sighting at the time of disappearance as due east of the observers. ~OINT

OF OBSFRVATION. Entrance to Stokes Hill Wharf, Darwin.

C. McKAY


J~---i/'-

1\,1 '>rlitjJo('J~ 7·~.1'All870 Set Quinn N.W . Field Security Section RAAF Provost Service NSW Section SYDNEY

20/98/AIR

2nd September 1959

Assistant Provo st Marshal SYDNEY REPORT ON AERIAL OBJECT OBSERVED 1. On the 1st September, 1959 the writer in company with A25570 Warrant Officer Jameson , M.L., interviewed Mr. David Osborne Moo re and his wife at 15 Nareon& Road, North Manly, in response to a telephone call requesting that we visit ~ him in relation to the si,hting of unidentified aerial objects. ·~J Attached three (3) sighting report forms as completed by Mr • . ,1 ~ ~ and Mrs. Moore. r. 'Z vl

2. Mr. Moore's interest in the sichting of unidentified aerial objects is well known, cognate reports from ~~. Moor e have been dealt with on our 20/98/AIR dated 6th M~ch and 6th February, 1959. 3.

The Brookvale Control and Reportine Unit had no

~~,c~ record of any unidentified craft being picked up by their

,r

equipment over the relevant periods .

The reports together with a sketch of the si,htin, made on the 30th August, 1959, are forwarded for information .

4.

Sgd. (NOEL V: . QUINN) Sergeant


£Ql:X REPORT 0~_!1,LAL OJJECr OBSERV:SD 1'

....

2.

3. 4.

David Osborne MOORE Nane of Observer • . .•... . ....... . •. . • .. • • • .. · · · • • • • • • • • • · • • • • . .•. 15 Nargong Road , North Manly Addr ess oi' Observer ........ . ........ . .... .... . . . .....•.•.•....... Instrument Maker Occupation of Obs erver .. ... •.•... . .•• ... • ... .. . .. ••••.•. • ••• ••. . Date and TiDe of observation (Ti~e give n in 24 hour clock 1550 hours 30th August , 1959 zonal tioe )

...................................................................... Twenty minutes Period of observa tion( s) .•.•. •....•. ••. . .• . ....•.••..•.•••.•.•••

6.

:.=...nncr of observc.tion : (Give de t c1ils of own position by map r ef erenc e if possibl~ , or by known l andoar ks, ~nd de scribe any equipoent used in the obse rv~tion) . Naked eye 20/50 binoculars. North Manly

.l...Z. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• •• • •• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

.......seen . ....in.. .Southern .........sector . ......of...the ....sky ...•............................. ......................................................................

7.

"lfhere it-s object first observ ed, '3 . g . over h ee>.d, conin... fror:1 behind ~ hi ll, ov ~r the horizon, etc . .From east . . over sea. to south . • . .

....... ..... .......... . ... ......... .... ....... ................. 8.

l?hdt first attrc1cted observer ' s

c~.tt e ntion,

e . ~ . li t::ht

or noise •

. . . . . . . fP:'.t.t.ip,c. .................•.....• . ...................•••.••...• 9.

Did obj~ct dppe~ e1S a li ght or as a definite obj ect . Object lime creen through binoculars - silver t o naked eye •

......................................................................

10 . If there Hc1S nore thcl.n one obj 9ct, ho;-1 l"'.a.ny '-Ier e therz , and uhc. t \l.:o.s their forr~ tion .

One ......................................................................

1, •

Wh::o.t ·.:as t he colour of the

12.

iVha t

13 .

~as c~.ny de~il

\Ic.s

Lime green to•••••••• silver or obj ect • •••••••• ••••• Tound

li~ht

i ts appc1re nt shape • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

...................................................................... No ••••••• ••• •• ••••• •••• of structure observable •••••

....................................................................... 14.

';ld.s d.ny nothod of propulsion obvious .•• • !l.0 •••••••• • ••••••• • •• • • • No ',7d. S

there a.ny sound • ..... .. .......................... • • • • • · · · • • • • •

· h t, or engle of e l evation ••••••• 50 , 000 feet a nd rising • 16 • *X He1g •. •••••••••••••••••••••.••• ••

1?.AX Spe~d, or anguLar ve locity ••.•• ~}?~. .......... ...... .......

. ... . .

18 . State any experience •thich e nablos observer t o be recLsontii.bly certc.t.in "'bout th ~ ;.,ns:~ers c iven to 16 .:>.nd 17 . Observer for 14 years Warrin~ah Sky watchers

......................................................................

*X

Sinc e it is nornally i n.,ossible to e stirld. t f' the hci eh t ..s.nd spc.'h1 d of .;. str-nge o"bject it •ill usu... lly be bet t er to ondo-vour to det or iiino the ..J.nule of clQv,..tion of tlu ob j ect, the anc;l o thr ou~h '1hicb it nov -.d, .... n.d tho tic-" t...•con to do this .

_,_


Q.QfX - 2fuw.ort on aerial. obj e.f!..t ~erv~J£..o!l.tfi~·l 19 .~ Direction of flight •lith r ef er ence to landoa.rks or points of the

coopa.ss. East to South

...................................................................... 2Q . Did the object ror.ain on a strc~. ight path, deviate or oanoeuvr e at <lll . Level flicht - returned a little - hovered then elevated A- B - to

..................................................................... No 21 . Was any trc..il of exhc.ust, va.pour or light s een • • ••••••• .........

c•

22 . Vfuer e did object disapp oc~.r, e . g . in n id- a ir , behind a hill, over the horizon . Rose out of sicbt •

.....................................................................

23 . Existence of any physic ...l evidenc e such as fra gn €lnts , photographs, or othor supporting evidence . No, but witnesses as below •

.....................................................................

24.

Weather conditions experienced at tirH:J (s) or Cloudless sky

obs ervc~.tion(s)

•••••

.................................................................. 25 .

LOCal tion of any air tr....ffic in tho Vi cinity at the tioo of • •••• sighting •

26 .

Loc~tion

.....................' .............................................. . ....Civil ......air ....t.r.affic ......lane ....•..... ................. .. .. .. .......... . of any neteorologicul stations in the g cner~l c~.r e~ ••••• Brookvale

..................................................................... . Attached report. 27. Any infornation ••• • •••.•••••••• • • • .................. . ..................................................................... ..................................................................... ..................................................................... add~tion~l

Qu-.s tions 25 , 26 d nd 27 to be .s.nsHer ed by interrogator . Mrs. Bartlett 68 Baroona Rd ., Northbrid,e. Mrs. Reddinc and Mrs . Carter~ 22 and 24 Hillside Cresced ,Nth . Manly. also family at above addresses . Family of Mr . and Mrs . Moore. Seven persons in all.


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,;'i'p,;_,f-r-

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ilh'S<:....aJ,

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REX

INSTRUMENT

COY.

WEEKLY TIME CARD

CO~l~IE:\C!:>."G ..................- .••..•·-····-·..············-·-········· ~(ON DAY

WED!ItESOAY

TUESDAY

JB NO.

Ord.

O"Time

Ord.

RAT£ PER HOUR. ....••..•..•.•....-

O"Time

Ord

1 O"Timo

THURSDAY

Ord.

O"Time

f"'RIDAY

Ord.

O"Timo

SATURDAY

Ord.

O"Time

TOTAL

Ord.

O"Time

RATE

OT. Po:na>ry

Ord.

OT,\LS... £

IPRODt:CTI\"E......................................................... R. & ~1 .....-······-···-··---·----·-············--

SICK...._..._

s

~a;-.e of

.... _.___·--·········-···-·-----

HOLIDA Y---··-------····----···-··--0/f PEXALTY·-·-·-··--····-·-··-··-········-···

.i\ddrass occu~a."li

TOTAL

uat.e "'"'

......20...· ~ : ~ pcr~o

.. nn• ~f:~f

e~ui 0

.....1 ... ..... .......

~

.•

~

.. .. . .

.. .. . ..


c 0 p y REPORT O~_A];.'!LAL 03JE~

David 0 Moore and M. E. Moore Nar:e of Observer ...•.....•....•.•.... . • • • .. · · · • • • • • •••....••.... 15 Nar ~ong Road , North Manly Address of Observer . ... ............... .. . . . . . . .. . ............. . Instrument Maker Occupo. tion of Observ~r ...•. . .•.... ••.••. ••.. ..•• .•• ••.•.•.••...•

2.

3.

Date and Tine of obsorvation (Time given in 24 hour clock 20. 5.59 1830 and 1905 hours zonal time)

4.

............................................ ......... ................. 5.

Perio.d of observc1tion(s) • ...•••... ...... .•• ...•••• • . • • ••••.•••••

6.

I;...nner of observation: (Give detcdls of Oim position by ca.p r eference if possibl~, or by kno~n landoarks , ~nd describe any equipoent used in the observ~tion) . Object posed over Manly Hospital. Observed as redish coloured

.................................................................... light also at 1905 hours 2 lights observed . 1 small white ............. . .................... ......... ........................... light ...............- ..1........red ....li:ht .....•... .................................

~~

lar~e

7.

"ilhere \lc.S object first observed , e . g . over hec:..d, conin£; froo behind a hill , ov~r the horizon, etc . 15 degrees above Manly District Hospital

...................................................................... B. ifua.t first attr~cted observer's a.ttention, o . 6 . li~t or noise • . . . . . . . . PP!l.s.u!l}. P?.s} ?!. }!-.g~.t.s......... ............•... • • ••. •. • • • •

::?!1.

9.

Did obj?.ct Yes •

appe~r

o.s a light or as a definite object .

.............................................................. ........

10. \J.I'k..

If there \laS nore than ono obj ect , ho\1 t'\c:..ny oer e thers, cind t w... s their forr!4 tion .

.........Two . ..•.......................................................... . Red and White . the co lour of the lic;h t or ob J ACt • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Diffused and Circular its appa.rent shape •••••••••••••••• ••••••• •••••••••••• ••

11 .

·:lha. t

~;a s

12 .

i'lhat

\lc..S

13 •

i7as cny dct...il of structure observable •••••N.o; •• • •••• , •••••• ••• • ,

................................................. ..................... • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • e • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

14

15 .

'•"""S ~•~

-' OY -

"'f> ..

11.

thod of propu 1 son i '" i ous .••.•• No . oov •••••••••••••••••••••••

•7u.s there o.ny sound . •••.• " • .~0. •...................... •• • • • • • · • • • • •

1

16 . xx Hoi ~ ght , or

~ngle

10 degrees above hill of alavation •.•.••••..••• • •••••••••.••••••••••••

17 .ftX Speed , or angular velocity ...••••..•... • ..•. . •• •••••••••• ·· · · • · ••

18.

State any exlJorienca .1hicb er..ables observ"'r to be reasonably ClOSlers civen to 16 a.nd 17 •

cer~in ~bout th ~

................................................... ................. . '

**

Sinc e it is nornally in.'oss ible to es tinCl ta the height ..,nd sp<h'd of c. str...nge objcc t it \:ill usuully be bl'!tt()r to anda.vour to dcternino the d.Ot.lr• of alov .... tion of tlD object , the anGlo throu6h 11hich it nov 'd , ...nd the tina t-'con to do this . - 1-


COP .Y - 2~~~~ ·_s~~~~~~g~eryy£ (con~~~l

with rereronce to

COtlf'ciSS .

l~ndm~rks

or points of the

N/A ...................................................................... 20 . Did the object rer.ciin on a straight path , deviate or nanoauvre at o.ll . As above • .

......................... ...........................................

21 .

No . Was any trail of exhaus t, vapour or light s een . . ...••...•••.....

22 . Vfuere did object disappear, e . g . over the horizon . Ceased to be •

in

oid-air , behind a hill ,

........................................... ..........................

23 . Existence of any physicc:..l evidencE such as gr aphs, or other supporting evidence . No •

fre~. gnen ts,

photo-

.....................................................................

24.

Weather conditions experienced at tirH3(s) or observc1tion(s) ••••• Heavy overcast 10/10 Cloud

.....................................................................

25 . Locc. tion of a.ny air trJfic in the vicinity at the tiuo of

...............Civil ......air ....lane. ........... .....................sighting ........•.... ........................................ .. . . .. . . .. .. . . ...........

26 .

Loc~tion

of any

net~orolo6iCul s~tions

in the

~enerQl c1re~ •••••

..................................................................... •••••••.••••••••••• .................. . 27 . Any .............................. ....................................... ............ ......................................................... ..................................................................... additio~l infor~tion

Qu ·, stions 25, 26 and 27 to be M.E. Moore D.O. Moore

ansm~r ed

witnesses.

by i nterrogator .


c 0 p y REPORT 0~~11 ;ti. 02.:LZC r OBS3RV:::D Nar.e of Observer • •¥t9 , .¥~tt~ .¥qq\~ ... .. •.

2.

........ ........

..... ..

Address of Observer .~ ? . ~~reone Road , North Manly . . . . .

.

.

. .

. . .

.

. . .

..

0

••••••••••

••

••

••

Domestic duties .. ..... ...................................

3.

Occupation of Observer

4.

Date and Tioe of observ~tion (Ti~e given in 24 hour clock 1140 hours 19.1.59 zonal time)

...................................................... ................

................... .... .

5.

Pe riod of observation(s) • •• • • • ?~~ - ~:~~~~

6.

t:C...nncr of observation: (Give dekils of Qi·m position by tlap r eference if possibl~, or by known landoarks , ~nd describe any equipnent used in the observQtion) •

.. ....................................... ................... ........ ............. ........................................................ ......................................................................

./._~

..

7.

7lhere 1'/.... s object first observed , 0 . g . overhe.,.d, conin;:; froc behind a hill, over the horizon, etc , 20 degrees above horizon •

. ....... .. ... . .. ............... .. . . . .... ..... . . . ...................... 8.

.lhc1t first attrc1.cted observer ' s c1ttr.ontion , e • .; . lioht or noise . Light - brilliant •

9.

Did obj e ct c1ppe~r as a lilh t or as a definite object , Definite object •

...... ................................................................

......................................................................

10. If there 11hc.o. t ,.,..... s the ir One •

\leiS

nore tbcin on'-"l .

obj~ct,

fornc:~. tion

ho·."l nc..ny 'dero there, dOd

..... .................... ............................................. 12 •

. Chromium Plate .lha.t ::a. s the colour of the lic;ht or obJ~ct • •• •• •••• ••• •• • •••• •.• Clear Shape 1'/ha t va.s its appd.rent sha.pe •• ••••••• • • •• •• •••• • •••••• •• • •• ••• •• •

13 .

No. 7/as .. ny d'!t....il of structure o!>servable • ••••••• • •• • ••••••• • •••• • •

11 •

...................................................................... ........ ... ........................ .................................... 15 .

No . Wa.s any ne thod of propulsion obvious •• • • • ••• ••• • •••••• • •• •• • • • • • • No . there c.ny sound . . .•.• • • • •...•••.•. • .•. . • • ••.•. ..•. • . • · · · · • • • •

16 . ~x

Height, or ~ngle of el evation • .•• • • • ••••••••• • ..•••••••••••••••••

14.

17 . K*: Speed , or angu l a :r velocity ... . ••. .. ... . •. . • . . .• ..• . . .. •••.. ··· • • •

18. State aoy exoerience 'lhich enables observer to be rea.so~bly certain ,.bout th'! ...ns·;ers ~iven to 16 d.nd 17 •

...................................................................... Sincfl it is nornally ir"ossible' to estirld.tf! the hoight u.nd speed of a str...nee object it : •ill usu...lly be better to onde.... vour to doter nino the ..~.n..,la of olov~tion of th:J object, the anGlo throu~h -.1hich it novod , ... nd tho tine L!t~n to do this •

_,_


- 2-

..,

~aport

19 .

on

a.eri~l ob J ec~.~pJLe~g

rcontd .l

~----

Directton of f light •li th refer enc e to lando..rks or points of t he conpa.ss . East to We st

.................................................................... .. 20 . Did the object r ec~in on a. strQi gh t p~th , devia t e or nanoeuvre at all . Straight path and appeared to return on same course •

.....................................................................

21 .

\'las any trail of

exh~u st, v~p our

or light s een • •• J\o••••••••• ••• ••

22 . Vfuere did ob j e ct di sappodX , e . g . i n o i d- a.ir, behind a hill, over the horizon . Faded •

.....................................................................

23 . Existence of any physic.:..l evidenc e such gr aphs, or other supp ortin ~ evidence .

d.S

fragn!:!nts , photo-

..................................................................... Weather conditions ex perienced a t tir\e (s) or ob s erva tion(s) ••••• ...................Cl..ear ...•.................................... 25 . Locution of uny air in vicini ty at t he tioe of sighting • .........................................' ..... ..................... . .................... .............. ........... ............ ............. 26 . Locution of in the ••••• ..................................................................... No •

24 .

tr~ffic

th~

~ny nct eorolo g ic~l s~t ions

27 .

Any addi tionul

inforn~tion •••••••

gc n er~l dre~

• •••••••••. • •••• • ••••••••••••••

..................................................................... ..................................................................... .....................................................................

Qu ' Sti ens 25 , 26 and 27 to b e ans v:ered by

int e rro~a tor .


TelEPHONE:

,t) ,No_

.ray 550

PLEASE QUOTÂŁ

_ _ _ __

Headquarters Support Command

R.A.AF

5/6/Air( 32A) ,/

Victoria Barracks St Kilda Road MELRHlRNE SC1 VIC

14 SEP 1959 Secretary Department of Air Administrative Buildings CAN13ERRA ACT

SIGHTING OF AN UNUSUAL AERIAL PHEN()}JENA

1. Forwarded herewith is a report of a aightill8 of an aerial object at Mildura on 30th August, 1959. 2. The Report was received under cover of a letter from Department of Civil Aviation, La Trobe Street Melbourne, dated 10th September 1959.

Encl

,.. ' :,. .


L er ...... ......................... .. ... ...... ......... .......... ~:..

2.

Address of Obse~or .• ;:?-~: . ?~ :-.. ~-i~: !!. •• • •• ••.. ••• • . • .• . .• . . •••.•.•••.• ••

J.

Occllpation of O'!>server •• : . :'1: ~.'7 . .~·. ~:.. . . .. .... .. . . . . .. ..... .... . .. ...... .

4.

Date and Time

ot Observation

24 hcu.r clock zonnl time)

(Time given in

• . ?. ~ .' . . ... . • 9. ; . . f:; : . : • • ••••..... • .•... . .• . . . .....•... . .. .. . .. . .• .. •...•• 5.

p,... io.1

6.

lhn~e~

ot Obset"l'a";ion(:;) . .. . ::';':-: ~: . ~; . ~ •• .;-!. ~~., ......... .... .. . .... ... . . .

of Obse~..a~ion (Gi•e details of own p-sition by map referen~3 if oossi't:' , o.· by l.LO"' l landmarks, and describe a~y equiornent used in the

0: ""crva"'io.:l). 1 eo

.e~

c·1:: •• len binocular from re •• o' Louse , • • , . , , , ,. ,..,,.. • • • • • • • • • , , . , • • , ., • •

• •••• "'~\

~·~C.C•

f'I'O • "f'' t t t •"'>"'f'II ' ''' ' ' "' O~ ttt tt tt t

......... .. ...... ........... .... .... . ... .... , ...... ......... .., .., .......... .. . . ········,····· ··· · teo-••• • · .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . ~

~

-·!'" · ~·,.·· · ·· ··

7.

':!ere was object. firs· cr.e::- the ·,~1.'iz-:'l ~tc.

-~s.:.ved;

80° to -~t Ol~ house movinE ... . . . . , ....... . ..... . .. .

e .g. cverheai.

o· ing fr.:>:l behind a hill,

••.c. . clirection •

~·· · ••• ~'" · •• · · ··· · · · · · · ·····.,··· ·· "' ·· 1···· · "'·· ······· · ·

8.

e . ~.

l'!'.at !'irst a"ttractcd obs ·rver ' s attention,

l'.s!it or noise •

. ~~~. ~~·~ . ~: .~*~;!1. !l?:>. ~~~:' ~ ~~~~f~: . . , . . . . -.... .. . .. ...... . .. .. .. .. . . 9.

