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SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

We were there 50 years ago on August 6, 1962 when Jamaica’s dream of becoming a great independent nation began. Today, The Gleaner stands with all our fellow Jamaicans as we continue to strive for excellence.


VOLUME 178 NO. 186

www.jamaica-gleaner.com

KINGSTON, JAMAICA

MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012

The

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Gleaner YO U R N E W S PA P E R S I N C E 1 8 3 4

Bolt

Usain, Yohan give Ja birthday gift André Lowe Senior Staff Reporter

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RNESTO MIGHT have spared Jamaica, for the most part, but the world felt the effects of ‘Hurricane Bolt’ when Jamaican superstar Usain Bolt successfully defended his Olympic 100m title, sprinting to an Olympic record 9.63, as Jamaica booked its third and fourth medals at these games – the perfect gift to a nation celebrating its 50th year of Independence today. PLEASE SEE BOLT, A2

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

F R O M T H E T H E G L E A N E R C O M PA N Y T O Y O U !

Happy 50th, Jamaica! F

OR MORE than 170 years The Gleaner has stood with, by and for Jamaica – celebrating its triumphs, recording its agonies, and highlighting its aspirations. We are best known for encouraging and facilitating national conversations, challenging powerful interests, and shining spotlights on inadequacies in governance and of government. We have helped the society to hold its servants responsible and accountable. For the last half-century we have proudly pursued this unwritten compact with Jamaica in its status as an independent country, the preparation for which The Gleaner not only mirrored, but in some respects, was intimately associated. For decades before the event, we reported on the personalities and issues that precipitated independence and our then editor, the late Theodore Sealy, chaired the committee that planned the national celebrations for Independence on August 6, 1962. Fifty years later, the consensus on Jamaica’s performance is decidedly mixed. On the social front there have been many gains, as many barriers to advancement have been removed. In economics, however, our performance is patchy to poor with growth trailing all global benchmarks and a heavy debt burden. Perhaps the greatest achievement of post-independence Jamaica is that, despite the stresses and strains on its institutions, we have managed to keep our democracy intact. Our ability to deliver, and expand, on our compact with Jamaica, is predicated on the maintenance, and widening, of the legal framework that accommodates a free press, which, ultimately, rests on the right of people to hold and exchange ideas, share information and to vigorously question their government and public officials, without undue legal fetters, including chilling effects of existing defamation legislation. Change to our libel laws is necessary and very important to all Jamaicans. In the last 50 years you have seen much innovation in The Gleaner’s offerings, often ahead of the curve, to

Looking back, stepping forward

yield our current portfolio which undoubtedly reflects a true multimedia offering. We have come a far way. In print, we gave you expansion with the addition of our Sunday Gleaner for weekend leisure, The STAR for entertainment and afternoon reading, our overseas weekly Gleaner and STAR publications, the Children’s Own and Youthlink for youth development and education. In radio we gave you Power 106 and Music 99FM. In digital, we gave Jamaicans locally and in the diaspora our Gleaner and STAR websites, our Blackberry mobile applications, and most recently our epaper, a digital replica of your favourite newspaper. To cap off a great 50 years, we have last week given Jamaica the gift of diGjamaica.com. We could think of no better way to celebrate Jamaica 50th year than to provide a web-based product which greatly improves one’s access to facts and figures about everything Jamaica, and enriches the user’s experience by presenting history in a way only The Gleaner’s archives can provide. Looking forward, we face the global challenge of commercial conversion of digital services, but remain confident that by leveraging advances in technology to serve the public better, we will see financial reward. To our loyal readers, advertisers and investors who have supported The Gleaner through many a difficult stage in the past 50 years (including near financial collapse), you may rest assured that through your continued support of The Gleaner and its products, you are ensuring the preservation of an important pillar of a thriving democracy as Jamaica moves head on into the challenges of the next 50 years. This is our commitment to you. Of course, none of our developments over the last 50 years would have been possible without the dedication and commitment of our great staff, past and present. They have much to be proud of, having contributed to nation-building and The Gleaner owes them all a debt of gratitude. Happy 50th Jamaica!

– Christopher Barnes

AS WE, today, reflect on 50 years as an independent nation, we have much to celebrate as a people. We have made significant progress in many fields and our resilient people have the drive and commitment to continue to work hard to make greater achievements in the next 50 years and beyond. We, too, are committing to continue to be your trusted source of news and opinion. We value your very strong support for our various products. We will not fail you. Our publication today, too, is special, reflecting the pride of a nation, packaged with stories out of the London Olympics and featuring people from different segments of this great nation, discussing the Jamaican dream. For this issue, we invited various groups of persons to discuss this notion of a Jamaican dream and, if there is one, what is it? What are the routes to realising this dream? We did not establish a composite Jamaican dream. We came close though. The dream of an educated nation reverberated; and education was seen as the route to other dreams. Jamaicans have always been striving to achieve their dreams individually and as a sovereign country. In this special package for you, we share the thoughts of many as they look back at the last 50 years and get ready to begin the next 50-year journey. Even though we have stained the soil with the blood of others. And regrettably so. Even though we have been guilty of gross mismanagement. And regrettably so. Even though we continue to face serious economic challenges. And regrettably so. We have built a strong foundation on which to grow and prosper into the future. The world has been forced to pay attention to us, not just to our sports and culture, but to a country whose people have virtually invaded the space of every nation on the planet and have excelled. Today’s Gleaner is a keepsake which opens the window to the Jamaican dream. – Garfield Grandison, Editor-in-Chief

Christopher Barnes, managing director of The Gleaner Company Limited.

Let us hear from you. Email us: editor@gleanerjm.com

From The Advertising Agencies Association of Jamaica

Wayne Stewart of Dunlop or the Advertising Agencies Association of Jamaica (AAAJ)

To the good people of free and Independent Jamaica THE EXCELLENT staff of The Gleaner asked me to write a brief note on behalf of the deCordova Family concerning the 50th anniversary of Jamaica’s independence from British rule. I am honoured by the request. Nothing is more precious to the human endeavour of life, prosperity and peace than liberty and the freedom to chose one’s own destiny free of outside control or coercion. Jamaica’s freedom-loving people made that momentous decision some 50 years ago on August 6, 1962. You well deserve to and should remain proud of it. Over 170 years ago, my great-great-great grandfather Jacob deCordova and his brother Joshua

THE ADVERTISING Agencies Association of Jamaica salutes The Gleaner Company for 50 years of service to an independent Jamaica and 50 years of fulfilling our members’ advertising orders with professionalism and a dedication to quality. With successive rounds of capital investments the physical quality of your product has been continuously improved. Your editorial independence has added to the vibrancy and spirit of our civil society over these first 50 years. The whole country has enjoyed and learned from your coverage of current affairs, international events, business developments, sports and the arts. We have also enjoyed many lighter moments of life with the comics, the cartoonists and often in reading your advice columnists. And The Gleaner’s stable of commentators has informed and stimulated public discussion throughout our independent life. The STAR, our leading daily, has also kept us abreast of the goings on of duppies in high places and at the stand pipe. The Gleaner has been a clear benefit to Jamaica and our industry in

deCordova, sat across a table and discussed not only how the newspaper they envisioned could have personal benefit, but how it could benefit and serve the Jamaican people. Of note, The Gleaner’s creation in 1834 roughly coincided with another courageous act of Jamaican independence, the ending of the inhumane and ungodly institution of slavery. No doubt, and likely unrecognised fully at the time by the deCordova brothers, The Gleaner would not only champion private enterprise, but would become a staunch advocate for and the ally of a free and open press, an idea admiringly carried forward under the watchful care of the Hon. Oliver F. Clarke. Without objective doubt by any student of liberty, both an open press, and an environment encouraging and rewarding the individual pursuit of gainful trade or occupation, are cornerstones and a bell-weather of a people’s true inde-

particular has been well served by the excellence of your advertising departments.The succession of outstanding leaders - Mr. Henri Hendricks, Mr. Leon Mitchell, Ms Moveta Munroe, Mrs. Yvonne Senior and today’s team led by Mrs. Karin Cooper and Ms. Nordia Craig have worked with the advertising Agency community for the benefit of our clients. This continuity is itself testament to the Gleaner’s commitment to a partnership with the advertising agencies.And where we have come to contretemps our respect for each other has formed a sound foundation for working through issues. The Advertising Agencies look forward to the coming 50 years confident that with The Gleaner commitment to journalistic excellence, your continuing innovation and commercial integrity the Jamaican public will be well served. The Advertising Agencies Association will continue to partner with you to deliver value for the client.

With best wishes W.S.

pendence. I am humbled if my Jamaican family has facilitated or contributed, in some small measure, to your independence. Again, to the good people of Jamaica, may your star of Independence continue brightly to shine, both in the sunshine and in the rain of the future. Warmest regards, and with my heart in Jamaica, I remain, Very truly yours, David Vann deCordova, Jr., B.B.A., J.D. Attorney and Counsellor at Law Beaumont, Texas * David Vann deCordova is the great-great-great grandson of Jacob de Cordova, the founder of The Gleaner.

David Vann deCordova


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

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Usain captures headlines online

THE GLEANER

CBS SPORTS

THE GUARDIAN

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ESPN

Blakes proud of son Yohan Nagra Plunkett Assignment Coordinator

WESTERN BUREAU: HE BLAKE household in Bogue Hill, St James, erupted into loud screams and cheers as their son Yohan ran a commendable 9.75 to place second in the 100m at the London Olympics. The 22-year-old athlete, who was competing at his first Olympic Games, made his parents, Shirley and Veda Blake, proud. “He did well and I am proud of him,” said his father, Shirley. “I love him.”

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For Carol Bennett-Smith, a friend of the Blakes, she was elated at her neighbour’s performance. “I am not disappointed. It’s his first Olympics. He will come back in the 200m on Wednesday.” The house was overcrowded with relatives and media practitioners who travelled to the community to watch the finals. “I feel so happy. Silver or gold, I want him to get all of the medals,” said Yohan’s sevenyear-old niece, Samoya Wright. “From Jamaica get a medal, all of us get a medal.”

RICARDO MAKYN/STAFF

I’ll be back – Powell

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SEE VIDEO ONLINE

www.jamaica-gleaner.com/videos RUDOLPH BROWN/PHOTOGRAPHER

Scores of Jamaicans turned up in Half-Way Tree, St Andrew to watch the 100m final in which Usain Bolt won in an Olympic record time of 9.63 seconds. His compatriot Yohan Blake finished second in a time of 9.75 seconds. The scene in Half-Way Tree, St Andrew was one of jubilation with Jamaicans from every walk of life dancing, screaming and tooting horns in support of the Jamaican sprinters.

PHOTOGRAPHER

Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce stands on the podium during the medal presentation ceremony for the women’s 100m Olympic finals, at the London Olympic Stadium yesterday.

‘Thank God for our athletes’ Daviot Kelly Staff Reporter

AS GUESTS were jumping around and whooping it up for Jamaican sprinters Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake, Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller clutched her heart, begging it to slow down. Yesterday, the lobby at the Office of the Prime Minister was the scene of pure national pride as guests watched the local duo take gold and silver in the men’s 100m final at the London 2012 Olympics. Before the race, Simpson Miller said a quiet prayer as the runners got into their blocks. And after Bolt and Blake sped to the one-two finish, she hugged anyone who came close enough, including some Cabinet ministers who came to see it unfold. Simpson Miller occasionally pumped her fists in jubilation but always reverted to a silent gaze upwards, thanking God for the blessings bestowed upon the nation.

See more Olympic stories in the Sports section.

SYMPATHY FOR ASAFA

Beer bottle thrown at Bolt A BEER bottle thrown from the stands landed near Usain Bolt in the moments before the 100m final yesterday in London, England. As Bolt and the seven other finalists got into their starting positions, a bottle sailed from the first row of the stands. It harmlessly bounced in Yohan Blake’s lane and didn’t

appear to cause a distraction to the runners, who started a splitsecond later. Edith Bosch, a female Dutch judoka who won a bronze medal earlier during the Olympics, claimed the man who threw the bottle was sitting near her and that she “beat” him. The thrower was reportedly arrested and taken into custody.

BOLT CONTINUED FROM A1

“It’s wonderful, it’s a wonderful feeling to give Jamaica a gold medal and defend my title, and I know that everybody is happy and tomorrow (today) when the national anthem is played, I think it will be even greater for all of us,” said an elated Bolt after his race. World Champion Yohan Blake equalled his personal best 9.75 to win the silver medal ahead of American Justin Gatlin, who recorded a 9.79 clocking and the youngster also had a special birthday wish for his homeland. “Jamaica we ‘likkle but we tallawah’, it’s been great and tomorrow (today) is

“We thank God Almighty for our athletes. Thank you Father and continue to guard us with your mighty hand. One love,” she said. Simpson Miller also had sympathy for the other Jamaican in the race, Asafa Powell, who pulled up before completing the race. “We should now give him our strength and our love.” The prime minister arrived just as the women’s 400metre was about to begin nearly an hour before. But she quickly grabbed a seat at the front to see if Novlene Williams-Mills and Rosemarie Whyte could add to the medal haul. The mood was understandably sombre as they finished down the track. In the approximately 40 minutes between the finals, Simpson Miller was busily

going to be a special moment for us on the podium,” said Blake, who joins Herb McKenley (1952), Lennox Miller (1968) and Donald Quarrie (1976) as Olympic 100m silver medallists. Asafa Powell, who aggravated his injured groin, pulled up midway in the race, which was the fastest 100m in Olympic history with seven sprinters dipping below 10 seconds and five breaking the 9.90 seconds mark.

BACK-TO-BACK WINS Bolt, who described the win as one of his most fulfilling, became the third athlete to win back-to-back Olympic 100m titles after Archie Hahn and Carl Lewis, however Hahn’s titles came two years apart in 1904 and 1906 while Lewis, who won in

andre.lowe@gleanerjm.com GLADSTONE TAYLOR/PHOTOGRAPHER

Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller clutches her heart in celebration as guests at the Office of the Prime Minister celebrate the one-two finish in the men’s 100-metre final yesterday. welcoming guests including special invitees, South African High Commission officials. But no doubt, the men’s 100m final was what they all came to see. There was applause every time one of Jamaica’s athletes came on screen and at the end, many felt the medals were an early Independence gift. Last night Opposition spokesperson on youth, sports, gender affairs, entertainment and culture, Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, congratulated Bolt on his victory. Grange also congratulated Blake on his silver medal and Powell for making it to his third final.

the most successful Jamaican male Olympian in terms of individual medals, with a podium finish in the 200m.

1984 and 1988, was handed his second title after Ben Johnson was stripped of his gold medal for a doping violation. “I was really under a lot of pressure, so after the trials, I went to the coach and we sat down and talked; he told me not to worry and that he knew what was the problem and that as long as I fixed my back problem, I will be OK,” Bolt said. The triple world-record holder also joined illustrious company, with Jamaican legends Herb McKenley and Arthur Wint as the most successful male Jamaican Olympians, with three individual medals each. “This is news to me, but that’s an honour. These guys are legends and folks that we look up to in Jamaica and also for me it’s an honour to be in the books with these guys,” said Bolt, who can become

ALL EYES ON 200M The pair will now turn their attention to the 200m, which starts tomorrow with the heats. Bolt is one step away from achieving his dream of retaining both of his Olympic titles, a feat which if achieved, he thinks will rank him among the legends of the sport. With Blake in earshot, and with a big laugh between the two, the defending 200m champion warned, “He (Blake) is saying a few things about the 200m, but I told him after the trials that he will not beat me over the 200m so he has a lot

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A disappointed Asafa Powell after the race.

more work to do because that’s my main event and that’s what I do and I will not let myself down.” He did have some encouraging words for his training partner though. “Blake is great, he executed that race well and over the years he can only get better.” Jamaica will be looking to add to the tally as Leford Green runs in the men’s 400m hurdles final at 8:45 p.m. (2:45 p.m. Jamaica time), while the heats of the women’s 100m hurdles and 200m get under way. Jason Morgan and Traves Smikle are also to particicpate in discus qualifying while Kaliese Spencer, Melaine Walker and Nickiesha Wilson will feature in the women’s 400m hurdles semi-finals. andre.lowe@gleanerjm.com

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LONDON, England AS HIS teammates Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake ran around the track in celebration, Asafa Powell was on his knees, crouched in disappointment. Powell ran well for the first half of the race, among the leaders and was heading for his first individual medal at the Olympic Games until it happened. A mid-race stumble caused a pull on his groin and aggravated an injury that has dogged him throughout his entire career, forcing the former world 100m record holder to pull up midway through the race, while his Jamaican teammates ran away for a one-two finish - Bolt in front with an Olympic record 9.63 run with Blake stopping the clock at 9.75. American Justin Gatlin was third in 9.79. Though disappointed, Powell is holding his head high after taking the chance and doing his best to finish the race and assured that he will be back stronger than ever. “I’m very disappointed,” Powell told The Gleaner. “I knew I would have been up in the medals if this did not happen, but that’s how it goes, I’m very disappointed, but I will be back and we will go back and fix this.” He added: “I tried. In the semi-final I kinda played around to get the tension off me and I was really looking forward to coming back for the final and giving my all.”

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

Independence means the opportunity for us to frame our own destiny and the need to rely on ourselves in so doing. It does not mean a licence to do as we like. It means work and law and order. JAMAICA’S FIRST Prime Minister Sir Alexander Bustamante in his message on Independence Day August 6, 1962, wanted the nation to fully grasp this new path.

