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Dirk Gevers Architecture portfolio I selected works


This booklet shows a drawn-out version of my architecture portfolio, a selection of transformation projects explored during my architectural studies. Personal information Curriculum Vitae 1. Hotel Santos 4 2. Radical hospitality 20 3. Revitalizing Structuralism

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Personal information

Ir. Dirk Gevers born 31-10-1990 Schijndel, Netherlands Phone +31620518671 Mail dirkgevers1990@gmail.com Web www.dirkgevers.com


Curriculum Vitae Education Sept 2016 – Sept 2018 Feb 2016 – Jul 2016 Sept 2011 – Apr 2015 Sept 2007 – Jul 2011

Master’s degree (WO) in Architecture of TU Delft faculty of Architecture, Delft with specialisation in Heritage & Architecture Premaster programme in Architecture of TU Delft faculty of Architecture, Delft Bachelor’s degree (HBO) in Building Engineering of Hogeschool Utrecht, Utrecht Post-secondary college degree (MBO) in Building Engineering of Koning Willem I College, s’-Hertogenbosch

Experience Nov 2015 – Jan 2016 Draftsman / measurer at Goed Getekend, Utrecht. Preparing drawings of existing dwellings by measuring and sketching their floorplans, used for further digitalization Sep 2015 – Apr 2015 Graduate intern at Asnova Architecture, Utrecht. Doing research on flexible and sustainable building design and applying this knowledge to the case study of a new cultural centre, while putting emphasis on the technical elaboration of the design Apr 2011 – Jul 2011 Graduate intern at Bouwbedrijf Vizee, Nieuwegein. Preparing and planning several building projects, requesting quotations, budgeting and planning construction work Jan 2010 – Apr 2010 Intern at Croonen & van Soest architecten, Rosmalen. Co-designing several small scale architectural projects troughout all the different phases of the design and construction process Mar 2009 – Jul 2009 Intern at Bouwbedrijf v.d. Loo, v. Heesch BV, Schijndel. Working on several building sites of private dwellings, ranging from carpentry work to bricklaying Skills

Languages

Specialties

Autocad Revit Photoshop Illustrator Indesign Sketchup Rhinoceros Maya

Dutch English German

Adaptive reuse Conceptual design Technical design


1. Hotel Santos The transformation of cities and buildings is one of the main emergent topics in contemporary architecture. Finding an appropriate balance between the old and the new is of fundamental interest for contemporary architectural design. The goal of this project is to seek for this appropriate balance, by taking into account the values of cultural history, technology, and architectural design of an historical, vacant building and subsequently making a redesign that cherishes these values and simultaneously adds value for contemporary use.

dominated by harbour activity. This former industrial district is currently being redeveloped into an urban living and working environment. A few of the industrial buildings are

1. Hotel Santos

Katendrecht, a peninsula located in Rotterdam, used to be

still present in the area. One of these remnants is the Santos warehouse designed by J.P. Stok and J.J. Kanters in 1902. The Santos warehouse was used for temporarily storing coffee beans, transported from the Brazilian harbour named Santos. As the Rotterdam harbour activities gradually started moving towards the west of the city, both, Katendrecht and the Santos warehouse lost their industrial function. Now, Santos warehouse is one of the two listed buildings on this former harbour district. The design studio proposes, as a research and design task, Santos becoming a four star, semipublic hotel with luxury facilities whereby an extension of the existing building is inevitable due to the amount of new m2’s demanded in the program.

7


Left Rotterdam is known for its harbours and they are one of the reasons Rotterdam is the large metropole it is today. Also the Katendrecht peninsula used to be dominated by harbour activity in which the Santos warehouse played an important role.

Left The warehouse is characterized by its simple form and logic layout. Roughly a cube, with an eclectic and detailed north and south facade containing windows and loading doors on each level. The latter were used as openings for the coffee bags to enter the building. Its simplicity enhanced the efficiency of this storage process.

Left The building consists out of six, similar open levels stacked on top of each. These spaces, only interrupted by a grid of columns and intensified by an interplay of light and dark, give the building it’s typical warehouseatmosphere.

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How can the Santos warehouse be transformed into a hotel (of which the required number of m2’s exceeds the available number of m2’s), while cherishing the cultural and architectural values that make this building a warehouse?