Did obj ec ~ a!"pc:c ns a

liYI t

definit~

or as a

cbjec ~ •

.. ~:?4-~. '?~-;':~~ - - . ...... .... . ...... . ..... , " .. .. ' 1::.

If t1e:.·e ,;-:ts

mor~

than one object, ho~r man;' w..:::-c t~lell":un·l t-rl,at was thoir

:or"'~t;o:>'1.

One

,,..,,,.,.,.,.,,,r,fl. e #IO • •• • • • •• • ••••• • , ,.., ..,, , , , ,., ,. ,.,. ,.,. , ,. ,..

11 .

\;x;.+ 1~s tho colo'U' of the light o~ objcc-';

12.

{,f...i·:t ~ t....''"' s

•• •••• • • r •• •• •• ••• •••

••• ••

vi es . ....Ll. •,-er .. ..... , ....................... . ....i~

c~ C<..

i :.s appa.r nt s:... ~f'C • --: . ,~~... • • • .. • .. .. .. .. • .. .. • .. .. • • • .. • • . ... ... . .. ....... . .. .

.. ....... ..... . . ............ ...,."\' .............. .... . .. .... ................ , ...... ....... . .,.~

13 .

!\as

l''

·r d -t:t'2. of

••• • • •••

14.

15.

Wa:;:

c.Il"

str~cturc obscn·ablc , .~ .... . ,,, . . ... . . ... . . . . . ... . .. . . .. .

•• • •• • ••r•••

• • • •·· ~ • ••• ••

•• • • • ,. •• ..,•• ~ • • • ••• •• • •'" •

•r, • •• •"' •••r•• ••

rcthoo or propulsion obvious ••·. : • •• ,. . . • ••• · .•••• • • • • • • • • • • • • · • • •

las thn-, ·

nr

-- I....v ....... .... . . ....................... .... . of c lev'1tion ...... 0°/90° , . ..........heir; ,. .... t., .......... .... .... .... .. .. . .. . .

scun 1

t.n'T

· ~

.... . .

~ - · ~ ····

..

UT".._ 077r

~n~lc

~

17 . ++

~:v,::cci, ,~. ~r ..

18.

St::..o -.ny o.::pcricnoe which e:•lllblcs obsct"l·... r to br :cnsor.~':l1v =~rt."..i."l nbout tho r>ns<~~r;: g:,-. 1 'o 16 'U\fl ·,7 .

++

S!r.c~ ~t is

? .. .

. . . . <I •

• • ,.

..

• ....

....

~

~

... .

....... .

... . .... .

.. .

... .. ..... ............ . ~

:'1lly impossible to cotimn~o the 'eight :mel sp<"od of a strange c~ject, i~ will usuaJly be better ~o ~nl~avollr vO uoto~ino the anglo of oloYaticn o:' .. n ohj oc•, tho :mglo through 11hic, it 11ovcd, 3.rti tho tiluo t::-.l~n to de thi. . :10:.

····· · ·· 2/ ·~

. .

~ >:.":'r

-.

.

'•#• ·~.

- :; i ..


- 2 -

on Actia.l Ob j!'ct Ql)servcd

(Cont 1 d )

Direction of flight with rofercnco to landmarks or points of the compass •

...............,...,..... ............................ ....................... . ~

20.

Did t he object romain on a straight

~th ,

devi ate or manoeuvre at all,

....•...ih .....,-.t.••.. ......... ................................. ............ . ~

tnil of exhaust , vapour or light seen

........................ 0

21.

Wils any

22 .

·•horu did object di sappear, e . g . in mid-air, behind n hill , over the horizon. e ..... e .Lit ..~1ei " .. ... .,. ... ... ."'..... .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. . ........ ..... .. .. .. .. .. .... . .

23.

~xistcncc of any physical supporting evidence .

~vid ~nce

such as

fragm~nts , pbotog~phs ,

or other

........................................................................ 0

21.. wcath... r conditions eXPCrionced :J.t tit;o (s) or obs<Jrvation(s)

.......1............ ...................... ...................................... ~e.s

25 .

Locati~n

of :l.DY :J.ir tnffic in the. vicinity at tho

til·~

of sighting •

• ::...1 ........... , ........ .................................... ................. ............. .. .................................................. .... .....

26.

Location of

:J.Dy

met eorological

s~~tions

i n tho general ar ea .

liiJ ..................... . ................................................ ..... 'l..::'~

2? .

Any adO.itional in£-onr.:ltion • :u!'• •·~.r.

~

li...

si • o~e.

.... sc

--"

..~.v.~~.~. :~ .-.t •••e• •~ •.~•.s.e••. ; .e.~.-•.•• •¥ . . . ~ .s

sur. clirn;~Y o . i "·

• • • • • • • • • • " • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • r• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

...' .......... ..... ...................................................... Questi ons 25, 26

an~

27 to be

answer~d

by intvrrogator •

............... .......... ~·e

c incideo rtith flicht of: t . bnllocr r ' is ~o=sitle e::::: 1 .r.-'tior•• i

1.

l·.(


COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

DEPARTMEN T O F CIVIL AVIATION t..t•pli~ :

Jt:W1::

68

0101

POSTAl. ADDIIE$$

BOX Ko

T•l~ Addr.M '"

" AVIAT. IIIUUAKJ:"

I, PO

&Rt&IAIIt: AtltPOBT K t 2

--

The Secretary , Department of Air ,

~13"arracks ,

... ~

~

REPORTED SIGHTING OF ASTROUOMICAL PHENOME:NA .

The attached correspondence reporting the sighting of astronomical phenomena in North Queensland has been received from our Officer- in- Charge , Normanton, and Hrs . E .A. \•/as sell of Silver Plains Station, via Coen, and is forwarded for your information.

~r).AJdf. (L . B. :./ILLIS)

For Regional Director.


Silver Plains Station, Via COEN .

July21st , 1959. The }.fanager , Civil Aviation Department,

CAI. JS .

Dear Sir, You may be interested to know that a very bright object , greenish in colour , flew across the sky in a westerly direction past our homestead , just after dusk on !!ednesday evening July 8th. It was so bright it lit up the ground and appeared to be q u1 te lot.1 . It even ca lsed the dog to bark madly .

~Y son David , saw the object also . south of the homestead at the time .

He

was 1~ miles

Yours faithfully ,

(Sgd . )

Mrs . E .A . Hassell.


.COMHONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA Department of Civil Aviation , Government Aerodrome , llORl-'ANTON . 29/7/59 . S .A.T. '"' . TO~SVILLE .

Subiect

Unidentified Fly ing Objects : Normanton .

The Communications Supervisor , Townsville has requested that I endeavour to make some enquiries reference reports of lights ("Flying Saucers") allegedly sighted in the Nor manton Area . Please find attached an account which I have had prepared for and signed by one , Mr . A. Charles who is the Marine Pilot stationed at Karumba . Also attached are the names of some persons who were in the vicinity and compared notes with Mr . Charles at the time of sighting and who if contacted should provide reliable corroboration of' the facts set out by Hr. Charles . \vhile the exact addresses of these persons are not known it should not prove difficult to trace them and solicit a statement should it prove necessary or desirable . The only other report that has come to my notice was one from my Senior Groundsman who in company with his daughter , reported seeing , just after dark on or about July 5th, a round multi coloured light moving in a rortl 'South directioâ&#x20AC;˘l at considerable height to the East of Normanton Aerodrome, and in the motion appeared to be in a horizontal plane and the object was visible for ~0/60 seconds and then disappeared ,

Signed (S .A. Aldred) Officer- in- Charge .

THE REGIONAL DIRECTOR

BRISBANE .

Forwarded as requested .

(Sgd . )

G. Do~gl~s S . A . LC.

3/8/1959.


COloiMOHWEALTH OF .AUSTRALIA

Department of Civil Aviation, Government Aerodrome, NORMANTON .

29/7/59 · S .A . T . C ., TO\VllSVIL:.E .

Unidentified Flying Ob:lects : NORHANTON . The facts listed hereunder with regard to my sighting of an unidentified flying object have been supplied by me at the request of the Normanton Representative of D. C.A. and are listed under separate headings for ease of description and assimilation . TI~E OF SIGHTING :

6 .40 P.M.

8/7/59 .

PLACE OF SIGHTING On the : Norman River , approximately 5 miles west of \-!ills Cr eek . (See Military Hap No . 1411 Burketown 4 Mile Series . ) DESCRIPTION OF OBJECTS : Luminescent object s i milar in shape to a wind sock , esti mated 25 to 30 feet in length . Considering the direction of travel , the smaller end of the object was foremost and was glowing a very dark bluish colour which appeared to gradually merge through reddish and orange shades to a pale , almost faint whitish colour at the rear end , giving something of an impression of an oxy torch, with the light being less intense away from the source . HEIGHT :

Estimated to be approximately 2000 feet to 3000 feet .

FLIGHT C~~ACTERISTICS : From my vantage point the object appeared to the Northeast , travelling in level flight in a direction from Southeast into Northwes~ There was no suggestion of engine noises , and if any sound was emitted by the object it was not audible . The object gave an impression of extremely high speed and was visible for an estimated 30 to 50 seconds from the time of sighting until it was no longer visible. WITNESSES : The follO\dng persons were in the vicinity at the time , si ghted the object and compared notes with me . I am not sure of the correct addresses , but , because of their prominent positions they should be easily traced if corroboration is sought . Mr . J . HORN ••. A Director of General Motors , Melbourne , Victoria . Mr . \~ . Green •• General Manager of Eagers , Brisbane , Q. Dr . Athol QUAIL (Spelling may not be correct). Specialist , Brisbane , Q. Dr. Harsh RENOU •• Melbourne , Victoria. From a report from a llr . R. PAVLOSKI , residing at Karumba, it is concluded that the objects line of flight lay between our position and his place at :-:arumba. A.C. Charles Signed (Original signed by Hr. Charles) . (Sgd.)

S.A. Aldred

Officer-in-Chars~.


~EPHONE : ;-

IN t.

I.IXY 130

f PLEASE QUOTE

No, _ _ _ _ __

Headquarters Trainine Command RAAF

Albert Park Barracks ;IELBOURHE SC3 VIC 5/6/Air(30A)

=7 AliS i953 Tiepartment Of Air .:.di.. inistrative Offices CJJ\.ai::.u..=tA

ACT

SIGH'!'lNG OF UNIDENTIFIED AE.-d.AL 0 :IJ:ECTS

Forwarded are seven reports received from the Department of Civil Aviation {Victoria-Tasmania Region), La Trobe Street welbourne. concerning sighting of unusual aerial phenomena in the t.rrLDURA , !.i.EltBEIIf and ROBINV ALE districts at night between 17th and 20th July, 1959 .

~.~~ 1" 7 .:i.

TALBERG)

Commander Far Air Officer Commanding

~ling

Encl

'~ \d~f. J I

/f.f;>'1

.[~TCD


d,>tlT ON AERL ,J. OBJECT OB:;JlR_'@ E. • EN D....CO':'l' Nac!e of observer ...•. •.•. ••••.•.•••••• • • • •• • •• •• .•• • • •••• • • .•••••. • • , • , •• , • •• • :So.x 3?1 P.o. .ilillr:i Vic . 2 . . . . dd.i:"3SS or Observer ...... " .• . .. .. ..••.. • ..• .. •...................... ~ •••••• '.eweoro..o :J,c.U observer ~- - I of ~ .,, • • ••• •••• • ••••••• • • • •.••• • . •••• • • •• •• , , • , J . Occupation of Observer ••••••••• •· ••e"'e<>rolo.;ic:.l Jffice ,.e,-oo. e • D , • 1 c. 4. Date and ':'i!:lc of Observation (Ti.me given in 24 hour clock zonal time) 20 '7 5q 2235' t.~e -~rrox . plus or -anus~~ n•te •r •

•••••••••• •

•••••••••• f

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

~ •

••••• •

....................... ............................. . 2235K Por

sever~l

~

sec.

5.

P9riod of Obscr•lation(s)

6.

1-''ln"le- <' • ..>se-vatic-.n (Gi'l•e details of own position by m:r.p reference 1f possib~~. or by known landmarks, and describe any equinment used in the observ'lt · o."l) . Ob;:rect~ • •

••~,.•~·· •

·•• •

si • ted frvm .J.n open -osition adjacent to ll t .nd lie., bu liinb .. ... ... .. .. . .... ...... , . , ••••• • • •••••• ••••• ,. ••••• • •• ••• • • •••• oe •••~

l:ILDORA VIC • ..... . .. ..Aerodror .........e ....... ,. ..., .......... . ····································· ,

,.,

. .. ... ... . . . 7.

,. .~ ···· ··· · .t; ····· · ······••&••· ·· ·· ~ · · ·· ····· · ·····~,,.,,.t,~ ·· · ·

Where was object first observed, e .g , overhead , cominz f rom behind a hill , over tho horizon, etc . Objects ca~e nto view from beuind trees as I f3ced the ~ direction ' ' ''" " ' , ,, ,

..................................... .

.... .. .. ........ .... ..........

8.

,fuat fi r st attracted obse rver's attention, e . g. light or noise , Line of turae br:~t .igh•s tr~velling ~t hiJJ s eed ,. '

............ . .... ... .... ... . ............................... ., ....... .

9.

Jid object app~a~ as a li5ht or as a definite object. apx;eared aa three distinct li&:-i:s, ye'low to oran,·e exhaust f;,,. a,

.:1ve ill' )ressian

. or, th.rae · jBi ·nircra.rt: · · · . ". · · . · · · · · . · · · · · · ·,,, · · · · · · · · · · ...... .... ...... . ~

ill.

If there was more than one object, hov many were there, 3nd what 1.ns their tio.,, Three oDjects, fir~t a~ aared ir lie , one be.lnd the other, se~•r~tei br two de ~ee in.erval~ . Durinz latter 45 de~ees o~ ~r~, tue o J~ to a~~eared • '" • ' ' • ~ • • • • • • • • • • ' ~ • • ' ? • • l : ' • t~Y, I I ' H.'' t • • ' l' • ' '· ~ '•" 1' • ..t. l• • ' " '' ll.' 1.• to be 1n a sta ereCl forma·non , Wl.T;Jl r;oe .ra1 1n0 ooJea• cu-~ng.Jl., <:.. a•..t e al:..(!Iltly.

fOT

a" · •

11.

~ll..1t ~ '.S tho cJlo..ll' of' the light o,. obj eat

12.

Wlnt was its e.~:-ar•nt shapo ... r~~. ~~

•N'H·."1 :•."'. h r:~t . ;!'1'/'' \ (. f!-'/~1;:'; ••

.. ;~ ..! . ~~ . ~~::;'P•• ?:~: . :?;· , ;.·~ . :~;:: ..

---<:::::'::> ~ - ~ "''" "f tt • t • l • · • ... .. ,. ... . . ... , •• ,."'."'·"• *••· •t•• ,. , • • • • • • ~

13 .

••••••• , ..... , •••••••• ,.

W~~ ""lY doUt:Ll of structure obsnrvable , , ., ,, • • r~ 1 , ,, •• , . , , , . , , . , , •• • •••• • •• • •• •• ,

17.•'

~

• • • J . ,. , •• , .. , .. . .. . . . . . ..... ,. .. . . . . . ,_. •• ••••• • ••• ••• • ••

S~c d. or ~n:

St .t.o ""lv o :po::>-iC'n~"o which ~P~l s ..bs,Jrver +;o be r<.asonab1y certain about t. t"l:;:· ".: g~.•·o·1 to 16 o.nd '7· E::.eve1• e!U'a sei"";CA with Buren of 'eteo:rolo~ d1t1e aasoc'i"LtP.:l. with obaerv1ng bi~u alti".-~.ie _ o ns by P.tl 1:1 "' - e and.r'ldll'· bo.th. dur~ng, nimt <ll\Q. daY. • • .BaNe. PDBBrllaoi. ,tM ~h.e~~ ~.t~tJ. i. "~. ~..! _t).Zlo~ ~ S .ni;mets,,~.;-oal!"e '.Uill'lClEi~_, .x:<!PK:et nose cone·· _ _.'tTh ..,, au. ,__Vlt!d or ..lrct-~.t ++ ~ 1c "'" ~~ l'loxn'\lJ.y l.!llpos51bJ.c to csti.mtlte tne hoi~ t an spood of .. strange o.JJr\...: ...t •.'i.D. usua''y bn bettor to endo::wour to d;;,;;cmin ~~ho n.r:glo of o~.ovction 'l4 t.hc ohj"!C't, thJ mg).e throu~h which i t movvd, 1nrl tho timo t-.J~ ...... ' c. thi . I h,ve always ridiculed previously reportei str~no~ o JfC~ , aa here ahould be 8 tu logical explanation for euoh phenomena· the objects wb'icl I ~ ted were neither in • h ·• t .n.Acb 'he known space vehicle cateeory , or meteorite ols~d· as t e ~r~~r•••• ·•r • • obje.:t ~ travelled ~a not fa~t enough , 1nd yet travelled at a spetd ~ 4n excess o1 ern jet cir•nft. .

18.


- 2 on Aqial Ob ject Observed

19.

20.

(Cont'd)

of flight with roforanco to landmark- or points of tb~ c oopass . 0\..JeOt<> trr..,.,l:ed in an ~rc approx 250 degre s to ~··o ie Te .. o ~ 1ne t rcr.. Ws.. t;(). sn:. ¥1:Ul>~. .~~ ~. ).PP~P7.. 99. dJ!iu~rSl• "'· s>l>JP.r-. RJJP. J).fl~. e..d for :: r t 4'1 e 'a'ees then a eareq to for:~~ a st~ trere Ol'llb t.on, tt. le ~er .u_lowir :;~o .. ihod ahead , second obJect ollO'Iflnc. slibll Y h1. ·her . -~rd. o Ject u Di<i t:ne object rccain on a straight ~-th, aeviaw or manoouvrv at all. "ouorlng Dir~ction

• ~P.J~?.t;>. :~;• •-!l!'l!i. ,ip.,

!':F!'i~:.. P!".t!'. !!;r. ';'_Of:. ~!. ~~:'?!-.'!If.· ... ~;; ·f..... ~~~§a~ Ff-•••• ,

21 .

ob ect p e~red to aver pr1or to a1sap e~~nce . llas any t r ;1il of exhaust, vapour or light seen ••• • •• ~~. ''!,13,t, ,t,r,

22 .

.:t~or._

did object disappear, e . g . in mid-air, behind n hill , ove r tho horizon. d> 3 ~o gared ' • ' • ' • .....-. • 'P .... ' ' • ' .

nbj ects • • • y,

23 .

towaris horizon, final '

• '

••••••• •••

T8~'n'o.'l'

si~htin~

obscured b

Airline

'b\lilding·.' . '' . ' •· ' ' ' · · · · · · ·

t.xistoncc of tmy physical evidanco s uch as f r agments , photogr l:'.phs , or other s upport ing evi denco .

Nil ............ ................... " ........................... .............

l4.

Weathe r condit ions exPerienced at tit~ ( s) or observation (s )

•• '1'J.rll3• .C.l.o.tJ.d)..e.s.s••VJ..s• .3$)• •trt;..l.e.s•• •••• • ••••• • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 25 .

Location of

;10y

nir tr;1ffic in the vicinity at the ti,. .. of siGht ing •

26. Loc.:.tion of

~

mctoorologi c.li stations in the g..mc r .u a r ea •

........................................................................ ........................................................................

............................ ..................................... .......

27 .

·"iff1' addi t ion3.l infol"JD.:ltion •.•••••••••••••••••••••••..•....•••.•••••••••

........................................................................ ........................................................................ ........................................................................

Que stions 25, 26 and 27 to be answer ed by interrogator.