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GREEN’S FORMULA FOR

realising inner-city dreams Livern Barrett Senior Gleaner Writer

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RESIDENT OF G2K, Floyd Green, may have found the formula that will turn the inner city youth’s dreams to reality. He is proposing the establishment of a mentorship system that would rely on the experiences of successful professionals who came from humble beginnings. “We have to find a way to take them back into these communities and have them reach out and touch these young persons to let them know that ‘I shared your reality ..., I was once in the position that you are in’,” Green suggested. He added: “These are not politicians. These are not necessarily the people in the media spotlight. But we have to seek out those persons and have them tell their stories and it is those stories that will inspire (inner-city) young people to keep dreaming and to realise their dreams.” Green offered this solution at a Gleaner Editor’s Forum recently, where youth leaders bemoaned the fortunes of their peers in the innercity. The lack of opportunity was a recurring concern. They believe that it could be stifling the ambitious dreams of young persons spread across the tough inner-city communities of the Corporate Area. Daniel Wilson, president of the University of the West Indies (UWI) Guild of Students, believes the dreams of inner-city young people are directly linked to the

opportunities available in their communities. “And those opportunities are tied into politics, they are tied into (the availability of) jobs ... . They are tied into a myriad of other stuff,” Wilson suggested. “Everyone’s dreams are centred around the realities they face. So as an example, somebody in the inner city, their dream could be to become the area leader ... . Somebody else’s dream could be to fly-out (migrate),” he added.

NO CLEARLY DEFINED STRUCTURE RICARDO MAKYN/STAFF

The youth groups find disturbing, the absence of a clearly defined structure to help them realise their dreams. The youth leaders argued that while most of these young persons are willing to follow the proverbial ‘straight and narrow’ path to success, these concerns could drive others to want to emulate commu-

PHOTOGRAPHER

Floyd Green, President of Generation 2000 (G2K). nity dons who are involved in criminal activities. Chairman of the National Youth Council, Ryan Small agreed, stressing that ways have to be

found to bring opportunities to these communities. Giving an example, Small said a recent visit to the community of Congo Hole, in St Elizabeth, reinforced for him the lack of opportunities faced by young persons in deep rural communities. For his part, president of the Young Entrepreneurs Association, Fabian Brown, is concerned that the absence of a system to ensure that the positive dreams of inner city young people become reality could be killing some of those dreams. “Based on my own experience of working in deep rural communities and inner-city communities, the young people in both these situations have their own dreams and they are real dreams and all that is required, for the most part, is facilitation of those dreams to become reality,” Brown reasoned.

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

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J A MAICA TH RO U G H TH E EYES O F BUS INE S S LE ADE RS

Looking back, looking forward Neville Graham

How did we get here?

Gleaner Writer

While we might have been ready politically for independence, perhaps the economic readiness was not so well thought through. So we have always been playing ‘catch-up’ as a nation, unable to replace British economic financial security with an independent economy, not yet mature with the requisite skills and resources for sustained development. That said, our foresight and skill sets prompted development of one of our natural, intrinsic assets – our beauty, creating a successful tourism industry comparing favourably with anywhere in the world.

Richard Pandohie CEO of Carreras Jamaica believes in Jamaica – believes in its capacity for greatness. He tells us how to get there.

What will/should Jamaica be like in the next 50 years? Brand Jamaica is recognised globally. asking: What have we really achieved?

How did we get here? AFTER 50 years of Independence, Jamaica’s scorecard is a mixture of brilliance and underachievement. In the cultural and sporting arenas, we have been amazing; impacting the world in many positive ways that have truly led to Brand Jamaica being one of the most recognised and revered brands globally. Unfortunately, on the economic front, we have failed in many aspects and now find ourselves at a crossroad where many of us are

I put the blame for our economic failures squarely at the divisiveness that ruled our politics and subsequently our policies over many decades. Additionally, as a people, we have, for too long, been content to be spectators, rather than participants in determining the direction of our country.

Expectation for the next 50 years I believe in our resilience and I believe that as a nation, we are

showing real signs of maturity and as such, my expectation is that we are ready to acknowledge our issues and take the necessary steps to address them. I am cautiously optimistic that we will make significant strides to achieving Vision 2030 and turning Jamaica into a true economic power, at least within CARICOM.

WINSTON SILL/FREELANCE PHOTOGRAPHER

capacity for greatness and it is imperative that we fulfil this potential, every single one of us, in moving our country forward and achieving greatness on all fronts.

How will we get there?

How will we get there? Christopher Dehring, born 1962

We will get there by having inspirational, transparent and caring leadership. As a nation, we have the capacity to rally and overcome all obstacles. We have a

Jamaica over the last 50 years?

Christopher Dehring, chairman of LIME Jamaica, was born in 1962, the same year Jamaica became independent. For him, 50 years later, Jamaica has a bright future. What is your assessment of

Makyn/Staff

ging Director, e.

Global technological changes will ameliorate life for average Jamaicans driving economic growth. Technology will improve everything from national security, to investments and even to everyday chores. Jamaica has a bright future in this new world with our natural creativity and athletic talent – two fantastic intrinsic assets to have in the digital age.

There is a lot to be proud of but some challenges we need to overcome. It is easy to take the privilege attendant to a strong democracy for granted, but look at other less fortunate societies where freedom of speech and democracy have a premium and it becomes clear. In my 50 years, I have grown up with a country maturing democratically, where violent partisan politics has diminished leaving more order and civility. Our economic status and our levels of crime call for improvement. Crime is undoubtedly our biggest threat to continued evolution and nation growth.

We need to modernise our legislation and government administration to benefit from the competitive advantages we have in the digital age. In the digital world, content is king; sports and music are the reigning kings of content; and Jamaica is at least a ‘crown prince’ in that world, if not a bona fide ‘king’.

Christopher Zacca, president of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica, sees significant growth in sports, theatre and tourism as well as the retail and distributive trade. Over the last 50 years we can cite examples in human development, democracy and health along with education in terms of availability as instances of progress. At the same time we bemoan a diminution in educational quality. Our sports, theatre and tourism along with the retail and distributive trade have all seen significant growth.

How will we get there? We got here by the strength and resilience of our people and the vibrancy of our democratic traditions. At the same time, we cannot ignore our negative growth in Gross Domestic Product relative to the rest of the region. Our average growth rate has been only 1/3 (0.6 per cent vs. 1.8 per cent) that of our partners. This has severely hampered us, built up a mountain of debt and engendered poverty. It will take us another 100 years just to get where our partners are at present! We need to batten down in a united effort to get out of our present situation, because we cannot continue this way. I am calling for a genuine partnership ... 50-50, private sector and public sector so that we can realise our growth potential and take charge of our destiny.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

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OPINION & COMMENTARY

LETTER OF THE DAY

Make next 50 better than the last

E S TA B L I S H E D I N 1 8 3 4

EDITORIAL

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Advancing ‘cool’ Jamaica H

ALF A century after the British accepted our invitation to pull down the Union Jack and dismantle their colonial administration, Jamaicans, the anecdotal evidence suggests, are decidedly schizophrenic about what we have made of Independence. Perception of the country, it seems, swings between nationalistic fervour and a debilitating pessimism – that we have achieved little or nothing. This newspaper adheres to neither of these extremes, believing that the Jamaican situation is far more nuanced and complex. More important, we are optimistic about the country’s future, though not blindly so. We understand that if Jamaica is to do better and come close to fulfilling its potential, we have to be honest and frank with ourselves in assessing the failures of the past 50 years, so as to avoid past mistakes. We know, too, it will require hard work to convert aspiration into reality. In reviewing the Jamaican ledger, a great asset is the perception that we are a ‘cool’ country, enjoying a brand recognition that is beyond our size or economic achievement. A vibrant culture, especially reggae music, and assembly-line style delivery of stupendously talented athletes contribute to cool Jamaica. But it’s more than that. Diplomatically, Jamaica punches above its weight. We are looked to for leadership in many of the world’s political forums. Part of the reason is that unlike many of the countries that achieved Independence at the same time as Jamaica, our institutions survived the severest of stresses. Jamaica maintained a relatively stable democracy. Its big failure has been its inability to translate a strong culture and global respect into sustained economic growth and in creating a country where the vast majority of its citizens, rather than having to hanker at opportunities outside, can, in reasonable comfort, ‘live, work and raise families’. This failure tells in: I Annual average economic growth over the last 40 years of approximately one per cent;

THE EDITOR, Sir: HE FIRST letter I wrote to The Gleaner was published on the eve of this country’s Independence. I was a schoolboy and the youngest Sunday school teacher in my church. Invoking Proverbs 14:34 – “righteousness exalteth a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people ...” – I wrote passionately on the subject. When it was published, I was the hero in Brown’s Town for the entire day. We have, since then, divided ourselves into two warring tribes, preying on the country’s resources and blaming each other for the country’s failures. The last time I checked, however, every single MP is a relative or friend to the rest of us. We go to the same places for worship, education or recreation. We chose them to represent us. They are what we see when we look in the mirror.

I Per-capita GDP that has changed little since Independence; I Infrastructure whose expansion and maintenance have not kept pace with demand; I An underperforming education system, from which only 30 per cent of the secondary-school cohort received passes in recognised exams. I High rates of joblessness, including around 60 per cent of the country’s youth being unemployed or opting out of the workforce; and I A high crime rate, marked especially by a homicide rate of around 45 per 100,000. These indicators do not mean that there have been no advances since Independence. Fifty years ago, literacy was below 40 per cent and a small number of Jamaicans attended secondary schools. There is nearly universal enrolment today and around a third of young adults are in tertiary institutions. And for all their inadequacies, Jamaica’s physical and social infrastructure are vastly advanced over a halfcentury ago.

Time to reflect, time to progress

But where change for the better is perhaps most obvious in Jamaica is the social advancement of the vast majority of the population who are descendants of slaves. It is ironic that, given the relative stability of our democracy, and its contribution to other spheres of national life, that a major factor in Jamaica’s underachievement is the nature of its politics – its conduct in divisive, tribal fashion that undermined continuity in policy and advanced the notion of politics as a means to deliver spoils. We have improved on this front. There is still much more to be done if we are to fix the economy and simultaneously overcome the problems that detract from Jamaica as the place to live. As a people of talent, energy and imagination, the fixes are not beyond Jamaicans. The process, however, demands commitment and, in a difficult global environment, extraordinary leadership. Which we must demand. In the next 50 years, the issues raised should be different.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Let’s really become a nation on a mission JAMAICA:50 Golden Moments 1962-2012 highlights high points in Jamaica's history since Independence as captured in Gleaner photographs. PRICE: J$3,000. Contact The Gleaner Library, 7 North St, Kingston, Tel: 922-3400.

THE EDITOR, Sir: AS WE pause to celebrate our 50th anniversary as an independent nation, let us not focus largely on having one huge Jamaica 50 birthday party or a slew of such parties. Much more is needed for this important milestone than simply throwing parties and enjoying ourselves. It is imperative that we pause to reflect on our achievements and challenges over the first 50 years and commit ourselves to working together to ensure that the ensuing 50 years will be even more rewarding and beneficial to all of us. After all, despite our fine

HOW TO CONTACT US….

SUBSCRIPTION Tel: 932-6189, 932-6190 Subscription available only where delivery routes are established

earth-shattering. Guilty civil servants, for example, could simply start giving a full day’s work. What exists now is wholesale fraud. The boss could cease creating unnecessary jobs for friends. This new thrust is going to involve many people making many sacrifices. In our quest for genuine nationhood, we must understand that Independence – like getting rid of the Queen – is not a panacea for struggling, underdeveloped countries. It is simply wistful romanticism to lust after Independence without a truly meaningful cause or course to follow. Our aim should be to become a truly functional society in the world. And all hands are needed. GLENN TUCKER glenntucker2011@gmail.com Stony Hill, Kingston 9

SOCIAL ADVANCEMENT

The opinions on this page, except for the above, do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gleaner. To respond to a Gleaner editorial, email us: editor@gleanerjm.com or fax: 922-6223. Responses should be no longer than 400 words. Not all responses will be published.

EDITORIAL News Desk: 932-6203,619-NEWS News Desk Fax: 922-6223 Sports Desk Fax: 948-1804 Call Us Toll-Free With Hot News 1888-THE STAR (843-7827) 1888-GLEANER (453-2637)

Can we, therefore, claim to be blameless when any type of reckoning reveals that the country should be much further ahead than where it now is? For many of the developed countries, the road to Independence was painful and bloody. There are those who think that ours came too easily. Many view the present celebrations with mixed feelings. Some of us are just coming to the realisation that we simply traded perceived oppression for starvation and joblessness for employed poverty. The truth is that Independence won’t change what we are not willing and able to change ourselves. May I suggest that we all get involved in this task of nation building. All of us. If we do not work at it together, I fear we will be having the same discussions at our centenary. And each of us is not required to do something

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES KINGSTON THE GLEANER COMPANY LIMITED P.O. Box 40, 7 North Street Kingston Email: advertising@gleanerjm.com classifieds@gleanerjm.com Website: www.jamaica-gleaner.com Tel: 922-3400,922-3500 SANGSTER’S BOOKSTORE In the Springs Plaza 17 Constant Spring Road • Tel: 960-8264

POWER 106 PREMISES 6 Bradley Avenue, Kingston 10 • Tel: 929-3496

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• GCT Registration #11835

achievements, we made some terrible mistakes during the first 50 years, which have impeded our progress greatly and which must never be repeated. Jamaica is still a country of great hope and promise, and our nation’s best days are still ahead. We can once more become not only that ‘Pearl of the Caribbean’, but that ‘Fine Jewel of the World’. That is conditioned, however, on each of us embracing that one important thing that binds us – our Jamaican identity – and playing our individual and collective parts to advancing the development of our nation. The Jamaica 50 theme, ‘A Nation on a Mission’, must be made more meaningful to guide us along that path. We must establish that clearly defined mission that is guided by a vision as to where we intend to go as a nation over the next 50 years, and ensure that each of us become stakeholders in that process. During the course of the next 50 years, we must be made to appreciate what it truly means to be a Jamaican and how our working together to build that better Jamaica will build our capacity to be a greater and more successful people. We must truly become a nation on a mission. KEVIN SANGSTER sangstek@msn.com

WESTERN BUREAU, MONTEGO BAY 9 King Street, Montego Bay • Tel: 952-2454, 952-2822 • Fax: 952-3828 Email: westernbureau@gleanerjm.com WEBSITE (GLEANER ON-LINE LTD) Website: www.jamaica-gleaner.com Email: feedback@jamaica-gleaner.com LIBRARY SERVICES Tel: (876) 922-3400 • http://gleaner.newspaperarchive.co. Email: library@gleanerjm.com

Collin Bourne Karin Cooper Rudolph Speid Anthony O’Gilvie Shena Stubbs-Gibson Marlene Davis Robin Williams Burchell Gibson

THE EDITOR, Sir: TODAY, JAMAICANS will celebrate the 50th year of Independence. It seems to be a period of fanfare and pageantry. On August 6, 1962, when I was 12 years old, I was filled with jubilation, though not fully aware of the real reasons behind the whole celebrations. There was much planning in and around the small communities of Point Hill, St Catherine. Those days, people did not have the luxury of television, nor did many people have the opportunity to travel to the National Stadium. However, we celebrated the occasion with Jonkonnu, merry-go-round, maypole, among other activities. It was a time of sharing and caring. As the years went by, I had great hope, dreamed dreams, and believed that the nation would be able to unite and succeed in our ambitions. To my dismay, this has not happened; instead, we have allowed our politics to further divide us to the point where we are more tribes, than a nation, fighting for scarce benefits and spoils. Many of us no longer think that by the sweat of our brow we should eat bread; instead, many continue to live on handouts. We have not been able to build our nation, maintain our communities, and foster healthy relationships. Indeed, since Independence, we have experienced some growth and development in our housing and other infrastructure, roads and better social services, but we lack the political will to stem the indiscipline and the monster of crime and violence. Gone are the pre-Independence days when the drunk man would be removed from the wayside just in case he might have been run over by a passing vehicle or stepped on by a passer-by. Instead, we have become so cold and callous. Are we our brother’s keeper, or have we lost that common touch? Surely, as a people, we have been given the information of change, yet too many remain uneducated and poor. As we celebrate the 50th year of Independence, may we use this time to reflect on where we are coming from, what we have done, and how we are going to chart the future for the next generation. IRIS WRIGHT zekewright@yahoo.com

Manager - Print, Plant & Distribution Operations Manager - Business Development & Marketing Manager - Group Finance & Procurement Manager - Human Resources and Administration Company Secretary/Senior Legal Advisor Manager - Media Integration Manager - Online & Information Technology Circulation Manager

Editor-in-Chief GARFIELD GRANDISON Managing Director CHRISTOPHER BARNES B.Sc., M.B.A. Chairman HON. OLIVER CLARKE, OJ, Hon. LLD


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

A5

OPINION & COMMENTARY

LETTER OF THE DAY

Make next 50 better than the last

E S TA B L I S H E D I N 1 8 3 4

EDITORIAL

T

Advancing ‘cool’ Jamaica H

ALF A century after the British accepted our invitation to pull down the Union Jack and dismantle their colonial administration, Jamaicans, the anecdotal evidence suggests, are decidedly schizophrenic about what we have made of Independence. Perception of the country, it seems, swings between nationalistic fervour and a debilitating pessimism – that we have achieved little or nothing. This newspaper adheres to neither of these extremes, believing that the Jamaican situation is far more nuanced and complex. More important, we are optimistic about the country’s future, though not blindly so. We understand that if Jamaica is to do better and come close to fulfilling its potential, we have to be honest and frank with ourselves in assessing the failures of the past 50 years, so as to avoid past mistakes. We know, too, it will require hard work to convert aspiration into reality. In reviewing the Jamaican ledger, a great asset is the perception that we are a ‘cool’ country, enjoying a brand recognition that is beyond our size or economic achievement. A vibrant culture, especially reggae music, and assembly-line style delivery of stupendously talented athletes contribute to cool Jamaica. But it’s more than that. Diplomatically, Jamaica punches above its weight. We are looked to for leadership in many of the world’s political forums. Part of the reason is that unlike many of the countries that achieved Independence at the same time as Jamaica, our institutions survived the severest of stresses. Jamaica maintained a relatively stable democracy. Its big failure has been its inability to translate a strong culture and global respect into sustained economic growth and in creating a country where the vast majority of its citizens, rather than having to hanker at opportunities outside, can, in reasonable comfort, ‘live, work and raise families’. This failure tells in: I Annual average economic growth over the last 40 years of approximately one per cent;

THE EDITOR, Sir: HE FIRST letter I wrote to The Gleaner was published on the eve of this country’s Independence. I was a schoolboy and the youngest Sunday school teacher in my church. Invoking Proverbs 14:34 – “righteousness exalteth a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people ...” – I wrote passionately on the subject. When it was published, I was the hero in Brown’s Town for the entire day. We have, since then, divided ourselves into two warring tribes, preying on the country’s resources and blaming each other for the country’s failures. The last time I checked, however, every single MP is a relative or friend to the rest of us. We go to the same places for worship, education or recreation. We chose them to represent us. They are what we see when we look in the mirror.

