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kidz

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ADULTZ

MAGAZINE

ISSUE 10 / NOVEMBER 2020

SPECIAL OFFER

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IN THIS ISSUE... VENUE TO VIRTUAL – WHAT’S ON BIONIC SUPERHERO TILLY LOCKEY MINDFULNESS & PARENTING GARDENING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE CONSTIPATION IN CHILDREN IS NOT ALWAYS RECOGNISED CHRISTMAS PRESENT IDEAS Image by Debbie Todd @debbietoddphotographer


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Welcome!

WELCOME TO OUR LATEST ISSUE

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hroughout the UK we are all facing varying degrees of Covid restrictions, which remains a challenge for some people. Hopefully, it will not be too long before we can start to socialise again and meet up with our nearest and dearest especially as Christmas approaches. For those who have met me at the Kidz to Adultz Exhibitions over the years (it’s probably thousands by now), you will know I am a ‘glass half full’ person and not a ‘glass half empty’, so I am optimistic the New Year, will truly be a New Year and not a repeat of this one! So, what do we have instore for you in this edition of the Kidz to Adultz Magazine? We have the a full timetable on what is on offer through ‘Venue to Virtual’ – a virtual showcase of equipment and services to support children and young adults with disabilities and additional needs. Register now and start watching from Monday 9th November. We interviewed Tilly Lockey, a 15 year old model and inspirational speaker, who, after surviving meningococcal septicaemia as a baby which resulted in the loss of both her arms and toes, has gone on to be an inspirational speaker and presenter for FYI News4kids. We have really interesting articles about Mindfulness, gardening and the wider benefits of adaptive cycling. There is a spotlight on some of the lesser known charitable organisations who can offer the most tremendous support for parents. A Christmas gift guide, a few competitions and much more… This is the last edition of the Kidz to Adultz Magazine for 2020. Have a wonderful Christmas and stay safe. Carmel Hourigan Editor & Manager Kidz to Adultz Exhibitions Disabled Living #kidztoadultz

Cover image by Debbie Todd @debbietoddphotographer

CONTENTS... Tilly Lockey interview.......... 4 New Disabled Living video!. 7 Syndromes without a name.8 Mindfulness, parenting and additional needs......... 10 Flowers for someone special................. 12 The benefits of adaptive cycling.................. 13 Venue to Virtual 2020........ 19 Competition time!.............. 22 Constipation in children.... 24 Brainwave online................ 28 Christmas gift guide.......... 31 Gaming: don’t be excluded.......................... 36 Win a pair of Spokeguards!...................... 37 Gardening for children with autistic spectrum disorders.............................. 38

FANCY BEING IN THE NEXT ISSUE?

If you would like to talk to us about promoting your company or organisation in the next issue of Kidz to Adultz magazine, call us on 0161 214 5959 or email us at magazine@disabledliving.co.uk

Disabled Living, Burrows House, 10 Priestley Road, Wardley Industrial Estate, Worsley, Manchester, M28 2LY

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Image by Debbie Todd @debbietoddphotographer

AN INTERVIEW WITH

Tilly Lockey

TILLY LOCKEY IS A 15-YEAR-OLD MODEL AND INSPIRATIONAL SPEAKER FROM NEWCASTLE. SHE IS AN AMBASSADOR FOR OPEN BIONICS AND PRESENTER FOR FYI NEWS4KIDS, AMONGST OTHER THINGS! 4


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n January 2007, 17-month-old Tilly Lockey miraculously survived after contracting group B meningococcal septicaemia. She pulled through but unfortunately lost both her hands and all her toes. Despite the numerous challenges Tilly had to overcome, she regained her strength and is battling on. Tilly and her family are looking for ALL the support they can find, the most successful being the “Give Tilly A Hand Scheme” http://www.givetillyahand.com We spoke to Tilly to find out some more information about the amazing work she has been involved with and her journey which has led her to where she is now. YOU HAVE A NEW TV ROLE AS A REPORTER ON SKY’S NEW TV SHOW, FYI: FOR YOUR INFORMATION. WHAT ISSUES ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO REPORTING ON? This issue I’m most looking forward to reporting on FYI is inequality and discrimination against the world’s minorities. It is so important for me to be able to speak out and educate young people about a problem that affects many of us individually, for example the colour of a skin, our size, culture, disabled bodies, etc. It’s sad that we even have to be activists for this because, at the end of the day: these are basic human rights! No one should be discriminated against, singled out or judged for what we cannot control. We are all human. People are people no matter what you look like or believe in and that is the message I’m trying to portray. HOW OLD WERE YOU WHEN YOU GOT YOUR FIRST BIONIC ARMS AND WHAT DIFFERENCE DID IT MAKE TO YOU? I don’t really know if I can call my first prosthetic ‘bionic arms.’ They were merely a tube with 3 prongs sticking out the top, tied together by elastic bands. I received this when I was two or three years old. It wasn’t a great experience. The device was handed to me in a brown paper bag as if something to be concerned about and it wasn’t a technology-

based device. Basically, the way it moved was I had to wear this big harness which connected to me and one of the three prongs. The way I would move my upper body would pull on strings which would then pull one of the ‘fingers’ left and right. I thought of the device as more of a weapon than a hand to be honest. It didn’t help me in the slightest so it was definitely a shock for me and my mam first entering the prosthetic world! I didn’t let this first bad experience put me off prosthetics though. Instead, it more so fuelled my motivation to work with prosthetic companies to get something better. Fast-forward to the bionic arms I wear now! I remember putting the

not going to be able to move fluently with your arms overnight and it’s going to take some time to get used to doing the things you want to do. My other piece of advice would be to not let the prosthetic mask your difference, instead let it accentuate that, because our differences are what make us who we are! I love to have my arms different colours to match with my outfit or mood and it’s always fun to have them light up! They’re like a fashion accessory! HAVE YOU FACED ANY HURDLES WITH YOUR DISABILITY? IF SO, HOW HAVE YOU OVERCOME THEM? I have faced a couple of hurdles in my life due to my disability. Of course there are the physical challenges that

Image by Debbie Todd @debbietoddphotographer

prototype on for the first time and the feeling I got was unexplainable. I picked up on how to work my muscles to cooperate with the arm’s fingers within about 15 minutes (it was that easy!) and within no time at all I was chucking around tennis balls making a mess! It was an amazing experience and felt like the start of something huge. It is fair to say I’m happy I stuck in with prosthetics! WHAT ADVICE COULD YOU GIVE TO OTHER AMPUTEES WHO USE BIONICS LIMBS? My advice to other amputees who wear bionic limbs would definitely be that practise makes perfect – you’re

come with having a physical disability like mine, but there’s usually a way around it like adaptations or me just figuring out a unique way to do what I want to do. However, a lot of the challenges that come with having a disability come with stigma around the word ‘disabled’ and the ideas society has placed on everyone - no matter what the disability. Growing up, I always wanted to start wearing prosthetics. But my whole life, I had people and doctors trying to give me a glove. Not a prosthetic, but a glove made of expensive material that my family had to provide the finances for - just for it to do nothing! Simply an accessory designed to make me

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blend in like I had something to be ashamed of and to make able-bodied people around me feel comfortable. I had to fight for a hand that could open and close, and this led to me being the youngest person in the UK to have ever received and worn a mioelectric prosthetic arm. I’ve always struggled with people just automatically making their own assumptions about me and what I can and can’t do. That always really got on my nerves because I do consider myself to be a very independent and determined person (my family could tell you that!). I think the best way to overcome interactions like this is basically just to educate people on it. Just because I’m missing hands doesn’t mean that I can’t draw, write, dress myself and it doesn’t mean that you need to aim any interactions with me to my parents. I am very capable and I want to be treated like the normal person that I am. WHEN DID YOU START LEARNING THE PIANO? I started learning the piano when I was around 7 years old. We’d had a piano in the house which my family had bought second-hand. It was crumbling and the paint was peeling off but they wanted to get it because when I was getting my hands amputated, playing the piano was one of the things on the long list of ‘things I would never be able to do’ and my parents never wanted to give in and limit my abilities! I was just having a tinker on the piano when I was 7 and ended up learning how to play Beauty and The Beast’s ‘Tale as Old as Time’. My mam filmed this and documented the achievement on social media and a local newspaper actually printed the story which was then seen by an amazing pianist named Michael Mulroy. Michael was missing a leg and he instantly knew he wanted to teach me how to properly play piano. So he started coming over for lessons which he never charged us for and he even went out of his way to create me a DIY prosthetic device to help me play chords on the piano (which was