1. Hotel Santos

Above As a guiding theme for the transformation, the general goal is to maintain the readability of the building being a warehouse. Therefore, its warehouse-typology and original functioning will serve as points of departure. The inevitable addition will respect the original building in such a way that it creates a synergy between old and new but still expresses the gesture it is its own entity that can be added and removed when desired, floating above and being subordinate to the historical warehouse.

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10

1. The existing warehouse contains a floor area of 7420 m2.

2. The new hotel program contains a floor area of 8525 m2.

3. The existing building needs extension. A simple, addition on top respects the rectangular, form that is typical for the warehouse.

4. A central atrium supplies the inner core of the hotel with natural light and air.

5. A open, unprogrammed zone refers to the orignal space plan with it’s interplay between light and dark that give the building it’s typcial warehouse-atmosphere.

6. This open, semi-public zone is accessible by a ‘slow’ route, allowing the public to enter the semi-public functions and experience the historical building and its outdoor views.

7. The hotel rooms are accessible by a ‘fast’ route, consisting of external elevators and internal corridors, a direct copy from the original logistic layout of storing coffee.

8. The hotel rooms located in the existing warehouse are supplied with natural daylight, air and outdoor views by attaching cantilevering, indoor balconies.

9. Resulting in a hotel that lends its organisation from the existing warehouse, and introduces a reversible addition that is in harmony with the original architecture.


1. Hotel Santos

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Below Added forms and materials harmonize with the existing ones, not opposing the readability of the building being a former industrial warehouse.