... rr '

,..,. ~.A

In l!ne ahead f¢rmation for first 45 degrees of arc. then

---<::::::)

stage.ered fo~~t1on during latter b lf of aro . 'lfitb biBher an.re:lr object aprearing to waver and c~~~ altitude radioly.

al ti-


J. ...... ............. ...... ..... ................... ....... ........ l'es~;er

1: •

t&rtc of observer

2,

Government lir ort · ~ildur Ac1dr>3SS of Obsc::ver • • •.••••••.•••••••••••• • •••• • .•• • , •• • ••••.••••••• •••••••

3.

Occ~.tpation

4.

Date a nd Time of Observation (T~e ~ivan in 24 ho~r clock zonal time) Aporox 2230 E .... .

5. 6.

... .

.

.

~e .eoro4ogical Observer of Obsen,er . ..... . ... . ........................ . .. . ... .. . . ...... ... .

. . . . . f" . . . .. .

.

.

.

.

. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .

45

.

.

.

....... .

...... .

.

.

......... .

....... .

.

sec •

P~=iod Ol Obse vation(s) • ....... ... . . . . . . . . 'r . " . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .

!hn.;er or C'!:!se::va:~ion (G:•:ve det.ail::r of o-.m p~sition by map reference ii' or b~' kl::)•JD landJ'larks, and describe e.-..y equi"'!lent used in the

f.=ssib:.~,

o::~erJat.ior..) .

a" e':l.red from be.rind screen at Drive-in ttle-tre

Object

••• "' • ••" ""'er••• •' ""'• •

«>•• >~ •• ••••• .,• •• • ••• "'••• • • • •• • • • "'*'"'"'•~· · · ~ •••• ~> •• ••••• •

•• • •• • ••••• •••• •• ••••• • • •• • • • • r •• •• • •••• • ••• • • •• ••••• ••••• •• • •'•~"~ • ••""•••• • • '"

..... ...................... ... . ...... ...... ... ......... ........ ............. .... .. 7.

lf--:~.:-.:l ..'<'-3 objcv~

over

tne c. . ~iz '"~

..... .... .. .. S.

. ..

~

flrwt :;;.s.....-cd: e . g. overhead.

'"'l' ir.~ fr.:>:>l

behind a hill,

l'!!tc ..

................. .... ,. ...... .... .. .. .. ..... ... . . .. ... ... .......... .

,ru..:tt firsv attr"\ctod obscrvcr 1s attention, o , g. liz.lt. or noise , -ie;...ts ••••••••• •

9.

• • • ., . . . . . .

~i1 otjrc~ ep~~

ll . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ,

. . . .... . . .. . . . . , . , .. . . . . . .

.. ..... ... .. , ...... -...... . ...... If

~1ere 1::ls mo-...

.

.

.. .

.

.... .

.

.

.

.

cbjec•

.......... .... ..... .... ... ......... ._ ...

(in persoective)

3" in diamet e r

~

iv.

defJ~t~

n- a li?ht or as a

l i6 l.ts - J.bout

.... .

·

·-~

th1n on-3 ob,iect, hoH m::m;.r werv t.ht?:Y ;and what was their

for ti'):t.

Five object.> in "V" form tion ,.-radually cb..mging to " line-:lhead " and disappearing

11.

· ' ·one oy ·one: ~ · · · · · · · · · · · · · . · · · · . . . · · · · · · · · · · · · . . · · · · ,. · . · · · · · · · · . · . · . . · · · · · · · Glowing oran a-red ..~t 1 "'-S the c.>lour oi' tha J.ight or object. ... ,. .................... . ..... ...

12 •

'1- ~

l'~~

tns

.

~

...s

... ............. . 13.

+-

a~ar ~ tl~

~-~ - ·

.. .

nil

anr''O::! . ...... ... . . . . . " ..... . ,. ... , • •• • ,. .. ..... . .... · · - ·~ · -· · ·· ·· · · · · · -·· · · ··

•••

. ........ ............ . ....... ....... . . ~

... . .. . .. ......... . ......... .... -" .. ., . ..

14.

W~~ 1n~ r.cthcd o~ p•~pulsion obvicos

15.

~~as thcr~

"7. •+ Sneed,

O "'

no

any ro1md

._

S';3.':.e :ll"Y experience which .::~abl<'s obscr-... r tho ans·.:-rs g::.vo:1 to 16 and :.7 ... .

... .

..... ('., ....... ....... .. .

jet like flaMe extend ..,

ooe~

• · • • r ......... ... a .. • • • ••• • • • • • • • • ... ,.,. ..... . . ,. ••

di~~~;;~;~d ·i~-~

.... .

" ~.-~

... ... , . . ......... ... ........ ... ...... to... . ap~rent

obJect~ ·~ eared in ~ ~

y

~"'g

.. .

++

. . . . . . . . . . . ,..

·r s [',...~1' e. . t,._'1.:._:. o"' struct~re obsor-"lblo ~·-~~~ - ~ · ~· ·c·~· · ·· · - ......... . .. . ... . . .. ·· · ···· ··-·· ··-- ·~

18.

4

.... "

.

·ect~or s~

~~ observer and

·m; ·ci;;;~ti~~ ~ ·.t;; ·i :.;~~. ·;~·;;·sky. ~ b~ =~'l~cnn'b1 • :

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ., • • • • ('

. . ... .. .

.... . . . .

J.

tab acout;

. . . . . . . . . . . 1'0 .

.. .

Sine i~ is ~or~illy impossible to ootima.o tho ~aight and spcod of a strange ohjoct, .i. .. w.:Jl •tsU'l.'.ly b' bett()r to endc .vour t;o dotormino th;:l nr.glo ot olc,·ati.on or t hi" ob> ct, ;,r- nnslc tl.rough ••hich it. -oved, nnd the tirno ...nltcn t.o do thiJ .

. . .. . ... 2/


- 2 '"9.~oort on Acti.al Obiect O?~orvcd

19.

(Cont'd)

Direction of flight with reference to landmarkc or points of the compass . Tr- ck oarr :.el .-.1 t.J. UJ/'Y trg,clr ·

······ ... ... ··•••····•·•·•····•··•·· ··•·••· ... ~

20.

·••···· ···· ········••··•

Did the object rocain on a straight :oath, deviate or manoeuvre at all • . . • . . . . . . . . . • . • . • . i:ir·.. i~ t . '~~*'t-:4 • • . •..•. •• • • •• • •• ... .••••.•..••• •• •• .••• •

21.

licht~ ~ e~rei to 01 • t . , ... , , .......... ~· ~1~~ .ihor... did object disappoar, o . g . in mid-air, behind a n!ll , ovor tho horizon •

~<hs

22 .

any

tr.:~il

of exhaust, vapour or light soen

.. ........ ..... " ................. ...................................... . tt.~.i-air

23.

~stcnce of any physic.~ supporting evidence .

cvid~nce

such as fragments,

photo~.pbs ,

or other

nil ................................................................... .... '

24.

Jc.:~thcr conditions exoc ri~nced at ti10(s) or obs ~rvation(s)

See accompun: 1nb report .. ....................................... ................................ 25.

Locat.ion of any nir traf'fic in the vicini ty at tho

tiJ;~~,;

of sighting.

nil ............, ........................................................... . ........................................................................ ~ny mcteorologi~

Location of

27.

Acy addl.t 1onal in.forma. tion • •.•. •... •......••••••..•• .•.. . .•.. . ••••••••• ~d

1

to .n- •• ne f

r1

tion

an~

dln-- eared

i'1 e t.aken to cover ;:;;, to "3 a-rc •

aroa .

Items "n eared as 5 11., ts in "V1' f'or:t'-t1on

. .

ch

stations in the

gcn~ral

26.

<'I •

••••• •

• • • • ,. . . . . . . . . .

.

o

..... .

arent!y

red to be about

J.r ~5

'lli.d.

"1.

~l:..ich

r.

sees a - •

... ... .. ..... ............ .

... .... .

....................... .................................................. ~ppeared

as pulsating li •hts simi ar to jet exhausts - ali .htly reddish or:~.n ·e . 'ITo no ....oe w.a ~o~ari but au.,.routJdi liie ce r., lai'e f • .le Questions 25, 26 and 27 to be answcr~d by int~rrogator , -P. -~ena .

;1Afi. ........................ . O"f.cer-. ~"T

Sgd.

ll"f

,_~lla.

21/7/';)9 ·

Note:- Reports frorn observers 10-15 miles north of this yosit1on !\re beine; sought and will be for .• arded, if obtai• able - also will forward cuttings from loc~l newapu~er3 .


--

"'fffOO: Cc

r -I

....Pt_!ltT ON a.ERLJ. OBJE<.;T OB.:.~RVED

J.

. • • • • • •• • •• •••• • •••• • • • • •••• •• • ••••• ..'{.~.·. F.it:filt:..IN¢. Address of Observer . • f!/..G.r.~..);#. . . . . -Rfl.lf.~ 7.0X. . •• ••. ••( !?:.~ .tl1-tF. t'Z-1 .'i'J-> r .u8 Occupation of Observer • • . . • /IP&7:1t:.vJ-."fYtew r. ... .. .. .. ... .. ...... ..... .. .

4.

Date and ?ime of Observation ('rime given in 24 hour clock zonal time)

1 • ~ &.me of observer . . ~"'!!~

2.

......~?i1j..Jfl. .. ;<,.v-fP..1 .. .... . ....... . .... . ... ..... . .... .... ............. . 5.

Period of Observation( s) •.••• ~:: . :'l.':{/f'!llf.C..S. • ••• 9-P.A«.J<•• •• ••••• •• •• , , ••

6.

?~er of Observation :

(Give details of o~~ position by map r eference i f possible, or by known landmarks, and describe any equioment used in the observation) •

.. .. .?.o.c:trrc~/'1. :-..~i?"f~~ .. .41/.tJ. NtJfr;;;!f • •~~f! • .t1f(frA'{"~~. tt~O.~t.w:-;- .... . . ·"' .~ . sf. ."1.~~~~ ... .f':W.~ ..~I~A·if<'l••l¥.'H~~'f . !'Yo k..Y~ . NrW. fl~~~e

.....aI)Ji!f/?slttliA~. :;• •I(w.8.~c ........................................... . 7.

Where was object first observed, e . g . overhead, coming from behind a hill , over the horizon, etc •

. . . • A'-!t;; .f/.tf~:r:..n eio.l~ . ./:I.e tet.'"'ktrf'l. ............. . .. .. ............ . .. .. . 8.

What first attractod obsc rver 1 s attention, e . g .

li~ht

or noise .

Lc11'1' ....................... ..................................................... 9.

Did object app<;ar as a li1ht or as a definite object •

. . ~l?f?:I/1!-.C/)••l?f ..'=~-~$_1;/ft;J. ~ . !..t.~l.f:'C. ••f~. :-. ':-1~/:{.()rl. -;'. ~.,.~... ••..•. 10.

If there was more than one object, bow many were thetiD, and ~1hut was their formation •

. . .cf!!~Y.t;M.. 9.~~~~ t: ................ .. ...... .. ............. .... ........ . fl.f. l~..

f ......................

11.

~lhat was the colour of the light or object

12 .

~lh.:l.t

13 .

Was any detail of structure observable ••. ;: •••• , •• •••. . . •• , •• • • • ••••• . • • •••

14.

Was any method of propulsion obvious •••.• •~ • ••. •.•.••.. • ••.•• • • • •• • ••.•. •.•

15.

.·/o.s thoro any sound .•••• , •.•••• • ••• •• • • • •

was its apparent shape .... '?f!ftd-:t~ .7.C! .f:.fl'$-.vP. ..S:?.tf............ .

...................... ..................... .................................. ................... ......... ............. .................................... "i.

1 .':. •• • • • • •••••• ••• • •• •• • •• • • • • • • •

16. ++ Height, or ~n~lo of elevation •• • .•. •••• • •• ~•••••••••.•••••••. • .•••••••.••• • 17 . ++ Speed, or angular v

18.

ocity ............... ~ ........... . ... . ............... ••

State any e..<pericnce which enables observer to bo rvasonnbly certain .:~bout tho answers given to 16 and 1? •

... ................................... ........................................ '

Sine~ it is norm4lly impossible to estimato tho hei~ht ~d ~ ood of

st~

object, it will usually bo better to endc.lvour to dc~ormino tho anslo of elevation or th< object, th~ 'lllglc.: through ~thich it movod, nnd the til:Jo takt.n to do this .

······ ·· 2/


- 2 -

'liii'6eport on Acri. al Ob je ct Ol?sorvod

19 .

(Cent 1 d)

Direction of flight with rofcronco to landmarks or points of the compass •

.. .-:':iffi.V.eJ.f.,.~'ll!i. ... .~(9§:f. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 .

. •.. . ....... . .... . .. ..•.

Did the object r ecain on a straight pPth , deviate or manoeuvre a t all•

• • .~/te';l/~t/:1; . CtN.t.!ri~

········· ···· ············ ······ ··············· vapour or light soon .Aftt. ...•..•.•.•... ...•

21.

Was any t r a il of exhaust,

22 ,

.•borl did object d i sappear, o . g . in mid-~ir , behind a hill , over the horizon •

.. ..fl./.i?f,• •ftc/(/.":(.C.I)i• ............. . ..... . . . ... . . .............. . ... . . . .. 23 .

~xistcncc

of a:n.y physical cvids ncc such as fragments , photogr".phs , or other supporting evi denco .

.............. ............. ...................................... ..... . '

~

24.

1JcJ.thcr conditi ons "xoori unc ed at ti•,e (s) or obscr vation(s) F;NcC'I~. t,\L ,c.~.s •. -S-I ~r.r~...''""'.,._..•1$ ~ -:- JlA 1,.-c:, • H.'Y .. I • l'f?, .....,, . • • Y.'• • • .~ • •";' 1.-;~ • •, • • , • •

• • , • , •• •"~'-• . .. ~'YH , ~-c: ·. ,

25.

Location e>f any air tr'tffic L"l the vicinity at the tiut.. of sighting •

.. ..tf(~'i(.;)J!r.. .. I!:1: fie.~.. ..~iff!lt?.t;~t>•• ~~lf~.. ':C:~ .. -~~'t').f.!':'•

•. •.IJ1. . ~/)J%.11. •.. .• ~ .tltf{~ /~.l/1-iV~tX .8:r.-ri'l1.~. PF;~If'.tt:Q.rf,t{.). . .. ••• 26.

Location of any motcorologi ell sta~ions in the general a r ea .

. . . . fl:('WRfl. ...1/.~~P."!t=:. ....... . .... . .... ................ .. . . . .• 27 ,

.U~y additional i aformation • Mo.£;.;{F.9.1l..-9h~~;t,C~I. ..~r.~f..P.t:U-1·. ... ..... .. . • •~0..<i'I!II.Af. f'A.f(i.<jiJ~Jtr•• ~!f!7~ .i!'f/1.1'. ••.-t'~':l(!f. li~~f?!'tt,:; ,/l:r..

;J;I':I~ .. (V!'('~~#":y. .:"r~P.;' Jl/.;i ~~¥. . 71-. *~-"ft:-.Q/7 :/.li .1 .. ............... . . . . . . . !?':'.D. :'!'? :r:. !~ .JJ!t:t¥<1.~'.1:!"!. ~7."'"1.:.~.- .• . •.... .• ........••... . .• •. Questions 25, 26 one 27 to be

fLAN£-'f'

(evuS

/J.ZI1'11li'1'H C<(Cf •

0~

elefl'q-(io,.J ~ •

6c.

answcr~d

fe>~t{joroJ

by int0rrogator .

J1-r -r;,.,e

S8.>6~~

.._'\7"...'1-r.o.-J

iay

&F.$it:ilf-r'"'~ fll"'r~~

~eo.t)uL•-;-.; /1'7"J¥er6C!~61..<.«•C"~<...

/'{//...L).Jif'~ H~ M

... ~':1. ~~t?.~-?~:.:. ....

j)c.r-ry /'of£ r. f)aJ~~,!e N


.:..PJttT ON AERLJ. OBJECT OB.>ERVED

1 •'"" Name of observer

llr. P. l'<ilcock ................. ............. .............................

J.

Address of Observer • . •. fl.o}',t)J. . ,e,s.t. ;~e;,r.b.e)A •••••••••• • ••• • • ••• •••• •••••• • ••• Farmer Occupation of Observer • • •.••••••••••.••.• • • • ••••• ••• .•••• •• . . ••• • ••••.•••••

4.

Date and Tice of Observation (Time given in

2.

2235E

24 hour clock zonal time)

20/7/59

................... ........ .. ........... .................................... at least 15 seconds ....... .......................................... .

5.

Period of Observation(s)

6.

Hruuer o: Observation ; (Give details of o'Wil position by map rererence if possible . ?r !:ly knol!ll landmarks, and describe any equi.,ment used in the obser<:J.tion) . F"lcing North at lderbein Town Hall , ,

~

..................................................

.... . . .......... ... . ...... .... .... .

. . . .. , • • o~~ . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ . 4 ····· · ······ ·· · · ········· · ·· · · ·· · · ·· · · ·····

.. . . .... , . . . . ... . ,. ...

7.

, . , 4 •'"~• &

..

• • • ~'•e ,. ,.•-., •• •

••• • ••• • ••••••••••• • ••• •• ••• •••• • •

vlhere was object fir st observed, e.g. overhead, over the horizon, etc,

comin~

•• • ••

from behind a hill ,

................ ........................... ... .

Overhead in position Nr. of observer ·· · ~···

8.

· ···· ,. ·· · · ·· ······ · ·· .._

•/hat first attracted Nu~ber ,

9.

obs~ rver 1 s

attention, e . g . light or noiso ,

spacing and flight of objects.

Did objec\. appuar as a

li~t

or as a definite object •

• PbJilCt.i. llP.!.e.ll;rtld. ~. ~ 'b}'igb,P).y, ;t,..;pm.a.tfl~ :;p!lflrPP. !.. Zl:J. ;i..J..>~..tllC;t. f r PUJ...

1u .

If there

lol:l3

more than one object, how many were there,and

flares) w.ls their

.~hat

for:.~tion.

One object w~.s thought to disappear behind a building but when emer •ed, there

~r~~F~~. :P.~~.t~. ~~~PJ¥. ~P~9~~. ?PJ~p~~- ~~!PP. ~1P~~iV,~. ,P~P~PF~. ~~P~~ .. tr~ck

and elev tion .

11 .

~fuat ~~s tho colour of the light or object

• • ~,~~~~P. PF}P~'·· · · · · ···••••·••

12.

·~at was its apparont shape . rP~~~-~j:P. ~~}t . Pf. ~~Ff~. ~r~P~~~~,p~jy, pj~~~'d

at intervals from the various spheres. ••• • •• •

13.

,. . ..

, , ••• " •" r "• ••• •'"• ~~t• • ••

Ha'l · :r• detail of :.tructure observable ••••• P?•• • •• •• ••••••••••••••••.• . . • •• · · ·· ~ ··· · . . . . . . .

14.

15.

.. •• • •••• • • • •••••• •• • • • ,. • •• •••• • •••••• • •• • ••

........

.. ..

,

. . .. .

.

.

,

..... .

.

... . . .

.

#1 • • • • • • • • • • • •

••••••••• •

•• •

••••• •

The apparent ejection of BP,rks was Was any method of propulsion obvious · · ·· · ···· ·• ···· • ······· • • ••••••••·•· · ·· illl!lledi' tely thought to be the trethod of propulsion "like a rocket" Jo.s thC"rc an:r sol.lllrl ~ .. . ., :o •

tts> ~ ,. ........... ... . ........ .. ............ . .. · •• · · · • • • • •

16 · ++ Heier. :. 1 or nn~lc of cl ova tion .. . .. t!-FP~91-• .39. (it~.,;;................ . .. • • • • • • • • 17 . +~ Speed, or n.n~·· ... · -·

18.