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Image by Debbie Todd @debbietoddphotographer

otherwise a thing I couldn’t do as you need minimum three fingers)! I still use that device today! It is made from a toilet roll tube, a garden rake and some tape, but without it, I wouldn’t be able to play. Michael is absolutely amazing and I owe it all to him! WHEN DID YOU FIRST START GETTING INTO MAKEUP AND CREATING YOUTUBE TUTORIALS? It’s actually quite a funny story! I went to school one day around Christmas time where I fell over and ended up breaking my fall with my right elbow. I thought nothing of it. It hurt but I thought it would just ache for a bit then go away, so I went to my next lesson. It was there I realised that my elbow was not recovering and I actually couldn’t bend or straighten my arm. So, my mam picked me up from school and took me to the doctors. It turned out that I had fractured my right elbow and had to wear a cast for 2 weeks. I was in this cast over Christmas which was very annoying because having only one arm was far from ideal! For Christmas I had asked for bits and pieces of makeup just to play around with and when it came, I was itching to have a go, but it was very tricky doing that with one arm. So I thought, why not try and do it with one bionic arm? At first, it was a messy procedure and I got makeup everywhere, but I was eventually able to complete a full face of makeup using only one bionic arm! I filmed this and put it out on social media where it gathered a lot of attention. I’ve been doing it

ever since and now it’s a lot easier because I have two hands! COULD YOU TELL US ABOUT SOME OF THE AWARDS YOU HAVE WON? When I went through the trauma of contracting meningitis and going through my amputations, I was nominated for a lot of bravery awards when I was very young. Recently, I visited New York where I picked up a Humanitarian award for giving back to the community. It was a spectacular night and my first trip to the big city and under such incredible circumstances - it was like a dream come true! I also have a lot of mental achievements and awards and I am so proud of everything I’ve been able to accomplish and be involved in so far in my 15 years of life! YOU HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN SOME INCREDIBLE THINGS. WOULD YOU SAY THERE HAS BEEN A SPECIFIC HIGHLIGHT? Probably the highlight of everything I’ve done is being able to have built up my presence online to help other people like me who have the same, similar or even a completely unrelated disability to mine, but are still faced with the same discrimination which unfortunately comes from being under the ‘disabled’ stigma. I treasure my social media profiles so much and I like to use them to reach out and support other people, speak about activism issues surrounding inequality and ultimately just have


fun doing my passions like makeup and piano. I like to show that having a disability doesn’t stop me from doing all I want to do. One of the best experiences I’ve had as an activist and motivational speaker has got to be the time where I spoke on a panel about compassion and technology, all whilst sat next to the Dalai Lama. That was absolutely incredible and will always be a completely surreal moment in my eyes! WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF HAVING 3D PRINTED ARMS? The advantages of having 3D printed arms includes them being very light weight, much lighter than other prosthetics. Another advantage comes with the price of 3D printing materials. Rather than being made from expensive materials like the silicone ones I previously had to fundraise for, these are a lot cheaper! Another thing that’s quite cool is that you can literally just print them! It takes a bit of time but is still very efficient. Also, if you have a 3D printer at home, you can gather the necessary materials and just print your own accessories!

DID YOU HAVE A CHOICE IN WHAT THEY WOULD LOOK LIKE? YOUR BLACK ONES WITH YOUR NAME ON LOOK AMAZING! Yes! The user/customer always gets to design their own arm. They range in varied different patterns and can be whatever colour you want - they can even be mix and match! Open Bionics also offer cool collaborative designs like Disney’s Frozen, Marvel’s Iron Man and Star Wars’ R2D2 which makes it that much more exciting for kids! They can quite literally become iron man! I have a couple of different colour and designs to match up with my outfit which I love. WHICH COUNTRIES HAVE YOU TRAVELLED TO WHILST PROMOTING OPEN BIONICS? I’ve done quite a lot of motivational speaking, travelling in my own right to share my story, but I guess the hero arm has become a big part of my story now. I’m promoting it all the time! I’ve been to Amsterdam a couple of times, San Diego where we attended Comic Con as I was modelling bionic arms based off of the video game Deus Ex (which also became a world Guinness record!), Washington DC, Mexico,

DISABLED LIVING HAS A

South Africa, Indonesia, Madrid a couple of times. I did have plans to go back to Mexico, Madrid and to go to Barcelona and Columbia this year, although Covid19 prevented all that from happening. However, most things have been rescheduled for next year, so fingers crossed we can get back to normal! I also went to China with the CEO’s of Open Bionics who are also my good friends at this point. We ended up winning the gold overall prize for the design of the hero arm and took home £100,000 to benefit the company! Her new TV role shows there is no stopping Tilly, who will have the chance to interview top celebrities and politicians including the Prime Minister, and report on the big issues affecting young people across the UK and the world. FYI: FOR YOUR INFO is the acclaimed weekly news show for kids available on Sky News, Sky One and Sky Kids On Demand. FYI is also shown in thousands of schools across the UK through First News Education.

new video!

DISABLED LIVING HAS PRODUCED A NEW VIDEO ABOUT ALL THE SERVICES WE OFFER

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any of you will know about the services offered by the Kidz to Adultz team, but do you know we have sensory rooms, booklets for children with bladder problems, free moving and handling sessions, a wide range of resources to download from the website and much more…

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SYNDROMES

without a name

SWAN UK (SYNDROMES WITHOUT A NAME) IS THE ONLY DEDICATED SUPPORT NETWORK AVAILABLE FOR FAMILIES OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH UNDIAGNOSED GENETIC CONDITIONS IN THE UK

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t is run by the charity Genetic Alliance UK. SWAN stands for syndromes without a name. It is not a diagnosis, but a term used when a child or young adult is believed to have a genetic condition and testing has failed to identify its genetic cause. Approximately 6,000 children are born in the UK each year with a syndrome without a name – a genetic condition so rare that it is likely to remain undiagnosed. We help our members make

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contact with other families who understand the unique challenges of raising a child affected by an undiagnosed genetic condition. We offer 24/7 information and support through our online forums for registered members. We also educate professionals about the issues faced by families affected by a syndrome without a name and help improve services so that all families receive high-quality coordinated care and appropriate

testing and treatment. Joining is free for any family in the UK with a child or young adult (0–25 years old) affected by an undiagnosed genetic condition. To find out more about SWAN UK and how we can help, visit undiagnosed. org.uk/. You can also get in touch with us at info@undiagnosed.org.uk twitter.com/SWAN_UK facebook.com/SWANchildrenUK instagram.com/swanchildrenuk


The Motability Scheme enables disabled people to lease a new car, scooter or powered wheelchair without the worry of owning and running one. Parents and carers can drive on behalf of the customer. The vehicle should be used by, or for the benefit of, the disabled person.

Making life easier for disabled people

“We went on our first family camping trip. Something we couldn’t have done without the new car.” Sam, Elisabeth’s mum

Who can join the Motability Scheme? You may be eligible to join the Scheme if you receive one of the following: • Higher Rate Mobility Component of Disability Living Allowance (DLA). • Enhanced Rate of the Mobility Component of Personal Independence Payment (PIP). • War Pensioners’ Mobility Supplement (WPMS). • Armed Forces Independence Payment (AFIP).

What’s included on the Motability Scheme? Insurance Breakdown assistance Servicing and repairs

How Motability, the Charity can help We can provide charitable grants for: • Car adaptations to help make travelling as comfortable as possible. • Vehicle Advance Payments for larger, more expensive vehicles. • Up to 40 hours of driving lessons, to ensure disabled people have access to driving tuition in specially adapted cars as necessary.

To find out more visit motability.org.uk or call 0800 500 3186

Tyres and battery replacement

To find out more about the Motability Scheme visit motability.co.uk or call 0800 093 1000

Motability is a Registered Charity in England and Wales (No.299745) and is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (Reference No. 736309). The Motability Scheme is operated by Motability Operations Limited under contract to Motability. Motability Operations Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (Reference No.735390).