I Per-capita GDP that has changed little since Independence; I Infrastructure whose expansion and maintenance have not kept pace with demand; I An underperforming education system, from which only 30 per cent of the secondary-school cohort received passes in recognised exams. I High rates of joblessness, including around 60 per cent of the country’s youth being unemployed or opting out of the workforce; and I A high crime rate, marked especially by a homicide rate of around 45 per 100,000. These indicators do not mean that there have been no advances since Independence. Fifty years ago, literacy was below 40 per cent and a small number of Jamaicans attended secondary schools. There is nearly universal enrolment today and around a third of young adults are in tertiary institutions. And for all their inadequacies, Jamaica’s physical and social infrastructure are vastly advanced over a halfcentury ago.

Time to reflect, time to progress

But where change for the better is perhaps most obvious in Jamaica is the social advancement of the vast majority of the population who are descendants of slaves. It is ironic that, given the relative stability of our democracy, and its contribution to other spheres of national life, that a major factor in Jamaica’s underachievement is the nature of its politics – its conduct in divisive, tribal fashion that undermined continuity in policy and advanced the notion of politics as a means to deliver spoils. We have improved on this front. There is still much more to be done if we are to fix the economy and simultaneously overcome the problems that detract from Jamaica as the place to live. As a people of talent, energy and imagination, the fixes are not beyond Jamaicans. The process, however, demands commitment and, in a difficult global environment, extraordinary leadership. Which we must demand. In the next 50 years, the issues raised should be different.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Let’s really become a nation on a mission JAMAICA:50 Golden Moments 1962-2012 highlights high points in Jamaica's history since Independence as captured in Gleaner photographs. PRICE: J$3,000. Contact The Gleaner Library, 7 North St, Kingston, Tel: 922-3400.

THE EDITOR, Sir: AS WE pause to celebrate our 50th anniversary as an independent nation, let us not focus largely on having one huge Jamaica 50 birthday party or a slew of such parties. Much more is needed for this important milestone than simply throwing parties and enjoying ourselves. It is imperative that we pause to reflect on our achievements and challenges over the first 50 years and commit ourselves to working together to ensure that the ensuing 50 years will be even more rewarding and beneficial to all of us. After all, despite our fine

HOW TO CONTACT US….

SUBSCRIPTION Tel: 932-6189, 932-6190 Subscription available only where delivery routes are established

earth-shattering. Guilty civil servants, for example, could simply start giving a full day’s work. What exists now is wholesale fraud. The boss could cease creating unnecessary jobs for friends. This new thrust is going to involve many people making many sacrifices. In our quest for genuine nationhood, we must understand that Independence – like getting rid of the Queen – is not a panacea for struggling, underdeveloped countries. It is simply wistful romanticism to lust after Independence without a truly meaningful cause or course to follow. Our aim should be to become a truly functional society in the world. And all hands are needed. GLENN TUCKER glenntucker2011@gmail.com Stony Hill, Kingston 9

SOCIAL ADVANCEMENT

The opinions on this page, except for the above, do not necessarily reflect the views of The Gleaner. To respond to a Gleaner editorial, email us: editor@gleanerjm.com or fax: 922-6223. Responses should be no longer than 400 words. Not all responses will be published.

EDITORIAL News Desk: 932-6203,619-NEWS News Desk Fax: 922-6223 Sports Desk Fax: 948-1804 Call Us Toll-Free With Hot News 1888-THE STAR (843-7827) 1888-GLEANER (453-2637)

Can we, therefore, claim to be blameless when any type of reckoning reveals that the country should be much further ahead than where it now is? For many of the developed countries, the road to Independence was painful and bloody. There are those who think that ours came too easily. Many view the present celebrations with mixed feelings. Some of us are just coming to the realisation that we simply traded perceived oppression for starvation and joblessness for employed poverty. The truth is that Independence won’t change what we are not willing and able to change ourselves. May I suggest that we all get involved in this task of nation building. All of us. If we do not work at it together, I fear we will be having the same discussions at our centenary. And each of us is not required to do something

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES KINGSTON THE GLEANER COMPANY LIMITED P.O. Box 40, 7 North Street Kingston Email: advertising@gleanerjm.com classifieds@gleanerjm.com Website: www.jamaica-gleaner.com Tel: 922-3400,922-3500 SANGSTER’S BOOKSTORE In the Springs Plaza 17 Constant Spring Road • Tel: 960-8264

POWER 106 PREMISES 6 Bradley Avenue, Kingston 10 • Tel: 929-3496

92 Hope Road Tel: 978-9947 (same premises as Bookophilia) OCHO RIOS Shop #16 Point Plaza (upstairs) Tel: 974-9384, Fax: 974-9384 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

• GCT Registration #11835

achievements, we made some terrible mistakes during the first 50 years, which have impeded our progress greatly and which must never be repeated. Jamaica is still a country of great hope and promise, and our nation’s best days are still ahead. We can once more become not only that ‘Pearl of the Caribbean’, but that ‘Fine Jewel of the World’. That is conditioned, however, on each of us embracing that one important thing that binds us – our Jamaican identity – and playing our individual and collective parts to advancing the development of our nation. The Jamaica 50 theme, ‘A Nation on a Mission’, must be made more meaningful to guide us along that path. We must establish that clearly defined mission that is guided by a vision as to where we intend to go as a nation over the next 50 years, and ensure that each of us become stakeholders in that process. During the course of the next 50 years, we must be made to appreciate what it truly means to be a Jamaican and how our working together to build that better Jamaica will build our capacity to be a greater and more successful people. We must truly become a nation on a mission. KEVIN SANGSTER sangstek@msn.com

WESTERN BUREAU, MONTEGO BAY 9 King Street, Montego Bay • Tel: 952-2454, 952-2822 • Fax: 952-3828 Email: westernbureau@gleanerjm.com WEBSITE (GLEANER ON-LINE LTD) Website: www.jamaica-gleaner.com Email: feedback@jamaica-gleaner.com LIBRARY SERVICES Tel: (876) 922-3400 • http://gleaner.newspaperarchive.co. Email: library@gleanerjm.com

Collin Bourne Karin Cooper Rudolph Speid Anthony O’Gilvie Shena Stubbs-Gibson Marlene Davis Robin Williams Burchell Gibson

THE EDITOR, Sir: TODAY, JAMAICANS will celebrate the 50th year of Independence. It seems to be a period of fanfare and pageantry. On August 6, 1962, when I was 12 years old, I was filled with jubilation, though not fully aware of the real reasons behind the whole celebrations. There was much planning in and around the small communities of Point Hill, St Catherine. Those days, people did not have the luxury of television, nor did many people have the opportunity to travel to the National Stadium. However, we celebrated the occasion with Jonkonnu, merry-go-round, maypole, among other activities. It was a time of sharing and caring. As the years went by, I had great hope, dreamed dreams, and believed that the nation would be able to unite and succeed in our ambitions. To my dismay, this has not happened; instead, we have allowed our politics to further divide us to the point where we are more tribes, than a nation, fighting for scarce benefits and spoils. Many of us no longer think that by the sweat of our brow we should eat bread; instead, many continue to live on handouts. We have not been able to build our nation, maintain our communities, and foster healthy relationships. Indeed, since Independence, we have experienced some growth and development in our housing and other infrastructure, roads and better social services, but we lack the political will to stem the indiscipline and the monster of crime and violence. Gone are the pre-Independence days when the drunk man would be removed from the wayside just in case he might have been run over by a passing vehicle or stepped on by a passer-by. Instead, we have become so cold and callous. Are we our brother’s keeper, or have we lost that common touch? Surely, as a people, we have been given the information of change, yet too many remain uneducated and poor. As we celebrate the 50th year of Independence, may we use this time to reflect on where we are coming from, what we have done, and how we are going to chart the future for the next generation. IRIS WRIGHT zekewright@yahoo.com

Manager - Print, Plant & Distribution Operations Manager - Business Development & Marketing Manager - Group Finance & Procurement Manager - Human Resources and Administration Company Secretary/Senior Legal Advisor Manager - Media Integration Manager - Online & Information Technology Circulation Manager

Editor-in-Chief GARFIELD GRANDISON Managing Director CHRISTOPHER BARNES B.Sc., M.B.A. Chairman HON. OLIVER CLARKE, OJ, Hon. LLD


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

A6

The next 50 years Five decades later, a dream deferred Don Robotham Guest Columnist

W

ATCHING ALIA Atkinson swim her heart out in the 100 metres breaststroke reminded me, as it should all of us, why we can be optimistic about the future of Jamaica. The answer, simply put: it’s the Jamaican people, stupid! These same Jamaican people, some of whom commit gruesome murders every day and involve ourselves in all manner of evil, possess qualities of unparalleled courage, determination and human warmth rarely encountered elsewhere. Medal or no medal, Atkinson and all our athletes embody these qualities. What they are doing is teaching us to recognise these qualities in ourselves – there is the real gold, more valuable than all the metal ornaments being handed out in London. Our future depends on us releasing these talents – which the Jamaican people possess in abundance – and channelling them in positive directions. This is easier to say than to do, because Jamaica is celebrating its 50th anniversary of political Independence at one of the most difficult periods in world history. From 1494, and especially after 1655, the Jamaican economy developed as an integral part of the expansion of the Western capitalist system. When we became politically independent in 1962, this was at the height of the postwar boom in the global economy, and the Jamaican economy, therefore, boomed with it. In 2012, however, we are marking our 50th in the midst of the worst global recession since 1929-31. It is as if we were celebrating our anniversary in the midst of the Great Depression – the locust years of 1934-36, which immediately preceded 1938. So, 2013 will be our annus horribilis, with 2014 possibly worse. While we celebrate our anniversary with pride and gusto – we have much to be proud of – we must also prepare ourselves soberly to weather this coming storm.

FOCUS ON THE GRASS ROOTS It will not be easy. But we can not only survive it, but turn the adversity to our advantage if we understand one thing and act firmly on it: the future of Jamaica depends on the country being opened up in all respects to the talents and aspirations of the grass roots of Jamaican society – the upcoming middle and lower class, the rural grass roots, the striving urban poor and their children. So far, this has occurred in only two areas: sport and popular culture. The results are there for all to see. If we want to overcome our economic, political and social difficulties, we have to extend this process deeply into the economy, our educational system and our broad socio-political and cultural life. For, while the challenges facing us over the last 50 years have been global in origin and largely outside of our control, our failure to grapple with them successfully was local and of our own making. For example, it was clear from the 1959-63 period when sugar output averaged a record 492,000 tons per year that our productivity was in terminal decline. Jamaica’s days as a ‘plantation economy’ were numbered. Our strategy to counter

TO OUR READERS: The Gleaner welcomes your views on any issue. Letters must bear the writer’s signature, scripted, printed or typed name, full address and telephone number where possible. When submitting a pen name, kindly submit full name separately; names and addresses will be withheld on request. Letters to the editor of 300 words

that reality was a modified Arthur Lewis model-import substitution serving a CARICOM market, plus expansion of bauxite and, especially, tourism. This gave us a limited respite in the 1960s and 1970s, but not enough to prevent stagnation. For none of this was based on putting the interests of grass-roots Jamaica first.

MUDDLED MODEL Our education system, for example, although much expanded and improved after 1962, basically assumed that the majority of Jamaicans would remain hewers of wood and drawers of water – but now in factories, mines and hotels, rather than on sugar and banana plantations. Therefore, where there was limited growth in the economy, the distribution of the benefits of growth only ended up fostering increased inequality, growing social tension and crime. Even in the heyday of Michael Manley’s redistributive economic policies, outside of efforts in the cooperative sector, the community enterprise organisation projects and the aborted people’s production plan, the approach remained basically unchanged: Left- and Right-wing proletarianism. The attempt to revive this model on an export-led basis with the expansion of the 807 garment sector in the 1980s came to a crashing halt with the coming into effect of NAFTA in 1994 – Mexico and Central America benefiting at our expense. All these efforts from Left and Right, laudable as they were, missed one key point: Jamaicans, with our extremely deep smallfarmer individualistic traditions, do not wish to hew wood and draw water for anyone but themselves. Any economic, social or political strategy which ignores this rather obvious reality, no matter how meritorious or theoretically correct, is doomed to fail.

I

N 1962, the challenges facing this country were summarised by the Queen of the Commonwealth and Jamaica’s symbolic head of state: “My government recognises that Jamaica faces many serious challenges. Among them are the continuing problem of finding adequate employment opportunities, particularly for the young people of the island; the need for raising the standard of living; and the need for increasing production. To this end, my government is engaged in the preparation of a comprehensive development plan designed to enable every citizen to play his part in the development and progress of his island.� The new government got off to a good start, and in the first 10 years achieved remarkable advances in economic growth, expansion of facilities for health, education and social mobility. It made a great impression in foreign affairs, but failed in the essential domestic task of unifying the people and giving them an understanding of the true meaning of Independence; nor did it inculcate the need for people’s patience and cooperation to make selfgovernment work. Among the prime requirements for selfgovernance are the shedding of mental shackles, abandonment of tribalism; avoidance of dependency; and other habits of colonialism. These cannot all be done in 10 years, especially by a people who have experienced centuries of subjection. The first government did not take this seriously enough; and so the steady march of progress was changed to a great leap to reap

even where we did not sow. The 40 years that followed show a pattern of negative growth with short spells of relief from downward trends; and even as we celebrate, there is no real hope that better will come. The only consistent growth is in the size of government. The question arises: Have we met the challenges set out in the Queen’s speech? Based on present economic instability, incompetence and corruption in places high and low, deteriorating infrastructure and lowering of national spirit, the answer must be a resounding, “NO!� After 50 years, we still lack employment opportunities, particularly for the young people of the island, and still need to raise the standard of living for the many. There is even greater need for increasing production, and more than all, there is no design to enable every citizen to play his part in the development and progress of the island.

HAS RISING TIDE LIFTED ENOUGH? Surely, there is evidence of individual prosperity and cases of personal triumphs with which even losers and sufferers may identify in the name of national pride. But how do we behave or perform as a nation? Are we less dependent now than in 1962? Is our state of peace, justice and security better? Have we more or less faith in government? Are we not a hundred times deeper in debt and vastly more reliant on foreign aid, loans and donations? The overall answer inclines to the negative; and the evidence indicates that we stagnate because we are still lacking in unity; still ignorant of the responsibilities of nationhood;

A NEW VISION This is the reality which we ignored in our first 50 years. This is what we must fix now and in the coming 50 years. In our economy, it means really supporting the modernisation (technology, packaging, marketing, finance) of the small and medium-enterprise sector – rural and urban – as a number one priority – more important than Chinese-financed infrastructure projects, Russianfinanced mining expansion or even International Monetary Fund financial support –crucial as those all are in the immediate short term. It means focusing not only on growth but on the distribution of the benefits of growth. In the education system, it means really transforming the secondary system in which our youths are currently languishing. It is not a matter of sidelining the big private sector and the upper-middle class. These groups have an indispensable role and we will not progress without them. It is a matter of building partnerships in which the focus will be on the grass roots. We have thousands of Atkinsons, Bolt, Blakes and Powells all over Jamaica. What we have achieved in sport we can achieve in our wider economy and society. I Professor Donald Robotham is an anthropologist. Email feedback to columns@gleanerjm.com.

or less have the best chance of being published. We routinely condense letters and seek to correct errors of fact, spelling and punctuation. We may use letters in other print and electronic products of The Gleaner Company Ltd. Please send your letters to The Gleaner Company Ltd, PO Box 40, 7 North Street, Kingston; fax to 922-6223 or email letters@gleanerjm.com.