• • • ~. !'-PP:'S>~: ~. ~!l~t . ... . .... ·. · · · · · · · · • • · • ·

Stc.tc :\ny e.:pcricnce •·hich ~nablcs obsorv ... r to be ruasonably ce rtain !lbout t'1o Pnc;:·:r:; given to 16 nnd 17 .

• 9~~~rY~r. ~~~~9~~t(l.o~}eP~.~~~-~r,~l~.of. ~r)y~~ • • . • ..• •.. •. . .. . ..•••. • .• • ..•. Sine"' ~t is noronlly impossible to estimate the hei~ht ~d ~pood of ~ str~gc object, it vill nsually be better to c nden.vour r.o dotormino tho nn~lo o!' elevation of the object, the ·"lllgle through \thich it r.lovod, mrt tho timo ~.a.l:o 'l t., C:o thi:J .

.. · · ···· 2/


- 2 -

~

Reoort on Aerial Object O'lsc>rveg

19.

(Cont 1 d)

Direction of flight with refcroncc to landmarks or points of the compass . \'lest to E•tst - .'!.ppeared in Nw and dise.p~eared in NE .. ..

....... ......... ............................. ........................

20 .

Did t he object remain on a straight pnth, deviate or

mnnoou~

at all•

. ~~~~~~- ?!l. !3~f'!'~ .. ~:. ~-t~: ... . .. .. ...... . . . ..... .. ......... .. •...... . •. ooc~sional s~a

emmitted

21,

Was any tr:1il or c:xl:uust, vapour or light seen

22 .

.1bcrc did object disappear , e . g. in mid-:>.ir, bohind a. hill, over the horizon. disappeared in mid air but some uncertainty due to the very bri~t mo,nli ht

23.

Bxistenee of any physical cvidDnce such as supporting evidence •

· ni!b.t· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· · · ·· · · ·· · · · ·· ·· ·· · · · ·· · · · ·· fr~gmonts ,

photographs, or other

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . t~'-~ - .. ............ .......... ................ .... . 24.

1Jeatncr conditions .. xoori enced at ti·~e(s) or obscrvation(s)

25.

Location of

~y

'l.ir traffic in tho vicinity at the ti .k of sighting •

. . . . . Qil . . . .. . .. ... . . . .... .. .. ........... . ..... ... ............ . .. . .... . •

........................................................................ 26,

Locat i on of

~y m~tcorological s~~tions

in tho general a rea •

. . . . W.cJ'J.n -~l:r99f~ . •. ... . ...... •• . . . .. .. . . . ..• . . .• . ..•. . . . .•. ... . .•.. . • objects . stopped o~ and continued observ tion. Daughter ali~bted r~~~· ~~~ · ~a · ~~~~i;d . that.th~; · ;;;~ · ~i~g · ; · ~~i;; ·~ iik~·th; · ;i~d~ :··· obaerver

by

r~ii ' thai ' ~bj~~i; · ~;~·~~i; · ;~ii ' ~~d· q~ii; ' ~i~~;:: : ·~;;~ · th; ·r~~~ · ii '; i s feren ' t

............................................................... .........

connected because he could see moonlight between them. Questions 25 1 26 and 27 to be answered by inturrogator •

23/7/59

Sgd.

'il'"'..,...; ,... ..........,,1 ..! ...... .. ........ off.cer-in- Charee :.til dura.


·'· .P':i,ilT ON .ti.ERLJ. OBJDCT OB5l'fRVED lol.r. norm Biggins

..-: ~

1,~~ame

0i:· p~~~· o!ri~~- a~b~~~~:· vi~:········· · ······· · ··· · · .. ............................................. .. .... .... Occupation of Observer .... .. .................................... ...... .. ... or observer ..••• Addrass of Observer

2.

J. 4.

Date and Til:le of Observation (Time given in 24 hour clock zonal time) 2235 20 (7 /59

•• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •••••• t • •• • •• ••• • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• • •• • ••• • • • • • • • • • • •

about 20 second3 .' " ............................................... .

5.

Period of Observation(s)

6.

l·!runer <'~ bse-vatie>n (Give details of own position by map reference if posslblE', or by l:nown landmarks 1 and describe any equinment used in the observ~li:!.o:1) .

Township Robinvale situated about 60 Uiles • . ......... . . .. ..............

"" ""•~t·~· ·· ·· · ······· · · · · ··· · ················· ·· ····

...... ,. .. ... . ., ... . . . . . . . . . . .. ..

•••• ••••••

7,

.. ,

•• •·· · ~•• •~ o·~· • • • • •·· ~ ·••••

comin~

from behind a hill,

... ... , .... ...... . ........ .. ... , .... ...., ...................... ~

What first attracted obsorver 1 s attention, e . g . Size of

••• • • •• ·• • • • •· ~· ·••

9.

••••••••••• •• • • •••••• • •••f•••• ' '

Where was objact first observed, e.g. overhead, over the horizon, etc , at>peared from N :t direction . -~· ·· ·

8.

~ . , ,

et~"• • e • 't •••••••••••••••••• ••• ••••••••f'•••••••••••••

li~ht

~

.......... .

or noise .

o~oject .

... ••• ,. •••••• • ·••• , •• • co ••• ••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Did object app·ar as a

li ~ht

or as a

de~inite

only

object.

.. .•...• -~~~~t!~ -~~u;t!~~~~ .w~~ .~~l!'!~~-~~~~ .~~ .~~~~ .. . . . .. . . .. ...... . ...... . 10.

w~s

If there

more than one object, how many were theno, and what was their

fo"C-l.ti~.,.

Four 1n line ahead formation . . ... ... , • •• ••• •• .•. • ,.'! ... . .... . . , .. .. .. . . .. .. .. ............... .. ...... .. .. . ... . ~

12.

- front object ••• , •• .1 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • tho colour of the light or obJ.eat .. 1 Reddiab. apfearea brl~•er Wh:1t was its apparent shape .... " ..~~':n<:<:l .. .. ..... .. ........ ........... . .

13 .

w~~ r~y dctni1 of structure obscrvablo ~ ······~~ ......... ... . .. . ............ .

11 •

~fu~t \~s

.. .. ........... ............ . .... .. ...... .

14.

Wn~ a.n~r

15 .

.hs

16. ++

Hc~gt~,

.. t~ .. ~···· · ···~· ·

~ c- · ···· · · ··· --· · ······· · ·············· ···· ·· ···· ···

·,···, .. . . . . . ,. ., , • • • • • • • •

lll • • • • • • • • • • •

•••••••••••• •

••••• •

no

mct.hoc\ of proprtlslon obv;;.ous .... , .. .. ..... . .. . ... . ... . , • • •• ••• ••• • • • • • • •

th"r~ O.'r''f

or

no

flound .. ,..,., .. ... , • .,"'~ · ··,• •• • ~ •• •• • •c•.» •• f>•• ~. nat an easy eye level"

~n~lo

of

•• .,• • •• ••• ••••• ••••

f"!! lO'V'Rtt10n • ,. •••• • ; • ••• ~ ••••••••••••••••••••• • • • • • • • • • • • •

....unable ........to. '.determine .........• ... ... ............... . 18,

++

Stt..';c •.ny oxpcricl"ce 1mich .;-wblc~ t!1o l\"l":·:r:: g:.ven to 16 lllld l7 . Sine' it is

nor~~ly

obs~rvor

to be rcasone.bly certain about

. .... ~ · · · ·_. · ~ · :t· . . · · ···· · · ·~ .. ··· ····· •t••·········

impossible to estimate the height and s ood of a strango o~jcct, ~t ~~1 ·~sually be better to endo3vour to dotcrrnino tho nn~le of oJovnt.ion or tho object, tho :mgl.., through 1:hich it moved, nnd tho time t~Yrn

t'

~'this.

········ 2/


.. - 2 -

~ 'Rcoort og lioti al Ob ject Observed 19 .

(Cont 'd)

Direction of flight with roforcnco to landmarks or points of the compass •

•• •~ . :~~;,;4!<! .~~ .-:~~'!'!~ .'!~~~*'~~ .~1:~~ .~'! .:<? .1'?·..•

....................... .

20 ,

Did tne. o. joct remain on a straight ~.tb, deviate or oanoouvre at all.

21 .

was any tr.:til of oxhaust , vapour or light seen

22 .

.."hero did object disappear, e . g . in mid-!lir, behind o. hill, ov1 r tho horizon.

no ........................

Object:. apr·et.red out of the distance a.nd disappeared into the

d

at·J.ttce, seeming

·i~ 'bi~~d ·i~t~ ·2·~; ·tb;~; ·b~;~;~ ·,~ri~~ii; ·t~iii~B ·~r;.;: ·················

photog~pbs , or other

23 . hxistoncc of any physical evidnnce such as fragments , supporting ovidonco .

no ........................................................................

24.

Weathe r conditions eXPeri enced at til~e(s) or obscrvo.tion(s) bri,;ht moonlight ....CloudJes,., ....................................................................

25.

Location of any air tr::1ffic in tho vicinity at the ti''" of s i ghting. •• •• •••••• •• •

nil

• • • • it •

•••• • •••••••••••••• •• ••••••••••••• •

••• ••• •

• •• ••••

........................................................................ 26.

Loc~tion of ~ny mctcorologi~l stations in tho goner~ aroo. .

'lildura ........................................................................

27.

nny

. .

add~tl.on.al

. . Object appeared faster thw srutnl.k but informatl.on .•.•••...•.• • ••.•••••• . .••.....• . ••.••.• • ••• •

Ur. ................................. Higgin3 ing ....................................... ( •r. Kni ht and. ".r. Walsh of Robinvale) when the ttenhon of a-1 three

seemed to be com aratively close.

M3S

fare~el

so~e ouest~

........................................................................ a tracted to the ohenomena • ........................................................................ Questions 25, 26 and 27 to be answered by interrogator . (Inform"ltion was phoned to M.ildura as a result in the Sunraya1a Daily) .

of <>.n article appearing

.,

'

.... :..~ .. .~· .1~:~. ~ ..... ... Officer-in- Ch, ge.

23/7/59

-r

s


••

~'JilT

1~e

; •

of observer

OU RERLJ. OBJECT QB..,;';;.f!VED

...... ~~~ - ~~~- ~~~: ............ .. .. ..................

2.

Aod::ess of Observer .••••.•••• , ••• • •• • •• ••• • .• • • ••••• • . • • • •.••. • • ••• • • • • ••• •

3.

Occupat:on of Observer

4.

Date and Tine of Observation (Ti!:e given in 24 hour clock zonal time)

TECHNICAL C. S. . • . 0. ........ ...... ... ......... ................. OFFI~ ~

2!J/7/59 2240E .

.

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

... .. 4

5.

Pn~ioe of Obscrvation(s)