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MINDFULNESS, PARENTING

and additional needs OLLIE BRAY IS A MINDFULNESS TEACHER AND WORKS FOR BREATHWORKS. IN THIS ARTICLE, OLLIE SHARES A SHORT MINDFULNESS PRACTICE FOR DIFFICULT EXPERIENCES WHAT IS MINDFULNESS?

“We suffer more in imagination than reality” Seneca

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ost of our suffering comes not from our circumstances, but our minds. Imagine two people stuck in the same traffic jam. One is getting increasingly frustrated that they aren’t moving, and worrying that they’ll be late, while the other is just enjoying the radio. Same situation, but very different experiences. We have the primary experience of our situation, and then we have what we add to that, with thoughts, judgements, worries, self-criticism, and so on. Of course, sometimes even our primary experience can be very unpleasant; there can be pain, frustration, anxiety, and fear. But it’s possible to accept that primary suffering without adding fuel to the fire with this secondary mental suffering. This is easier said than done of course, because most of our secondary suffering is triggered automatically. This is where mindfulness comes in.

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Mindfulness gives us the ability to notice our automatic thoughts, reactions, and judgements, which are so often harmful and unhelpful, and begin directing our minds in a more beneficial direction - perhaps one with less resistance, and more kindness to ourselves and others. So, how does one learn mindfulness? As with any skill, mindfulness requires a little practice, but here’s a short exercise, called RAIN, that can get you started when you’re having a difficult experience: Recognise the experience recognise how you’re feeling in your body. Recognise how this experience is affecting you. Many of us live in a painful inner prison without being fully aware of it. Recognising what is actually happening moment to moment is the first step. Allow the experience - usually when we feel discomfort, we either try to distract ourselves and numb out so we don’t have to feel that way, or we lose ourselves in the story that the difficult feelings are telling us, and

become overwhelmed. To allow the experience is just to let go of resistance, and just to be with the experience how it is. We can accept the feelings without accepting the judgement behind them. Investigate with kindness - this means switching from a closed, contracted mind state to one of openness and curiosity. What’s going on here? You might ask the question “what am I believing?” In other words, what judgements am I introducing here? Do this with gentleness, kindness, and care for yourself. Everybody feels this way sometimes. You’re not alone; how would you respond to a loved one who feels this way? Non-identification. You are not your thoughts. You are not your pain. You are not your feelings of shame or distress. These experiences will arise, and they will pass away. You can allow yourself to feel those sensations fully without letting them define you. Here’s a short account from a mindfulness teacher and mum on how mindfulness has helped her.


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am not a very good advert for mindfulness and parenting. I don’t look the way the Facebook ads for mindfulness look; I eat big bags of Chilli Heatwave Doritos, binge watch Netflix, and my house is not very tidy (we have a big bag of odd socks that we rummage through daily to find a pair. We call it the sock pile.) Still, it is no exaggeration to say that the practice of mindfulness has transformed my life. I want to share stories of shining pride about my daughters, one of whom has additional needs, but my girls are private souls, so I will try to say a little about why mindfulness has been a little bit of difficult magic in my life as a mum. I went on my first mindfulness retreat 13 years ago when I was 10 weeks pregnant with my eldest daughter. It was called One Moment at a Time, (run by Breathworks, who I went on to train with) and I still remember the grey sickness, tight band of headache, and how my mind whirled with all the first baby planning thoughts. I didn’t know then that she was different, but I already knew that I would do everything to keep her safe and prevent her suffering. In mindful movement workshops I lay on my back and wept- I had no idea how my body wanted to move, having lived largely from the neck up for most of my life. Pregnancy and mindfulness brought me back into relationship with my body, and I promised my unborn baby, rocked by my breath, that I would love her with my whole self. I began to come into a kinder relationship to my body – previously a vehicle for taking my brain to different locations where I often tried to fill it up with wine. In fact mindfulness helped me stop all that pre-baby - but that’s a whole other story. My daughter broke my heart wide open, and mindfulness helped me keep it open. “The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places”. So how is mindfulness a superpower? Well there is an intensity that parenting brings that

I had not experienced before. I am very aware there are many families that have things very much harder than us. We are lucky. Still, I cannot help but notice that many families don’t see as many daily challenges as we do. Being with my daughter’s suffering whilst being unable to align the world with her needs has brought feelings of grief and rage. Seeing statutory services fail her. Feeling misunderstood. Letting go of needing to be liked and becoming willing to be ‘that parent’. Becoming an advocate. Learning to honour my daughter’s autonomy. Noticing my wish to control. Noticing my aversion to her suffering. All of this required that I learn to work with my mind - rather than against it. Fundamentally, that’s what mindfulness is about: developing an awareness of how your mind works. Until I knew my mind, I couldn’t work with it - I was just fighting against it. I learned to notice how one event - a certain kind of trigger - would create a cascade of thoughts like a nuclear reaction, leaving me stressed, tense, hurting. Once I noticed that, I also noticed that I had other options - I could respond, rather than react. I can relax my body, get curious about what I’m feeling and thinking, without getting caught up in that experience. It may sound like a small change, but the results were huge. It allowed me

to have better conversations with those in positions of authority. It allowed me to catch myself before I made things worse - for myself and those around me. It allowed me to be with my daughter in her pain without being overwhelmed. Both on and off the cushion, mindfulness has taught me to be with my mind, and be in my body. And of course, sometimes I still get it all wrong, I make things worse, I say the swear word within ear shot, I get caught up in anxiety and fear for the future. I am a mess. Mindfulness teaches me to come back to the body and the breath, and see it’s never too late to meet myself, my daughters and those around them with kindness. Sheena Lovegood, Breathworks Mindfulness teacher Breathworks are passionate about helping people living with pain, illness and stress to reclaim their lives with mindfulness and compassion. They teach 8-week courses, retreats, and events, as well as a full mindfulness teacher training programme. You can find out more about Breathworks and upcoming events on the Breathworks website – www.breathworksmindfullness.org.uk

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TELL US ABOUT

someone special AND WE WILL SEND THEM FLOWERS!

This year the Kidz to Adultz team have spoken to so many people who have said they don’t know how they would have coped

during the Covid restrictions, if it wasn’t for one very special

person. We would like to hear about that ‘very special person’, whether it is children telling us about parents or carers, or parents telling us about neighbours, friends or relatives.

You don’t have to write pages, a few lines will be fine. You do not need to include contact details of the person you would

like flowers sending to at this stage. The Kidz to Adultz team will pick one request at random and then contact you.

g.co.uk Please email your request to info@disabledlivin

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THE BENEFITS OF

adaptive cycling

CYCLING IS FUN! BUT WHAT IF A DISABILITY PREVENTS YOUR CHILD FROM RIDING A REGULAR BICYCLE OR TRICYCLE?

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n adaptive tricycle can fill the gap. Now your child has the opportunity to participate in this age-appropriate recreational activity alongside peers, in the home, school or community. Not only will a child benefit physically, but adaptive cycling improves psychological well-being and social acceptance. For those who learn to pedal and steer independently, cycling builds cognitive growth and self-esteem. So, lets hop on those bikes and explore the benefits further. SOCIALISATION Ethan, a 17-year-old young man with autism, is nonverbal and unable to sit still for more than 15-20 seconds at a time or use his hands with concentration. He

loves movement and is constantly on the go but never succeeded in riding a tricycle. During the recent COVID-19 pandemic, Ethan’s mum obtained a large Rifton adaptive tricycle. For the first time, Ethan could be contained in a safe sitting position while purposely moving. The continuous pedalling and simultaneous eye-hand-coordination to steer the tricycle helped Ethan develop the basic skills of concentration and coordination remarkably well. At the start, Ethan tolerated only 5 to 10 minutes on the tricycle, but soon routinely began riding for 30 to 40-minute sessions, three or four times a day. Naturally, Ethan fully enjoyed his tricycle time. On rainy “indoor” days, Ethan pedals the tricycle on the stationary stand,

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using the attachable communication tray as a surface for his entertainment devices. Despite many attempts at medication changes, nothing has changed Ethan’s hyperactive state so remarkably, nor improved his ability to sit in one place and attend to one task, as his adaptive tricycle. Since starting on the adaptive tricycle, Ethan has become more relaxed when pedalling and does not resist the safety seatbelt. Ethan will even hop onto the tricycle seat in between scheduled times and sit peacefully, choosing to pedal or not. The most beautiful days are when one of Ethan’s relatives loads his tricycle in a pickup truck and meets the family at an outdoor bike trail. Ethan stays on the tricycle for up to an hour with a family member supervising. Some days, his brother or his aunt will ride a bicycle alongside him. Mastering the tricycle for longer distances is a personal accomplishment. “Even if he cannot express it in words,” his mother Ellen says, “being on the tricycle gives him a sense of satisfaction in doing what other people are doing.” STRENGTH AND FLEXIBILITY As a child grows, it is important to maintain the use and mobility of the leg muscles. Muscle and bone growth are interconnected, so pedalling a tricycle is a natural and fun way to encourage and develop appropriate muscle strength and flexibility. Even for a child who does not demonstrate any volitional movement, the adaptive tricycle passively moves the child’s legs through the motions, assuring full leg extension and adequate muscle length to prevent contractures. Another issue common to children with cerebral palsy or other physical disabilities is muscle weakness. As a result, a child may lack the stamina to participate in regular and daily physical activity. This contributes to a detrimental cycle of continued inactivity and further disability. Joint contractures, loss of bone strength, spine and limb deformity, skin breakdown and decreased function of the lungs, heart, and circulatory system result from increased periods of inactivity. Providing active exercise and fitness opportunities can reverse this cycle.