Kudos to The Gleaner, a beacon of pride THE EDITOR, Sir: I WOULD like to express my thanks – and I am sure the thanks of Jamaicans in general – to The Gleaner for the role it has played over the years in the development of Jamaican society. The Olympic Games schedule you have published is an example of the many services you have performed for the benefit of the entire nation. It is my hope that you will continue to realise how important your contributions are to positive growth in our society. I envision, for the next 50 years, that The Gleaner will continue to promote honesty, integrity, love and

prosperity; that the focus of your publications be towards uplifting our people; and that you will loudly denounce actions that denigrate humanity, and deny the human rights so many of our forefathers died for. As The Gleaner continues its march in its second century of existence, do remember to take care of your younger sibling, independent Jamaica. Let your conscience guide you in the exercise of your attitudes and actions towards your 50-year-old younger brother. COMMITTED READER devonrb@gmail.com

Jamaicans need to buckle up! THE EDITOR, Sir: AS A second-year management studies student at the University of the West Indies (UWI), one of my greatest concerns is the economic development of this country. The lacklustre attitude from the productive sector, and the very slow pace at which our economy is reflecting growth are among the main problems hindering nation building. A public forum was put on recently by the Department of Management Studies, UWI, and Jamaicans United for Sustainable Development analysed the lack of sustainable development over the last 40 years. I am sure that many forums, discussions, press conferences, meetings and such the like have been held with a view to finding and implementing solutions geared towards sustainable growth. But with all the seriousness of these ideas, we are

still not finding the real reason why, with all our best runners, with persons from Jamaica sitting on major global councils, there is not more economic growth and development. We claim we love our country, but when it comes to what can I do for Jamaica, we rather focus on what the nation do for us. This has to change in order for us to see a new Jamaica. We are now celebrating 50 years of Independence with not much of sustainable growth to show. We have to start at the basic-school level by inculcating within the school’s curriculum a nationdriven perspective, so that in time to come, successive generations will change. Let us face the truth: we cannot get anywhere unless we acknowledge that this is the underlying issue that needs to be addressed in order for us to finally see growth and development in Jamaica, land we love. TERRY ANN DWYER-EDWARDS justdoitterry888@hotmail.com



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I Ken Jones is a veteran media practitioner. Email feedback to columns@gleanerjm.com and kensjones2002@yahoo.com.

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and still blissfully mindless of the need for sacrifice, self-reliance and patriotism. In 1962, a sound of caution was made in Parliament by Dr Ivan Lloyd, then the longestserving legislator. He recognised the threat of failure and warned: “ ... One of our outstanding problems, now that we are about to get full nationhood, will be to exercise all the discretion and all the intelligence and knowledge that we can in trying to keep the country truly united at all levels. It can hardly be said at this time that we are a properly united and properly integrated country. “... We all, as politicians, should see to it that we do nothing ... which might be examples for people who have neither our intelligence nor discipline ... When we ... take such action and say such words on the street amongst a crowd of people who can easily and quickly and readily be inflamed, the danger is we may light fires which we may not be able to put out and control. “Unless we exercise the greatest amount of restraint and discretion in public places, not only in what we say but what we do, we may well make this place uninhabitable for ourselves.� Seldom has there been more thoughtful and forthright expression made by one in government. Poor governance and divisive activity persist; and the same evil force that threatens to make the next half-century a bitter experience prevails: lack of conscientious political leaders, who delight, rather, in keeping the people divided so that even sheepish politicians may safely graze.

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THE EDITOR, Sir: JAMAICA 50 celebrations are coming to a climax as we near Independence Day. But I’m not exactly excited about this, and most of my friends aren’t exactly excited either. What have we truly achieved? Most people will point to our music and track and field. Those are fair points, but I think they’re more related to the brilliance of individual Jamaicans rather than the country. I mean, Bob Marleys and Usain Bolts come only once in a lifetime. What else do we have? Look at what used to be a booming sugar industry! It’s now almost completely owned by the Chinese! Take a gander at bauxite; that industry is also nowhere near its glory days. Are those things we’re proud of? Don’t even get me started on the debt. Yes, over the last few years we have developed highways. Or did we? Oh that’s right, they’re owned by foreign companies who will continue to gain all the income for several years before turning them over to the Government. It seems like we’re only really celebrating our survival, since we haven’t had much major accomplishments. The political oneupmanship has not helped us thus far, and if it doesn’t stop, only God knows where we will end up. To most of the people I’ve spoken to, Jamaica 50 celebrations are, in their words, “celebrating 50 years of slackness�. For me, they seem to be a glorified fabric sale, with Ping’s and Pablos probably being the main beneficiaries. Don’t get me wrong, I love my country and I’m proud to be Jamaican, and I will do all I can to make it better. It may be a huge stroke of luck that the Olympics happened to fall smack in the middle of it all, in the country from which we were made independent 50 years ago. Try to imagine Jamaica 50 without the Olympics. I can’t. It is full time for us to have more tangible achievements for which we can truly be proud. ALWAYNE ALLEN allenalwayne@gmail.com

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SECTION B

SPORTS ‘This one means more’ BOLT GETS GREATER SATISFACTION FROM LONDON 100M TRIUMPH André Lowe Senior Staff Reporter

LONDON, England: SHOWED the world that I am the best.” Usain Bolt had a lot to prove going into last night’s Olympics 100m finals, but after a 9.63 seconds victory inside the London Olympic Stadium, the message is clear: ‘Operation Legend’ is still on track for the big Jamaican. “This is just one step, I still have another step to take in the 200m. I need to win that and then after that it will be left to the fans and the media to determine if I m a legend. But I think that is what it will take,” said Bolt, who along with Yohan Blake, who finished second in a personal best equalling 9.75 seconds, took Jamaica’s medal tally to four (two gold, one silver and one bronze). Bolt, also shared that he is more pleased with this win compared to his world record-breaking triumph at the Beijing Olympics four years ago, because of the challenges he had to endure this season and the doubt around his ability to successfully defend his title. “This one means more because a lot of people were doubting me saying a lot of things that a lot of people could beat me and that I wouldn’t win,” said Bolt. “It means more because I showed the world that I am without a doubt the best and this is where I want to become a legend. “I came to the championships slightly worried because I wasn’t racing as much, but after the semifinals I felt smooth and I was confident that I could do it,” Bolt added.

“I

Justin Gatlin was third in 9.78, while Asafa Powell suffered another Olympics heartbreak after he was forced to pull up short of the finish line after aggravating his groin injury, as seven of the eight finalists dipped below 10 seconds, making this the fastest ever 100m at the Olympic Games. Blake was extremely happy with his silver medal and is already thinking of the 200m showdown where he plans to once again test his training partner.

JOKING AROUND Despite the rivalry, their rapport was clear as the two were seen before and after the semi-finals and finals joking around. Bolt was on one occasion seen talking at length to the 22-year-old. Blake shared that Bolt was helping him to stay calm and encouraged him right throughout. “I am not disappointed at all, I have to give God thanks and my coach Glen Mills. Everything has been going according to plan, I got a medal in my first Olympics, Usain Bolt got the better of me tonight, but it’s still a Jamaica one-two, so I am happy,” said Blake. “He (Bolt) knows that it’s my first Olympics and he told me to stay calm and that nervousness is a part of it and that I should keep my head up and I think it was a really good race on the day,” Blake shared. Kimberly Williams, 14.48m, and Trecia Smith with a season best 14.35m were sixth and seventh, respectively, in the women’s triple PLEASE SEE MORE, B3

RICARDO MAKYN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (centre), Veronica Campbell-Brown (left) and the United States’ Carmelita Jeter display their medals on the podium during the medal presentation ceremony for the women’s 100m Olympic finals, at the London Olympic Games yesterday. Fraser-Pryce (10.75 seconds) won gold ahead of silver medallist Jeter (10.78), while Campbell-Brown (10.81) took bronze.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

FACT:

B2

James Beckford’s long jump silver medal at the 1996 Olympic Games was the first to have been won in the field events. Beckford and David Weller (cycling) are the only Jamaicans to win medals for anything other than running in the 20th century.

Digicel Photo of the Day

RICARDO MAKYN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Jamaica’s Usain Bolt does his trademark pose for fans in the London Olympic Stadium as he celebrates winning the Olympic Games’ men’s 100 metres final yesterday. Bolt won in an Olympic record, 9.63 seconds.

STANDINGS Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 16 18 19 20 20 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 31 33 33 35 35 37 38 39 40 41 41 43 43 43 43 43 43 49 49 49 49 49 54 54 56 56 56 56 56 56

Country China United States Great B & N. Ireland South Korea France Italy Kazakhstan Germany Russian Federation Hungary North Korea Netherlands South Africa New Zealand Japan Romania Denmark Belarus Cuba Poland JAMAICA Ukraine Ethiopia Australia Canada Czech Republic Sweden Kenya Brazil Slovenia Croatia Switzerland Iran Lithuania Venezuela Georgia Mexico Colombia Spain Slovakia India Azerbaijan Belgium Armenia Serbia Indonesia Mongolia Norway Guatemala Thailand Chinese Taipei Malaysia Egypt Greece Moldova Tunisia Singapore Uzbekistan Hong Kong Qatar Argentina

G 30 28 16 10 8 6 6 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

S 17 14 11 4 8 5 0 10 16 1 0 1 1 0 12 4 4 2 2 1 1 0 0 12 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

B Total 14 61 18 60 10 37 6 20 9 25 3 14 0 6 7 22 15 35 3 8 1 5 4 8 0 4 4 7 13 27 2 8 2 8 3 7 1 5 1 4 1 4 5 7 1 3 7 20 6 10 1 5 0 4 2 5 5 7 2 4 0 2 0 2 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 2 5 1 4 1 3 3 4 2 3 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

B3

100 joys and ‘Still work to do’ ‘Charlie’ the barber FRASER-PRYCE SETS SIGHTS ON 200M GOLD MEDAL FRANCIS BELIEVES ATHLETE HAS ‘EXCELLENT CHANCE’

André Lowe

Senior Staff Reporter

LONDON, England: ITH THE 100m title firmly tucked away, coach Stephen Francis is expecting his prized athlete Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce to make an impression in the 200m at the Olympic Games, as she attempts the sprint double for the first time in her career. The 25-year-old Fraser-Pryce certainly seems to agree, as she offered: “I am here to complete a mission and there is still work to do, so let us see what happens in the 200m.” Fraser-Pryce became the first Caribbean women to win back-toback 100m Olympic titles with a time of 10.75. It is the fastest legal time registered in an Olympic women’s 100m final.

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HOW GREAT it felt, how great it always feels, to stand with pride as your nation’s National Anthem plays in a stadium, its athletes standing on top of the podium and glistening medals dangling from necks. I can never get used to it and it hits a soft spot every time. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Veronica Campbell-Brown started my day the way they ended the previous one, on a real high. Congrats again ladies and see you in the 200m. I must also say a big congrats to the 100m champion Usain Bolt and silver medallist Yohan Blake. I hope that Asafa Powell is able to get over that injury. For anyone questioning whether Blake’s emergence has threatened his relationship with Bolt, they only needed to see them before and after their semi-final and final yesterday.

NO BEEF IN THE CAMP

ACHIEVEMENTS The late American, Florence Griffith-Joyner, had won the 100 gold at the Seoul Olympics in 1988 with a wind-aided 10.54. Her compatriot, Marion Jones, had won the Olympic Games 100m final in Sydney, Australia in 2000, but that time and her achievements have all been wiped from the records for drug use. World champion Carmelita Jeter was second in Saturday’s final in 10.78, with Fraser-Pryce’s compatriot, Veronica Campbell-Brown, winning her second Olympic 100m bronze medal with a 10.81 clocking. Fraser-Pryce is the third fastest woman in the 200m this year, with a 22.10 personal best effort, which was done at the JAAA/Supreme Ventures Limited National Senior Championships in July, as she got the better of defending Olympic champion Campbell-Brown. However, Francis is convinced that the diminutive sprinter has all the ability to lower that personal best and surprise many here in London.

RICARDO MAKYN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce stands on the podium during the medal presentation ceremony for the women’s 100m Olympic finals, at the London Olympic Stadium yesterday. Fraser-Pryce (10.75 seconds) won gold ahead of silver medallist Jeter (10.78), while Campbell-Brown (10.81) took bronze. “I don’t know how fast she can go, but I suspect that she can go a lot faster than 22.10 and I think she will be able to run the 200m as fast as a typical 10.70 seconds 100m woman, which is 21-mid or 21high; so we will see,” said Francis. The much respected coach is still missing an Olympic 200m champion from his CV, but is quietly confident that Fraser-Pryce, who only

sparingly runs the event – mainly to help with her 100m speed endurance – stands a strong chance of mining gold in the half-lap event. Like she did in Beijing four years ago, Francis believes that the fact the Fraser-Pryce will be competing with little expectations will work in her favour. “I think she has an excellent

chance, she will not make those technical errors she made in the 100m because there won’t be any pressure on her and she has nothing to lose, so I think she has a very good chance,” Francis said. “This is new territory that she will be going in and hopefully she will be able to recover in time from the 100m and be able to run a good race,” Francis added.

MORE CONTINUED FROM B1

Have a happy Independence Jamaica! WE GOT the party started a bit early here, first with the playing of the national anthem during the women’s 100m medal ceremony. It was pure bliss just looking at gold medallist Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce beaming with joy on top of the podium and bronze medallist Veronica Campbell-Brown looking as lovely as ever to her left. It sent real chills up the spine, just looking at the flag being raised and Jamaicans in the stands; real Jamaicans and those, who for the night, became Jamaicans – all decked out in their black, green and gold – expressing such deep emotions for our little nation. Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake certainly ‘tun up di ting’ a few hours later – gold and silver in the 100m – in the fastest time ever seen at the Olympic Games and the fastest race at the Games, with everyone except Asafa Powell, who pulled up

before the end, dipping under 10 seconds. Phew! Just typing that got me tired. If you think Saturday night was crazy, well imagine what took place last night! Everyone was on their feet at the first sighting of Bolt and company; every volunteer abandoned their posts and stood around hoping for a sighting of what was the most watched race in history. Things were a bit worrying yesterday morning, as London woke up to very dark skies and rain, with some forecasts predicting all-day showers. Well, with the perfect conditions that we were blessed with for the evening session, it seems that even God himself wanted to see a fast time in the 100m. Keep them coming Team Jamaica. The medals are coming fast and furious and this is exactly how we like it!

jump final while Novelene Williams-Mills, 50.11, and Rosemarie Whyte, 50.79, finished fifth and eight in the women’s 400m final. The triple jump was won by Olga Rypakova (Kazakhstan) with a 14.98m mark, while Colombian Caterine Ibarguen, 14.80m was second and Ukrainian Olha Saladuha was third in 14.79m. Jamaican-born American runner, Sanya Richards-Ross (49.55), took the gold medal in the 400m ahead of home girl Christine Ohuruogu

They did everything together on the warm-up track and were like kids in the mixed zone, even cutting in on each other’s interviews. Blake even shared that it was Bolt who helped to get him calm and settled before the race – so no more talk about any beef in the camp. I can imagine the excitement in Leyton last night as Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake secured Jamaica’s latest medals at the Olympic Games. You see, a group of us jumped on a train to the quiet town, located just a few minutes from the Olympic Park, to link Jamaican barber ‘Charlie’ yesterday morning. The Gleaner’s photographer, Ricardo Makyn, had made the trip before to get his haircut and swore by Charlie’s skills, but what Mr Makyn didn’t tell us was how much of a riot Charlie is. Jamaican flags and other paraphernalia hanging from every corner of the small barbershop, an old Killamanjaro CD blaring from the audio system, colourful chatter and a few “choice words” from the Jamaican vernacular greeted us as we stepped through the door. “Yow see some real yard man

They did everything together on the warm-up track and were like kids in the mixed zone, even cutting in on each other’s interviews. yah,” Charlie exclaimed. He spoke about everything! From Bolt/Blake and the Olympics, Kartel and Shabba (Ranks) to Reneto Adams. “Yow, when Adams talk mi ’fraid and a way a England mi deh’,” Charlie said. A customer calls, Charlie tells the person to get to the shop before a certain time because he will be closing early to go home and watch the Olympic Games. Like most Jamaicans here, he is having the time of his life; enjoying every minute of Jamaica’s sprinting dominance and appeal at these Games. Did you guys hear about the drunken fan that threw a bottle on the track before the start of the 100m? I don’t know what exactly he was trying to accomplish, but a Dutch reporter told us that he actually got punched in the face for his troubles by a judo athlete. How him ‘fi wah mash up’ the big race?

(49.70) and another American, DeeDee Trotter (49.72). Dane Hyatt finished sixth in his 400m semis with a time of 45.59. Leford Green will continue the medal assault today as he lines up in the men’s 400m hurdles final, while 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce restarts her double campaign, along with defending champion Veronica CampbellBrown, and Sherone Simpson in the 200m heats. Brigitte Foster-Hylton, Latoya Greaves and Shermaine Williams will open up in the 100m hurdles heats, while Jason Morgan and Traves Smikle will compete in the discus qualifiers.