p + 32700 Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room p + 29210

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

p + 25720 Sky bar

Bar/ lounge

Bar / lounge

p + 22305

p + 18440 Congress room

Congress room

Congress room

Congress room

Congress room

Congress room

Breakfast room

Breakfast room

Lobby

p + 15070

p + 8320

p + 8320

p + 4945

Lobby p=0 p - 700

p - 3350

1. Hotel Santos

Section AA

Fragment 1 p + 32700

Luxury suite

Short stay room

Hotel room

Short stay room

Hotel room

Short stay room

Luxury suite p + 29210

Short stay room

Short stay room

Short stay room p + 25720

Short stay room

Sky bar

Short stay room p + 22305

Hotel room

Hotel room p + 18440

Bar / lounge Hotel room

Hotel room p + 15070

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

Hotel room

p + 8320

p + 8320

Hotel room

Hotel room p + 4945

Restaurant

Lobby

Bistro p=0 p - 700

p - 3350

Section BB 13


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

31840 20770 5715

5155

100

100

9700

10970

100

5080

100

4340

1350

100

100

A

I 4550

I

Restaurant 218 m2

8990

H

Bistro 218 m2

4220

100

G

G

100

4220

12160

8990

H

100

Lobby 170 m2

F

F

15580

15580

Storage 7 m2

E

D

100

D

33760

9240

33760

Storage 8 m2 Kitchen 49 m2

4220

B

Bistro 218 m2

100

Restaurant 218 m2

100 12160

4220

C

8990

4220

Lobby 170 m2

8990

E

34420

4220

Kitchen 16 m2

C

B

B

4550

B

A

A A

1

5780

2

3

100

Ground floor 5650 5755 5755

1

5300 100 2225 100

2

100

5170

4

2845

3

5

20080

5300 100

31840 31950

5300

9700 32500 9700

100

100 100

4

5

100

6

5300 2845 100 2225 100 5170

100

6

5780

7

5650 5755 5755

7

A

Hotel room 22 m2

Hotel room 22 m2

100

Hotel room 22 m2

4120

12215 100

100

100 3350

2520

33870

4000

9430

100 2140 100

100

C

B

4150

3875

4550

3350

2710 100

Hotel room 22 m2

D

4120

Hotel room 22 m2

B

12025

Hotel room 22 m2

100

B

Hotel room 22 m2

12025

100

100

Congress room 94 m2

E

4120

Hotel room 22 m2

100

4120

4220

B

A

A A

5755

100 2225 100

15590

100 2225 100

5755

31950

Second floor 5650

1

14

100

100 4120

4220

C

Hotel room 22 m2

100

Hotel room 22 m2

Storage 5 m2

F

100

Hotel room 22 m2

100 2140 100

Hotel room 22 m2

3350

4220 33870

34420 4220

D

Storage 5 m2

Hotel room 22 m2

3350

F

G

4120

Hotel room 22 m2

100

4220

Congress room 94 m2

Hotel room 22 m2

4120

G

H

100

4120 100

4220

12215

100

4550

H

E

Hotel room 22 m2

4150

I 3875

I

5300

2

5300

5300

5300

5650

32500

3

4

5

6

7


1 100 600 100 600 100 600

2

3

4

5

6

7

30770 5165

100 2220 100

5165

100 2225 100

3825 2845

100

3825

100

100

3825

9700

100

3825 100

2845

100 2220 100

5165

100 2225 100

5165

100 600 100 600 100 600

Short stay room 34 m2

100 100 2310 100 4020

Storage 5 m2

Hotel room 21 m2

4090

4220

100

Hotel room 21 m2

Hotel room 21 m2 Sky bar 110 m2

10070

4220

B

4090 6725

B 6725

B

D

C

100

Hotel room 21 m2

100

C

E

Short stay room 34 m2

B

100 600 100 600

A

100 600 100 600 100 600 100 600

4550

Short stay room 34 m2

10070

34420

32580

D

F

32580

Hotel room 21 m2

Storage 5 m2

4220

4020

Hotel room 21 m2

4780

Hotel room 19 m2

100

4220

Hotel room 19 m2

Hotel room 19 m2

4220

E

H

G

Hotel room 21 m2 Hotel room 19 m2

4980

4090

Hotel room 21 m2

100 100 9240 100 1400 100 100 2720 100 4000 100 2720 100 1200 4090 100 4020 100 2310 100 4020 100

G

F

6725

Hotel room 20 m2

I

100 100 1200 100 100 1200 100

6725

Hotel room 20 m2

Hotel room 20 m2

5190

Hotel room 20 m2

Short stay room 34 m2

4220

H

5190

4550

100 600 100 600

I

100 600 100 600 100 600 100 600

A

A

A

5165

100 2275 100

Sixth floor 1

15490

100 2275 100

5165

30770 5650

2

5300

5300

5300

5300

5650

100 600 100 600

32500

3

4

5

6

7

1. Hotel Santos

100 600 100 600

Above The public route allows the orignal, open space plan with it’s light and dark interplays to remain intact as much as possible and providess access for the semi-public functions. 15


Left The new building functions according to the orginal warehouse typology but became a hotel that is now ‘distributing’ and ‘storing’ people, instead of coffee-bags.

1. Hotel Santos

17


18


Left Visitors entering the building are located directly in the hotel lobby, with on both sides different occasions for eating and drinking. Visitor’s attention will be drawn towards the central, administrative counter, right below the building’s atrium.

1. Hotel Santos

Left The hotel contains hotel rooms, short stay rooms and luxury suites. All three types have different characteristics in terms of size, materiality, and views, since they are located in different parts of the building.

Left The atrium is surrounded by the public features of the program such as congress rooms, a shop and a breakfast room. At the top of the existing building, a fluent transition between old and new materials allows the addition to merge with the existing building.

19


20


100

120

655

385

240

25 20 50 70

150 125 10 10 10 1030 1060

1. Hotel Santos

5 125 150

200

5

1010 80

120

240 385 545

25

100 100

var. var. var.

170

5

340

145 120

70

235 210

5

100

10 10

10 10

120

5

170 340

5

150 125

70

125 150

10 10

10 10 100

10 10

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2. Radical hospitality Although newcomers are often depicted as a threat, Amsterdam has proven that immigration can be successful. With exceptional social and economic openness, Amsterdam has proven several times in its history to turn the influx of newcomers into periods of success. The current city is limited equipped to absorb newcomers. Furthermore, there is a great shortage of housing. Because of the rise in house prices and a growing waiting list for social housing newcomers are having more and more difficulties to find a place. The chance of a successful arrival is partly determined by spatial conditions. That is probably why housing newcomers success formula to discover, encourage and embed new talent. Therefore, this project examines how the design of a more clever living environment can enhance arriving. With increasing urbanization it is essential to give the tradition of

2. Radical hospitality

at distant mono functional locations has never been a

the ‘open city’ a re-interpretation. As a test location, the design studio depicted the former Island of Kattenburg. Kattenburg is located east of the Amsterdam city center. After a turbulent history, starting in the early 17th century, it was decided by the municipality to sanitize Kattenburg in the 1960’s, the old neighborhood was demolished and new housing was erected. Its current modern, urban design is characterized by long gallery slabs of 5 to 7 stories high, placed around open green spaces. Most ground floors are constructed as the top of a parking deck. The apartments are accessed either through a ground floor entrance or via the galleries. This outdated neighborhood is ripe for accommodating a new population.