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Kimberly Kennedy has spastic quadriplegia, a form of cerebral palsy affecting all four limbs. She is unable to walk independently and is non-verbal. But she loves outdoor physical activities. From a young age, her family involved her in many adventures including horsebackriding and jet skiing. By the time she was 6 years old, Kimberly was able to maintain her sitting position with close supervision. Now Kimberly is 24-years old and one of her favourite activities is taking her pink Rifton tricycle for a spin. “Kimberly stays at home because we have no Day Program Services in our geographic area,” says Jeannine, her mom. “Spending time on the tricycle is engaging and a great physical activity for her.” Out in the sunshine, Kimberly’s grandmother pushes and steers the tricycle while Kimberly holds onto the handlebars. As the tricycle moves forward, the pedals cycle through their full revolution stretching out Kimberly’s legs. “It also helps with her core strength and sitting ability,” continues her mum. “She can be in it for an hour at a time on nice days. It’s good exercise.” COORDINATION For a child who independently rides the tricycle, practice sessions can include advanced activities: steering exercises, uphill pedalling, stopping, and starting, backing up and safety awareness tips. An obstacle course is a great way to challenge motor planning as well and further develop eye-hand coordination and visualspatial perception. Hudson has autism spectrum disorder and speech apraxia; he is non-verbal. Before the age of five, his family would occasionally offer him the chance to ride a tricycle, but Hudson simply could not manage to keep his feet on the pedals, nor would he sit at ease or properly steer. Then he began using a Rifton tricycle, sitting with the support of the backrest and with the pedal straps securing his feet in place. Because he felt safely and comfortably positioned, he was happy to be on the tricycle while a family member would push on his legs to guide his pedalling motion, move the tricycle forward,


HERE’S THE EASY WAY TO FIND WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR... and help him to steer. Within a few months, Hudson was pedalling and steering on his own. His family was surprised that the alternative of an adaptive tricycle could make such a difference. The independent movement, especially outdoors, gives Hudson a sense of freedom and calm. “He’s a happy rider,” his grandmother Grace says. “And now when we’re at a playground that has a tricycle course, Hudson will pick out the sturdiest tricycle on his own. He can now ride over a variety of surfaces on a regular-made tricycle which he could never do before!”

The Disabled Living Supplier Directory provides information about companies and organisations that provide equipment, products and services to support disabled children, adults and older people. You’ll find the Supplier Directory on our website www.disabledliving.co.uk

ENDURANCE Children with disabilities, particularly those with mobility limitations, have few opportunities to challenge their cardiovascular system. But adaptive cycling is one activity that can make a difference, impacting a child’s walking endurance, gross motor function, and health-related quality of life. Brandon is 19 years old and has a dual diagnosis of spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and autism. Because he has poor depth perception, Brandon cannot walk for long periods of time and relies on someone being right next to him for safety. On the tricycle, he is more independent and can achieve speeds and work-out levels that challenge his cardiovasular system. “On his first attempt, Brandon was only able to perform four pedaling cycles, traveling about 3 meters,” Andew, his dad, explains. “But with regular use he has built up his muscle strength and stamina. He can now cycle down our 70-meter driveway and back again by himself. He loves it!”

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BALANCE Keira was born with infantile spasms and seizures. At six months of age she was diagnosed with epilepsy. Despite numerous medication changes and even the implantation of a vagus nerve stimulator, Keira continues to have two or three significant seizures every week. It was never safe for Keira to ride a regular bicycle with training wheels. But she tried out a Rifton adaptive tricycle for the first time when she was 11 years old. Fortunately, on the adaptive tricycle, her poor balance and risk of seizures was not a barrier. Because of the built-in stability and secure seating with a supportive harness, seatbelt, and side supports, Keira’s sitting balance was a non-issue. This tricycle was completely safe. Keira’s mum could guide the steering with the rearsteering handle. Kiera was excited to ride it and was able to propel herself right away. Now Keira is 13, and riding her tricycle remains one of her favourite activities. On another note, believe it or not, tricycling even has the potential to improve a child’s balance. This was initially borne out in research done in Queensland, Australia.¹ When cycling, a child continually weight-shifts to maintain the centre of gravity over his or her base of support in order to effectively move the trike forward. This repetitive postural practice not only allows a child to sit better and with more control when off the tricycle, but also carries over to improving balance in an upright position while reaching or even running. PROGRESSION LINE For a child who cannot walk independently and sits for long hours in a wheelchair, riding a tricycle can guide alternating and reciprocal leg movement patterns such as those experienced in walking. Activating these key “walking” muscles and patterns has further therapeutic benefits beyond the tricycle. Annie Garcia Rojas received her first tricycle when she was 7 years old. She has quadriplegic cerebral palsy. She loved her new tricycle from the word go. Within the first week, she figured out how to pedal it herself, and a little while later, she was independent in steering it. After one month, her sitting stability improved, and she no longer required the support of the butterfly harness. Now at age 10 she has a medium tricycle, and she is in it every day, never less than 30 minutes, and sometimes for up to two hours in good weather. “Her legs used to be very skinny,” her mum says. “Now her legs look thicker, there is more muscle.” Annie uses a Pacer gait trainer to walk. “Before, when in her Pacer, both her legs would be turned inward during stepping. After she used the tricycle over several months, I noticed that her legs and feet were pointing straight ahead and were better aligned when walking. And now she can run in her Pacer!” Annie doesn’t like to be in her wheelchair. She rides her tricycle when her siblings are biking in the park and she uses her Pacer when her mum is shopping in the mall. Lelis tells, “It’s always a big joke for Annie when she goes

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fast. She looks back at me running to try to keep up! She laughs and laughs.” Parents are the first to celebrate the joy of each child cycling on his or her tricycle! And now therapists and teachers are increasingly recognizing the benefits of the adaptive tricycle as a valuable therapeutic mobility device. Lori Potts PT Physical Therapist, Rifton 0114 285 3376 hello@jiraffe.org.uk www.jiraffe.org.uk Jiraffe are the exclusive distributors of Rifton products in the UK.

¹Armstrong, E.L., Spencer, S., Kentish M.J., Horan, S.A., et al. (2019) Efficacy of cycling interventions to improve function in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinical Rehabilitation. 33(7):1113-1129. Abstract https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=30935240 Photo ©2020 by Rifton Equipment. Used by permission.


Education

Condover College Ltd is an Independent Specialist College and Residential Care provider for young adults aged 18+ who have severe learning disabilities and additional complex needs including: autism, PMLD, communication difficulties and visual impairment. Our mission statement promises to offer the people we support the same rights, choices and opportunities as people who do not have disabilities. It is our responsibility to support young people to exercise these rights to lead a fulfilling life. We also have our own specialist in-house Physiotherapy and Speech and Language Therapy teams. Complimented by our brand new Hydrotherapy Pool and therapy centre. All education placements are funded through the ESFA and students are required to maintain their Education Health and Care Plan.

To find out more about our Education Programmes and Short Breaks...