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

B4

Bolt’s a true champion, say Todd, Jackson Jermaine Lannaman Gleaner Writer

FORMER WORLD youth medallists, Odail Todd and Shericka Jackson, say Usain Bolt, in winning the men’s Olympic 100m at the London 2012 Games yesterday, demonstrates that he is a true champion. “It was unbelievable. He came from nowhere to win and what it shows is that he is a true champion,” said Todd, who won gold in the 100m at last year’s World Youth Championships. “I am very disappointed though that Asafa Powell got hurt as it could have been a one-two-three for Jamaica,” added the Green Island High student. Bolt, who was defending his title won in Beijing, China four years ago, did not get an ideal start, but after catching the field near 50 metres he powered away to the line to win in an Olympic record 9.63 TODD seconds, with compatriot Yohan Blake finishing second in a personalbest 9.75. American Justin Gatlin was third in a personal best 9.79.

ALWAYS BE A CHAMPION “I learnt from this race that once a champion you will always be a champion,” said Jackson, who claimed bronze in the 200m at the World Youth Championships last year. “He did not get the start as I had JACKSON expected, but after coming out of the drive phase he executed to the line. “I never doubted him, despite his performances at the Jamaica trials as I knew he would have done it. It was just amazing, and stunning,” said Jackson. Todd, who along with reigning World Youth champion, Odean Skeen, are considered as future Olympic 100m prospects, said Bolt’s run was a motivational boost. “It’s really a boost for me to know that I am a part of the next generation of sprinters who are next in line,” he said. “I learnt that technically you don’t have to get a start to win gold. But it is also Bolt, and they also say Bolt is not human,” he added with a chuckle. Jackson, in the meantime, also saw Bolt and Blake’s efforts and is spurred to do greater things. “I was thinking after the race that that should have been me,” she joked. “But as time goes by and I improve you never know.” Bolt, who joined Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce as repeat 100m champions at the Games, will next turn his attention to the 200m where he is also the defending champion and world record holder.

NIckeisha Wilson

Melaine Walker

Kaliese Spencer

Female hurdlers ready to clear 400 semi obstacles André Lowe Senior Staff Reporter

LONDON, England: ALIESE SPENCER is the fastest Jamaican and third- fastest qualifier to today’s women’s 400m hurdles semifinals, as all three Jamaicans – defending champion Melaine Walker and Nickiesha Wilson also booked their lanes from yesterday’s heats inside the London Olympic Stadium. Spencer, quite comfortably, ran a time of 54.02 seconds – her best time so far this season, to finish second in her heat behind Russian Natalya Antyukh, 53.90. She is aiming to win that elusive first major international medal, after fourth-place finishes at the IAAF World Championships in Athletics in 2009 (Berlin) and 2011 (Berlin). “I have been training hard all season and it just has not been coming, but I guess this is the right time so I’m looking forward to the rest of the competition,” Spencer told The Gleaner.

K

“What is to be will be and God is God, so perhaps it was just not my time, but now I’m here,” Spencer added. “I have worked and prayed very hard that this year will be mine.” Walker, who is looking to successfully defend the gold medal she won four years ago in Beijing, was also conservative in qualifying, stopping the clock at 54.78 for a second-place finish.

HAD TO RESPOND “The instruction (from my coach) was to make sure that I run the first three hurdles, get control of the race and try and run the last 300m,” Walker explained. “It was a pretty good race; I didn’t want to push that hard, but being in a competition people will push you and you have to respond, so I did just that and I am happy to be through to the next round.” Walker said she was a bit flat in the heats, but is expecting to return firing on all cylinders today. “I’m a little flat, I must say, through this round but I know I’ll be ready to come out and give it my best tomorrow.

“Winning the gold here would mean a lot to me, but at the same time I just have to focus on going through the rounds, get to the finals and then see what happens,” said Walker. Sporting the Olympics logo in her hairstyle, Wilson, who was also second in her heat with a time of 55.53, expressed satisfaction with her effort and is looking forward to competing in the final despite a hamstring niggle. “I am pleased with that performance, it will put me in a good enough lane for the semi-final so I’m happy with it,” Wilson said. “To tell the truth, I am not 100 per cent because my left hamstring is hurting a bit, but I am really pleased with myself and I know I will get better and I am just waiting to see what God has in store for me,” she added. The women’s 400m hurdles semi-final is scheduled for 8:15 p.m. (2:15 p.m. Jamaica time), while the final will be run on Wednesday at 8:45 p.m. (2:45 p.m. Jamaica time).

Powell puts Ja in charge

I CRICKET: DIGICEL TESTS

Series win at last! Chanderpaul, Roach guide home Windies Jermaine Lannaman Gleaner Writer

LED BY the experienced Shivnarine Chanderpaul, West Indies registered a comfortable come-from-behind five-wicket win over New Zealand on yesterday’s fourth day of the second and final Test cricket match at Sabina Park. Chanderpaul, who resumed the day on 20 not out, went on to post an unbeaten 43 as West Indies, set 206 to win, achieved their target at 206 for five midway the morning session. The victory gave West Indies a 2-0 sweep of the series and propelled them to one place above New Zealand on the ICC world rankings from eight to seventh. It also represented the first time the regional team was winning back-to-back Tests since 2002, when they defeated Bangladesh in Bangladesh. “It’s a good feeling to win and as such we are happy at the moment,” said West Indies captain Darren Sammy. “It was a good team effort in this match, as has been the case

IAN ALLEN/PHOTOGRAPHER

West Indies captain Darren Sammy (front, centre) holds up the Digicel Trophy as the team celebrates its 2-0 series win over New Zealand, by scoring a five-wicket victory in the second and final Test cricket match at Sabina Park yesterday.

throughout the series and in general throughout the tour. “We just need now to be more consistent going forward as we seek to improve as a team, and once we do that we should reap some success,” he added. Starting the day on 135 for four

and needing a further 71 to win with Chanderpaul, Deonarine and wicketkeeper Denesh Ramdin and the bowlers to come, it was felt by many that the chase could turn out to be a close one. However, thanks to Chanderpaul, who looked easy in characteristi-

cally chipping and tucking the ball to various parts of the ground, and nightwatchman Kemar Roach, who hit a career-best 41, it turned out to be otherwise. Roach, demonstrating competence with the bat, played a number of genuine straight and cover drives and shared in an entertaining 70-run fifth-wicket stand with Chanderpaul. Roach was eventually dismissed with the score on 183, but with 23 runs to get it was a case of too little too late for New Zealand, who deployed their young but promising four-pronged pace attack to no avail. Narsingh Deonarine, whose tidy part-time off-spin in the second innings helped to bring West Indies back in the game after they had surrendered a 51-run first innings lead, ended as the other not out batsman. He made 15. “It’s disappointing that after doing so well in the first innings we did not capitalise in the second,” said New Zealand captain Ross Taylor. “But credit to the West Indies. They knew what they had to do to come back and they did it.” He added: “We had a poor tour, but it’s a young team and we are always learning, and we look forward to arriving in India in a week’s time and improving on the lessons that have been learnt.” Marlon Samuels, who made 123 and 52, was named Man of the Match, while Roach, who ended

NEW ZEALAND 1st Innings 260 (M. Guptill 71; K. Roach4-70) WEST INDIES 1st Innings 209 (M. Samuels 123; D. Bracewell 3-46, T. Boult 3-58) NEW ZEALAND 2nd Innings 154 (M. Guptill 42; N. Deonarine 4-37) WEST INDIES 2nd Innings (target: 206) (overnight 135 for four) C. Gayle lbw b Boult 8 K. Powell lbw b Southee 6 A. Fudadin b Wagner 27 M. Samuels c *Taylor b Bracewell 52 S. Chanderpaul not out 43 K. Roach c Southee b Williamson 41 N. Deonarine not out 15 Extras (b4, lb2, w8) 14 TOTAL (5 wkts, 63.2 overs) 206 Fall of wickets: 1-20 (Gayle), 2-20 (Powell), 3-94 (Fudadin), 4-113 (Samuels), 5-183 (Roach). Bowling: Boult 12-1-46-1 (w1); Bracewell 13-0-38-1 (w5); Southee 14-4-30-1; Wagner 12-3-41-1; Williamson 7.2-1-18-1 (w1); Guptill 4-0-21-0; Brownlie 1-0-6-0 (w1). Result: West Indies won by five wickets Series: West Indies win two-match series 2-0 Man-of-the-Match: M. Samuels (West Indies) Man-of-the-Series: K. Roach (West Indies) Umpires: M. Erasmus (South Africa), P. Reiffel (Australia) TV umpire: R. Kettleborough (England) Match referee: R. Madugalle (Sri Lanka) Reserve umpire: G. Brathwaite (West Indies/Barbados).

with an overall 12 wickets, was presented with the Man of the Series award. The series victory was West Indies third in succession against the Kiwis, having earlier won the preceding Twenty20 international and one-day international series, 20 and 4-1, respectively.

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados (CMC): LANKY PACER Christopher Powell grabbed a five-wicket haul as defending champions Jamaica put the choke on Barbados on the first day of the third series of matches in the Regional Under-19 threeday Championship here yesterday. Powell snared five for 22 to dismantle a strong Barbados batting line-up and send the hosts tumbling for a meagre 106, after winning the toss and opting to bowl first at the Police Sports Complex. At the close, Jamaica were in a spot of bother on 62 for four, 44 runs adrift of first innings lead. After the start of play was delayed by 45 minutes due to a damp pitch, Barbados were off to a poor start when Shayne edged a catch behind off Powell for five with the score on 13. In the seventh over, Barbados slipped further into crisis when Craig St. Hill was run out at the non-striker’s end by Powell and off the next delivery, captain Shai Hope was caught down the leg-side by wicketkeer Aldaine Thomas for a fifth-ball ‘duck’. It was a rare failure for Hope, who came into the match with two centuries in the first two games. Barbados struggled to lunch at 30 for three and afterward with six runs added, Jameel Stuart was bowled through the gate for 15 by Powell, who switched to the northern end.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

B5

CAYMANAS TRACK LIMITED TIPSTERS’ COMPETITION RACE

TVJ -$1,150 WINS: 29

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AT THE TRACK

-$8,983 -$665.25 -$5,211.25 -$1,009.25 -$8,100.75 -$1,459 173 27 180 29 167 30

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POWER 106 -$7,399.75 -$1,632 149 30

THE NEWS -$8,620.25 180

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+$1,207.25 -$940.75 -$1,795 33 174 28

HITZ 92 -$6,928.75 -$1,990 -$10,165.75 144 145 27

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‘Myrtleboy’ on a mission MAN, the consistent pair of PALACE GOLD and PALACE GUARD, along with the recent winners COBRA and SHINING |GOLD, both up in class seeking hat-trick of wins. The Raymond Townsend-trained SMOKIN MAN finished a good second to the fleet-footed MR SKILL behind a fast time (58.1) over the straight on July 28, a race in which the then favourite PALACE GOLD ran a bit below par in finishing 51/4 lengths third.

Orville Clarke Gleaner Writer

T

HE BRILLIANT American colt, MISMYRTLEBOYRICHIE, looks hard to oppose when he bids for his 11th consecutive win in the 50th running of the Prime Minister’s Stakes grade one feature over 2000 metres at Caymanas Park today. Fittingly, the 50th running of the PM Stakes will coincide with the Jamaica 50 raceday. The 10-race programme also features the Jamaica 50th Anniversary Trophy, a commemorative race over 1100 metres for overnight allowance horses. The holiday programme is being sponsored by the L.P. Azar Group, to the tune of $1.2 million. Only five have been declared for the $1.3-million Prime Minister’s Stakes and on the strength of his recent fast-time runaway win over a mile, MISMYRTLEBOYRICHIE should not be beaten with four-time champion jockey Omar Walker again riding him for trainer Lorne Kirlew. Despite returning from a 13-month absence on July 14, MISMYRTLEBOYRICHIE ran as though he never left the track, making most to win by six lengths from the 2011 St Leger winner, COMMANDING CHIEF, and EMPEROR

FAILED BY A NECK

GLADSTONE TAYLOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The 3-2 favourite GALACTUS, one of two winners for leading jockey Dane Nelson and champion trainer Wayne DaCosta, staves off the fast-finishing 12-1 chance ALIAS SIR CAT (Chalrick Budhai) by half a length to win the opening race over 1100 metres at Caymanas Park on Saturday. HALL, covering the distance in the smart time of 1:37.2. Now that much sharper and with nothing to extend him on the lead, ‘MYRTLE BOY’ should have too many guns for his four opponents, despite topweight of 57 kg.

The Noel Ennevor-trained EMPEROR HALL renews rivalry with him on 7 kg and should close out the exacta in this small field. MISMYRTLEBOYRICHIE is definitely on a mission – that of breaking WAR ZONE’s all-time record of 12 consecutive

wins. He should move on the heels of the 1996 Triple Crown winner and Horse of the Year after today’s race. Meanwhile, seven starters have been declared for the Jamaica 50th Anniversary Trophy race over 1100 metres, including the speedy SMOKIN

PALACE GUARD from the Fitzroy Glispie stable failed by a neck to catch SIR D over 1200 metres on July 21 and now assured of stronger handling from Richie Mitchell, replacing the apprentice Conrad Ellis, could well go one better. The trio of PALACE GUARD, PALACE GOLD and SMOKIN MAN should decide the outcome, with PALACE GOLD (Robert Halledeen up) fancied to catch SMOKIN MAN in deep stretch. I also like UNCLE KEN in the second race, BRILLIANT LAD to turn the tables on recent conqueror UPPA TUNE in the third, SHE CAN PREACH in the sixth and BULLET LINE in the closing Independence Day Stakes Trophy over 1600 metres for $180,000 claimers.

LOCAL RACING PROGRAMME TRIFECTA:1.5.6.7.8.9.10. EXACTA:1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10. DOUBLE EVENT:1&2.2&3.3&4.4&5.5&6.6&7.7&8.8&9.9&10. QUINELLA:1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8.9.10. SUPERFECTA:2.3.4. HI-FIVE:6.7.8. Pick-9:2-10 Pick-6:1-6, 5-10 Triple:1-3 , 2-4 , 3-5 , 4-6 , 5-7 , 6-8 , 7-9 , 8-10 HIT-6: 10 PICK-4: 4-7

003 003 0 000 400 004 400

Race 1 12:15PM Purse: $528,000 3-Y-O & UP CLM($450,0-$400,0)/NB5YO-NW4 1000M (5 FUR.ST.) T’FECTA EXACTA QUIN D/E SUPER 6 #1 Triple: 1-3 ______________________________________________________________________ 043 230 000 100 121 000 123

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

PAPPA D THE GUARDIAN KING FERDINAND SARAGOSSA FABULOUSCONNECTION TIME OF STORM EMERGENCE

3/1 9/5 50/1 7/2 5/1 16/1 8/5

3 7 6 4 6 5 5

L T&L B&L TL BTL B&L &L

450 450 450 450 450

RMitchell PFrancis CBudhai* JErwin* FJones* RCole* 450 SEllis

RAzan VWilliams CAtkinson,jr LFreemantle DMurphy CAtkinson,jr VWilliams

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

GLORIFICATION GENERAL CURLIN UNCLE KEN DANDYBELLE YES WE WILL FUNNY SIDE DIVINITY SANKOFA

40/1 14/1 8/5 6/1 7/2 7/1 5/1 9/5

4 6 4 3 5 6 5 9

L VL

250 250 250 TL 250 TC 250 T&L 250 &L 250 L 250

ABudhu* CBudhai* SEllis RMairs* DaneNelson OMullings ConEllis* RHalledeen*

PHylton LFreemantle RBurrell EASubratie RobDarby,sr AMcDonald PLynch RMathie

54.0 54.0 55.0 54.0 54.0 56.0 53.0

52.0 54.0 54.0 52.0 54.0 52.0 52.0 56.0

Race 3 1:15PM

Purse: $715,000 **** L.P. AZAR LIMITED **** IMP3YO&UP(NW3&MDN)/NB3YO-REST. STAKES 1500M (7 1/2 FUR.) EXACTA QUIN D/E S’FECTA Triple: 3-5 ______________________________________________________________________ 431 030 114 241 312 221 103 040

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

UPPA TUNE KROLL DIOR KAL KAL BRILLIANT LAD DOUBLE BUTTON EL PATRON FILL’S FANCY

9/5 40/1 5/1 7/2 2/1 8/1 5/2 60/1

3 4 3 3 3 3 3 4

T&L OWalker VT&L JErwin* CL CliveLynch T&L DaneNelson BTL ARobles TL CBudhai* TL DCardenas &L1 j.n.e.