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Amsterdam population 1.000.000

Left This graph illustrates the increasing number of Amsterdam its population whereby the municipality’s prognosis predicts the growth is expeccted to continue the coming years.

900.000 800.000 700.000 600.000 500.000 400.000 300.000 200.000 100.000 0

1860

1880

1900

1920

1940

1960

1980

2000

2020

2040

urbanization until 1960

city renewal from 1985 until now

suburbanization between 1960 and 1985

prognosis: growth is expected to continue

Development of Amsterdam population 22,5 x 1.000 15 7,5 0 –7,5 –15 1980

1985

1990

excess of births domestic migration balance

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1995

2000

2005

2010

foreign migration balance

2015

Left A large part of the increasing number of Amsterdam its population is assigned to the again, increasing balance of foreign magration, meaning that more foreign people are settling in the city, than foreign people leaving.


How can a residential complex enhance the arrival and integration proces of newcomers, while using densification as the main design strategy?

shared

shared

shared

Above Instead, the re-design contains multiple and different social domains that are correlating with the dwellings. To achieve this, a gradient of public > communal > shared > private is flowing into a new, heterogeneous building form. The residents are thoughtfully mixed and have different demographic backgrounds, living in a relatively high-density and communal environment where living together and sharing is the standard.

public

communal

public

2. Radical hospitality

Above The proposal strives to react against the modernist, urban principles that contain some but autonomous domains for social interaction. Often, they accommodate residents with equal demographic backgrounds that are living in an anonymous living condition. Also, the homogeneous building form and the mono-functional program create an unattractive an uninspiring environment that does not stimulate the arrival process of newcomers.

communal public

25


1. The existing building slabs characterize themselves as being homogeneous, modernist building strips with repeating, similar sized dwellings that each consist of two storeys.

2. The outdated facades are removed. The same applies for some levels, both enabling freedom for the introduction of new forms, spaces and materials.

c a

e b

d c

b b c

a

3. New volumes are added, diversifying the existing, homogeneous slab. As a result, a ‘roofscape’ introduces a new and unique living environment to the complex.

d

a

4. The building accommodates a diverse program with different domains for social integration, cohesion and work. a. public boulevard, b. restaurants/cafe’s/ shops, c. multifunctional/communal space, d. offices, e. housing.

b a b

5. The target groups are carefully mixed. Starters, students and newcomer’s (a) live along each other, same accounts for native families and newcomer’s families (b).

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6. Again, to stimulate social integration and cohesion, but also to be able to increase the number of individual dwellings, the different target groups all share spaces for living.


7. Porticos, combined with the shared space are added, centralizing  the social spaces.  These four porticos end up and are linked together on the ‘roofscape’.

8. Finally, the building is wrapped in a new, contemporary skin. By using brick masonry and zinc roof cladding, the newcomers are settled in an environment that is common for dutch dwellings, preventing them from feeling segregated.

2. Radical hospitality 9. This results in a densified building by dividing the inner structure into multiple, smaller dwellings and simultaneously by introducing shared spaces that allow the individual dwellings to be smaller. These shared spaces, along with other architectural elements stimulate the amount of social interaction between the different target groups, therefore contributing to the integration processes of newcomers. Still, the residents remain having the oppurtunity to withdraw themselves, when desired.

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A

B

C

A

B

C

Ground floor

A

B

C

A

B

C

A

B

C

A

B

C

Second floor

Fifth floor 28


Above The linear concatenation of, what used to be, similar and homogenous building slabs now becomes a diversified and articulated landscape making a mark on the urban scale as well. 29


Above The generous communal space is capable in fulfilling multiple purposes relating to either working or leisure, both striving to enhance the process of social interaction between residents and the integration of newcomers. 30


31


Below The multi-levelled ‘roofscape’ can be seen as a communal street, linking together small dwellings, intimate outdoor spaces and a central collective greenhouse with kitchen for food production and consumption.