We provide both day and residential education placements, on a 38 or 52 week basis. Students come to us to develop and improve their communication skills, increase their levels of independence, gain confidence and self-esteem to be able to make choices and take greater control over their lives. Our curriculum includes a broad range of learning activities in college, in the local community and at work. The Grafton Centre offers individualised quality learning programmes for students aged 18+ following one of two education pathways.

The Employability Pathway For those students who aspire getting into voluntary or paid work, as well as developing greater independent living skills. For those who succeed on this pathway there is an option to undertake a supported internship in the final year.

The Design For Living Pathway For students whose main aspirations are to live as independently as possible, through the development of their communication, personal and social interaction and daily living skills. Some students have a strong sensory focus to their programme to match the way they learn and experience the world.

Short Breaks For young people aged 18+ we offer Short Breaks (Respite Care) at our Greenfields scheme in Bings Heath. The six-bed dormer bungalow with a large garden offers the perfect home-from-home for short stays. Our Short Breaks provide both relaxation and fun for people to enjoy time away from home in a happy and safe environment. Guests can participate in a wide range of activities and enjoy the peace and tranquillity of the grounds, whilst parents and families can enjoy a break from their busy caring roles.

admissionsandcontracts@condovercl.org.uk 01743 872250 www.condovercollege.co.uk

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Scooa Cot Let the Scooa lii your baby to you. High/low and head raising funccons Looks like any other nursery cot Easy for moving and handling Compeeevely priced for community use

UK's leading manufacturer of bespoke specialist beds & cots Fully profiling bed that turns Independent leg movement Grow with the child Reposiion and find comfort with minimal intervennon. Starrng length of 60” growing to 66” then finally 72”.

Caribbean A Unique Childrens Turning Bed Telephone Assessments - Video Calling Assessments & Presentaaons - Home Visits

Savu Cot Bed AAraccve cot/bed that is versaale and safe Wooden surround with choice of bed funccons Bedroom Safety – No gaps Profiling in the correct place Safe sleeping environment Range of colours and themes

www.centrobed.com t: 01233 635353 e: sales@centrobed.com


COME AND JOIN US (you are very welcome!)

Monday 9th October – Friday 13th

October 2020

Come and join over 1500 people, who have already registered to experience the Kidz to Adultz ‘Venue to Virtual’ online event. Companies and organisations will showcase equipment, products and services to support disabled children, young adults and those with additional needs. Expect a week long programme of useful information, advice, presentations, equipment demonstrations, funding options and competitions, together with a live Q&A chat facility.

Click here to register now!

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PROGRAMME MONDAY 09:00 – 10:00 10:00 – 11:00 11:00 – 12:00 12:00 – 13:00 13:00 – 14:00 14:00 – 15:00 15:00 – 16:00

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TUESDAY

INTEGREX LIMITED

BRAINWAVE

THE MOVEMENT CENTRE

JIRAFFE

CENTROBED

THE SLEEP CHARITY

MEDPAGE LIMITED T/A EASYLINK UK

SCAN MOBILITY

IRWIN MITCHELL

DRIVING MOBILITY

LITTLE BIG INSECTS

NEATER SOLUTIONS LTD

TO BE ANNOUNCED NATIONAL STAR

MAGAZINE RACK...


...GET READY FOR AN ACTION PACKED WEEK! 9TH–13TH NOVEMBER 2020

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

QUEEN ALEXANDRA COLLEGE (QAC)

FAMILY FUND

THE BOPARAN CHARITABLE TRUST

THERAPOSTURE LIMITED

SMARTBOX

SLATER AND GORDON LAWYERS

SAFESPACES

PRECISION REHAB

FORMALIGN

IRWIN MITCHELL

MOTABILITY

ADAPTIVE MARTIAL ARTS

BEAUMONT COLLEGE

MOUNTAIN TRIKE COMPANY LTD

CL MEDILAW

14:00 – 14:15

DERWEN COLLEGE

TO BE ANNOUNCED

LECKEY

TOILET TRAINING CHILDREN WITH A DISABILITY – BLADDER & BOWEL UK (PART OF DISABLED LIVING)

BUSTER FINDS HIS BEAT – JUST LIKE ME BOOKS

FROM 14:15 DISABLED LIVING (ORGANISER OF KIDZ TO ADULTZ EVENTS) GRAND FINALE

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Win £100 of

LOVE2SHOP

Vouchers!

THE KIDZ TO ADULTZ TEAM VALUE YOUR FEEDBACK AND WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WHAT YOU THOUGHT ABOUT OUR NEW VENTURE VENUE TO VIRTUAL JOIN US FOR OUR WEEK LONG PROGRAMME OF EVENTS AND AT THE END OF THE WEEK CLICK THE FEEDBACK BUTTON AND SUBMIT YOUR FORM

THE CLOSING DATE IS 30TH NOVEMBER 2020 A WINNER WILL BE PICKED AT RANDOM AND NOTIFIED ON FRIDAY 4TH DECEMBER 2020. 22

kidz ADULTZ

to

COMPETITION TIME!

EVENTS

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY 2021 MIDDLE

Thursday 18th March 2021 Ricoh Arena, Coventry

SOUTH Tuesday 18th May 2021 Farnborough International Exhibition & Conference Centre, Farnborough

WALES & WEST Friday 25th June 2021 The International Conference Centre (ICC), Newport NEW VENUE!

SCOTLAND Thursday 9th September 2021 Royal Highland Centre, Edinburgh BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!

NORTH TBC 2021

NEW VENUE!


Medpage Model MP5-UTB High Sensitivity Children’s Bed Seizure Detection Alarm The Medpage MP5-UTB super-sensitive sensor is positioned under the bed or cot mattress where it continually detects body movements from a sleeping person. The detected movements are analysed by computer software that differentiates usual sleeping movement from typical seizure movement. Continuous seizure activity generates an alarm, which is transmitted to a parent alarm signal receiver to warn of an ongoing seizure.

Established

1984

Medpage MP5-UTB Epilepsy seizure monitor with portable parent alarm

For the detection of Tonic/Clonic seizures

Adjustable sensitivity and alarm delay

Quick and easy to set up

36-Hour battery backup

Medpage Limited T/A Easylink UK

Minimum body weight > 3Kg (Cot)

Portable parent alarm receiver

www.easylinkuk.co.uk T: 01536 264 869

£170.00 (VAT exemption available)

FM84603

TECHNOLOGY TO HELP WITH AUTISM Watch & Care Home Wireless Camera System (3 cameras)

Wireless home indoor alarm kit (Autism/Special Needs care)

Order by telephone only Order by telephone only Order Code: V160KM3 Price £99.99 inc VAT Website code V160 The kits featured are exclusive offers for Kidz to Adultz exhibitions and can only be ordered over the phone

Kit includes: 1 x portable parent alarm receiver, 2 x wireless door alarm, 1 x PIR motion sensor, 1 x Wi-Fi remote power socket (works with Alexa) and can be switched on/off with included pendant transmitter independent of Wi-Fi. Order Code: DRXKM4 Price £99.99 in VAT

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Constipation IN CHILDREN IS NOT

ALWAYS RECOGNISED

CONSTIPATION IN CHILDREN IS OFTEN UNRECOGNISED. OVER TIME, THIS CAN RESULT IN A LARGE BACKLOG OF POO SO THAT THE CHILD BECOMES ‘FAECALLY IMPACTED’. THIS IS THE MEDICAL TERM USED TO DESCRIBE SO MUCH POO STUCK IN THE BOWEL THAT IT CANNOT BE PASSED EASILY)

W

hen this happens children often develop soiling (poo leaking into their pants). It is the soiling which then becomes the trigger factor for families to seek help. However when the child has additional needs it is often the assumed that the soiling is a result of the child’s ‘condition’ rather than because there is an underlying problem with constipation.

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As a result of this misconception, many children with additional needs, along with their families, suffer unnecessarily. The following case study is typical of some of the families who contact us. Tommy (not his real name) is a 10-year-old boy with autism whose mum contacted us because of his soiling and the problems he had been having with his bowels since he

was 2-years old. The family had been told that this was probably due to his autism and he may well ‘grow out of’ the problem. However, constipation does not get better on its own. In fact, it gets worse as time goes on and causes more problems. Tommy also had a problem with day and nighttime wetting and no one had thought that constipation could be the cause.