IParsard JThomas LFreemantle WDaCosta GSubratie GLewis ACNunes SSharpe

57.0 54.0 54.0 54.0 56.0 54.0 53.0 55.0

Race 4 1:50PM Purse: $715,000 **** KINGALARMS SYSTEMS **** IMP3-Y-O & UP MAIDEN CONDITION RACE 1200M (6 FUR.) EXACTA QUIN D/E S’FECTA Triple: 4-6 PICK-4 ______________________________________________________________________ 400 1. LITTLE MISS JAYLA 004 2. EVANCHO

40/1 3 & 5/2 3 B

DaneNelson DCardenas

LKirlew TChung

3/1 4/1 50/1 99/1 30/1 6/1 5/1 9/2

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4

C VT& TL VL1 T&L2 L L1

OWalker AChatrie* DAThomas ABudhu* ConEllis* JErwin* SEllis ARobles

FRichards LKirlew WDaCosta EFullerton MPowell LKirlew FRichards GSubratie

Race 8 4:20PM

Purse: $715,000 **** SUMMERSET FALLS **** NB3-Y-O MAIDEN CONDITION RACE 1100M (5 1/2 FUR.) T’FECTA EXACTA QUIN D/E HI-FIVE Triple: 8-10 ______________________________________________________________________

54.0 54.0 51.0 52.0 52.0 53.0 54.0 55.0 000

Race 2 12:45PM Purse: $462,000 3-Y-O & UP CLM($250,0-$230,0)/NB5YO-NW2 & 6YO-NW4 1820M (9 FUR.25 YDS.) EXACTA QUIN D/E S’FECTA PICK-9 Triple: 2-4 ______________________________________________________________________ 000 304 423 200 004 431 000 011

3. MISS BOSS LADY 4. SHEZA BOSSLADY 5. LADY CELTIC 6. MYSTIC JAZMINE 7. LIPSTICK LILY 8. MY GIRL TIFFANY 9. MR. BOSS ALI 10.LUMINOUS TRIESTE

52.0 52.0

Race 5 2:20PM Purse: $715,000 **** THE JAMAICA 50th ANNIVERSARY TROPHY **** 3-Y-O & UP OVERNIGHT ALLOWANCE 1100M (5 1/2 FUR.) T’FECTA EXACTA QUIN D/E SUPER 6 #2 Triple: 5-7 ______________________________________________________________________ 002 010 400 223 202 311 411

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

SMOKIN MAN BLACKIE DAVIS NEW KINGSTON PALACE GOLD PALACE GUARD COBRA SHINING GOLD

5/2 7/1 7/2 8/5 9/5 12/1 10/1

4 5 6 4 4 5 4

& VL T&L T&L L T&L L

RStewart ARobles DaneNelson RHalledeen* RMitchell LMiller OWalker

RTownsend GSubratie WDaCosta HowJaghai FGlispie NPalmer HowJaghai

022

50.0 55.0 55.0 52.0 52.0 50.0 52.5

Race 6 2:55PM Purse: $480,600 NB4-Y-O & UP RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE V(NW2) - F&M 1200M (6 FUR.) T’FECTA EXACTA QUIN D/E HI-FIVE Triple: 6-8 ______________________________________________________________________ 002 040 034 300 103 403 000 001 000 400 000

1. FRIENDS FOR LIFE 2. LEMONADE 3. MONEY HONEY 4. BURNING CLEARANCE 5. FRISSON 6. SOJOURNER TRUTH 7. CLASSICAL PLEASURE 8. TE-AMO 9. DARCAS AMANDA 10.RIBBON IN THE SKY 11.SHE CAN PREACH

30/1 9/2 6/1 7/1 9/2 5/2 7/2 40/1 7/1 10/1 8/1

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

BL BTL VTL VTL BL TL TL V&L &L L T&L

RHalledeen* OWalker SEllis CBudhai* DaneNelson ADancel* AChatrie* AThomas RMitchell RMairs* DCardenas

STodd FRichards GSubratie CAnderson STodd PHylton STodd LFearon EBrown WSoutar PLynch

53.0 55.0 55.0 55.0 56.0 55.0 53.0 53.0 54.0 54.0 56.0

Race 7 3:50PM

Purse: $516,600 **** PABLOS **** NB4-Y-O & UP RESTRICTED ALLOWANCE IV(NW3) 1400M (7 FUR.) T’FECTA EXACTA QUIN D/E HI-FIVE Triple: 7-9 ______________________________________________________________________ 400 000 312 004 000 100 003 210 040 000

1. MY GIRL NALA 2. GETUPSTANDUP 3. ANNTRACK 4. PERFECT FLYER 5. GOOD INVESTMENT 6. AALIHAAT 7. KING T 8. ORDEROFDISTINCTION 9. SPLITTING IMAGE 10.BUSY

14/1 50/1 7/1 1/1 9/5 35/1 7/2 5/1 50/1 60/1

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5

BTL L L L TL CL C B&L BL

PFrancis RCole* OMullings DaneNelson RMairs* MGrant* OWalker SEllis JAnderson* AThomas

GSubratie GGriffiths WParchment PLynch RMathie WSoutar RTownsend LClarke NPalmer DPryce

53.0 51.0 57.0 54.0 52.0 53.0 55.0 53.0 54.0 52.0

000 0 4 000 000 000

1. WESTERN TRADITION 2. LITTLE FIRE 3. EUSEBIA 4. KOBALT 5. VIBES MASTER 6. DONATA 7. QUICK MARCH 8. GOLD PLATED 9. WHISTLING JET 10.LEGAL EXPLOSION 11.MOVIE DIRECTOR 12.PLATINUM KING

8/1 20/1 18/1 6/5 5/2 30/1 6/1 50/1 12/1 99/1 25/1 3/1

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

L1 L1

ARobles AChatrie* KRobinson SEllis AMartin RMairs* MGrant* MPowell DCardenas ADancel* ChrisDouglas CliveLynch

&L1 L V&L TL2 L L L

MPowell GMoo-Young PFong NPalmer WDaCosta NPalmer FParham RayPhillips ACNunes KDavis LRobinson EASubratie

54.0 56.0 51.0 56.0 56.0 56.0 53.0 52.0 54.0 52.0 53.0 53.0

Race 9 4:50PM Purse: $1,320,000 **** PRIME MINISTER’S STAKES **** 3-Y-O & UP GRADED STAKES 2000M (10 FUR.) T’FECTA EXACTA QUIN D/E ______________________________________________________________________ 030 000 213 111 444

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

LADY MACBETH SAINT MARY EMPEROR HALL MISMYRTLEBOYRICHIE RAISE A RUCKUS

14/1 20/1 9/5 1/5 4/1

5 4 4 4 5

VL L T&

DAThomas RCole* DCardenas OWalker PFrancis

VL

GSubratie LKirlew NEnnevor LKirlew PFeanny,od

50.0 50.0 50.0 57.0 50.0

Race 10 5:30PM Purse: $438,000 **** INDEPENDENCE DAY STAKES TROPHY **** 3YO&UP CLM($180,0)/NB6YO-NW3 (START FOR $180,0 SINCE 6/4) 1600M (8 FUR.) T’FECTA EXACTA QUIN HIT-6 ______________________________________________________________________ 241 014 041 100 332 000 220 010 443 000 324 303 400 004 000 101

1. BULLET LINE 2. SKIPPING THE STORM 3. TOPLESS ANGEL 4. KEEPIN THE PROMISE 5. LA’S DANCER 6. SERIOUS BUSINESS 7. LADY GORAKHPUR 8. CHRISTMAS GIFT 9. KING SOLOMON 10.TOP MAN 11.RISING HURRICANE 12.PRINCE OF ARABIA 13.NEPTUNE 14.STAMP OF AUTHORITY 15.FEELINGINTHESLIPS 16.AWESOME WILDCAT

3/1 8/1 20/1 9/1 20/1 7/1 40/1 4/1 20/1 99/1 8/1 7/1 60/1 99/1 7/1 9/2

6 6 5 4 8 4 6 9 5 6 7 5 6 5 5 4

CL BL V T&L VL VL &L &L T&L T&L L L L TL TL TL

180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180

SEllis AMartin OWalker JErwin* RMairs* PFrancis ConEllis* RMitchell RHalledeen* ABudhu* ARobles CBudhai* VNajair ADancel* OMullings DaneNelson

THESE ARE THE ALLOTTED WEIGHTS EQUIPMENT: B-blinkers V-visor N-no whip G-goggles

VWilliams TChung BDawes PaulSmith EASubratie MAnderson BMcIntosh LFreemantle LTomlinson PFong EASubratie DLee RayPhillips GMoo-Young AMcDonald CFerguson

55.0 57.0 55.0 55.0 53.0 53.0 53.0 57.0 55.0 53.0 55.0 55.0 53.0 55.0 55.0 57.0


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

B6

Education holds key – Pitterson-Nattie Ryon Jones Staff Reporter

SENIOR SUNSHINE Girls head coach, Oberon Pitterson-Nattie, is helping to groom a number of Jamaica’s young netballers, as the team is in a rebuilding phase in preparation for the 2015 World Championships. She is of the view that the same hands-on approach is needed by parents in Jamaica in the lives of their children. She had hoped that Jamaica’s 50th year of Independence would have been greeted with a more peaceful society. “I grew up in Arnett Gardens and all I wished for was a little less violence and I don’t think it has materialised,” Pitterson-Nattie said. “I was around during the 1980s election and it wasn’t pretty; it has got worst,” she added. She now believes that educa-

National netball coach Oberon Pitterson-Nattie

tion holds the key to peace being realised in the island, and that parents have a pivotal role to play in ensuring their children make the most of the educational opportunities. “My dream for the country is for us to get our youths really educated, so they can understand what they are about and be honest and have integrity; that’s my dream and if we can get to that I think we will be OK,” Pitterson-Nattie said. “Everybody should get a chance to be educated and parents need to play a more pivotal role in ensuring that their children go to school and get a proper education. She added: “The chance for education is there, but I don’t think we utilise it enough and it is not going to happen just with the teachers, but the parents have to be involved.”

‘National road plan’ for sports SEE MORE ON B14

Dreaming of: ECONOMIC PROSPERITY, BRAND JAMAICA

Juliet Cuthbert – Olympian.

Captain Horace Burrell, Jamaica Football Federation president.

Burrell hopes we get it right by 2062 THE STREETS of Jamaica reveal a picture of economic hardship and this is the story that most Jamaicans have to tell. President of the Jamaica Football Federation and owner of Captain’s Bakery, Captain Horace Burrell, is dreaming of economic prosperity for all Jamaicans in this the nation’s 50th year of Independence. “Economic prosperity I am sure is the dream of every well thinking Jamaican and this is one area in which I believe we could have done better,” Burrell said. “I firmly believe that we could have done better as it relates to our economy.” He added: “Although we have made strides, when you consider that as a people we are blessed with such vast talent in every

respect, I believe that as a nation at 50 we should have been further ahead.” Burrell would like to see the country ‘get it right’ by the year 2062. “I would love to see Jamaica achieving economic prosperity for the majority of our people and jobs being created for all,” Burrell stated. “I would love, generally speaking, for us to have a more educated Jamaica and be naturally able to take advantage of the many opportunities that will present themselves. If we are going to be self sufficient 50 years from now, we are going to have to create more industries and on a whole the nation has to find its niche,” he added. – R.J.

‘Tackle corruption, illiteracy or we are doomed’ JULIET CUTHBERT, the 1992 Olympics 100 and 200 metres silver medallist, believes the country’s greatest shortcoming over its 50 years of Independence is the failure to successfully tackle the problems of illiteracy and corruption. “In the 1970s and early 1980s we had a literacy programme and they were doing things to actually educate the masses,” Cuthbert said. “I think people are still being left behind in Jamaica because of the high level of illiteracy. I think it is detrimental to the upliftment of our society; education is the key to solving a lot of the problems in this society,” she added. Cuthbert is also hoping for a more stable economy. “I would have liked to see a more stable dollar, a more stable economy and for us to be more

competitive worldwide in the manufacturing sector,” Cuthbert expressed. “The dollar is steadily rising and we cannot be competitive if the dollar is rising and we are not making anything. It is hopeless to me, very depressing and I feel sorry for the next generation,” she added. Cuthbert, who now owns and operates a gym locally, is dreaming of a fully literate country by time the next 50 years roll around. “For the next 50 years, what I would love to see is for us to have 100 per cent literacy like Cuba,” Cuthbert shared. “If we educate our society we would also have more law and order. She added: “Corruption is still at the core of society. If nothing is done in the next 50 years with the corruption plus illiteracy I think we are doomed.” – R.J.

FILE

Jamaica Cricket Association president, Lyndel Wright.

Peace, productivity the ‘Wright’ way LYNDEL WRIGHT, president of the Jamaica Cricket Association, had simple dreams for his country by the time it turned 50, but unfortunately these have not been realised. “I wanted us to have an institution like Boys’ Town in every parish to help develop young people under the leadership of the likes of Father Hugh Sherlock and I wanted peace in my country, where as a nation we could live in peace and in harmony and praise God,” Wright said. “Another vision I had was that Boys’ Town would become something like a national stadium, but this can still become a reality,” he added. The man, who hails from west

Kingston, believes the way forward is for the citizens to unite irrespective of political affiliation and work towards a common goal. “No one political party can help Jamaica, Jamaica needs Jamaicans coming together as one to work for the betterment of our people and our country; we need to unify our people,” Wright emphasised. “We have to be productive and there has to be generation of employment so that our people can be better off financially and of course, we want to maintain and sustain the spiritual balance that we have in praising God,” he added. – R.J.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

‘Boxing lacks infrastructure’ Andrew Harris Gleaner Writer

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AMAICA BOXING Board of Control’s (JBBC) second vicepresident, Leroy Brown, strongly believes that better infrastructure can aid in the revitalisation of the sport in Jamaica. Brown who has served in various capacities within the board over the past decade, spoke of the sport’s plight during a special Gleaner Editors’ Forum on the role of sports in national development. “The lack of adequate infrastructure is one of our greatest problems,” Brown said. “There are a number of gyms across Jamaica, but they don’t have the facilities needed to to properly develop boxers.” Brown, in making his appeal, pointed to the tradition and potential of boxing and the dream of many youngsters in post-Independence to become Commonwealth and world champions in the sport. He said boxing was one of the sports that helped to put Jamaica on the map in terms of sporting achievements pointing to former champions Bunny Grant, Michael McCallum, and the late Trevor Berbick. Brown said that while the sport has made some strides in recent times, especially with the assistance of Wray and Nephew through their sponsorship of the popular television series, The Contender, a lot more could be done. “The need is high for boxing equipment to make great boxers. We also need to fix the problems facing the introduction of boxing at the high-school level where most

PHOTO BY CHADWYCK VASSELL

Leroy Brown, JBBC’s second vice-president.

parents see boxing as more dangerous than football. But boxing is not more dangerous than football,” he said. Brown also said that while not every youngster who participates in boxing will become a millionaire by winning a world championship title, there are still a lot of benefits that boxing offers, including character and personal development.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

Marva Bernard, Jamaica Netball Association president.

Bernard dreams of Barbican court Robert Bailey Gleaner Writer

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ARVA BERNARD, president of the Jamaica Netball Association (JNA), has revealed that plans are in place for the construction of a multi-purpose netball court at the Sunshine Girls’ netball house, which is located in the upscale Barbican area of St Andrew. Bernard told a specially organised Gleaner Editors’ Forum on the role of sports in national development, at the company’s offices recently that whenever events are being staged at the National Stadium facility, the Sunshine Girls are unable to train at the netball courts. The Sunshine Girls use the National Indoor Sports Centre and National Arena whenever they are preparing for international tournaments. The JNA Divisional Leagues are held at the outdoor Leila Robinson courts. All these facilities are situated on the Independence Park complex. “We have struggled to train consistently, and so what we are doing is that we are looking to see if it is possible to put it (netball court) there based on the title and the lease that we have,” she said. The house, dubbed ‘Sunshine Chalet’, or simply ‘Netball House’, is used for housing players from the various national programmes during training camps, seminars and meetings. The five-bedroom house, which also has a swimming pool, was handed over to the JNA by then Prime Minister Bruce Golding in January 2010. The JNA boss added that the construction of the netball court on the property would be a dream come true for her administration because this will help with the development of the sport.

WE HAVE A PLAN “We have a dream and we have a plan, but you have to first start with a dream,” Bernard said. “I think we can do it, but we just want to make sure that we have all the legalities cleared,” she said. “This is just part of our ten-year plan to put a netball court beside the swimming pool at the Netball House,” Bernard stated. Bernard noted that her association has not identified the funding for the court, but they have been in discussion with a number of corporate entities that have expressed an interest in the project. “The drawing is going to be done by a friend of ours, who is an architect. We will then seek the funding ... because we believe that the funding will come, but we have to have a picture of what we want,” Bernard said.

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

Jermaine Lannaman Gleaner Writer

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OUR OF the country’s leading sports administrators have called on the Government to consider implementing a national sports infrastructure development project similar to that of the ongoing national road infrastructure development project. Marva Bernard, president of the Jamaica Netball Association (JNA), Fritz Harris, secretary of the Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA), Edward Shakes, principal of the GC Foster College of Physical Education and Sports, and Leroy Brown, secretary of the Jamaica Boxing Board of Control were panellists at a special Gleaner Editors’ Forum held at the company’s offices on July 11. “Infrastructure is critical and I think that it is a big project that the Government should take on for Jamaica 50,” Shakes said. “We talk about 50 years and looking forward, but one of the areas I think people need to give more credit to when we talk about Jamaica being world-class is to attach that label to our athletes and our coaches.

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Sports administrators dream of ‘national road plan’ for sports the highway and the government found a way through investments to get them built,” he added.

