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The Neophyte: “ Yes.” The Wise One: “ Then I will answer you, Servus. The souls of great poets have all their knowledge hidden within them. In their passage through life and through death it comes to them ; or, I should say, in their passage through many lives and many deaths they suddenly blossom and retire from the life of the world, for which they are now too great. But what I have just said opens up another subject; one which to us can never be separated from Death.” Servus: the slave o f the world: “ You mean re-birth, or rather, re­ incarnation ? But is there not a distinction in your use of these words ? ” The Wise One: “ Most certainly. Re-birth is a negative word, which, when used by an Occultist, acquires a meaning different from what it ordinarily bears. With us it means that moment, which comes to some men either in life or in the shades of death, which makes of them new men. Re-incarnation is, of course, simply the passage from one earthform to another. Those who are indeed reborn are freed from re­ incarnation.” Servus: “ And do you not hold your place here, as teacher in this temple, as being one who is reborn in this sense ? ” The Wise One : “ Not so. Those who reach this state cannot approach the world.” Servus: “ Then we of the world can never be taught by those who know ? ” The Wise One: “ I, who endure your scoffs and insults, reached knowledge by my patience. It is given to all to approach knowledge, but some, alas, advance like the tortoise. My son, let us enter the temple.” The Wise One and the Neophyte enter the temple, where are a little crowd of other neophytes waiting for their master. And Servus, without, in the temple garden, sits lazily in the strong sun and watches a lizard. Presently he looks up at the temple. He knows that within there is a discussion of thought which chills him, even though its margin attracts him intellectually. A feeling comes over him that the knowledge of which this temple is a symbol is handed on from race to race, till the races themselves fall under a greater law. The thought dwarfs him, makes him of no importance even to himself, and hurriedly he arises and goes down the hillside to the city. We are such pigmies that, as a rule, great thought dwarfs us and we resent i t ; or we succeed in dwarfing it by the vulgar “ Hobson N ew com e” method of refusing to believe in any other possibilities in it save those evident to ourselves. To the Hobson Newcomes of the w'orld death is a thing to be put off as long as possible, and then to be met with decency. He might pull a wry face sometimes when, in w alking to the City of a morning, he got some gentle reminder that man is m ortal,

13H.P. Blavatsky & M. Collins, editors - Lucifer Vol. III, No. 13 September, 1888  

Source : The International Association for the Preservation of Spiritualist and Occult Periodicals (IAPSOP, www.iapsop.com), digitized by Go...

13H.P. Blavatsky & M. Collins, editors - Lucifer Vol. III, No. 13 September, 1888  

Source : The International Association for the Preservation of Spiritualist and Occult Periodicals (IAPSOP, www.iapsop.com), digitized by Go...

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