He was soiling on a regular basis and this was causing some stress within the family. Tommy was also becoming more aware of the issue and was feeling very embarrassed by it all. The picture his mum painted of the problem very much reflected an underlying constipation with overflow soiling. Healthcare professionals usually know that overflow soiling happens outside the child’s control. However, Tommy’s family did not know this and did not believe Tommy when he said he did not know that he had had an accident. Once this was explained his mum was upset saying: “…I know that this is something we have all since felt guilty over, not believing him when he told us he didn’t know. To us it’s like, “how can you not know?” NICE sets out clear guidelines for healthcare professionals about the management of children with constipation, so we suggested mum take Tommy to the GP as soon as she could for him to be seen and started on some treatment. To support Tommy’s family, we wrote an email for his mum to take to

the GP. We suggested that the soiling could be caused by constipation and what might be the right treatment. Following the visit to the GP Tommy’s mum wrote the following: “I got Tommy into the doctors and she was lovely! She had been through the same thing with one of her children and she loved your email and advice. She was very impressed and said that’s exactly what process she went through and what she was going to recommend… So, we have been given Laxido. 1 sachet a day for at least 3 days then 2 a day depending on how he’s getting on. I’ve been given a follow up appointment in 2 weeks to see how he’s getting on.” Tommy’s progress was reviewed 2 weeks later. He was opening his bowels on the toilet every day and the number of accidents was greatly reduced. So, by seeing the child as a child first, rather than the ‘condition’, listening to the story and taking note of the signs and symptoms, the problem of constipation can be recognised. In fact, if any child presents with soiling, we always

consider constipation to be the cause until proved otherwise. Tommy and his family had endured the problem for nearly 8 years. But a simple solution helped him to start to get better within a few weeks. Tommy’s mum has since written: “…I really am over the moon I found the organisation and appreciate all the help you have given us.” The key message is do not presume that any soiling is because the child has autism or learning difficulties and then do nothing about it. All children have the right to appropriate assessment and treatment. Visit BBUK’s resources page for more information about constipation in children – https:// www.bbuk.org.uk/children-youngpeople/children-resources/ June Rogers, MBE Children’s Specialist Nurse, Bladder & Bowel UK Helpline: 0161 214 4951 bbuk@disabledliving.co.uk www.bbuk.org.uk

LOOK WHAT DISABLED LIVING WAS UP TO LAST YEAR...

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s a charity, Disabled Living produce an Annual Report at the end of the financial year. It is an opportunity to showcase the work undertaken throughout the year by all our team. If you have any comments, I would be delighted to hear from you. Debra Evans, Chief Executive https://issuu.com/disabledliving/docs/annual_report_1920?fr=sYTU5ZjEzMzcz

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Custom designed, safe, living spaces and beds for people with complex needs.

Versatile, strong environments for safe sleep and relaxation. Ideal for high or low sensory use and the promotion of behaviour self management. Regularly funded through the DFG.

All our products are custom designed and made to meet the needs of individual or multiple users.

Home At Keeping Families Together

Schools In Strong, comfortable and safe high sided beds designed to meet varying nursing needs. Can be used with hoist.

Supporting Inclusion

I

ospital s nH Enabling Treatment for Acute Conditions

Quick assembly safe travel beds for holidays, respite & trips away from home.

Visit our website for our full product range Contact our expert team for purchase, rental and funding options. Call 01706 816274 or email info@safespaces.co.uk

SAFESPACES.CO.UK

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BRAINWAVE online

BRAINWAVE HAVE BEEN DELIVERING ESSENTIAL THERAPIES TO CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES FOR OVER 38 YEARS. RECENTLY, THE CHARITY DEVELOPED A VIRTUAL THERAPY SERVICE – BRAINWAVE ONLINE

B

rainwave’s multidisciplinary team consists of qualified Physiotherapists, Speech and Language Therapists, Occupational Therapists and Learning Development Support Workers. Their Therapy Programmes are based on the principle of neuroplasticity – helping the brain find new pathways in the neural network by providing regular repetition of newly acquired skills. The results can be life changing. Children who couldn’t move, now walk; who couldn’t make a

28

sound, now giggle and whose low attainment at school, is now greatly improved. Hannah is mum to three-year-old Eliza. Eliza has a rare chromosome disorder and is following a Brainwave Therapy Programme. When talking about Eliza’s progress, Hannah said: “The Programme was clear and easy for us to follow - we shared it with her nursery and they were able to incorporate the activities into her day. “Since our last visit, Eliza is making great progress. She is taking a few

steps holding one hand, progressing amazingly with the walker and can finally climb off the sofa backwards and not head-first! She can also point to her head, nose and ears, and loves to interact with a speaker button while reading a simple story. “We are hugely thankful to Brainwave. Please keep doing what you do, it makes a huge difference to all those extra special children like Eliza.” Dawn Chance, Brainwave’s Lead Specialist Paediatric Physiotherapist, said: “No two children and no two


families are the same. We pride ourselves on fitting our Therapy Programmes around the needs of the child and, also, around family life. “We take the time to explain the Programme to families. This enables them to deliver the therapy to their child, at home, with confidence. We film video clips demonstrating each activity and exercise for the families to take home and refer to when they carry out the Programme or when they want to demonstrate to others, such as carers and teaching assistants. “We also loan families the equipment and resources required to carry out the Programme, such as speech and language aids or physiotherapy equipment.” 2020 has been a challenging year for the charity. In March, they took the difficult decision to suspend face-to-face assessments at their three Centres. This decision was taken to protect the children they support, many of which are medically vulnerable to COVID-19. However, Brainwave rose to this unprecedented challenge by developing a virtual therapy service, Brainwave Online, to ensure they could continue supporting families following a Therapy Programme. With detailed planning, they delivered a virtual service that mirrored their face-to-face reassessments with the same high standard of support. They researched and invested in a secure, NHS-approved, medical consultation platform to protect children and families online. The team at Brainwave have also

implemented measures to ensure their Centres are COVID-secure. This has enabled them to reintroduce face-to-face assessments at their South West Centre in Somerset and their South East Centre in Essex. Su Jenkins, Head of Health and Safety at Brainwave, said: “We’ve carried out extensive risk assessments and are following Government guidelines to ensure we are creating a safe environment for our families and our staff. “We’ve introduced one-way systems in all of our buildings and temperature checks take place on arrival. We’ve stepped up our extensive cleaning schedule, cleared out and redecorated family and therapy rooms and we have also sourced a huge amount of PPE for staff and families. “We’ve gone above and beyond as we know that many of the families we support have been shielding. We want to reassure them that we are doing all that we can to make our Centres as safe as possible.“ The charity is continuing to offer their Brainwave Online service alongside their face-to-face assessments, with many families opting for a mixture of both face-toface and virtual therapy. Eight-year-old Hudson has cerebral palsy and has been following a Therapy Programme since he was three. He recently had a reassessment with Mervin, Specialist Paediatric Physiotherapist/ Sensory Integration Practitioner, and Claire, Specialist Speech and Language Therapist, and was awarded a Certificate of Achievement for walking independently. Hudson’s mum, Suzanne, is delighted with his progress: “We just had our reassessment with Mervin and Claire at Brainwave’s South West Centre. It was, as always, a great day. Brainwave are so supportive and positive, but they also give us new challenges to work on. “During lockdown, we did the Programme five days a week. That has definitely been a game changer and Hudson is now walking independently!”

Uniquely, Brainwave also offer ongoing support to their families from two Family Facilitators who, together, have vast experience of working with families and children with additional needs. They make contact with a family prior to their first assessment, and again several weeks later, providing an important link between families and the Therapy Team. They talk to families about their experience and provide invaluable feedback to the therapists on how each child’s Therapy Programme is progressing. In addition, the Family Facilitators are available to signpost and support families by email, phone or via the private, peer-to-peer, family Facebook group. Brainwave’s Chief Executive, Keith Sinclair, said: “This year has been extremely challenging for everyone, and I am so proud that we have been able to adapt and develop an incredible new service option for our families, with Brainwave Online. “We take a ‘whole family’ approach and our Family Facilitators have been pivotal in achieving this, often providing a lifeline to families during the difficult lockdown period. They will continue to be crucial in helping us reach out to families, connect them to support and inform the future development of our services from the valuable feedback they receive.” Brainwave support children with various conditions. They also support children with no official diagnosis and can assist families in accessing their services through a meanstested Priority Fund. To enquire about how Brainwave can help your family, please complete the Family Enquiry Form: brainwave.org.uk/family-enquiryform or call: 01278 429089

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! s e s u a c d o o g g in lp e .h .. You can generate funds for Disabled Living when you purchase goods from Amazon. For every purchase you make, Amazon will make a donation to Disabled Living at no extra cost to you!