CALLING FOR ASSISTANCE

URGENT ATTENTION “This is so because when one looks at infrastructure support it is in need of urgent attention, but yet still we are able from time to time match skills with the best athletes and teams in the world. “We therefore need to take a closer look at what is happening to our sports infrastructure network, and how it can be improved. In the same way the Government can strategically go out and seek funding for a highway and other big projects, they should, in the same manner, approach the building of sports infrastructure across the country,” he declared. This has been a constant call from sports administrators over the years, especially in light of the country’s outstanding sporting accomplishments since Independence. These include the almost yearly

Edward Shakes, principal, GC Foster Sports College. accomplishment of athletes on the world scene, including the Olympic Games and World Championships, the qualification of the Reggae Boyz to the 1998 World Cup, the rise to third in the world of the Sunshine Girls netball team and the accomplishments of the Jamaican and the once world number one ranked, West Indies cricket team.

Marva Bernard, Jamaica Association president.

However, due to what is a generally described as a lack of funds and according to the quartet, in some instances a lack of understanding of the evolution of sports and its effect on the world economy, little has been done to address their pleas. “There is no doubt that we need

Netball

Jamaica Cricket Association secretary, Fritz Harris.

an extremely large investment in sports,” said Brown, who is of the opinion that boxing could have produced far more world champions had there been better facilities and government support. “For example, right now I think we need a multi-purpose stadium whereby different sporting associa-

tions can converge rather than everybody having a little area somewhere. There is no doubt, however, that it’s going to cost a lot of money. Therefore we have to think about a multi-purpose stadium like how we think about the highways. “We recognised that we needed

Harris, whose association has in recent times been calling for assistance regarding the installation of lights at Sabina Park so as to raise the popularity and profile of the sport nationally, also voiced similar sentiments as Shakes and Brown. “Sabina needs lights and if this does not happen we will not be able to expand in cricket, as on the international scene cricket is increasingly being played at nights,” said Harris. “There is also the need for better cricket grounds across the country and a cricket academy to name a few, which can take not only Jamaica’s cricket, but West Indies cricket to new heights. Bernard, in the meantime, while agreeing with the sentiments of a sports infrastructure network build up, said it cannot be expected that the Government alone can do it and called on the private sector to join in the investment. “I think that we would be foolish to expect the Government to do everything and sometimes some of us sit and wait for them to do everything,” she said. “But this mindset needs to be changed, and especially among those in the private sector, who should be able to look into a sports infrastructure project, and recognise that over time there can be returns both from a social and economic perspective.”


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Full benefit of success in sport is not yet realised

GC Foster rising to the challenge Keisha Hill Gleaner Writer

Time to market that Jamaican brand John R. Myers Jr Gleaner Writer

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HE SPORTING arena is perhaps one prominent area where the Jamaican dream is very much alive, given the island’s huge success in producing stars with the likes of Olympic and World 100 and 200 metres record holder Usain Bolt and boxing champion Mike McCallum. But top officials in the administration of sports here have suggested that the benefits from realisation of the Jamaican dream in sport could catapult if we were ‘savvier’ in the development and promotion of a sport brand. “In many respects, I think that we have not captured the full potential of what sports can do for us in our economy. We have our sports stars and the income from sports is probably limited. If we look at athletics it is only a few that make money from it and we have conquered the world at one time in cricket,” observed Edward Shakes, the principal of Jamaica’s sole sport college, G.C. Foster College based in Spanish Town, St Catherine. According to Shakes, there lies immense earning potential from a Jamaican sport brand, which would generate much needed revenues that would make a significant contribution to the country’s GDP. “We haven’t really built an industry around our sport. We don’t have brands, for example. Our business people are not going out and establishing brands for sport wear that you associate with Jamaica,” he lamented at a Gleaner Editors’ Forum on Wednesday, July 11. He was among a contingent of top officials addressing issues that

THE G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport seeks to train at the highest level, both academically and professionally, physical education teachers and other sports personnel. Established over 30 years ago on 41 acres of land at Angels in Spanish Town, St Catherine, it is the only institution of its kind in the Englishspeaking Caribbean. Since its establishment, the co-educational institution has seen much development and improvement not only to the physical facilities, but also to the curriculum and programmes offered at the college. These improvements, according to Edward Shakes, principal of the college, will continue in an effort to make the country and the Caribbean region proud of the institution. “The college was established to train physical education teachers and coaches because of the absence then of trained persons. Since then, 90 per cent of our graduates are trained persons working in Jamaica and the Caribbean,” Shakes reported.. Now, Shakes said, persons are not only trained as physical education teachers and coaches, but also as match officials, persons in the areas of recreation, as well as massage therapy, gyms and the hospitality sector.

affect sport. Citing the case of sprint star Usain Bolt where a Chinese businessman shared that there was a huge demand for apparel with his image around the time of the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, the sports educator bemoaned the fact that “our business people are not going out and establishing brands for sport wear that you associate with Jamaica.” He expressed a desire for sport in Jamaica to be transformed into a thriving industry like that in Australia where sport and recreation contribute an estimated 15 per cent to the economy of the country down under.

NO BUSINESS ACUMEN “We really need to grasp those opportunities and we are not doing that. I am not talking about setting up factories to manufacture because that is not where the money is, it’s only in the brand and so having a Jamaican company build a brand like Nike or Puma; something distinctively Jamaican and being able to earn income from that I think is important,” Shakes explained. Marva Bernard, the president of the Jamaica Netball Association sought to explain why sport has not developed into a business or an industry. According her, over the years sport evolved from the club or association structure where they are led by persons without the necessary business acumen to take it to the next level. “The sports evolved out of the club situation where mummy carries Mary and Johnny to football and to cricket and netball, and the parents become the managers and the parents become the presidents

NOTICE Will Mr. Obrian Thomas whose last known address was Ovany Street o/c Sunset Street, Montego Bay, St. James or anyone knowing his whereabouts kindly contact The Child Development Agency Shop 18, Sky View Mall 80 Main Street, Santa Cruz St. Elizabeth TELEPHONE: 966-3246

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Will Mr. Walford Esson, last known to be living at 1m Glasspole Avenue, Kingston 2, or anyone knowing his whereabouts kindly contact urgently The Adoption Board Child Development Agency 40 Duke Street Kingston TELEPHONE: 948-1145

RENOVATED AND MODERNISED

Edward Shakes, principal, G.C. Foster sports college. and there is no business acumen to it so it’s a club, it’s an association so the whole business of the business of sport is lost because all of these mothers and fathers become the presidents and it isn’t translated into the business,” Bernard explained. She believes there has to be a paradigm shift in the structure and management of sports organisations in order for it to become an industry and its full potential is

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WILL PHILLIP LIGHTBODY AND VENEISHA STERLING, WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS PARADISE, NORWOOD, ST. JAMES, OR ANYONE KNOWING THEIR WHEREABOUTS KINDLY CONTACT CHILD DEVELOPMENT AGENCY AT 979-3446/ 979-1024

FILE

realised. Fritz Harris, the secretary of the Jamaica Cricket Association suggested that “one of the new thrusts going forward is to have the youngsters at an early age understand and be aware of all the different areas that they could divert into and I believe that will drive in a serious way an industry going forward.” Shakes, whose institution is dedicated to training athletes and sporting professionals, said a focus is now being placed on designing training programmes aimed at creating the kind of professionals with the skills necessary for building a sport industry. “Down the road the thrust of the college is really going to be in training qualified persons who can sustain and support the growth of our sports and recreation,” he said.

The facilities at the G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport include a 400m mundo track, football, rugby, cricket, baseball, a multipurpose gymnasium, weightlifting, table tennis, tennis courts and outside netball courts. “We have renovated and modernised the offices and we are looking to add a spectator stand where the track is located,” Shakes said. The college, he said, has a rich history of successful coaches who are involved in different sporting disciplines at the national level. These include: Michael Clarke, coach of the 2012 Grace/ISSA Boys’ Championship winners Calabar High School; Maurice Wilson, coach of Girls’ Champions Holmwood Technical High, a school which has won the title nine years in a row. They lost

out on a 10th straight title this year to Edwin Allen High School, coached by Michael Dyke – another G.C. Foster alumni. “Our coaches are developing sports in the schools and, by extension, helping Jamaica to excel. We also have persons in football and cricket that are doing well. Quite a lot of the Sunshine Girls learned their skills here,” Shakes said. There are more than 600 students at the institution, with a majority of them coming from rural parishes. The principal is also calling for persons to invest in the development of the institution. The student housing, he said, was built at a time when there was a different ethos at the college. This ethos, he noted, has changed and with the number of students that require accommodation on campus, it has been difficult to provide for them.

ADDITIONAL INVESTMENT The college has also been offering scholarships to some students to offset their expenses. There are more than 70 scholarship recipients in the programme, and Shakes said with additional investment they will be able to offer more assistance to students who are in need. “For over two years, the Sports Development Foundation has been good in providing scholarships and will provide over $20 million dollars in assistance over a fouryear period. Jamaica Bickle also provides us with US$10,000 per year towards our athletes who have a definite need,” Shakes disclosed. The G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport has also embarked on a new phase in its development process. The institution recently launched an exhibition looking at Jamaica’s participation in the Olympics up to the year 2000. This is the prelude to a museum that the college will establish to chronicle the achievements of Jamaican athletes. “The exhibit has started with track and field and in due course we will be adding other sports. We will also include new and emerging sports,” Shakes said. keisha.hill@gleanerjm.com

FINAL L DAY

JAMAICA 50

INDIAN EXPO

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THURSDAY, JULY 26 MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 TIME: 11AM - 7PM.

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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012

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PHILANTHROPY AND THE JAMAICAN DREAM Nedburn Thaffe Gleaner Writer

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S THE country celebrates 50 years as an independent nation, kindling the philanthropic spirit in Jamaicans will be key to helping the nation’s disadvantaged live out the Jamaican dream, some young business leaders say. The professionals, who were guests at a Gleaner Editors’ Forum at the newspaper’s North Street offices, agreed that while they were all fortunate to be “living the dream”, it would not be complete if the masses are left out. “People need help getting a fair leg up and it’s something I would like to see as part of my dream,” stated Krystal Chong, who is the director of marketing and business development at Honey Bun Limited. Chong believes that while ordinary citizens have a role to play in helping others move along in life, Jamaicans need to demand more from the Government, which has a large role to play in helping to lift people from the rut to realise the dream. “I would like to see people demand more for themselves. I think the reason why private companies work is because your customer is the person who determines if it’s working, if you are going to go out of business, and I think it should be the same for the public sector. People need to realise that they are customers and they are paying taxes,” Chong said. In the meantime, GraceKennedy Brand Manager Rachael Browne believes the natural patriotic spirit exhibited by Jamaicans can be exploited to ensure the country’s disadvantaged achieve the dream. “It’s great to see it, it’s great to see the Jamaican people pull together and support our athletes and support our upcoming anniversary and I hope that it continues, because then you see the dream coming out,” she said. nedburn.thaffe@gleanerjm.com

‘Join hands to carve destiny’

RICARDO MAKYN PHOTOGRAPHER

Joy Baker had a horrible experience more than two decades ago when she lived on Orange Street, Kingston. A raging fire claimed several lives, including that of children. She decided then to dedicate her life to serve children. She cares for more than 300 of them in and around the Southside community. Here Mama Joy poses with two of her babies.

Rachael Browne ... if one is not educated to a particular point, anything you tell them they will believe.

Krystal Chong ... Jamaicans want to put in hard work and provide for their families.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

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‘Invest more in education’ John Myers Gleaner Writer

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ROMINENT BANKER and businessman Aubyn Hill is one of the fortunate Jamaicans to have realised his childhood dream – that of attending a prestigious high school and enrolling in one of the most sought after universities abroad. “Jamaica gave me a really good education at the primary level and

at the high-school level to form a base that helped me to excel when I travelled overseas to study at the higher level up to Harvard Business School,” he shared in an interview with The Gleaner. “So I am very pleased that part of my dream has come true,” he said. But Hill expressed disappointment that the dream he realised, which would have formed part of

the dream of many other Jamaicans, did not come true for them. “I am disappointed that only a few people like me have had their dreams come true. I think a lot more could have had their dreams come true if we had had better economic management and I must stress that we run our business and our education and our lives by higher standards. We have allowed

our standards to become far too low in Jamaica,” he lamented. The Harvard graduate said further that “the economic promise that Jamaica had in the 1960s has really faltered all along the way, for the most part, since we have been independent and that is part of my regret, because it has held so many people back that our economic dream has not happened.” He said, however, that all is not lost “if we raise the standards of education, raise the standard of

HILL

civil behaviour and we raise the standard that we expect people to live towards ... especially as we get our economy in place with a combination of private sector-led, but Government-facilitated economic growth.” “I think we have to invest more in education ... I think our standards have fallen far too low to compete with the best that is now coming out of India, China, Singapore and elsewhere,” Hill said. “I think that the biggest thing that our leaders have to do, apart from investing in education, is make sure they become economic facilitators... and not economic blockers,” he added.


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Jamaican and visiting Canadian cadets marching in the float parade along a street in Morant Bay, on their way to Lyssons Recreation Centre where a parish fête was held by St Thomas Indpendence Celebrations Committee. House Speaker Michael Peart was a member of the Cadet Corp in 1962 that participated in the Independence Day activities.

Old cadet remembers Independence morning Daviot Kelly Staff Reporter

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HEN THE Union Jack was lowered and the black, green and gold was raised at midnight August 6 in 1962, at least one current member of parliament was inside the National Stadium to see it live. House Speaker and Member of Parliament for South Manchester, Michael Peart, was a member of the squad of cadets who were part of the symbolic changeover to selfrule. “We were just assigned to man the gates or stand at attention during key moments. We never played a major role, but I was glad to be there,” he said, joking he wished he was among the cadets who hoisted the black, green and gold. Peart, then a 14-year-old in Manchester High’s Cadet Corps, recalled the various groups camped at Newcastle and were transported to the various events leading up to August 6. “It was much more exciting than now. Then, every little district and village had something going on. It was bigger. This is the anniversary, but that was the first one,” he told The Gleaner. When he addressed a special joint sitting of the Parliament on Thursday, Peart said, “I remember the excitement, the hopes and the expectation of the people for a new independent Jamaica and the way forward. “We have experienced many challenges since Independence, but we have exhibited the determination, the commitment and dedication to duty and the resilience to overcome them,” he added. Peart described the feeling inside the stadium as “a joyous occasion” and that there was no fussing even though the place was jam-packed. He told The Gleaner that being a part of the preparation and implementation, added to the excitement of the event. “When you’re standing at attention in your cadet uniform and people are looking up at you, it’s a special feeling; feeling of pride, makes your head swell,” he

MICHAEL PEART

‘I remember the excitement, the hopes and the expectation of the people for a new independent Jamaica and the way forward.’ gushed. As for finding any photos of him in his uniform, that’s a tough task. “I’ve been trying to contact some of my friends from those days, but the technology was different then. It’s not like now where you take a picture and can download it right there,” he laughed. “Every time I see photos of the event, I’m still trying to see if I can spot myself.” In the meantime, Peart said in spite of the many gains the country has had, the hopes and dreams many Jamaicans had in 1962 remain unfulfilled. “We haven’t achieved certain things. Corruption, crime and violence are holding back the progress,” he said. But Peart felt that Jamaica had achieved in other areas, citing improvements such as more children having access to education, more teachers with qualifications and better physical infrastructure. “The economy is the problem, though. We haven’t got the growth we are capable of,” he said. He felt getting the economy on track was important to eradicate the level of poverty. Asked to identify one Jamaican who most tried to carry the Jamaican dream, Peart went for former Prime Minister Michael Manley. “The opportunities that were open to black people were not fully realised until he did his work,” said Peart, lauding the late leader’s social transformation policy. “It was critical.”


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AS JAMAICA celebrates her 50th year of Independence, seven of her young successful executives share their perspective on what they believe to be the Jamaican dream.

MARK CROSKERY

RYAN DUQUESNAY

GERARD FONTAINE

STEPHEN PRICE

RACHAEL BROWNE

KRYSTAL CHONG

Mark Croskery – president and CEO at Stocks & Securities Limited I’m very passionate about it (my job), but it’s hard work and not accepting complacency. But the bottom line is only that in Jamaica you have to follow up religiously. Unfortunately, you have to micromanage to an extent and don’t accept complacency. I love what I do, but the thing is, in Jamaica, you have to follow up, so if you have a problem you have to find a way, and I think contacts is key too. You have to be able to call somebody to get something done whether its public relations etc., and you just have to make it work for you.

KERRIE BAYLISS

Ryan Duquesnay – Lithographic Printers I am living my Jamaican dream. Unfortunately, my dream is ever evolving and getting bigger ... A dream of mine as a child was always to come home (to) a home. There are a lot of Jamaicans (that) don’t (have one). There are a lot of Jamaicans that want it so bad.

Gerard Fontaine – Fraser Fontaine and Kong In coming back to Jamaica, I am very content about being in Jamaica, about working in Jamaica, about building an organisation. Giving back to Jamaica has now become a priority ... I am lucky enough to be living and being able to take part in stuff that I really enjoy, and things that I really want to do and being given the opportunity to do that it is amazing ... You ask about my Jamaican dream? I think where I am right now is pretty much what it is.

Stephen Price – regional special projects manager/marketing commander at LIME I didn’t get to be that superstar athlete, (but) I am living my dream now in the sense that I have been able to enjoy education within this country ... I have worked in a number of roles over my career, which have been so satisfying to me. Whenever I see the glee in my mother’s eyes probably that’s how I believe I have done well enough ... We all believe that we have to invest in our children, so I spend my time trying to give back as well as I raise the next generation, (enable them) to have their own dreams and to follow through on those plans.