6.

~~~~er

... .

.

.

.. .. .

... .

.

..... .

25

... .

.. .

.... .

............. .

.... .

..... ................ .... ......... .................. . more than

seconds

~

c: Observation (Give details of o~ p~sition by ~ap reference if poss:".blc, or by .7.0~r-" landmarks, and descr i be any equiumcnt used in the o~zerv."' ti.o:l) . Observed from 111ldura 360 deg3 to about 045 degs • . . . . .. f't . . . .... .

.... . _ .......

,~

..

.

. . . . .. . . . .

"'.~· ·· .,·· ·· · · · "· ·· · ·· · ~ ···,··· · · · ~·· · ·· · ···· · ·· · · ··· ·

".~ ·· · ··- · ·· · ··· ···· · ·· · ., · ···

····· ~··c. •

. . , .. . .. . . .... . ...

l'l ... . . . . . . . . . . .

••• • • " ••••:0''" " • • •• • ~> •• • •• ••••t-• • • • o • • • ll•4•• • '•"'~"' • ••••••••• •• • ••• •••• • • •• • • • 0'

--..,.._

W'1erc h'aS object first ,'.Js.:.."Ved. e.g . overhead: ::omi.ng fr:>;n behind a hillJ over the t:~t'i7~:'l qtc. - object movine, like meteorite 1n the dist ~nee ,.,...•• •• • #' ~' •• • ••••• •

8.

••• •• • • • • - •••• • • • ••••• • •••

~i"t first 'lttract'ld observer's attent5.on, e.g. l;~;.t or noise . •• •• ~'• •a·-•

9.

•• • r • ,. • • • •., • ., ., ., , ., , ,.,#• • ••• •• • •

obiec~

!)id

-

. ... , • • ,. ... . . .. . . .... ..... .r • • "•" • "" • - · • ..... • • •• • •••• • ••• • •••••• •• ••• ._)jec~ .

a,,p•.;ar a::: a li-sht or as a definite

. . . t'!'!'i '.;. lit;~~~!.H'!'! !'!~'!'!~~>! ... - J.~ ..i!~ .. .. . .. ............ .... . 10 .

If i'c

.n~r., was ... , "\"l

mo··:: vha 1 on:J

oojec~,

hm1 macy werJ th~N',"nd vhat was their

fou; object in line ahead -

.......... .................... ........ ...... .. .. ............ .... .... . ........... ..... ... ... . "'

.O:t~l .Et. -::t~<L .fi:i.IV:i.h:t. to.·. • • • • • sate_lite but bi .,-er nd bri ;bter

11 ,

\·liut t..-:ts tho colou.,.. of tho light or obj cci.

12.

w'h,,t t.."l:: i~s ~Pr'lr,•nt sh ~po • . :q:\.J, -~~~ ..... •

.. ·- •• • •• • • .. • • .. .. • .. .. • • •

................... ........ ... . .. .................. ..... ...... .. .

movement tended to produce

13.

.... ....... .

an impression of elongation , , , ,. appeared like an unucual meteorite ~!~s ar.v dot'\ ·; of structur e obso:rwa~fag . 'a 'tailink' ~Hichsx~· wM.bh' gave"· .. • .. • ••• •. • ••. Uil . • • •. . ••• . ••• •. ~~~7?~?:?~.?~.ro~~~:.P;?~~~??

14.

Was

~n:·

t::ot.h')-1

propuJ.sion obvious .• ••• , •••. abo1o1t 25. 4egrees• •• • •• • • • · • • •

unkllown· .. ................. ...

15. 16.++ H~i~"+

17 .++ Speed 18

J

........... .

~

....... "., ....... . .... . . . . *" . . . . . . . . . . ..

,....,.. nnCI'l.O: cf clc"VUtio:""l .... ................. #>.,. .......... .. . ,. . .. ,. • •••••••• • · · · · ·• • o~

n~

:t •

r • •

• •

Sta::.C r..ny oxporict.ce woich onablos obso;~rvor to be •'C'I'COn'\"1·

• • •

• •

• " • •

• rt.•in

• •

• • • •

n't:out

tho ans\r::: g >c~l to 16 n.nd 17. ·· ·- ··~·· · ··

-.+

. . . . .................... ,. ....... ......... .... ....... ................ ....... .,. ........ ~

~

.

Sine .. i.t is 'lora llly impossible to est.il'k'l'Ze tho J-ryi"ht nnd -,,..od of a str .ngc object, it will usu~lly be better to endc~vour ~o ~otorQinC tno anglo ot olovaticn o;:" th" object, the wgJ.o throu~h Yhich i t "'ovod, nnt'l tho timo •.,:o. l::c•t to do thi .. .

• ••••. •. ?./


-- 2 -

~oort on Ayri al Ob j ect Observed 19.

(Cont'd)

Direction of flight with reference to landmark~ or points of the compass . West to Eaat

................ .. .............................. ........................

20 .

Did the object remain on a straight path, deviate or m.:~.nocuvr.:. at i l l.

Str i.;ht path ......................... ............................................. . no ........................

21.

~las

22 .

..ihar.. did object disappear, e . g . in mid-air, behind o. hill, over tho horizon.

23 .

~xistonc~

any

tr~il

of ex:hilust, vapour or light seen

of any physi cal supporting evidonco •

~vidJncc

such as fragments ,

photogr~phs ,

or othor

........................................................................

24.

1Joathcr conditions oxperionced at ti.me(s) or obs<.!rvation(s)

...... ... ............ .......... .... ...................... . ........ .......... 25 .

Loc.ition of any a ir traffic in the vicinity at tho ti•'l<;; of sighting •

........... ....."' ..................................................... . .................................................................." ..... ~

26 .

Loc.1tion of any m::tcorological stations in tho gcnenl area •

.......... . ............................................................ ~

27 .

~

.1.ny additional iofoi"''C:l.tion .•••••••..• • ••••. ••• ••.•••. • · · • · • • · · • • • • • • · • •

............. ,. ......................................................... . .........." ............................................................. ........... .. . .. .......................... ...................... ........... Questions 25 , 26 and 27 to be answcrud by interrogator •

Sgd..

......J. ..!J~.tt.1!~ ..... Officar-in- CLar

23/7/59

d,


.l .P A1T ON AERLJ.! OBJECT oa..,~

X. :Joy 1•

Name of observer . . . . . • • • . • • • • • • . • • . • • Box 50 9~h· ~~·: . . • .... ... ......... • .. ...... • .. • . " ... ..... ............. . • 1 . • . •. .. • • • ... . ..•. .• ••.••••••••• 3uil-ier Occupati on of Observer Address of Observer

2.

3.

4.

••

•••••••••

••

••

••••••••

•••

•••

0

••

••• •

••••••••

Date and Time of Observation (Time given in 24 hour clock zonal time)

2235E on 20/7/59,. ....... ..... ....................... ................. . ......................

5.

Period of Observation(s) • • • • ?9. ~~?~~~:

6.

Man~er

........ .. .. .... .. ...... ............ .

o: Observation (Give details of own position by map reference if possible , or by known landmarks, and describe any equir.ll!lent used in the observat.ion) . •

Near Town Ball Clock in Deakin Avenue~. Mildura• ~ ' f'l ~. e ' e

too"' r

,0

t

t

t

r

t

fl •

"" t

t

t

.. ..... ..... ......... ... ...

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

· · · ·· · · · ~ ·· ··

lo f

t

•• •

t

1f1 t

t •• •

t

•• t

t

•••

t t

t.

t e • •

•• •••••••

............ ..........·················

•• • •• • • •• • " • r•••• • " • • • •~• • • "'~ • • •••• • • •••• • • •••••• • •• ••• •• • • ••••• • • • • ••••••• ••

7.

Where was object first observed, e . g. overhead, comine from behind a hill, over tho horizon, etc. In mid air - looking along 9th Street and anparently moving from .1est to South. •••••• • "•" ••• • ••• •••• ••••••r • .- ••••• • •• ••••• ••• " • ••••••• • • • •• ••• • • • • •• • • ••• ••

8.

What f irst attr acted observer's attention, e , g, l i eht or noise .

9.

Did object apJXar as a

li~t

or as a definite object •

....... ~~~.r~~r.~~~-~~~- ~~r~~~~9~~:~: ... ..... ...... ...... ... .............. . 10.

If there was moro than one object, how lllllllY were then;;,and vlhat for·.::.tio'l •

\IJ.S

their

• • • • • , . " ..... ... . . JPkl-r. !-t't. J.~ttt . iiPP~ , ...• ....... •.•. • . .. •• ..•••••.• . • • •.•. • • 11 .

What ":as tho colour of the light or object

12.

~twas

... .

... .

orange red. ............................... .

snberic:ll its apparent shape •. . . •. • • .•••• • • • • • • • •• • • •.•• • ••.•• ; ••••••• •• ••••

. . . . . . . . ... .

. . . 'i' . . . f' . . . . .

.

.. ,

~ ··· ·· ·· ' ·· ·· ··· ·· ··· · ··· · ··· · · · · ····· · ·· · ··· ·

no ~y dota~ or ~tructuro obsorvablo ~ ···· · · ·~~ ·· · · · · · ······· ·· ····· · ·· · ··

13.

..... ........ . .. .... ...... ....... .. ... ... ... .......... .. ... ........ ......... ... . ~

14.

15 .

no WRr. any method o~ nrooulsion obvious ···· ~ ·· · ···· · ~·•r. • •• • • • • ••••• •• • · •• • •• no ias thrrc any sound .... ~···••,.,lf' • • •• •.r • ·· · " ····· .. ~l:·"' · ····· · · ···············

16,++ Hcigt~, or angle of clo~tion

approx 20 de 0 re s • • • • • • • e • • • • '" • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

- 50 second., . ....West .....to ...East ., ................................. . 18.

St!..to r-.ny e.:pcricnce \.lhich , ':lablo~ obs..:rvur to bo rcasonnbly certain about t!ll" :l'lS'"l3 givon to 16 u.nd 17 •

++

•• •

,

~·· ···· ···

... . . . . . . . . .

.

.

.

. . . . . ('" .. .., . . . .

~

!),

...

~

.

. . . . . . . ,.. •

••••••••••••••• •

••• •

Sine. it is norn~lly impossible to estirnnto the hoi~ht and spood of a strange o~jcct, it will usually be botur to cnd~~vo~ to dotcrmino t~o an,lo of olovatio:J o!' the objoct, tho mgl throug:h \lhich it moved, and the time t~~n ·~ ~o thi •

. . . . .. . . 2/


·' - 2 eoort on Aoti.al Ob j ec~ Ohaorved

19.

(Cont'd )

Direction of flight with roforcnc.._ to landmarks or points of the compass .

..........West .....to ......t......... ................. ........................ Ea..

20 ,

Did the obj e ct r omain on a straight path, deviate or manoeuvre at all.

......................ine. ... ............................................. .

Remained on

tr~il

tr&i~t

no ........................

21 .

was any

22 .

w'her u .did object disappear , o . g . in mid-air, behind o. hill , over tho horizon.

of exhaust, vapour or light s een

........................................................................ objeo~

2) .

a. e .re.:l t.o breJ.k up

~xistcnce

of any physic~ supporting evidence.

~.:.. disappe ..r

~vidancc

i

dd- ir

such as fragments , photogruphs , or other

no ......................................... ...............................

l4.

w~athcr conditions exocri cnced a t tiMe(s) or obs~rvation(s)

. . .... .~~~'Qt .~QQ~ . 25 .

~14t . Q~~4t ....

. .. . . ..•.. . •. .. •. .. . ..... .• . •. . .. •...•

Location of any air troffic in tho vicinity at tho tiln.- of sighting.

nil ........................................................................ •

26 .

• • • •

• •

• • •

• • • # • •

•••• • •••• •••••••• ••• •• ••••• •

•• ••••• ••••••• • •••• • ••• •• •• •

Locst ion of o.ny meteorologi cal stati ons in tho general area •

• • • • • • • • • • • ·:~~~~';''! . ~~~t<?~~ . ........ . ... .. ... . . ... .•... . .... . . ..... .• ...• 27 .

..ll"ly-

additi oll3l. i nfornn.tion ...••. :~! -:. ••••••• •••••••• •.••• ••• ••• •• •••••••

........................................................................ ........................................................................ Questions 25, 26 (l.nd 27 to be s.nswercd by int.-rrogator •

.....1..//'!.'\ :~~~ ....... .


r

:YSt./t /; C IVIL AVIATION

__

, __ ,...,. 62- 0131

,

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,

A.Uor- .. A\'\AT toX 11)9

.....,.,.,..._ ..

o. 1'4.

tu::tA.CTW

,..01'

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. , Lf1T1..£ COLUNS S'n£ET,

l\CEUIOVJlNJ!, C.l .

~c.t .

1.::)

6S61lnr

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Secret&ry. Department of Air, Victor ia Barracks, St. KUda Road, JdELBOURNE. VIC.

-

/

I

I

I

u.

......_/

Porn.rded for ycAJr aotion please is a copy of a letter r eceived f'rom a Mr. s. F. North of Yount Barker . Western Australia.

rt:::nn~~

for Director-General of Civil Aviation.


Muir Road, JdOUNT BARKER.

W.}.,

15th July, 1959.

The Department of Civil Aviation, 88 St. George 1 s Terrace, PERTH.

fl. A.

Dear Sir,

I direct this letter to you, as I have no:ld.ea as to what other body or Department I should write, and know that, if you are not the

organisation concerned you will forward the letter to the proper place. I feel that the incident, although perhaps unimportant in itself, yet f!83, with other reports, build a basis for any investigation which rmy now, or in the future, be oarried out. light.

The incident i taelf was the appearance in the sky of an unexplained It occurred at B. 20 p.m. last night (Tueada,y, 14th July).

I was standing with three companions when I first observed this light travelling from West to East. At first I thought it was a meteorite in flight, but quickly saw that it did not follow the usual flight and characteristio11 of such a body. I drew my companions' attention to it, and we all watched it, making coa:ments upon its appearance, course and flight, until it disappeared. I immediately committed to mind such features as I could observe, with the object of reporting thea. When first seen it was about twenty degrees West of South, a:nd was in eight for about ten seconds , dnrlng which time it travelled to a point about sixty degrees East of South. Its path was flat, without trajectory of any type, neither did it appear to be gaining or losing height, but I do not know whether its course was straight across my line of vision to the South, or slightly angled. Ita line of flight was twenty to twenty-five degrees above the horizon. For some reason I gathered an impression in my mind that it was reasonably close, not more than a Kile South of us. When it disappeared it did so suddenly as though it had turned away from our vision that plane of its body which had shown the light , but we could not discern any darker body in the sky. I t is possible however, that its line of flight bad interposed Mount Barrow between it and our line of aigbt. In shape it was long and narrow, 1 ts height being about onet enth of its length. Its length was between three and five degrees. About one-tenth of the distance from the front ap'!)eared to be a dark break in the line of light. The light was white, faintly bluish, with the same intensity as a nonDBl star; the edges appeared to be clear-cut, without any eff'ulgence. It had the same clarity as an aeroplane caught in the searchlights, but of course, there was no band of light either in the sky or in its Vicinity. I especially looked to see i f this could have occurred by its being in the beam of ear lights, but could not discern these, and moreover its 1ength of flight was too long for it to have been so held.

Whilst it - s in sight no sound or any nature was heard except the oooasional oolllllents of ~self and companions.


-

2

-

The night was oold, clear and still, with the anticipation that the morning would bring a :f'rost.

J.!y companions were Miss Brown, a telephonist at Mount Barker, Rev. Father Cryan, the Parish Priest at Mount Barker, and J.fr. Richard Kopec, an officer of the CotmiOZJWealth Bank. We had just finished Choir Practice in the Catholic Church, and were standing in f'ront of that building when the light was observed.

Distances and dimensions are given in degrees, and are apprarimate only , because five years of Arf1t3 training accustomed me to the quick method of measuring degrees by the outstretched hand method. I1' this information is of interest I trust you will use as you find necessary. If valueless, I will not be disappointed if the letter is consigned to the w. P. B. I t' you lmow what object passed across 1cy vision last night, you will earn Icy everlasting tba.nka by satisfying ~ insatiable curiosity.

Yours faithfully,

(Sgd..)

S.P. North


IN RE

EASE QUOTI:

No

5/2/1 Air( 56A)

7 AUG 1959

Secretary Department of Air ~dministrativ~ Offices

c... tffiERRA

~cr

RF.PORT ON ~ERIAL SI GHTING Attached herewith is a report on a fl ying object from Constable Taylor of Burren Junction. A suitable letter of thanks has been forwarded to t he Constable .

tJ~cf!ic<- r-?; ( J.!. J . t:JORE) . ang Conur.and~r

At tach .

For Air Officer Commanding


Felice Station, Burren 17th July 1959.

Junct1~n .

The ~e~artment of hir, and Research. Subject:

Strange flying objects sighted in the Vicinity of Burren Junction.

I wish to inform you of strange objects seen flying in the sky at night in the Burren Junction area. Firstly on the night of the 7th July 195q at 9.~ pM I was patr~lling the ctock route about 12 miles due Sou~outh rast fro~: Pnrren Junctior. in my car. I saw a bright red light in the sky and stopped my car on the side of the road, alirhted and observed that the bright red light was or arreared to be an object of a kind . It was reddish on top and from the bottom shone a very bright to blood red lizht this came out in a cone shane from the botto~ and thinning out in the middle of the cone it hovered over trees, backv.ard and forvard, and side\vays. It did not appear to be very high in the sky and I fully expected the object or light to pass over my vehicle at any moment and in fact I had my spotlight which is powerful ready to shine on it if it did pass over me. Then it appeared to go away s1ov;ly to the •· Pst, North 'est and v.ent out of sight , I could see it for some distance going away. At the time I thought to myself it ~as so strange that no person 101ould believe me i f I told them about it. .t.t 'L.I;m_l was inspecting stock about 3 miles further on down the roaa-Tafter I had kept this object under observ6tions for at least 10 to 15 oinutes) . I mentioned the subject to a ~r . Barton who was in charge o! the stock , and with two young lads who were droving >.ith him, he told !':e that he sav. strange object near the roadl?ay on the stock route . He said that at about 7 am that morning be mentioned to the boys that, what ~as the big grey cattle float doing on the side of the r oad, he didn' t think anymore about it, but later the t~o boys roce their horses witr.in several hundred yards of what they thoueht was a float and ~tated that they saw a large grey thinf which lookPd like a triangle on the bottom with a dorne on top, they stnod watching for several minutes and then became almost ~rightened, ~hen suddenly the dome di~ap!eared and then the bottor as if by magic. At exactly 0 . 20 pm on the night of the 17th July 1950 I \','atPrloo Street , Burrn Junction when I sal~ the objegt or li&ht in the sky "gain, i t was nearly due \''est of Burren Junction and appeared to be moving around in the sky slowly . Hr . George . Herrinr: of " Rothesay" was passing in his car and I stor-ped him ana he al~o observed the lieht in the sky . It did not come close and was about 6 !'1iles av ay or ll'ay be a bit less as it H s hard to tell it was still red on top with the bright red r,low corning from underneath, and from this distance it appeare~ to become bri~ht and then dull . It then appeared to come to earth and disappear, this I i magine would be the light going further a~ay an~ only appearin to come to earth .

wa~

in

Sir, this ~ay sound silly as fact what I saw and how I can describe the object that the drovers saw and it to you as it would have sounded to me, I saw something in the sky it c~uld be

a saying is but it is in it, I can only tell you of must sound very immaginete but ov.ing to the :fact that right - or could not •

• . /2


- 2 -

This file is being forwarded as confidential, not to be released to newspapers or the like but for your benefit only 1f it is of any use . 1 read in the newspapers of some object heine slt:hted in the liorth of Australia and this is Ninly what prompted me to write to inform your Department, after seeing the light to- night . On the papers attached I have triPd to draw the light how I saw it and the object as described to me . Sincerely . Sro. C.A. Taylor Constable lst Class 6109 •

. ' -.,... ~r. . ~.;.~:.~~.

.

..~~~~

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fj/. () o.f·

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----....._---....._

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..


TREPHONE:

• IN

f'enr 1 th 23Jl

Rt!:.:"~LEASE QUOTE Headquar ters

Ho~e

PEh'RITH

l',·,•

RA.~

7

Cocmand NS

7 AUG 1959 5/2/l Air( 55A) Secretary Department of Air Administrative Offices CANBERHA ACT REPORT ON

~ERIAL

SIGHTING

Attached is a report received from RAAF Provost Service, Townsville relating to an unidentified flying object.

J~ tlfcc c ,.~ (~·. t.:uuR~) Wing Commander For Air Officer

Corr~anding


CONi-~ ->

QQ E X

17/2/Air(lA)

u c

s

1~8 D #~I"/17i7J~~ 1-""fJ"-v'

..

rrovost Service North QUPPnsland Section 13 Sturt Street Townsville RA~F

22nd July, 1959 Provost t.;arshal Department of Air !'elbourne S.C. l.

Copy to: - Headquarters Home Col"lllland (D.P . ll. ) Headquarters Home Command (Jntell Off)

UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECT 1. On the 16th July 1959 , this Section was advised by the Intelligence Officer , RAAF Base Townsville, that a report had ~een received by hie, from a member of the ~ . 7 . C, Department of Civil Aviation, Garbutt , regarding the sighting of an Unidentified Flying Object. It was claimed that the unknown object had been sighted by a civilian, namely, Mr . Clive Robertson , Psrk Lane , Hermit Park, Townsville, at approxima~ely 0900 hours on the mornin~ of Tue~cay , 14th July, 1959. Mr. Robertson when interviewed stated he was the Chief FrojectiQnist at the Regent Theatre, Hermit Park . At about 0915 hours ~n the day in quest ion , he was engagPd outsioe the theatre , repairing a neon sign . i\t the time he was standing on the awninr; roof . l'r . Robertson said he had completed the repairs, switched on the sign and whilst looking up to see if the latter was working, not1ced a round object, bright silver in colour , flash across the sky in a south easterly direc tion . It ap~eared to travel with a jet likP covement. There v.ere no vapour trail~, neither was there any noise . r·r. Robertson said the obj,.,ct appeared to be perfectly round at the hase and tapering to a smaller circumference at the top . The outlines of which appeared t o be blurred . It was about 3 ft. in 0iameter. 2.

3.

In answer to ouestions, ~r . Robertson said he could not estimate the height or speed of the object, however it was visible even after passing behind clouds . It was sighted for about 1-1; minutes . Mr. Robertson said due to the fact he was alone on the roof , it was not possible to get anyone to v·itness the incident . The matter was reported to the D. c . A. Garbutt . 4. Enquiries carried out at the Metrological Section, Garbutt, disclosed the following information:At about 0915 hours, 14th July 1959 , the visibility was estimated at 40 miles . The ,o;ind was 4 knots per hour, travelling in a south easterly d irection. The cloud formation was estimated at i at 12,000 ft. high. General remerks, a blue sky and more or les~, a perfect day . A met . ballon wa s r eleased at about 0900 hours , tha t same day. Civil Police were contacted, but no corroborative evidence was forthcoming.

5.

Fro~ personal observations Mr . Robertson appeared to be an intellir.ent, level headed type of man, and not ~ne iven to hallucinations . However it is possible he sighted the rJet . Balloon , although Met Sec tion, Garbutt, state the balloon would only drift at a V• ry slow speed, due to the velocity of the wind .

6. ~nclosed for information are newspaper reports, pertaining to similar incid~nts, in and around ~'orth Queensland area . Sgd .

(,;,J . N!-' AL)

\'arrant Officer in Chart RAKF Provost ServicP North Queensland Section TOiNSVILLE


-

0 U L!..._r.:fl J

- ....~';===~--

liSaucer

II

Nati'!es Terrified by ' 'Saucer"-

HUGE RED OBJECT

Seen Near Karumba

LANDS NEAR T.l. BRISBANE, July 14.-A huge glowing red ob Ject is reported to hove landed on top of o htll on Prince of Wales Island, 10 miles off Cape York Peninsula. Native..-.. o n the 1one1y tl\ln.nd t~r-e terrified a..r•d ri!'!U.Sl: to go n«>ar lhe un\dentlned obj•ct, "

rt'port r~Ol~hlng Tburadll.)'

l sla.Dd ch>.imod to-night.

EYEWITNESS wcm:w.n. ){rg~

A nu.ttve.

Abcd~t!go. of lt~IIUid, wbo mo.de ·when ~e and her

:p:tu

N~..

Thua-,dn.y

tho> o·oport

tamtiY re-

l un\fod 1.0 th"'T hom• l•huul to-ni~<bl.

se.td th•y bod ""on

tho obJeeL

She told a ~•dent 1t "a."j on top of a hdl IU Pon Lahou. on tbc tsJo.nd'll r.outh· tl'n Up.

Port Llbou Ill 12 miles from TbllN<Ia~· I•IMcl Tho ob)cet bad \antlod th••ron Wedn.e=ada~t mgbt. th•• nJgbt four c1'0COdUr huntr-rll •ighted an unld•ntiO•d object ov~r lhe !\onnan Rsvpr. The woman aid tb~ obJeCt on tbe tult could not ~ .et"n ln the d3.yUme but it g:we on a r@ddiS-b glow at ntJ:bt T..h~ hland•s tnb.Db•tanu,.;-.. 12 hatl\te$'-"P. e-re wn too ternll•d to lnsJ>t'Ct 1t. On Wedn•><IG)· night ..,,_ era! Thursday lshnd reol-

dents

report\.'d &ttf'ing a g""'n object nymg to" over Thursdav L'lland On u.• ."8.mc J:lfgbt. a sb"nog,. obJC<'l

ha.d also be•n rtport~d at MtlJ)OOn hti.s.sion, on lho west c:oast of Cnpe York


---

58/26

The .;;ect•ctary, Department o.~. Dei'crce , Ci\NBm.!:Lh

~ . ; . 'I' .

Furtba~ to my .nemorandum 58/ 26 of 1 7th June, 1959, regarding the above subject, I attach i'ol' your

in.formo tion c opied of correspondence recc.~tly rt".ocei ved t'rom t~e Ad~ini~trator of ~apua and Ne~ Guinea . Copi ea of this me:norandum and sttacbments buve also been forwarded t o tbe De~rtmerts of Air, Civil Aviati on and National Developnent res_.ectively, and to the Carunon.ealtb Scientific and Industrial {esearch Organization.

~

( C. R. Lamber t) Secretary.

The Secre tat•y, Dep~;~rtrn~nt ot' the '\i:c, CfiJfBERRA . A. C. T, Copy 1'or infot'lnation.

-{!.;IC.~t.t; (c . R. L&-,be}• t) ~;ar decr~tacy .


De,l Artment or the Adminidtrutor Port Morel:lbY 1\D. 93/5/2.

22nd July, 1959. The tiecretary, Department o:f Territories, C \l BE.t~:{A . REI'ORTi!:D SIC1-H'I'INGS Re:fer~nce

0~='

pr.YING OBJECTS

13 made to my memorandum AD. 93/5/2 o:f

3rd June , 1959. 2. Writ t.en repoL'ts o:f the o..:currence re:ferred to in t Pe above memorandum have been r"'coived from two Native A!'f'airt~ officers , JJe.asrs. R. G• • Or•.vin and , . L. Smith. These reports are e~cl~.aea aa Att&cLmenta 1 and 2. 3.

E. Bvenett of ~emarai has glv~n the D~atrict Samara!, an nccount of another 11 Jighting" in e rollowi ng terms :-

~. COGl!lli~sioner,

t

"

On the night o:f the 26th June , I waa at about eight miles below Bsniara in Goodenough Bay. I had just li.atened to the evening news and between 7 . 15J:lll':li:l 7 . 30 p . m. went outside . I saw a~ object approach :from a north to ncrt h-ea.aterly direction, descend and then hover in the skY about 500 :feet up. I t wa.a at an angle of a.bour 450 up from me and when I spanned my hand out i n front of me to mea~ure i t, my hand shielded about halt: of: 1 t from view w1 th the re11aininu part vial.ble. I t aeeced to me to be about 60 feet long. It had the silhouette o:f a rugger :football, and had a kind of ring around it; wi th about :four semi-domed porthol es visible in the .:>ide that I could see . A glon was co~" from these ~ortholes . lt remained hovering for about four minutes and then disappeared rapidly in a southerly direction. GI 7A

The followin~ morning I went across to a vi llage just below BOIANAI and the~e the na t1 ves asked m~ ... :r I had sc::e1. the 'new America! AiL' Force ' that had u.i-~JeaJ.•ed the previous evening" . The :foll wing rei>ort ha~ boen furnished by Bishop Doyl e of the domaJ Catholic ~fission at Sideia : -

4.

"

In June, 1958, there came from a

direction a round object about the size o:f the moon pale blue in colour and emitting liubt brighter than the moonli~ht . s.~emed to hover in he 3ky at about as high as the moon, over the ~i3sion property. kfter about .t'ive minutes 1 t moved in a noJ.' tberly direction end disappeared in mid- sky. (~ en by five senior school boys at the 3ame time) . ~outherly


- 2 -

late October or early Movembor 1~58, About on two evenings about 7 o'clock a light a O'Jt the size of a bright star, white in colour, moved high across the ,/ea tern sky from N.w. to s. ' • On the second occasion the li ght was not conatant but a ~peared to f'laah on and off at r egular inte rvals of' about two seconds . Thia phenomenon was ob served by a uumher of the Fathers , Brothers as well as a l arge number of' school children One Saturday in '.lay this year a large green elip t i cal object wa~ oee~ by nine school boys. It was 10uch l arger t han a star and moved ravidly. On June 13th this year at about 6 . 15 p.m. odd boys ~aw an ellptical object about 1he size of a football , a pretty green colo\U' rt~ce very fast ar.d low across the Ea~tern aky towa rds the North Ea st. tw~~ ty

...

At 8. 50 p.m. on June 27th this year two of' the Brotbers saw e large fiery object about hdf the aize of' a :full moon in tbe Reatern sky movin~ slowl y either down the Western sky or away from t he oboervera in a iVedterly direction. At one sta ~e tt.e ob ject of' which t he light waa appearing to dirnimb to a pinpoint, suddenly glowed br ightly again. It turned blue before finally dj sappearing. Tbe whole phenomenon l asted about ten minutes" .

5. &ncl ~ aed as Attachments 3 and 4 are t'e11orts of' :t'urtber sigbtinga received from 'tfesara . Orwin and Smith. 6. At one stage , the Harbour Master at Samarai was inclined to the belief' that it waa the planet Venus whi ch was bein~ seen. He stat ed that this plane t sometimes has the habit of' emit ting blu e , ~reen arA red flasheo of' li~t, and also t hat light refraction due to te 1perature chanRes in the atmos~here gives the i~presaion of t he planet moving. However, the Dist rict Of'ttcer was recent ly at Baniara and discussed tbi;3 m~ tter ~-ersonally with fir. Orwin and other people there who have sighted these objects and he is inclined to the belief' tbat t l.eJe sip:htinP,a are not to be dismissed lightly and that, i n ract, something strange a nd aa yet unknown was truly oh served duri ng periods mentioned by tbe re. orting Qtf'icers. The Di stri ct Co~ l saioner says that Mr . Orwin ~~other eye witnesses to these occurrences are quite convinced t hat they ard not si~htinp: the planet "Venus" . 7• Tbe aegional Director, Attorney General ' s Department ba$ been kept :fully in£ormed of these re1orts.

(D . LI. CLELAND) ADt!Il:I ">'!'!{AcTOR

(4 f< ttachmeata)


Sub District Office , BANIAI!.A. r~ilne Bey District . 17th June, 1959. UNIDENTil<'IED FLYING OBJHCT SiatrrED FROM BANIA.RA - MILNE

BAY DISTRICT

On the night o~ Sunday the 2Lth Uay, 1959, I was sitting on the verandah of my bouae in company with Mr . R.L. Smith, Cadet ~strol Offi~er . The ni~ht waa vory clear with no clouds and rao.ny stars. I noticed a parti cularly bright light hiph in the sky to the west of Baniara. At ~irat I thought that it may have bee_ a bright star but the object be~an to move in an erratic direction to the south west. T~.e object wa.:> first sighted at 1900 hours and was under constant observation t~om that time . T~e first time it was aighted it appeared to be emitting a bright blue light. As it began to move towards the aoutb west, sometimes rapidly and aometlmea only perceptably it chu.oged colours frOin blue to bright c:treen ~·d then tbi::~ would be ter:ninated by ar. c.range flash. The charu?ing li~hta a:ppeared to come from the bott om of tbe object .

At 2015 hours, after beinu. kept under close observation, the object finally disappeared in a aouth- westerly di,•ection. It was not possible with the naked eye to determine the sha~ of the object and it did not have the appearance of a star or meteorite . It al>.PeS.£'ed, at the distance , to be a re~ar shape but it::~ size could not be estimated.

(8ad)

R. O.

Orw~n .


Sub- District O~ce , Baniara , Milne Bay District, T. P. & N.O . 17t h June , 1959. UNIDENTIFIED 1<'LYING

OBJECT SIGHTED !"ROM BANIARA - l4.B. D .

On the Idght of Sunday the 24th May, 1959, an unidentified flyi~ object wa~ sighted from Babiars. The rol~owino description of the object is as accurate as possible to my 0 >3ervations. ap~rently

At 1?00 bra •• on the said date, an object was s i ghted, high in t he sky in a westerly direction from Baniara. The predominating I n the 1. rat instance it was stationary. colour of light emitting from the object was of a brilliant irrides cent blue. Soon after first sighting the object, it commenced to descent erratically in a south- westerly direction ; somet imes quite ra1'idly and at other times olmost corning to a halt. Duriag tr.e~e movements , the blue colour would change for an instant to ~ bright ~reen, te~inated by ar orange flash. The~e colour3 appeared to come from a lower position on the object - as if fro~ its base . Tne object ·ompl etely disa ppear ed from view , in a south- westerly direction at 2015 bra .

(Sgd}

R. L.

Smi th


----

COPY.

~

31 - 1-4/11 4th Ju1y, 1959.

Tile Distri ct Com;nissioner , Uilne Bay District, ;:,A!.UiAI .

SIGHTING o-.;- FLYING OBJECT - BAl'"'ARA Reference is made to my radiogram 6 of 29th June, 1959 and your 17- 2-4/134 of 30th June, 1959, to the Assiotent Adminiotrot or, copy of same being minuted to tnis office . T .e following report based on the siq;htin ps of Mrs . ~ . L . Smith is sub~itted for your lnf'o!'ma ... ion.

R. G. Orwin ahd Messrs. n . G. Orwi n and

On Sat. trday 27th June, 1959, a t 1940 hours Ur. R. L. S::Ji th noticed a bright white apherical light ~W :from Baniara and high in the sky. It appeared to be hetween 8 and 9 thousand feet from the crround . Both :lr . L nd .Irs . Orwin also saw this object after ~ . a~ith d~cn their attention to i t. The object remained stationary for aome t~e and ther slowl~ bepa~ moving ac.•oss the a!cy i r> a "Yeaterly direction. It bad tht> appearance of a " s~arkler" which is co~only used i n firework displays. Also ai.'C3 of liP'ht e:nanating from the object appeared to '!:>e blotted out at regular intervals. A greeL lip:ht aJ.so appeared at regular inte!•yals at va1'ious points of the object. There did not apv"'""-'·' to ba any defi nite order in the a peararce of tbia li ~bt . T' e object looked as t hough it h~d a r ·d base or that a red glow was ori~inating f rom ita baae . At t te ti~e of sighting and while the object was unaer o aervetion the~e wore ~any stars ~resent and few clouds in the f.t'ea .Jhel"e ... he obj .!Ct was to be seen. There was a def1ni te r eflecteJ. g.low or the few clouds i n the area whe" the object .t>ll33ed i~ close .L1roxi mi ty to them. It wa::J also noticed that there wa;;J - renec";ion l ike ::. bean of l i ght o n the water between t he lila1nland 81·d the isls.ud and t hi<3 emanated from t he object. In contrast the reflect1on o ~ the ::Jtars in t.he ~a~er, which was vers ~ooth, ~ere similar to pinpoints only . Aa t he o~ject alowly moved across ard downwards in a weaterly di~ect ion it was kept unner constant observation. ~~om t e wharf it was then seen th~t there was whnt arpeared t o be a round bro~e coloured disc below ar.d to t he ipht of the bright l~ght . ~s the li~ht moved ao did this disc keepin" the same dis t ance , about 500 to 1 000~ach tlme. This wa~ first n~ticed at 2025 boura . The bright li~ht ard o1dc both finally disappeared cloud low in the western hori zon at 2045 hours .

~ehind

On Sund~y 28th a t 1820 hours the briut t lipht f9S a~ain deen by Mr . and Ura vrw1n. I• apJeared in the s9ne •oa!tion as on the previous night althoupb it wao not as J.'ipht at firs t. At 2001 bo~s the ~riq t li"ht moved ~t orest J~ced alonP. the J-•e track aa t he ~roviou3 Di~ht but in a minute cove~ed the sane distu•ce lt bud taken half un hour to cove r previou.:~ly. The liaht ,uca.n~ very bri11ht d· ·:-ing thia rs 1 id :nov~ent ·;& diC.. its r et'lection on the oea. IrJr o~ped about 5 00 feet during the uerl od and from my o~lnion it looked as thou~h it was ~oin~ to Lond to tha north we3t of' t h~ stution on t h(; :n lnlttnd . Tr.e 11 ht wa:J kept; under o J&C C'vation rlur.1ng the ru~>id moveJ,Jc!mt c:~nd .tr . Orwin ran to the wl .arf l'or thia pu~~l'oa e. It slow~:~d u.P <~nd re •.:lined in the we:Jtern


-

2 -

sky and remained thexeuntil it slowly disappeared spain low on the horizon at 2115 hours . The bronze dla- wao a~s1n diahted in the same relut~ve ~ oaition as the night be~ore . Ur . Smith was preseâ&#x20AC;˘.t with 'lr . Orwin to kee:; the bri~ht li~ht under observation :from 2005 hours unt il 1 t disappeared. Th1o o:N'ice t,as been advised that the planet Venus coul.d be ex.ected to be seen :from ~he station in approxim~tely the same direction a~ th~ bright l i ~ht wa3 first seen. However the ~lanet Ve<.ull was oet3n on the 4th Jul.y, 1 g59 by myself' and The Naval. Intelligence Jfficer who wa~ visiting the distri ct, and :from ita sighting I am of' t 'e opinion t hnt it was not the brirrht lil7ht seen previ ously as tbio lipht was much lower than Venne ond more to the north of' the _.osl tion of Venus . Forâ&#x20AC;˘warded

~or

your inf'ormati on, pl ease . (Sgd)

H. Orwin

a/A~si3tant

Dist.rict Of'!'icer .


Sub- D1Dtr1ot Ofri ce, Baniare , tlilne Bay Diatr t ct. 7th July, 1959.

PF'JIDU'

l'U 3 1-1 =4/11

Aa ~toted in tbe attscred ~e.ort, the ori ginal object wa3 night sighted from the 4th July onwarda. The pl onet Venus however Wd5 visible. ~~ring tho e~ly e vening of .londay the 6th o~ July, I wstcbed ~or the original object between the timee of its Frevious appea~a r.ce3 . The pl3nat Venu3 WQ3 v13 ble ot this tim.:! only. However, I awoke durilll' the nicrbt :1t 0050 b!'a ., happened to look ot tt;e sky and notived a very br1eht light.

On observing th1G li~ht more cloaely, I was convinced that it waa t he sane one as aeen bet~~en t he 27th of June ond tht~ 3rd of July. Venua \988 not v1aible. The object a~paored to be lower in the sky than on previous occnsiona end cloaer to the point of observation. The hronze waa not evident on this o ccasion. After watchine i t for rifteen minutes, and ohject like a !"allin~ star see~ed to como .t'ro:n near tbe b3ae of' the object and shoot earthward at â&#x20AC;˘ trema ~oua speed and at about t'o.1.â&#x20AC;˘t y 1'1 Te degrees to the !tt'Ound. Arter about !"1 ve more ~uutes th13 procedure waa re~ated by a ~ ther similar object, but th13 one went to the other side. It ia ~ealiz ed of courae thst these objecta could havo bean shooting star~, and could haTe coaae t"rom soma distance behind the object. After ob.:Jerving the object f'or alinoat an hour , it moved owoy in a similar l irection to before {resterly) alt hough wben f irat 3ighted it WSJ more to the south than on prev1oua occasiona.

F0 rwarded for your inf or.nat1on pleaae. (dpd) C~de t

R. L. dmlth

Ptrol Officer .


1"1 JtCPLY

ouan

128 .1. 21 ( 20 )

,;q

C OMMONWEALTH OF A USTRALIA DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE CANBERRA. A.C.T.

~o:emorandum

REPORl'ED SIGHI'lrfG OF FALLING OBJECT TERRITORY OF PAPUA AND NEW GUINEA

Atta.c hed is a copy of a memorandum dated 17th June , 1959 , from the Department of Territories. It is noted that additional information may become available and this will be forwarded when it is received. 2. any

If, in the meantime , you are able to throw light on the incident, your advice would be appreciated .

~-'( Secretary.


Department of Territories, Canberra. No . 58/26

17th June 1959

The Secretary, Department of Defence, Victoria Barracks, I>!ELBOURNE. RbPORrED SIGHTING OF FALLING OBJECT TERRITClRY OF PAPUA AND NEH GUINEA

I have been informed by the Administrator of Papua and New Guinea that he recently received the following radiogram from the Assistant District Officer at Baniara in the Milne Bay District :-

"Apparently unidentified object sighted from Baniara 1900 Sunday ~th May in westerly direction appeared high in sky but comrrenced to descend erratically in SW direction colour was of brilliant blue alternating at long intervals to a reddish glow and ending with a green flash object disappeared at 2015' hours" The Administrator is obtaining a full report on the occurrence, and I shall furnish you with any additional information that may c ome to hand.

(Sgd)

C.Râ&#x20AC;˘ .Lambert Secretary.


THIS PAGE IS REPRODUCED FROM A BADLY FADED OR ILLEGIBLE SOURCE. SCANNING THIS ITEM AT A HIGHER RESOLUTION WILL NOT IMPROVE ITS LEGIBILTY.

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No, _

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Headquarter s Training Command '

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5/6/ Air(28A)

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Park Barracks \ IJELBOtlRNE SCJ VIC

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Department of Air Administrative Offices CANBERRA ACT

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l959

â&#x20AC;˘

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--

SIGHTING OF UN-IDENT I FIED AERIAL OBJECTS

Herewith is a report received from the Department of Civil Aviation (Victoria- Tasmania Region), LaTrobe Street hlelbourne, concerning the sighting of an aerial object at Launceston, Tasmania on or about 2nd May, 1959.

(li

(~

I

Group Captain Yor Air Officer Commanding

Encl ./

Rt~ a'-J ~T------------~------------

----------~~----~------~


1•

i'lame of obsei""V"er •• ••• • . : • •• • • ••• • • • ••••. • • • • •.• • •• • •••••• • • • ••• :· • ••••••••••

2.