How to help us... 1. Visit smile. amazon.uk 2. Click ‘Start Shopping’ 3. Login to your Amazon account 4. Confirm Disabled Living as your chosen charity

Choose Disabled Living as your charitabl e organisation and we will receive 0.5% of the price of eligible purchases!

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IS IT TOO SOON TO THINK ABOUT CHRISTMAS PRESENTS?

Definitely not!

I

usually start to think about buying Christmas presents after the October half term holidays. The Christmas guides are in the shops, the children have spent the holidays drawing circles round everything they could possibly wish for, or we have been brainwashed by the continual television advertising, that is no longer seasonal. When my children were young the television adverts started in September. Now as I watch YouTube videos and the children’s channels with my granddaughter, they are just continual. There is no doubt this year our buying habits will change due to Covid restrictions, with more on line purchases. However, if you do want to hit the high street, The British Retail Consortium are launching

Equip to Move Memo Orthopaedic footwear in lovely colours and styles for both boys and girls from size 18 to 38.

a campaign with a cheeky take on the governments message ‘Stay Alert, Control the Virus, Save Lives’. The campaign to ‘shop early, start wrapping and enjoy Christmas’ should encourage shoppers to avoid lengthy queues. In the Kidz to Adultz four page Christmas gift guide, I have brought together a collection of very practical equipment and products which could be the perfect solution when grandparents, aunts, uncles or friends start to ask, ‘have you got any ideas what I can buy?’

Debra

Chief Executive, Disabled Living

Spokeguards

We print your favourite image to personalise your wheelchair, making you stand out in a crowd!

Many other products available. 07905 539 212 enquiries@equiptomove.co.uk www.equiptomove.co.uk

07584 207019 www.spokeguards.co.uk

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The Glow Company

Bubble tubes in various colours and sizes 90cm and 1.2m

from £49.99

Marcella Allen Photography Beautiful family photoshoots in your own home or on location. A gift to last a lifetime

from £75.00 0345 5059090 www.glow.co.uk

Kozy Fozy Our Kozy bags will keep your child toasty warm,dry, feel safe and be secure. While they sit in their wheelchairs/ specialists pushchairs. You will be all set for day of adventures.

£59.99 07759 368770 02475 118805 www.kozyfozy.co.uk

De Novo Healthcare Brand New Children’s Footwear Collection The perfect gift for your little one. Order now and get 15% off! Mention ‘Xmas 20’ when you place your order. Valid until 01/01/21. T&C’s apply.

www.denovohealthcare.com

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07482 992613 marcellaallen0708@icloud.com www.marcellaallenphotography.co.uk

A gift of money is always welcome and the children can buy just what they want!

Explore Your Senses Explore Your Senses offer a treasure-trove of sensory delights for your loved ones this Christmas. We offer imaginative sensory kits and are constantly searching for quality products to inspire and engage. We have a website bursting with innovative toys. 01535 662812 www.exploreyoursenses.co.uk


Meru Discover switch adapted toys, technology accessories, switches and lots more Christmas present ideas for the big day.

info@meru.org.uk

www.merushop.org

Redbank House Sensory Rooms, Manchester Give a gift voucher for The Sensurround Experience at Disabled Living’s fabulous rooms

from £10

Special Kids Company Specialists in adaptive clothing and accessories for older children and young adults with special needs. Our range of products include clothes, shoes, swimwear, bibs, bedding, wheelchair accessories and much more!

0121 354 6543 help@specialkids.company www.specialkids.company

Incy Wincy Range of swim products for children and adults. Kes-Vir Girl’s tankini with shorts. Swimwear for girls with integrate waterproof swim briefs, discreet for when you use the local public pool or go on holiday, as well as for aquatherapy. Designed for bowel and urinary incontinence. 10% discount code KAM10 Offer lasts until 31/01/2021

0161 214 5959 info@redbankhouse.com www.redbankhouse.com

01189 560 295 info@incywincy.net www.incywincy.net

Fledglings

Pods Play Sensory Tents

Fledglings, part of the national charity, Contact, is a unique not-forprofit shop full of toys, clothing and sensory products designed specifically for disabled children and adults to help them and their families with some of the everyday challenges they face. Our shop is packed with great gift ideas like this bright multi-colourful Large Textured Tangle – perfect for sensory and tactile fun. 0203 319 9772 fledglings@contact.org.uk www.fledglings.org.uk

Immersive sensory spaces. Interchangeable themes with relaxing sound effects, audiobooks and ebook. Creative learning environment. Hours of imaginative play!

03302 232454 hello@podsplay.com www.podsplay.com

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NE

DO YOU TO ACCESS THE Do you needNEED to access the toilet urgently?

W

toilet urgently?

BLADDER & BOWEL UK (BBUK) HAVE LAUNCHED A NEW JUST CAN’T WAIT CARD Recognised and supported by many retail and service organisations, giving you access to toilets not normally available to the general public. Bladder and Bowel

UK (BBUK) have launched a new Just Can't Wait Card

There may be additional restrictions in place Recognised and supported by many retail and service due to Covid19. organisations, giving you access to toilets not normally available to thesized general public. • FREE pocket plastic card

FREEconfidential pocket sizedhelpline plastic card • BBUK

BBUK confidential helpline • Available from BBUK – a charitable service Available from BBUK - a charitable service

New!

Get your card from: Get your card from: bbuk@disabledliving.co.uk

bladderandboweluk@disabledliving.co.uk www.bbuk.org.uk

www.bbuk.org.uk

Registered Charity No: 224742

Registered Charity No: 224742

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equipment and products to make life easier in partnership with ...in partnership with Shop online with Disabled Living for What’s the advantage? equipment and products to make life easier

The best of both worlds...

partnership with The main...in advantage of purchasing via the Disabled What’s the advantage? website, is the online and get free TheLiving main advantage of shop purchasing via the Disabled opportunity for you or your Living website, is the opportunity for you or your professional advice clients clients to speak to to speak to With over 250,000 items in stock at With over 250,000 items in stock at Occupational Therapists or Therapists Occupational competitive prices, weor are offering Continence Specialists for competitive prices, we are offering you choice from a wide range of freeContinence impartial help and Specialists for manufacturers including mobility advice, ensuring you choice from a wide range of aids, daily living products, and unnecessary purchases are help free impartial and continence suppliers together with manufacturers including mobility not made. telecare and telehealth equipment. advice, ensuring aids, daily living products, and unnecessary purchases are continence suppliers together with not made. telecare and telehealth equipment.

www.disabledliving.co.uk/online-shop Telephone: 0161 607 8200 Charity number: 224742

Over 250,000 items in stock at competitive prices

When you shop online with Disabled Living for equipment and products to make life easier you or your clients can speak to Occupational Therapists or Continence Specialists for free impartial help and advice, ensuring no unnecessary purchases are made. Telephone: 0161 607 8200

www.disabledliving.co.uk/online-shop

Large choice from a wide range of manufacturers, including Charity number: 224742

mobility aids, daily living products, and continence supplies Telecare and telehealth equipment

Why not take a look today at www.disabledliving.co.uk/online-shop Telephone: 0161 214 4590 Charity number: 224742

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GAMING:

don’t be excluded

EVERYONE CAN; IS A GAMING AND TECHNOLOGY CHARITY. JULIAN IS THE GENERAL MANAGER HAS OVER 19 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE OF WORKING WITH ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND SHARES WITH US, HOW ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY MAKES THE GAMING WORLD MORE ACCESSIBLE

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s well as managing the everyday running of the charity, Julian also undertakes the assessments, where he matches assistive technology to disabled people’s needs. With his vast experience he truly sees the power and benefits that assistive technology can have on people’s lives. Assistive technology can ensure disabled people are able to break down barriers and lead a more independent and enriched life. Take something as simple as talking, something most of us do every day and take for granted. For

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some disabled people this isn’t as simple and assistive technology like communication aids have the power to help them find their own voice and ultimately gain independence. Technology is forever growing and becoming a part of all our lives - mobile phones, computers and laptops are things most of us depend on for the likes of work, online shopping, keeping in touch with loved ones, games etc. So, imagine if you were unable to use devices like these due to your disability. Assistive Technology enables disabled people to be able to use these devices. For individuals with dexterity

issues, something like an assistive keyboard can allow them to type with much more ease. Then, with a range of alternative mouse’s such as trackballs and joysticks, using a mouse for a computer can be made achievable.


