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A CRUISING COUPLE

With just 50 miles separating the Feltons from the closest point in the Bahamas, they make an effort to head there regularly, but they’re also eager to explore new routes. And while they love it when the kids join them, David and Nadja enjoy their alone time onboard. This summer, they took a one-week trip down the East Coast to Key West, up the Gulf Coast, up the Caloosahatchee River, across Lake Okeechobee, and on to the St. Lucie Canal to return home. “When it’s just us, we stay on the boat, whether on-hook or in the marina,” David says, noting that he appreciates the 345 Conquest’s forward berth and its Dynamic Cabin System, which converts the bed into a dining table via an actuated lift. “It gives you a lot of room down in the cabin when you’ve got people onboard. And it makes for a really nice-sized berth when you’re spending the night. The layout of the boat is phenomenal. Best in class, as far as I’m concerned.”

LOBSTER LOVERS

The Conquest also facilitates father-son time with Gerrit, who has gotten into fishing and lobstering in the Bahamas and the Keys. “We’re usually snorkeling,” David explains. “We go down there with a measuring stick, find ’em in a hole, stick a hand in, grab it out, measure it and throw it in the boat,” he says of the lobsters. Both Gerrit and David are also certified to dive, and they often nab the crustaceans on charter-boat scuba excursions. Now that they’re becoming more experienced with their underwater adventures, they plan to use the Whaler. “I think the boat is set up really nicely for diving,” David says.

“The layout of the boat is phenomenal. Best in class, as far as I’m concerned.” HISTORY OF PEANUT ISLAND

Peanut Island is a manmade recreational treasure perched at the mouth of the Lake Worth Inlet. The 79-acre spot, punctuated with palm trees, was created from port dredging remnants in 1918. It gets its name from a planned-but-aborted peanut oil shipping operation. Perhaps the most fascinating fact about this gem is that it houses an old bunker (built in 1961) meant to shelter President John F. Kennedy in the event of a nuclear attack. The Kennedy compound was once open for tours via the Palm Beach Maritime Museum, but it has since been closed to the public. Now, Peanut Island, a Palm Beach County Park, mainly serves as a sandy stretch of respite for campers, snorkelers, kayakers, beachcombers and boaters like the Feltons.

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vol. 9, issue 2

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www.bostonwhaler.com

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Whaler Volume 9 Issue 2  

Whaler Volume 9 Issue 2