"ddress of ObsP-rver . •• ••• •• • ••• •• ••••••• ••• ; •• • • . ••• • ••• ~ •.• ."•••• • ••••• •• • •

3.

Occupation of Observer • • ••••••••••• •••••• • ••••••• • •• •••• •• • . . •• • •••• •. •••••

4.

Date and Time of Observation (Time .ivcn in 24 hour clock zonal time)

............ ..... .. ........... ........ ...... .. ...................... ..... ...

.................................................. .

5.

Per iod of Observation(s)

6.

f·anner of Observati on (Give details of mm position by map reference i f possible, or by lmo1.1n landmarks, and describe any equiooont used in the observati on) . '

'

~

• •.• •• • •• ; ; ;-• •• ;. •••• .• •.•••••••••• : •. !'•.•• ~• .• ••• • •• ••• : ••••.•••• •• :-• • ! ••••• ~

......-....................................................................... ............................................................................ ~

1.

comin~

Where was object fir st observed, e .g . overhead, over the horizon, etc.

from behind a hill,

i. • _..... ............................................................................. c.;

8.

~at

f irst attracted

obs~rvcr 1 s

attention, e . g .

li~ht

or noise •

...... .-...................................................................... . 9.

Did object ap? ar as a -

li~ht

or as a definite object .

--

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . r-.)..,. •• • •••••• ••••••• • •••••• • • • • • •• •••• • • • ••• • • •• •• ••

10 .

I f ther e was more than one object , how many formation •

w~ru the~, and

........ ............. - ....... ... ........ :.... ... ).

-

·

~

~

.....

;

WlS

their

.........·..............

................................ t~:

11 .

~~t

12 .

..!ha,t was i ts apparent shape • • • • • • • • • • • • • : • •••• • •••••••••••••••••• •• •••••••

13 .

Was any de·~il of structur~ obsorvabla •• • •• ••• ••• • ••• •• ••••·•••••••••·• · •••

was

th~

·

what

colour of the light or object

............................. ............................................... .............. ..............................................................

14.

~as any mcthocl of propulsion obvious • ••• ••• •• • • ••• ••······••••••••••·••• ••

15.

.~o.s thcrt any so\.U\d ..... ..... ..... ~ .••..••• • .••• ••. •••••. .. ..• .. • . ..•• . ....••• •

16.++ Height, or angle of el evation •••• • .• : ••••• • •••. ~ • • •. ....••••.•••••••••• ••• • ~gular v~

Speed, or

18.

State any o.q>cri cnce which enables obs... rv~r to bo rtlasona.bly certain ~bout tho answer s given to 16 ~d 17 •

++

ocity

........•......................... .................

17 . ++

............................................................................

Since it is nor~~y impossible ~o cstimntc tho h i~ht and ~~cod o~ . str~gc object, i t will usU.:l.lly bo b1. ttor to cndc cvour to determine the analo of el evation or l:.ho object, th_ mgle throuo. uhich it movod, 1nd tho time taken to do this .

~~······ · · 2/

I


Repor t on Agtial Ob ject Obsorvocl, {Cont'd) 19.

Direction of flight with rofcrcnco to landmarko or points of the compass •

20 ,

Di d tho objoot remain on a straight path, deviate or

............................. ................... ........................ rnanocuvr~

at all,

............................................. .

.....: ••--. ••••••• •c-."1 .1•• • ••• •• 21.

was any tr.:1il of exhaust, vapour or light soen

22 .

w~ere

did object disappear, a , g. in

mid-~ir,

........................ c

bohind o hill , over tho horizon,

••• • • •.. . ..~..• .....o•• •~•••• • ••••.•.. . .• ~ ..•.. • • ....••.. .• .• .• . •.• • •.• • •.••••••

23 ,

of any physical evid ·nco such as fragmon ts , photogr1.phs , or other supporting cvidenco ,

~xistence

........................................................................ 24,

\Jeathcr conditi ons ~;;xocricnced at tinc(s) or obscrvation(s)

..............-......... .................................................... . 25.

Locati on of any nir

tr~ffic

in tho vicinity at tho tim._ of si!!hting.

........... ..... ...................... .............. ......-... ........ ... ... -

,. .,

-.

-

...

,.

~

-

..

"

,...

-

-

•'•

c

-

-. .,;

,, J.:.

· ······· ··············· ~···· · ················ ·· ················· · ···· · · ·

264

Loc~tion

of

~ meteorologic~ st.~tions

in the general aroa.

- . ........................................................................ '

27.

Any' addi t i onal tnformati on ••• • • • ••• • ••••••••••••••••········ • ·•• •• •••••

......................................................................... ........................................................................ •.•...•...........• ......•..•..... .... .........••.... ...............•••• Questi ons 25, 26 and 27 to be answered by interr ogator ,

.........................

;1


-r

MXY 130

""'ONE:

IN II.EPL Y Pl.ÂŁASE QUOTE

No.------

Headquarters Training Command RAAF

Albert Park Barracks MELBOURNE SC3 VIC 5/6/Air(26A)

2 ~APR 1959

Department of Air Administrative Offices CANBERRA ACT

SIGHTING OF UN- IDENTIFIED AERIAL OBJECTS 1. Enclosed is a report submitted by Mr. J.W.Follett of Carrum, giving details of ~ sighting of an un-identified aerial object over the sea at Carrum on 17th April 1959. 2.

The first report of the sight ing was phoned by

Mr. Follett to the duty Operations Officer, Training

Command on the morning of the incident . On checking aircr aft movements with RAAF ACC, DCA and Moorabbin Airport, the Operations Officer was assured that no aircraft had been anywhere in the area at the time .

Commanding Encl


~

.

t

0

~I!A'LJ ~~!S!fdi~ .1o fl t/.:.W. ~-~ .K.£;.~. ·.. [ QL L. f. J: T .. . . . . . .

REPORT ON _...

1.

Name of observer

2.

Address of' Observer

3.

Occupation of' Observer fii/.1}/(J}.G.~/;.· . ....... . ..

4.

Date and Time of Observ,tion (Time given in 24 hour clock zonal

/(f.IJ.5.J. ~ P..A.f<. .f) ....5.fR Y.'.{. f- .5.T. A.I. ~O/I) ....... ...... .

..... . ·f ../1. • M : . ... .(. {'J•. !Jf~ I.~ ~ r_~) .. •. . . . . .. •.. •.. ..~~~e) • ./

5· 6.

Period of Observation(s) .

-~~ - ~~ .•• ...•• •... • • . .

Manner of Observation: (Give d~ails of own position by map reference if possibles or by known landmarks , and describe "flY equipment used in the observation) . .

/;J. .~k -~r::_~r~~~-7'~ ~ rA<. . fd~ w.tku •.kt7 ~ . J/1.,.. .'$'J .

.lfv.... r!J.;r. ...w. .4-k-.4-1. k.J..U.....t.f~.., -~-..!

7-

Where wa fl object first ob&erved ~ e. 0 • overhead , coming from behind 8 hill, pver the 1lOr izon ? etc •

8.

Wast first attracted observer s

..A4·7:.-~-. ~. - ~ .........

.u..;a. ..F

&tte~tion

e. 0

li:ot or noise .

;L..~ .~~ ..~ d .. M 9. 10.

11.

12 .

A. ,l~~/.~ Did object appear as al{ibht or as a definite Object . j1 M..~. ~ .a/~~ - ~~ 1 ./MVW.. ,. &~ If tnere was more than was their formation .

a

object, how many were there,

what

:.: .::...: :.::::::~~ ,:~=~~~~i~F r . ·r ·.. ... . .~ ~. -~

13.

8

~ ..... ... . .... .

~::_~~-~:~~~~~. ~~~~~~~~,~. ~ :'t~ r·

14.

Was any method of pro puls ion obvious , . ~c-;-.•.•••••. • •

15 .

Was there any sound •. .. .• - ~

16 •.A:Il3e1ght, or angle

or

r..... .. .. .. .. .... ... ....

elevation~.~- d~.. .OttY.~. ./<-1

l] •.A:IlSpeed, or an~ular velocity • ••••• ~~ . ~ . ~r .......... 18.

State any eJi t>er1ence which e ne::>les observer to certa1r. sbout the ane :1ere. ::;i ven to 15 and 17 .

tfe

...

reasonably

Jt.-.fk~..~b~LW. :#.KJ.~~ - ~f...tr.tfn<-.~70': ....--:-tr'l'~ A*

Sinc~t is normallyJ(mpossible i6 est~ate th~~ei3ht nnd speed~ of a strange object it will usually be better to ende&vcur to determine the angle of elevation of the object the angle through wh1~ t move~ ar~ the ti~e taken to oo this.

4/.(

"' ~ I

.... ./2


19.

Direction of flight with reference to landmarks or ooin t£ of the compass.

................ .... .. ........ .. .. ............ ..... ... ....... . 20 .

Did the object remain on a &trsight peth, deviate or manoeuvre at ell. _f__

. .~t. . ~- /no-. . tK .

(_

. ~~- . . - ~ o

. ~!7•...... . .

21.

Was any trail of exhaust. vap

light seen

22 .

Where did object disappear~ e . g. in mid- air , behind a hill, over the horizon •

.4 .·~ ..~ ..4v... ~.. .4w:i+.~~ d;Jt- ~ 23.

. .. r .. .. (.~{ ~ .

24.

fragment~ photo-

Existence of any physical e vidence such as graphs, or other supporting evidence •

~ ~ .k-..~~--='~"'"'· d ...... .

W~ther conditions experienced at time(s) or observation(s)

.

~. ~. . ~ .a.. . ~ .~ ..~. ~. ~~-; .~ 25.

Location of any sir traffic in the vicinity at the time of s l .snting •

............./.vi........ ........... .... .................... 26 .

~eneral

Location of any meteorol03ical stations in the

ares .

.......... .. .... ... ..... . .............. ....... .......... . ~.

27 .

Any addi t1onal informs tion .. ... ..•. ••. .•.••.•... . . . ...• . ... . .. •

4

•••

............................... .. ........ ...... ..... .. .. ........ .................................... ., ..... ..... ............... . Que stions 25s 26 and 27 to be answered by interrogator.


~~----~--------------------------~----------~------~-----------------.....

COMMON\\.EALTH BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

.. Ul

~ausuauieatioa.

/I// ,7

Il l+

to bo

edd"'I!..W ~~ Tht- Dirrclor of \Jtl"ro10f}

P.O. BOX 1289 K liELBOlJR);£, Cl.

"9021

Ttl•pboo• ze Tis;

54/-566

8th

The Secretary. Dep~tment of Air , Victoria & r c's , St . Ial.ia rCl . I

pril , --53 .

' .At~ention

.:E480URNE

Sightine:

I

-

Unidentified F'lying Object

The attached report, originally f0~varded to the Deputy Director , Bureau of eteorology , Tasmania , is enclosed for your info~ation .

!tf~l/.4-( .J. '!IMs) Actin~

Director of

W.etecrolo~v


Account o1' S~g:hting of Unidentified Flyl.n Objects at Risdon, T smanis or- Thursday , J~unry Sth , 1959, by .L. rewton , 10 ...c Guinness Cresce1 , _.enuh Valley , a.ntl , . JJ . Sha~. , 4 :Brooker Avo:; ., oone.h

At 9 . 00a.m . on 8 . 1.59 Newton and Shaw left the .ydro - Electri... oon~ Offices for isdon hith tn object of planning alter ticns to a hi h voltcge underground cable ter~inal structure s ... tu ted in Risj n ~d . , on the per~ eter of the r.orks of the .Electrolytl.c Zinc Company of /Asia Lt.1 . ~o

~ssion ' s

,t 9 . 20 . n . Sh-1. , r.ho w.,s lookin up t the top of the structure c stl lly re? e'>'1ton ' s ttentil"nto wh:-t appeareu to be piece of newspaper caught in <'n u draught and high in the air over the .z. ~ompany ' s prop~rty . Its · ltitude woul~ b~ about 1000 ft un~ both ~en atched it eradu lly flo t to e rth. hen it 1,a., ..1bcut 200 :ft from the ground it accelerated to a hi "'h speed and disapeareu between tv:c bui dJ.ngs in the E. Z. Company ' s orkshops ar.,& abo \At one quarter of a m~ le 'lWay . It \vould h· ve been bout 30 -~· ~rom th ground travell~ne bout 60 m. p .h. and possibly 9ft . lor.oe 1hen it daappeared It had the appe·u-aDce of a pure wnite linen sheet and w· s quite flexible . (A subse.tent intensive sear~h in the area 2! hours later revealed notning hica coulu account for the phenomenon) .

As the object was nearly to the ground , ' ewton sighted a sll:l:;.J. r object ~ ... bot., Shaw anti Ne\ ton wa.tc u tm.s disappear rapidly in a downward d.irection in n area bet"een the E . ~. Company ' s Administration block ana: tw: wharf several sec nds after the disappe ranee of the first object . ihi:!.st conject:.trin~ on tho:! n ture of tnese obo.~ec-s 1nJ whilst still lookin. to th, north est. after the disn.ppeo.r:'>noe of the seconl o ject, S1aw dre1 ~;;Htor ' s attention to a hif'b flying object nich ~ved t tremez.dnus olo'eeu l.n a Northerly direction dis.,ppearing behind ount :Jirection ( ltitude 1469 ft . ) . This object was Sl!L.."lll, f laslunp, brilliantly with an intense I• hi te lig...1t wl th a frequency of about 1500 cycles per minute nd £1ppe red to be et on altitude of at !east sev~r 1 thousana feet. This sightin lasted about one second durin~~; 1 hich the object tr·welled tnrough about t .. enty degrees of the ~.;ompass . Both men then looke back lon the course of the flasning object < nd immedi te.q noticed c;. sim:i.lllr object sloHly describing a large clockwise circular figure slightly to the North East of the zenith a.nu over the Derwent River . After one complete circuit 1t began to hover and move on . It d~a tnl.s several times until it w s close to t.1e sun 1.hen it became st tion ry though still flashing in a simil'l.r manner to the other object described in the preceuing par agr ph und at a simi ar altituue . Suddenly two jet black elcn~:;ated objects c..ppeared s ... ightly to the i;crtn of the object and be~an to 'floa ao1vnwaras towards the river . To make t~e most of tne sighting it s greed t •. at :ie1 ton wou.u give his a~tention t~ ~~e f tne bl ck objects ~u Sh 1 would watcn hl'lt I ' s assumed to be t 1e p"...r.ent body . Tne black object floateu downwards <md beg n to have the aopearance of an inverted skittle lith a ball attac +~ the ena of the handle . Its descent w~s le_surely and the ' skittle ' rotated slo ly .bout the b _l 1hich was leading. It cou.t.u h ve been from 3 to 6 ft . lona a..-.,d m·ly noss1bly have reduced its dl1nensions fls it neared the surf~ce of the river . hen bout 100 ft . from the surfEce of the river its descent w s arrested and it bes n to move hortzontnlly in a southerly directJ.on for about 100 f+ . ~~en it gin descended vertic lly nd entered the wat er abou~ 1800 ft distmt without any apparent disturbunce . HoVIever t o se gulls wh1ch ,., ere flyin slo 1ly upstr ~n the Vl.Cl.nl..ty dived s. rply to the surf c ....ere the t'bject ais p eare bu.,; r.hcelet! l<Hil nu m de off . The tJ.me 1 s no 9 . 4'l .m •

. ./2 ·:~ .

..

;

... ,

-~

.~;.

-

.,....


Dur1~ this t1me tue paren~ body w sin t1e one 路 s tion but slo ly decreas1na in size unti. i~ uisappeared bout the s e ti e es the bl c~ object hit the ~~ter . Its brilli~ce was ~n iminshed ~n intens1t d 1 s easy to see evetl tnough it w s v~ry close to t sun ' s d1sc . The 1e ther t t ..e tie w ple ss.nt r.mt1 sunny

ith near clou less sky anJ ~ ~iant southerly drift of air from the r1ver .

,... S;d .

. L . !.ewton) Electric 1 Encineer

(11 . D. Shaw)

Electrical Engineer A . . I.拢 . (Atst . ) .

I


MINUTE SHEET

j

\

,. ..

\ .F. Form A 60 (Mar., 45)

[0\I::Jl


-

TUEPHONE:

I~

No.

.~PLY ..Pl~SE QUOT,F

51~/I

Ai r \3'>A

)

Headquarters, Home Command Penrith I . W.

New South Wales 6th August, I058

SPcretary

~epartment

of Air Victorin Barracks

1!ELB0t1P.UE 'llC REPORT 01-T 'JNIDE:JTIFIED FLYinG OBJECT

Forwarded here~ith is a report receivP.d from Headqu:u'ters R . A. A.F . Amberley, on an unidentified flying object .

$~-~~ 7 N / . G. lAI.:TZIER) ng

Commander

r Air Officer Commanding


OYA:L ATTSTRALHD

Hednquarters R. A. A. F.

Ipswich 405I

AUBERL...'!:"Y,

AIR FORCE

Q.LD â&#x20AC;˘

31st .Tuly 1958

'BS .5/209/Air(7A) Headquarters , Home Command R. A. A.F. PEliRITH, I . ... , N. S . Yl. J};tTSlJ.,J,

REPORT ON

SI }R:'. GS FLYlllG OBJECT

U!:rDEIITIF~

I. Eorwarded herewith are two copies of a report on the sighting of an unidentified flying object in t~e vicinity of Amberley on the !4th ~uly IQSS , When this Headquarters learned of the sighting the Ease Squadron Intelligence Officer Flight Lieutenant Taylor \'18.5 Despatched to interview "!!embers of the group of men alleged to have observed the phenomenon. Having discussed the subject with all the witnesses, Flight Lieutenant Taylor decided to take detailed evidence from the man who first sighted the object and the most highly trained witnesses only. Ho~ever the evidence given by the remainder ofthe group generally conformed ~ith the statements of the two main witnesses . 2. Following Flight Lieutenant Taylor's first interrogation of the ~itnesses I interviewed at Amberley llr. Bruce Stephens the Constructional Engineer who had the presence of mind to train his theodolite on the object. Unfortunately the theodolite was the conventioned type giving bearings and angle of elevation only and was not a modern range-finding instrument. Had the theodolite been equipped for range - fin~ng other valuable evidence ind uding the altitude of the object could have been calculated. 3. Mr. Stephens impressed me as being a most intelligent and reliable witness. He explained that he was positivP that the object was solid and was neither an optical illusion nur a meteorological phenomenon . He explained that he had not reported his observation direct to the R.A.A.P . because he was certain that the object, b~ing solid, would ~~ve been tracked and recorded on "your radar." As a matter of' fact, the Amberloy O. C. A. 7'as still unserviceable on the day of the sighting. Ur. Stephens could not be induced to esti~te the size, speed or altitude of the object . He stated that i t 'l':as moving during the entire period of his observation; was omitting no noise and he v¡as impressed by the brilliant whiteness of the undersurface . 4. Having examined the evidence and intervie~ed Mr. Stephens I can offer no satisfactory explanation of this occurrPnCP and I earnestly recommend that thi~ sirhting be t~ken seriously.

(D.R. CHAPUA!r)

Group Captain Officer Co~-anding .

)


I.= tinn:

Ti

13451\

14th July 19;8 1 5 minutes

thi. pllenom non was sighted on the 14 i-..h July 1958, .in!' rm ion w s not made known to R.A.A . F. au~r0ri~ies until July 2ls .::R, Lng.i.neer of 66 P!Ifl!: MG:JNTAIN R AD, N "J-: IP.:.'t.'Ili!', an e R. A. A.F. learned of the matter through dis·ussion witr Mr. MERVYK J \..1~ • Mr. NUT'LR pas~ed the inform<>tion to !LA.A.F. Amberley Mrl 4nv s~i tions waro comm nc)d on • e l2nd J~ 1958 .

rhe obj ct under discussion was

si~~t~d

and

obs~rved

by twelve(12)

members of s const;ruction gang employed nt t 1e oartiaJ..ly "lr •cted electric liuntin{'; a'l.d mnrsl alling yru-ds • t WULKUR~A 1 miles We:Jt of Ipzwict: .

It rcmilicd vi::ible until 1400K, and was .first noticed by llr. AROLD • VY!l JA.;!iv.rrz, plant oper~tor, :~f 78 om-m STRE11', NO!fi'H IP.,.n..;, who described t1 c features ns round, silent and cloud-like, givina off lit;ht reflection, solid in construction, but emitting no sound or any obvious m~ans of propulsion. lhen si{':hted, it was to the !lorth- • est and apart fr m one slight period where it appeared to hov~r, the direction remained -.:onstant until visual c:"nt ct w9.s lost . Corrobor tive ev;i.denc"' to this eff et. "' s Piv n ry ot er

wor~n .

u-. RRUC S!li:PHENS, 'onstruction mrineer, of 5 LIMA 'I n', AUCHEh'FLOw.i:R, BRISBAl , wt o 'IJII.S "ngnred in line level cbecklno at the loco.tion, whe notified, made observations of the phenooene through his eodalite for noprox '1-tely e · cht minutes, until it dis.r.pneared bel w terr'! ln. is desc ption is ar. follows : A solid body of definite ah3pe (see attach d sketch) 1.11tb brilliant unders~de lirht reflection, not caused ~ sun. e w~s unable to ~sse5s toe altitude, distance or means of propulsion and t 're was no parent sound. Path of travel W"S North- lest 'With c<Jnstantc direction. Bearings ".nd anguler elevation were as follows : -

06°

·,o,

L L

02° ZJ. I

L

01° 3.3 '

BRG II

"

316°T .311° 05 'T .3100 2l ' T

Weather conditions at tf!e time 1.1ere : FU-e, cloudless, sli ht haze . fhe po~iticns Of ~iehting fall witnL~ the R. A. . F. ~ontrol Zone, Ambcrley rnd passes through the Instrument let-down area. o R . . A.r. or ~;ivil aJ;rcr:~ft were airborn" or operatine within these conf.lnea nt the Ill stnted (It is mnndat~ry for all civil ~roffic ~o request clenr~c~ from .A.A.~. Artoorl Y r rc proco ine through this aren) tl-"'refore t e po 9ibility of it btl · IUl airer ft i 1:1 st unlikely. t

e 1\ly i

tiloon. On 1nt rrog>J.tion the ob ervers nnn:ed~ gnve strai t forward 1nfor t.i shewed no tendency to cmbollish llnd t ir details were id ntica.l thnt o" shape . Thl. can b understood rendily ~ Mr •• TEP _, ad t o ·f + les~opic as ~ce ov r t of the ~ed eye nnd .ua.lific t:.io!'ls rior to tr t of tho e>t .r bs x·vers.

~tb

dO-kf (ac. ( .. ~. rMt. >

~liebt

Lieuton t


El'Cl (1)

~~ . Jackwi~z's description of object observed

with naked eye •

.4: TCH (2)

TI!EODOLITt. OBSERVATION SOLID CLEARLY DEFI~~ uTRUCTURE PRESENTATION

A.'l illustr'l.t.i n of Mr. Steph.,n 1 s drawing of the obJ ct b rvcd thr "h n heodolit.c . A c y of lr . Steph n 1 s or.iginal ske tc ther ui th his th obj cts elev::ttion i :U. o t.t; ched