Switch buttons are something the team at Everyone Can use a lot for people with motor impairments. They can help people access and control a computer, smartphones, wheelchairs, smart home appliances and much more. Paired with mountain arms they can be positioned in the best place for that particular person, for example if they’re unable to use their hands they can be placed near their elbows, head or feet – whatever works best for that individual. Eye gaze is a piece of assistive technology that can help severely disabled people. If they’re unable to use their body from the neck down this device can allow them to control a computer, a communication aid or video game by using just their eye movements. In some cases, it doesn’t even have to be assistive technology that can help someone. Voice recognition devices such as Google Home, Amazon Alexa and Siri can help a disabled person to use their mobile

phone or control their environment at home, for example turning on and off their lights. Gaming has become a popular hobby for a huge number of people, especially the younger generation. Luckily, companies such as Microsoft are forever adapting and ensuring disabled gamers can access their favourite games. With the Xbox Adaptive Controller coming out in 2018, it has enabled a lot more disabled gamers to play no matter what their disability. The team at Everyone Can has seen the demand to help disabled gamers and carried out a lot more gaming assessments in recent years using hardware such as the Xbox Adaptive controller, switches, joysticks and eye gaze. So it’s clear to see there is a wide range of assistive technology out there, but with nobody’s disability being exactly the same, you need to know what is right for you. This is where Everyone Can help. They provide 1-1 assessments for disabled people to find out what a

person wishes to achieve, how their disability is preventing them and they will then match technology to their needs to help them achieve their goals. They also run free gaming sessions at their centre for disabled children and adults. It’s about getting people gaming together, having fun and gaining confidence. For more information on Everyone Can, visit their website www. everyonecan.org.uk, or to talk to them direct call them on 0808 800 0009, or email them on contact@ everyonecan.org.uk

CHRISTMAS WHEELS

Win a pair of SpokeGuards!

FRANK AND HILARY FROM SPOKEGUARDS HAVE DONATED A FABULOUS COMPETITION PRIZE. ONE LUCKY ENTRANT WILL BE PICKED AT RANDOM TO RECEIVE THEIR OWN PERSONALISED PAIR OF SPOKEGUARDS! All entrants, will receive a 25% discount for your own pair, so it is win, win! Please email SpokeGuards at enquiries@spokeguards.co.uk Closing Date: Sunday 23rd November 2020

For more information about the company and to see some of the designs that have already been produced for customers, go to www.spokeguards.co.uk T&C’s: The winner will be picked at random and notified by Monday 30th November 2020.

The team at SpokeGuards may contact entrants to inform them about new products and offers.

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THE BENEFITS OF

Gardening for children

WITH AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDERS

IF THERE WAS EVER A YEAR WHEN THE APPRECIATION OF GARDENS REACHED NEW LEVELS, 2020 WAS SURELY IT

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any people found them invaluable places of refuge, rest and calm as their lives changed and anxiety often took hold in the face of a new global threat. Growing plants gave people a muchneeded sense of purpose and control and exposed them to many physical and mental wellbeing benefits. Gardening also offered more opportunities for families to spend quality time together and many children who encountered the joy of seeing seeds grow will benefit in ways far beyond the plants that emerged from their efforts. How much this will reverse the long-term trend of children

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being disconnected from nature, particularly children with SEND which has been a concern for many years, remains to be seen but the increasing recognition of gardening’s health benefits is welcome. For kids among the 700,000 people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in the UK, the garden offers life-enhancing opportunities, ones that can improve confidence, independence, and awareness of the world around them. Many children with ASD suffer high anxiety levels and that’s where time in a garden can provide plentiful opportunities for the mind to rest, relax and be restored.


In Social and Therapeutic Horticulture programmes at the gardening-for-health Thrive, we have seen how gardening can improve not just physical and mental health, but communication and the use of language, social interaction, thinking abilities, collaboration skills and creativity among client gardeners with ASD. THERAPEUTIC ADVANTAGES While exploring nature in the countryside can offer these benefits to children with ASD, a garden has the advantage of offering therapeutic features and activities in a small and secure space. Digging over soil, for example, is good exercise that burns calories, strengthens muscles, helps range of movement and develops balance, co-ordination, and agility. Its physical intensity can channel aggression and reduce frustration. Digging with your child will encourage social interaction and offer opportunities to learn about the role of soil and the life that it produces, as well as life that it contains, such as worms. Looking out for the ‘treasures’ that the next spadesful of soil produces also brings an element of fun to the task as well as a sense of achievement that will boost self-esteem. Potting on a seedling requires concentration that can take the mind off negative thoughts and the stepby-step process is a useful way for a child to learn about doing things in sequence. Fine motor skills will be developed too. ENGAGING THE SENSES Children with ASD can have sensory sensitivities and problems feeling and understanding sensory information coming from their environment and their body. A calming space can help hypersensitive children, reducing anxiety and boosting concentration, while hyposensitive youngsters may benefit from a garden offering stimulation. The elements that make up a garden are important for children with ASD and there are certain features that can promote

therapeutic benefits: • Having areas of shade will help those sensitive to light escape the glare of the sun • Think about the colour of your plants; orange, yellow and red are stimulating colours that can induce stress, while pastel ones can be calming • Certain sounds, such as rustling grass, gentle water features and wind chimes can have a relaxing effect • Seats under trees or dens provide areas of escape to chill out • Scented plants can be beneficial, lavender can invoke calm, while mint can have a stimulating effect • Encourage the exploration of touch by having different textures to feel, from tree bark to the softness of Stachys Byzantina (Lamb’s Ear). LEARNING Whereas a classroom can pose challenges for children with ASD, at Thrive we see how the garden can be a stimulating educational environment where they can learn about nature, life cycles, counting, measuring, using tools, the importance of plants for food and their role in cooking and nutrition.

It is also a place where the joy of nurturing plants brings the universal benefits of satisfying meaningful activity that boosts wellbeing, confidence, and quality of life. Put all this together, gardens and gardening offer a powerful mix of health, social and learning opportunities that can equip children with ASD with important life skills to use in different contexts. Thrive runs Social and Therapeutic Horticulture programmes for people with a wide range of disabilities and long-term health conditions at three centres in Birmingham, London and near Reading. Discover more about the health benefits of gardening and tips to make it easier at www.thrive.org.uk

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Disabled

LIVING

THIS IS WHO WE ARE AND WHAT WE DO…. DISABLED LIVING

A charity which provides impartial information and advice about products, equipment (assistive technology) and services for disabled children, adults, older people, carers and the professionals who support them. We have a range of services which you can access via our helpline, through the website or at our Kidz to Adultz exhibitions. www.disabledliving.co.uk

EQUIPZ

The team comprises occupational therapists, trusted assessors, moving and handling specialists, physiotherapists, nurses and continence specialists. We respond to enquiries via our helpline and website. Some people opt to visit the Disabled Living Centre based in Manchester for a free equipment assessment. Helpline: 0161 214 4590

BLADDER & BOWEL UK

The team provide information and advice for children, young people and adults with bladder and bowel problems. We provide a confidential helpline managed by a team of specialist nurses and knowledgeable information staff. In addition, the website offers a wide range of downloadable free resources. Helpline: 0161 214 4591 www.bbuk.org.uk

KIDZ TO ADULTZ EXHIBITIONS

We organise the largest FREE UK exhibitions totally dedicated to disabled children, young adults, their families, carers and the professionals who support them, with over 100 exhibitors at each event. We currently deliver 5 events nationally in Coventry, Farnborough, Newport, Edinburgh and Manchester. www.kidzexhibitions.co.uk

TRAINING

We run a comprehensive training programme for professionals and carers. Most of our courses are accredited by Open Awards and others provide CPD opportunities. Our training courses can be ‘tailor made’ to suit your organisations requirements and can be delivered throughout the UK. www.disabledliving.co.uk/training

Profile for Disabled Living

Kidz to Adultz Magazine Issue 10