Section AA

2. Radical hospitality

Section BB

Fragment

Section CC 33


Below By transforming the former, neglected green zone into a public boulevard, an attractive connection is made between the city center and the increasingly popular northern part of the city. The diverse program and the residents can then benefit from this development.


Starters, students and newcomers

Above Instead of deliberately separating different target groups, these sections combines starters, students and newcomers that collectively share a living room, kitchen and balcony. 36

Right The same accounts for native and foreign families. In this case, the shared space is completely outdoors and equipped with a kitchen to collectively relax, cook or play with the kids.


Native and foreign families level 1

2. Radical hospitality

Native and foreign families level 2

37


38


510

190 190 340

20 50 70

10 10 10

320

2. Radical hospitality

80 80

150 180

95 95 95

40 40

30 30 15 75 75

100 100

39

190 310

120


3. Revitalizing Structuralism Structuralism represents a human, social architecture that can interact, grow and adapt. Starting in 1959, Structuralism became a very influential movement in The Netherlands. But what happened ever since? Despite the design of open structures, flexible for the future by extrapolation or adaptation, the buildings show shortcomings in indoor climate, aesthetic appearance and programmatic possibilities. The design studio aims on discovering the future potential of Structuralist buildings by making a redesign of the Centraal Beheer office building in Apeldoorn by Herman Hertzberger office building can be seen as an building of openness, consisting of neutral cells that are combined by an intelligent system. A non-hierarchical system that is open for internal changes, open for social interaction and open for individual interpretation.

3. Revitalizing Struturalism

from 1972, functioning as a case study. The Centraal Beheer

In order to respond to the studio’s aim the most directly it is essential to give priority on these inherent characteristics that make the Centraal Beheer building a Structuralist building. Although the buildings show a very strong and recognizable formal language, most of them were designed from the inside out, starting from the human perspective and the perspective of (future) use. Ignoring these good ambitions would be disrespectful, freezing them would be a missed opportunity. Structuralism might have the inherent capacity of continuing its still relevant concepts. The result can be seen as a revitalization or facelift of Structuralism that arises from the building’s inherent but reinterpreted characteristics, showcasing its current and future potential.

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Left The original building is open for internal changes, meaning the capability of absorbing different office-related arrangements within a 3x3m zone, ‘the interpretable zone’ which formed the ‘basic building block’ of the entire complex.

Left The original building is open for individual interpretations, meaning that it was designed as a canvas, unfinished, waiting for customization by the office employees. The individual identity was not lost in the structure, on the contrary, it was strongly expressed. For the employees this created a sense of belonging.

Left The original building is open for social interaction, meaning it stimulated social and visual contact, perceiving its users as one community, instead of separate individuals. The openness is also non-hierarchical, making sure the building treats every employee the same way. The building resembles a small city, with (semi) public domains for people to interact.

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Can the Structuralist paradigm of openness (open for: internal changes, individual interpretation and social interaction) be revitalized in such a way that it meets contemporary needs again?

3. Revitalizing Struturalism

Above The task is to juxtapose the paradigm of openness to contemporary (and future) needs of society. This resulted in proposing a system of openness that can accommodate a range of different programs that can change, grow and shrink. A system that keeps functioning like a small city but now has the opportunity to become part of the public domain, as intended. A city in which community life can re-evolve. Also a system that requires active user-ship, meaning that users can come up with own initiatives and even self-built part of their own added program.

43


44

1. The existing curtain wall will be removed since it is technically degrading, energy consuming and aesthetically unpleasing and will therefore not suffice to meet the desired concept.

2. By removing 4 towers, the number of towers receiving natural air and daylight increases significantly, without completely disturbing the original building composition.

3. The existing interconnected system of services are removed because the building will be used by an undefined number of new users. Therefore a decentralized and seperated system of services is essential.

4. Removing the ‘center’ floor elements increases, again, the amount of natural light and air inside the building. It also distinguishes the center, allowing it to become an extension of the public domain just as Hertzberger intended.

5. By inserting several core’s that contain the essential vertical infrastructure every surrounding tower is provided with services and circulation. This decentralized sytem enables almost every island to operate independently.

6. In the bottom and the top of the infrastructural cores, spaces are reserved for the addition of sustainable climate installations. These climate installations are able to respond to the different requirements of each possible program.