of Observer · -- __

1.

Na~e

<: .

"ddress of Observer --" !! _

Occupation of Obser ver

4.

Date and Time of observation (Tice given in 24 hour clocY. tonal ti~e) - - --1~!'

t)T_

~n·

Phone.

..,!' ·~

.Pl.!

195S

.

-~ --~-- -

~ -

140Qb: - -- - - - -

Per iod of obaervation(s) _

6•

kenne r of obser vation: (Give details of own position by map relerenc~ if possible, or by k~ landcsrks, and describG any cquipcent used in the obse rvat i on) . ______ _ ___ lflSll.U.

CSS~l'-TICE-- --- - -----

------

_ --- - - · - '9B.G _Z7n° T

7.

;;here was object fi r st obser ved , e. g . overhead , comin& f r or:: btlhind a hill , over the horizon, etc .

a.

'·•hat fir st attracted observ... r' s att~ntior., e . g. li~ht or noise .

9.

Di d object appear sa e light or as e definit e object .

lOo

If t her e v~s mbre thbn one object, how ceny wer e ther e , end ~hat was t heir f orost ion.

11.

•met wa& the colour of the light or object. _ __.,; ,z

1;,. .

'..bet

13.

••.a.a any detail of structure o'bservsble _

14.

Vias

any

15.

Wns

ther e any aound

was

its appar ent shape. _

m~:thod

~ ~'oud

.!..il:2 __ _

_

_ _~~--- _ - - --

of propulsion obviou& _ __ ______ !)__

16. •• Hei ght , or engle of elevation 17 . 18 .

..

1111

Speed , or angular velocity State any cxpt..rionce Which enables oboervcr to b~ reasonably c~rtoin about the answers ~iven to lo ond 1~.

Since it is normo1ly imposeiblt to osti~~te th~ heiGht and rp~~d of a strange o~ject i t will uaually ~ bctt,r to cndeovour to d~tcrmin~ t~ aagl of e l eYation of th~ objoct ,th~ angle through which it uoved, ~nd th t~ taken t o do thi.-.


CONFIDENT AL

19.

Direction of f l i ght with ref er ence to landma r ks or points of t he compose .

20.

Did the obj ect r ema in on o stra ight path, deviat e or manoeuvre at ell.

21.

';',a s any trail .of exhaust, vapour or light see II

<.2 .

lihere did object disa ppear, e . £. in mid- a ir , behind horiton.

2),

Existence of a ny physi ca l evidence suc h a s frngcents, phot ogr aphs , or other supporting evidence .

- - --0

• • • E.!..!lE!LEP.:::l-1 -'l.!:'J.ON •• - •• -- -· · - - -

hill, ovr: r t he

R

Weather conditions expr: rie nced et tima(s) or observetion(s) -----·"'.o~I- ~_:J:_____ ..::: .."'·- 7 .::." _ z __ - --

25.

Location of any air traffic in the vicinity at the ticc of sighting.

---·-- -26 .

- ---- - - -

*"-- - ·--~- - · - - --- -

------- -•--..------- . ..... ' - - - -

Lccetion of any meteorolog ical stations in the ge neral e reo __ __

Any additiona l

Questions

25,

inform~tion

26 end 27 to be

o nswer e~

by inturrogator .


B:ttuCE.. ST~"S- • _

l.

Name of Observer --·- _

2.

Address of Obse rve r _ _5_L!Mt

sr2EE!,

AUC~~VEE

. Phone .

____

:-:-__

Occupation of Observer 4.

Date end Time of observation (Time g iven in 24 hour clock zonal tics)

5.

Period of ob&ervation(s) _

6,.

t.anner of ob servation: (Give details of own podtion by map r efer ence i f posaible, or by known lendms r ks, and desc r ibe any equipment used in th;; ob&ervat1on}:

- __ _.!;.. !![._ 1JI g) - -

-

-

· , ~ I ...~..:..r.&lDOl.l.:Il'.:. • ---~-- - --- - ------- - -- - - _ _ ~~ _I...r.u;;__ZJ_0_J7 1S. __ . LONGJ. 15.2..' k4.' E

- - - ·- •I

_

\ - - -- _ - -- -- _ :: ~ 21.0~

J ~ MllJS .:Wl·' !P.3WI.a!:l.

7.

\,here wa e object first observed, e . g . over head 1 coming from behind s hill, over the horizon, etc.

8.

\that first attracted observer ' s attention, e . g . light or noise .

Did object appear a s e light or as a definite object .

10 .

If ther e Vl8s more than one obj.tlct, how me ny we r o ther e, and Whet was their formation.

11 .

~nat

1:1.

\.nat wee its apparent shape . _

13.

•:1a s a ny detail of structurE observablo

14 .

Vi as ony method of propu1sicm obvious __ __ ___ !!.:li.. ~e~nbl.e _ __

was the colour of th.; light or object . _ _ -. 1· ft-+

\'lea ther e eny sound

Wi.t!L..l!~. -

_ ....::;:;!:.....!:-._ ,...•.B~ __

__ !"1.\l••

16 . •• Height , or e ngh: of e levet ion

17. •• Speed, or angular velocity 18 .

State any expe. riunc~ which enable• observer to be r easonably c rtein about the ~nswers given to 16 ond 17 .

- - - --- - -'.11.:!" \!I.!L ~J

il(il(

J.!'......-.L- - - - - - - - -

Since it ia normr1ly impossible t o estim~t c th~ height and spe ed of e strange object it will usually be bottc.r to ~ondo;evour to d~t.rmint th, 1.1r.::;le of elevation of the object ,tr ent;lL throurh which it c;ovcd, ond the tioc taken to do this.


. /-

19.

Direction of flight wi~h refer ents to landmar ks or points bf the eompese4

- ..llarth-.wllt.el:l:1~~~- -- - -- -- - -- - ·-- - - - - - -

bid tho

db~ oct r emo iri on a stra i ght peth, deviate or ma noeuvre at

llii & fr.;dnl ~r:igd . .ol..~BUJatlgQ ;_li:fl»~ ~ ll~l!!lt

path .

21•

':.as shy trai1 of exhaust, vapou r or light l!een .lDlz......~ra~ Z'!f!~

£2 ,

Vms re did obJect disappear , o. g . in mid- ai r, behind B_hill, over the rorh.on.

L3.

Existene~ of a ny physica l evid enc~ suc h a s f r ngoents , photogra phs,

or other supporting evidence . _ __u H ,:q _ _ _ _ - -

\'leathe r conditions expt.r ienced s t tic:e(s) or obs erveti on(s)

25.

Location of any oir traffic in the vicinity at the time of sight i ng .

26 .

Location of any meteo ro logi cal stations in

27 .

Any additional

th ~

gener a l a r ea ______ __

_________________- - --·--- -------·inform~tion

_...

...

..

- --- - - --------· ..-~

...

.... --·--

-- - ----

Questions 25, 26 end 27 to be answered by int errogator .

·..

• • \.


TELEPHONE:

<'· ":11 IN REPL t PlEASE QUOTE

No.

Headcu" rtP~

• o-

R:.<~F

FElffiiTH

5/2/1 ... 1 r{39~)

Secretary Der.art~ent

of nir ;..• '"' •

N.

18 t h Februar y 1059

Acninistrctlv~ ~ffi ces Cn BI:'R.&;

1I

(ntter-tion : D. ... . F.I. )

~.

REPO FT

v.~

ASRIAL SIGhTING

Attached i~ a report obtained from tr . David Osborne l'oore and his l?ife of 1 5 Nargong Foad, North ''a nly , New So nth '"ales by the ... ssistant Provost l'arshal, Sydney .

#(~~p

f1ng Con:oancer for ... ir Officer Comr.anding

Encl .


u:n

~ 25570 H. Off. .Tameeon M. L. Field Security Section R. A. ~. 1". Provost Service 1":1-r , /} o(J., J r.. s. •· Section

~

/ / ~ >1'-

)

20/98/AIR

IIV' SYDNEY 7r"''-t'?# 6th Februory 1959

Assistant Provost l.arshal SY.J.iEY

On the 5th February 1959, the writer and No.A21 6306 Sgt. 1. Shept srd E. D. or this section interviewed .r• .Javid Osborne l:OORE end his wU'e, residing at 15 Nargong Road, l~orth r.:anly, io re.t'erence to the sighting of a strange light in the sky on the 1st February 1959. (Our 20/98/~ir- 6th March 1958 deals with a cognate report from · r. Moore).

2.

It appears that at 2025 hours on the 1st February 1959, Uoore in coupany with his wife saw a bright white lightj described by Mr. Moore as similar to a 200 watt electric light gl obe. The light is alleged to have appeared from the South Vest, travelled over North f&anly in a North East direction; under observation for·approximately ne (1) ~inute then suddenly disappeared. ~r.

ff.r. Moore is a member of the U.F.O. organization, during 3. conversation he mentioned numerous aigbtings of objects observed in the Manly area by members or his Society. At about 0830 hours and 1130 hours on Tuesday 3rd February 1959, Mr. Moore allegedly saw an object in the air immediately above the Brookvale Control sod Reporting Unit, be described it as being the size of an omnibus radiantly illuminated. Later inquiries by the investigators disclosed that a civilian helicopter had in fact visited the locality at the times stated on that date, the craft had l8nded in~ privately ..:>wned clearing between the accommodation and functional a. A. J.. . F. areas. This information suggests that l!.r. Moore ' e sighting 1vas correct but his interpretation or what he saw was influenced by his genuine - although to the investigators - a~parent fanatical enthuaiasr. for spotting unknown objects , all or \VI.tch he a1'firws cofue from outer space and are manned by beings either friendly or hostile to our country. tr. !oore decries the ass~ption that the objects could be ethereal.

4. rhe area in which ~:r.l. oore siGhted the "light" reported i n this instance is one of the lanes used extensively by civilian aircraft. The Brookvale Control and Reporting Unit have no record of any unidentified craft being picked up by their equipment over the relevant period.

5.

Lr. !:o~..re extended a cordial 1ov1 tat1on to any officer or the R.A.h.F. at neadguerters Home Command to attend a funotton to be held at his home, commencing at 1930 hours on the 21s t February 1959. Guest speaker vtill be Dr. G-eorge .iWAMSKI from ~~erica . ~r . Adamski is associated with the U.F. ~ . organizativn and will s~eek · n ~uter space objects; he will be eccom~eoied by J u ne I ARSDEN well known astrologer. 6.

Attached is slghtinc form as completed by lr. loore •

.-fn·A·~

r ~->.i:"~ r:;:-t( vt;~.:~soN >

~~tp' ~ ~~ -~~~ ff1cer


I!~J .~' o:'~

1. 2.

,,

-

...::..-qiAL OBJ'LCf OBS::RV..::..J I/

-,.,

-

lfsme of O'bse rve 1'• • • • • • • • I' • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 11 ""'1.., rr,.o' ' r 1,;J-/ I>A/ Address or Observer••••••••••.••.••.•••• , .••.•••• • ••••••••••••

- ~ c ; •.... Occupation of Observer•••••••.•....

A;W£~ /. ~ ..••• ••••••••••

~

• ••

Date and Time ~f observstiJo (r ime g iv ' n 1n 24 hJur clock zonal ... ..., . .;,.o:J~~ <::,.... )~,..;:> '"'time)

.................................... ·-.......................... I

t/_.

/'

/

--1'

5.

Period of observ~ t1on (s) • • .. .• •••.••..•• .• .• • ~ ••• ~ ••••••••••

6.

l.iE!nner all' observE~tion: (Give a.etr.ils 0!' own p~sition by mElp ret'erence if possible, or by !cnown l e- ndmarks, and describe soy equipment used in the observf'tion) .

.-~ . ~ ~:.?~. ~ ..........~v.~ .... .................................... . ............................. . ........ ... ..................... .............................................................. 7.

lhet'e wes object first observed, e . g. overhead , coming from behind a hill, ~ver the hori~on, etc•

.... ....~:~<.... ??~.... .!:a~liKd. ..... ....... .... .. ... . a.

./hat .first adr.lcted observer ' s

a~ ·tention,

e . g. light or noise.

~I.9:'l/'7 ••.•••••• •..............•......••..•.....•...............•.•

9.

10.

Di d object

es s l i ght Jr

~ppe~r

~s

s definite object.

....... ~~./;;:'(". .................. . . ............................ I f there was more tihan one object , how many ·yere there, and whst wfls their formatio n.

......................... ............................ ......... (

\...-

1 1,

.fuat ·..res the CfJ 1 our o f

~h •' . " ••~ "e 1 l.,jnt ')r o b Jec~.~ •• •••••• ••••••••••.

c " 'C U0E. ........... . .. . . ... . ........................................... -..!.{ L, ciif'~" HhE:t w s its eppa.ren ~ s h Clpe ••• •••••••.••••. • .••~Lf[~ ••••.••• r. .. ... {I

13.

iss any de t~ i 1 1f' s true ture observable ••••••••

.#. ?. .• ·......... .

......... .. . .................. ............................... ..-

<~-

14.

Vif'S

~ny

15.

w~s

there eny sound•••••••. . •4/_t!••... ...........................

~

Jl :..

met hod

O.f

propulsion Ob Vious•• • • • • • • ~-r..c?

.£(.. •••••••••••• --

6.

Height, or angle of elevet1on•••••••• ? .. ............. ...... . . .

7.

Speed, or angul r velocity•• • • ••••~~ • • • :~ ·· · ··•••••• •• • ••• •••

18.

Stste any experience which en bles observ~r !io be reason8blY c ert ain about the answers gi v~n to 16 and 17.

~ ••.•.••• • )! •• ·~ ..•........ ·•··•·• ••••• •••· · •••··•··••·•···••• Since it is nor tally iml;)essible to es-.imste the height t-nd speed of El strange objec-t it 11.11 usually be better to endeavour to determi ne ~hu angle of' el..'nt1on of the object, ~he oogle through which 1 • moved, and 11e time .,nken vo do this. -1-


---

- 2-

0port on aerial obJ ~ct observed ( c?nt. ) 19.

Direction of .fli.;ht wi Gh re.f'e1•e nce t., lsndr.1 1rks or points oJ: t ho CJmpsss. .... ....,-0 v................................ .... ...........................

20.

Did the at ell.

on s s ·r a ight path, deviate or

o~jec t ~v~ein

menoeuvr~

................................. .............................. ..:::.

~1 .

~ny tr-il or exhaust, ve~our or light s e en•••••••• C..... .

/as

here did objecG disappe ur, e. l. in mid - air, behind a hill, over the horiz:>n•

22.

•••••••••••••••••.<! .'!:..-..·. ~<r.Z................... ........... . 23.

::::xis-;ence ')f eny physicel evidence such as rregments, photogrl'phf: , or ., t;her suppor ·~ing evidence.

IC ............. .. ............................ .... ............. . ~

.leo,her C')Oditi Jns experienc~d at ti~e (s) 0r observatl?D (s)

.............../(,. ,. .......................... . .................. 25.

en~

Lccsti?n or sighting.

ir tref!'ic in i;he v icinity

a~

the time of ~

t " ............... A<\ ·········•• c-f' •·······························

............................ . .

26.

Loca tion

............... ................. .

or an:. mo:Jteorol?gical sta ,ions in .. he gener<:>l area •••

I .t

I

...

•.•••.......... •..........• 27.

""

.,

,,

~~ -··········· ~ ···················

~ny additional infonnati-::>n. ... . .... : •••· •••••••••••••• ! ....... .

............................ . .............................. , ""'

............... ............................................ . ~

~ ··························· · · ··········· · · ··· ······ ······· · ··

............................................................ •

• •

• •

• < •••••••••••••• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • . .....

1Uestions 25, 26 and 27 to be E>nsw.:Jred by interrogator.

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TtlEPHONE :

-

~-- A~~t,IA ~-

lllXY 130

....

COMMONWEAlTH OF

- -

IN REPLy PLEASE QUOTE No. _

_ _ _ __

- "

!)

ss f

>/'-' /l <J.~~r4'-f'...:Z.~rvlull~l,AN AIR FORCE

"'

Headquarters T~~in1ng Command

R.A;U'

Albert Park Bat·racks

?UELBOURNE SC 3

5/6/ft.ir( 23A)

30 J N

1

VIC

9

Secretary Deuartment of Air Victoria Barr'lc:<s •....::J..i.iJ::>URN:E SC1 VIC

SIGHTING OF tlNDENTIFI:SD .AERH.L OBJECTS

Attached is a report concerning the sightings of unidentified aerial objects at Risdon, Tasmania.

~ Ca::tain

~ouu

?or A~-brfic~r Commandi~~

Encl

-~~~ -

----------------~--

~-----------~--


-

~

WSTRAL!Alf :1\h - •

\}~~artara 'l'osmanian Squadron Air Training CCirp& 8 Pibroy Plaoe HOBART 21st Jawary 1959

Headquarters Trai.nii:g Canuud R. A. A. F. Albert Park Barraok:s JJelbourne S.C. 3

SIGHTING OF UNIDENT.IPIED AERIJIL OBJECTS RISDON. HOBART• eth JA!~ARY 1959

1. The attached statement giving details of sighti.~ of unidentified aerial objects at RISDON, Hobart on the 8th January 1959 by Joleaers NRW~>N and SHA·.r was received fran the Depart~~~~tn+. of Civil Aviation, Hobart, on t he 16th Jawary 1959. Prior to passing the statement to this Headquarters the Officer i n Charge ot the Department satisfied himself that there were no looal civil aircraft movements or meteorological conditions which could be associated with the sii!Pt~.

2. On the 20th January Messrs NEWTON and SHAW ware intervie111-ed by the writer. Both men are staff electrical engineers with the State H;rdro-Electrloit7 CCIIII!Iiasion az!d give the impression ot being very mature and stable individuals. When asked t o give verbal accounts of the sightings each did so with cont'idence and. certainty. In each oaae the verbal account WIIB in eDot conforroity with their written statement. }. Bot h men were 111earing sunglasses at the time of the sightillgll a-1were therefore abl e to visually f'ollO'II' the course ot the seoond flashing ob:.c to t he tenninal point near to the sun's disc and to make their sii!Pti1181' ot th& blsclc "sld.ttle shaped" object "llhich appeared to ca:oe from tbe flashing object. SllA Y is an ex- aircrew navigator and is 34. years

4.. d

of

age.

re·.rroN u J

age.

S. The writer is of the opinion that actual and definite sightings '"'" made by SHA•f am NE'IITON and that the matter deserves further investigation.


Account of Sighting of UDidentifiod Flying Objeote at Risdon, Tasmania on Thursday, January 8th, 1959, by . L. trowton , 10 ~c ~uinnoss Crescent, Lenan Valley, and A.D.Shaw, 4 ~rooker Avenue, :.Ioonah. At 9.00 a . m. on 8/1/59 .rewton and Shaw left the Hydro-Electric Commission's

~oonah Of~ioes

for Risdon With th e object of planning alterations

CD~C

to a h1.gb voltage undel:'ground terminal structure situ.a.ted in Risdon Rd., on the perimeter of the works of the Eleotrol~io Zinc Co~any of A/4sia Ltd. About 9.20 a . m. Shaw, who was looldng up at the top of the structure oasually drew Newton's attention to

v~at

appeared to be a pieoe of

new~aper

oauS):It in an updraught and high in the air over the E. Z. Company• s property. Its altitude would be about 1000 ft lllld both men ''atohed it gradually float to earth.

rrhen it was about 200 ft from the ground it aooelerated to a high speed

and disappeared between tr.o one quarter of a mile awa-;;.

buildi~gs

in the E. Z. Coapany•s florkshops area about

It would have bean about

~

ft. from the ground

tre.velli.llg about 60 M.P.H. and possibly 9 ft. long when it disappeared It had the appearance of a pure white linen sheet and was quite flexible . ( A subsequent intensive search in the area ~ hours later revealed nothing which could account for the phenomenon) . As the object was nearly to the pound., Newton sighted a similar object

and both Shaw a."'d ll'ewton watched this disappear rapidly in a downward direction in an area between the E. z. Company' s Administration block and the wharf several

seconds after the disappearance of the first object • .7bilst conjecturing on the natura of these objects and whilst still looking to the North

~est

after the disappearance of the second object, Shaw

drew Newton ' s atta!ltion to a high flying obj eo.t w.b.ich moved at tremendous speed in a Northerly direction disappearing behind Uount Direction (Altitude 1469 ft).

'l'"nis object was amall , flashing brilliantly with an intense white light with a ~equenoy

of about 1500 cycles par minute and appeared to be at an altitude of at

least several thousand feet.

This sighting lasted about one second during which

the object travelled through about twenty degrsas of the compass. Both men than looked back along the course of the flashing object and immediatel y noticed a similar object slowly describing a large clockwise circular figure slightly to the North East of the zenith and over the Derwent River. one

co~lete

circuit it began to hover and move on.

Attar

It did t:Us several times

until i t was close to tile sun · .·ilen it became stationary though still flaslli.ng in a similar manner totbe other object described in the preceding paragraph and at a aimilGr altitude.

Suddanly two jet black elongated objects appeared slightly

to the North of the object and begen. to float doml\'rards to.tard3 the ri Vfr • To make the moot of the sighting it was agreed that .rewton -rro his attention to one of the black objects and Shaw would watch what to be the parent boccy.

,

appearance of an inverted hs descent was leading.

wtl6

\VSS

assuced

The black object floated doml'l'llrda end began to have the skitt~e

with a ball attached to the end of the handle.

leisurely and the • sh.'"ittle' rotated slowly about the ball which

It could. have been trom 3 to 6 tt. long and mny po.51bly have

reduced its dimensions as it neared the surfao"" of theriver.

Uhen about 100 ft .


from the surface of the river 1 bori~ontally in a Southerly direction for about 100 ft verticall~ and entered the water about 18oO ft distant

disturbance.

Hoqevsr tao sea gulls which were

Vicinity dived sharply to the surface ~ere tne object slowly and ~ade off. The time was n~ 9路 45 a.~ . Duril18 this time the parent body was in the one position but sl< decreasing in size until it disappearedlbout the same time as the blac~ hit the water.

Its brilliance was undiminisb.ed in intensity and waa e

even though it was very close to the sun' s disc.

The weather at tne

pleasant and sunny rlith a near cloudless sky S.."\d a light Southerly dJ: air from the river.

... Jltw.:. ( .... D.

Shaw)

...