8. A new layer of skin is added within the existing structure, resulting in a box-in-box principle. This ensures that each program is captured in it’s own box, so that there is no leaking of sound, thermal heat or fire between different programs.

9. Finally, the adaptable services and interior walls are added. These elements respond to the different technical and functional needs of any program and are in line with the modularity of the project, so that they become circular and interchangable.

B

A

3. Revitalizing Struturalism

7. The added bridges connect the infrastructal cores with the centre and with each other, forming one connected unity again. The centre, along with these added bridges, create a new scheme for horizontal circulation.

A

B

10. The before described interventions (1-8) result in an optimized framework. A system that is waiting to be filled in by future users and resembles a city, consisting of streets, squares and plots. These plots are now capable of accomodating a range of programs that can be added, removed, grow or shrink. Its configuration will organically change during the future life span of the building.

45


46

Ground floor, north quadrant

First floor, north quadrant

Possible programming

Possible programming

Second floor, north quadrant

Third floor, north quadrant

Possible programming

Possible programming


Below By opening up the center, its space reaches to the surrounding public domain, stimulating the people to finally walk trough the infamous and iconic building.


Above The removal of some towers results in the emergence of outdoor squares within the existing mixture of urban elements such as streets, plots and parks.

Above By preserving the structure of the center, the original building composition remains readable. The center now becomes an exciting green space for seondary circulation. 48


Third floor, north quadrant Possible programming

Second floor, north quadrant Possible programming 3. Revitalizing Struturalism

First floor, north quadrant Possible programming

Ground floor, north quadrant Possible programming

49


Right Multiple plots being programmed as a family dwelling.

Right Multiple plots being programmed as a public library.

Right Multiple plots being programmed as an exhibition space.

Right Multiple plots being programmed as an architectural office.

50


Section AA, north quadrant Possible programming 3. Revitalizing Struturalism

Section BB, north quadrant Possible programming

51


52

1. The process of using the building starts with meetings that are held to attract a variety of users that show interest in adding their own program to the building. Hereby the building responds to whatever societal need is emerging.

2. An online platform regulates users and programs troughout its entire, dynamic life span. Users are able to pick and rent an x number of available plots.

3. Tenants then have the option of self designing and ordering their infill, making use of the modularity of the builing. Both, the designs and the infill elements can be shared, traded or sold, making the building elements circular building elements.

4. A contractor will install the wall that seperates different plots. In terms of sound and thermal insulation, this wall meets the equal technical requirements for each possible program.

5. If the user, while self designing his/her infill, indicated on the digital platform to activate the outdoor loggia, a contractor will carry out the limited but necessary construction work.

6. The same contractor will connect the secondary services, that meet the demands of the program of that program, to the collective services. Services are in this case, ventilation, water and electricity.


8. Due to leightweight panels and an easy to use system, users are able to install their self designed space plan.

9. After installing the infill elements, users can now choose to finish these with any type of finishing, taking into account that they are self responsible for their infill elements.

10. Eventually a user will leave the building.

3. Revitalizing Struturalism

7. Once a tenant has finalized their infill design, the next step is transporting the self designed and ordered building elements from the basement storage, via the elevating platform in the heart of the building, to his/her plot.

?

11. The plot becomes available again on the online platform. Here, the new user will be informed about the option to buy, partially buy or ignore the previous infill.

12. The new user can come in contact with the old user, again via the online platform. Allowing him/ her to discuss with the old user and have a look at the plot and its current infill.

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56


100

70

70

20 50 20 70 20

735 450

150 50 100 150

100 150

50

300 300 600

50

100 150

20 50 70

300 300

140

50

70

100 150

250 250 640

1020

150 180

250 250 640

250 250 640

70

70

140

140

70

70

20 50 70

20 50 70

100

50 250

105

290

100 100

150 180

150 180

880

1020

1020

200

140

300 500 50

70

45 45 250

250 250 660

240 240 45 45

150 180

235 235 145

10 1065

890 400

815

580

50

50

100

545

1020

235 10 55 10

100

57

10 100 20 130

300 300

100

660

50 250

140

100

70

290

70

150

90 90

10

740

1065

400

815

580

50

10 55 10


End.


Dirk Gevers Architecture Portfolio ǀ selected projects  
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