Rachael Browne – brand manager, GraceKennedy “The dream would be not to see so many children on the road by a traffic light, begging, whether its by choice or force.

Krystal Chong – director of marketing and business development, Honey Bun Once you have achieved a dream it’s natural to have a bigger dream ... . I would personally like to make that opportunity to be available to everyone. I think people need help getting a fair leg-up, and I think it is something that I would like to see as part of my dream.

Kerrie Bayliss – Former Miss Jamaica The dream is to be comfortable in life ... my dream is to be here. I was away studying for so long and I feel like it’s a shame that so may people who are away stay away and they don’t want to contribute ... I made the decision to come back and start at the bottom, and build my dream, and I feel like that will help me to be able to one day realise that if you put in the work you can achieve it and not take the easy way out.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

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Veterans want the J’can dream nurtured THE GLEANER SHARES PHOTOGRAPHIC NUGGETS OF KAY OSBORNE, FAE ELLINGTON AND TOMMY COWAN

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S JAMAICANS jump the 50th and recommit themselves to the mission of securing the Jamaican dream for all, three of the country’s celebrated citizens have expressed the hope that the country will rise to achieve its full potential. Communications consultant and former general manager of Television Jamaica, Kay Osborne, is calling for the democratisation of the Jamaican economy. “For there to be progress and a realisation of the Jamaican dream, we have to democratise and restructure the economy to serve the interests of the country,” Osborne asserted during a Gleaner Editors’ Forum last month. “The Jamaican dream will vaporise if there is no reward ... . People must begin to feel that there is a link between the effort that they make and the outcome,” Osborne warned. “People must begin to feel that they are valuable,” she added. Veteran broadcaster Fae Ellington believes that had the country followed through on the vision of self-sufficiency in agriculture as promulgated by late Prime Minister Michael Manley, far more persons would be realising the Jamaica dream. Ellington, who also serves as acting chairman of the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission (JCDC), has claimed that many of the nation’s past leaders “came with some right

OSBORNE

FOREIGN EXCHANGE TRADING SUMMARY Trade Date: Friday, August 3, 2012

PURCHASES: Currency USD CAN GBP Other Total

Volume 36,903,073.81 1,389,661.04 2,099,241.34

Weighted average rate

USD value 36,903,073.81 1,367,316.58 3,251,352.38 1,410,494.75 42,932,237.52

SALES: Currency USD CAN GBP Other Total

Volume 38,393,271.02 899,524.99 1,312,155.70

89.1028 87.6701 138.0045

Weighted average rate

USD value 38,393,271.02 897,508.53 2,050,239.25 1,135,216.84 42,476,235.64

89.6886 89.4875 140.1381

PURCHASE RATE: Currency

Highest

Lowest

USD CAN GBP

89.9500 89.8000 140.2000

74.0600 72.4600 113.4600

Highest

Lowest

SALES RATE: Currency USD CAN GBP

93.2400 91.6600 143.5300

10-DAY MOVING AVERAGE RATE: Currency Purchase USD CAN GBP

89.0600 87.3800 137.9769

75.9100 87.0000 136.4500

Sales 89.6246 89.1183 139.8391

The above-mentioned WEIGHTED AVERAGE SPOT SALES RATES will be applicable for CUSTOMS and G.C.T. purposes from August 4, 2012 to August 7, 2012. The spot transactions of Authorised Foreign Exchange Dealers and Cambios are reported above.

PLEASE SEE DREAM, C8

Osborne, seen here as the winner of the Miss Jamaica Nation contest 1967. The competition was organised by the Marcus Garvey’s Pan African Movement to allow black Jamaicans to represent their country during Independence celebrations in Africa.


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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

DREAM CONTINUED FROM C7 thinking at the right time”, but added that the divisiveness which existed in politics thwarted most of the efforts to move the country forward and enable most Jamaicans to realise the dream. “We went on a path where, if we had followed and understood and weren’t playing tribal politics where feeding ourselves is concerned, we would have been in a much better position now,” Ellington said. “It was obvious, anybody who lives in the world knows that it is best if you can feed yourself either in your home, in a community or as a nation and Michael Manley had the temerity to come and tell this nation and the world that that is what we need to do and people nearly hang him for it ... we beat up on him.” Jamaica’s food import bill jumped by US$100 million last year to a US$930 million or approximately J$81 billion. In the meantime, Tommy

Cowan, a prominent gospel music producer and promoter, believes the Jamaican dream is unclear and so is lost on many. “When I think of a dream, I think within the scope of a vision ...,” said Cowan. “But, on a whole, if you go out and say to the people of Jamaica ‘what is the Jamaican dream?’, they don’t know.” The gospel music producer and promoter, while pointing to the absence of a clear vision, acknowledged that Jamaica as a nation has made significant strides since becoming politically independent 50 years ago and that many people have progressed in pursuit of their dreams. “In this country, I find that we could become anything ...,” he said. But he is firm on the view that our political leaders have a duty to articulate the Jamaican dream to the populace. “I think it is the responsibility of both political parties or leaders. I don’t think you can go from bottom up. It has to come from top down ...,” Cowan insisted.

In this 1962 photo, Fae Ellington, who had just arrived in Kingston from Smithville, Clarendon, strikes a pose in her Harbour View Primary uniform.

Tommy Cowan at age 7.

The Jamaicans, which was formed in 1962, includes (from left) Tommy Cowan, Martin Williams and Norris Weir.


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THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SECTION D

Entertainment INSIDE >> C O M I C S | H O R O S C O P E | C L A S S I F I E D S

5-0

Dreaming of the big

FILE

The commander of the Caribbean Area and members of the Staff and Services of the Headquarters Caribbean Area saluting the Union Jack as it was slowly lowered for the last time at the flagstaff at Up Park Camp in July 1962 to mark the disbandment of the British Military Headquarters in Jamaica after 307 years.

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HEN THE sounds of ska filled the air in 1962 there was a dream for Jamaica’s music industry. When Rex Nettleford twirled on stage in a very Jamaican way for the National Dance Theatre Company (NDTC), there was a dream for the arts and for culture. When Barbara Gloudon wrote about the great literary minds of the time, there was dream in that ink. What was it? Fast-track 50 years later. Jamaican popular music has made its mark on the world stage, though many say it is now dying a slow, painful death. The NDTC is 50 years strong with a body of work internationally renowned. Jamaica’s theatre has made massive leaps, even making small inroads into into the lucrative film industry. Many world-renowned artists, artistes and the like have called Jamaica the place of their birth, but have we achieved our dreams in the areas of art, music, dance, theatre, culture? Are we where we want to be? That is a question The Gleaner put to some of the foremost thinkers in the area of culture and entertainment and, I daresay, the answer has proven much harder to come by than you would at first imagine.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

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CULTURAL MODELS FROM COMMUNITY AND SCHOOL NEED TO BE REPLICATED

Alpha, Tivoli provide blueprint Davina Henry Staff Reporter

A

FTER 50 years of producing remarkable sounds, dancehall has risen to the fore as the popular music of the day. What that has meant is that many of our popular artistes never learnt the finer elements of music. There might not be any who

have learnt to read music, and still not any who play instruments. But more than that, there is the problem of having persons who have to choose as early as 15 to go with music or nothing else. “Can you imagine if somebody with the talent of Vybz Kartel didn’t have to make that choice?” asked Professor Carolyn Cooper during a recently held Gleaner Editors’ Forum.

RUDOLPH BROWN/PHOTOGRAPHER

Carolyn Cooper makes a point during a Gleaner Editors’ Forum at the company’s North Street, Kingston, offices recently. Listening attentively is Barbara Gloudon. Cooper was pointing out to a room full of cultural aficionados at The Gleaner’s North Street headquarters that one of the problems of producing artistes and artists at a high level is the fact that there aren’t many legitimate places for them to hone their talent at a young age. “We do not have to reinvent the wheel,” opined Herbie Miller, director/curator of the Jamaica Music Museum. Miller agreed with Cooper, but thought the model for producing such spaces was already present. “Put an Alpha Boys’ [School] in every parish,” Miller told the room. If Jamaica’s music history is looked at over the last 50 years, Miller must have a point. There can be no doubt about the contribution Alpha Boys’ has made over the last five decades, having produced many of the country’s great musicians in a great many genres. There was also consensus among members of the forum that many of

the nation’s children are not being properly exposed to the history of Jamaica’s culture, leaving the future of that culture in limbo. Outside of Alpha Boys’, Miller also lauded St Annie’s – a school known for producing great musicians – and the Tivoli community cultural project model for the work those institutions had carried out and the successes they achieved.

HOME FOR WAYWARD BOYS Alpha Boys’ School was founded in the 1880s as a home for wayward boys, providing them with an education and practical training in various vocations, music being the most prominent. The music programme at the school matured and gained unique stature during the jazz era of the 1940s and ’50s. This period saw the training of the majority of Jamaica’s top hornsmen, many of whom would go on to be instrumental in the development of

the island’s first indigenous pop music: ska. Alpha graduates went on to feature prominently in the emerging musical styles of rock steady and then reggae. “While music might be the thing we look at Alpha and recognise it for, everybody that leaves Alpha knows something other than music, They know everything that they can make a living off,” Miller said. Journalist Barbara Gloudon stated that Alpha Boys’ School had produced not just good musicians, but some of the most exemplary gentlemen across the face of the earth. Alpha Boys’ School has produced some of music’s top performers, including Oscar Clarke, a trumpeter who toured with Louis Armstrong’s orchestra; Tommy McCook, a saxophonist of Skatalite fame and a leading name in reggae; and Don Drummond, the world-renowned trombonist who gave to Jamaica Eastern Standard Time, Reload, Occupation and many others.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

D3

Don’t forget the last 50 years CULTURE EXPERTS SEEK TO KEEP HISTORY ALIVE Sadeke Brooks Staff Reporter

CONTRIBUTED

Marlon Simms in Keith Fagan’s ‘Intransit’.

After 50 years of Independence, nobody dances EDNA MANLEY COLLEGE STRUGGLES FOR PUPILS TO CARRY ON TRADITIONS Curtis Campbell Gleaner Writer

T

HE EDNA Manley College of The Visual and Performing Arts has a school of dance. That school is finds itself scraping to find dancers to fill its matriculation quota. According to international dancer and lecturer at Edna Manley, Marlon Simms, dancing is not seen as a traditional profession in Jamaica, even after 50 years of contributions from entities like The National Dance Theatre Company. “Dancing is not a traditional career and it does not have a strong offering in the secondaryschool system where children can be exposed to dancing and the different career opportunities available,” Simms said. He said that Edna Manley College has numerous programmes geared at educating and training dancers in an effort to develop their craft and make them more marketable.

RANGE OF PROGRAMMES “We have several programmes, ranging from associate degrees, bachelor’s [degrees], and even a studio certificate. So you don’t have to have five CXCs, you can still get through. These programmes were designed to meet the needs of the students,” Simms said. “We want to train them with the relevant education to become performers, choreographers and educators. There are different arms of dancing, so if you don’t

wish to dance, there is the option of producing dance events. Simms believes one of the problems faced by Edna Manley College – as it relates to getting better matriculation rates – is the fact that the cost of education can be very expensive. He also pointed out that the school provides scholarships which students can apply for. “The price is on par with other universities, but there are organisations that provide funding like the Students’ Loan Bureau. We have a payment plan as well as scholarships which are sponsored by private-sector organisations,” he said.

EARLY INTRODUCTION The lecturer believes improvement is possible, but that the interest of potential dancers must be piqued from the secondary-school level. “The secondary schools don’t provide children enough information about careers. They have a CXC course that is offered, but other things should be considered – like proper facilities and a dance teacher,” he said. Simms also advised that persons who want to become professional dancers should make that decision early, citing that the degree programme can take as long as four years, and some students tend to quit before the completion. Training can be very vigorous, Simms explained. He also revealed that the Edna Manley College has embarked PLEASE SEE DANCES, D11

THE RICH traditions that found ways to play themselves out in our various forms of entertainment are slowly going missing. This according to a group of industry insiders who gathered for a Gleaner Editors’ Forum recently. Looking at the existence of a ‘Jamaican dream’, the group noted that Jamaican traditions are being lost. First to address the issue was chairman of the Little Theatre Movement, Barbara Gloudon. “As the people’s ancestral wisdom die out, the memory is dying out,” she said, noting that there is a need to set up research and resource centres so that Jamaica’s history and culture can be preserved. Adding to the point, former Minister of Sports, Youth and Culture Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange pointed to the Tivoli Community Cultural Programme, a movement she was a part of decades ago, which she says could be replicated in the 800 communities across Jamaica. Luckily, she said, “The schools over the years have been the heart and soul of the festival movement and the Festival of the Arts that is done by the JCDC (Jamaica

RUDOLPH BROWN/ PHOTOGRAPHER

Barbara Gloudon (left) makes a point during a recent Gleaner Editors’ Forum. At right is former Culture Minister Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange.

Cultural Development Commission). If it wasn’t for the schools it would die because they (youth) are not doing the community cultural programmes.”

MIXING OLD AND NEW While there is a need to preserve culture, university lecturer Professor Carolyn Cooper says there is also a need to mix traditional culture with what is new. “One of the spaces for the traditional forms is in the formal

curriculum, where students are taught the history of the Jamaican dance and theatre. Once the children learn that, they have the tools to innovate on tradition and incorporate it into the modern stuff,” she said. Dr Clinton Hutton, a lecturer in political philosophy and culture at the University of the West Indies, Mona, supported Cooper’s point. “I think the traditions and rituals of traditions are exceedingly important,” he said, noting that the

basis of jazz, R&B and soul are rooted in the traditions of the black church. Therefore, he said, young people should be taught the history so they can have a greater appreciation for the culture and our forebearers. Sadly, he said, the country has not produced enough textbooks that look at the different areas of culture. “Yet, it is proven that it is in the cultural realm that we have had the greatest success in the world,” Hutton said.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

D4

BEETLE BAILEY ®

ANDY CAPP ®

PEANUTS ®

REX MORGAN ®

BY DEAN YOUNG AND DENIS LEBRUN

DUSTIN ®

BY MORT WALKER

TIGER ®

BY REG SMYTHE

HI AND LOIS ®

BY KELLY AND PARKER

BORN LOSER ®

BY SCHULZ

BY WOODY WILSON & GRAHAM NOLAN

BY BUD BLAKE

BY ART & CHIP SANSOM

JUDGE PARKER ®

BY GREG AND MORT WALKER AND CHANCE BROWN

DAILY CROSSWORD

BY WOODY WILSON & HAROLD LEDOUX

QUICK CROSSWORD Across

Down

1 Mouldiness (4) 4 Burnt remains (5) 8 Testimony (8) 9 Fever (4) 10 Aspersion (4) 11 Height (8) 12 Cared for (6) 14 Adage (6) 16 Nonsense (8) 19 Compassion (4) 20 Threesome (4) 21 Dislike (8) 22 Scare (5) 23 Ripped (4)

2 Beneath (5) 3 Drinking vessel (7) 4 Vigilant (5) 5 Hale (7) 6 Valid (5) 7 Develop (6) 13 Certificate (7) 14 Wise (7) 15 Idea (6) 17 Grub (5) 18 Kingdom (5) 19 Problem (5)

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CRYPTIC CROSSWORD: NO. 26,871 1

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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

YHLYS ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

KAEWA

LINTSP

RAMETK Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

A: Saturday’s

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Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

BLONDIE ®

(Answers tomorrow) BOGUS DEFACE INFORM Jumbles: MUSHY Answer: He was this with his expensive fencing equipment — ON GUARD

25

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Across

Down

1 One’s fiancée proposed (8) 6 Unusually gifted young scholars may be told not to (6) 9 Detectives in US agency, retired but sharp (6) 10 How a bright idea may come to you? (2,1,5) 11 Beaten by heroic exploit in action (8) 12 Make merry, take in a show (6) 13 Not how other people would picture you? (4-8) 16 Foolishly remind fellow to be up to date (4-8) 19 Iron man? More deadly, Kipling said (6) 21 Give warning to number after earthquake (8) 23 Reckon the deceased’s property is about one thousand (8) 24 Agent gets upset with point in dispute (6) 25 Stroke a gander (6) 26 Much less neglect (3,5)

2 Did some stealing — arrested (6) 3 Bear has no right to invest (5) 4 Told he can get involved in Olympic event (9) 5 Forgot production lines (5,2) 6 Instinct for money in the market (5) 7 Pronounced to be released (9) 8 Enthusiastic, still supporting City (8) 13 Rescuing army? (9) 14 Old master takes class in new term (9) 15 Crossword addicts should be used to such a setback (8) 17 Porridge for a stable diet (7) 18 Grave-digger needs stone to be put in position about ten (6) 20 Dodge nowadays accepted by first wife (5) 22 A spirited harp-player (5)


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

HOROSCOPE

D5

CROSSDOUBT

THIS DAY IN OUR PAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Let the competition begin. You are ready for whatever comes your way and should engage in as much personal and professional interaction as possible. Challenge someone special and a stronger bond will develop. Love is in the stars.

The following events took place on August 6 in the years identified:

1965:

The Senate passes three bills sent up from the House of Representatives, amending the Income Tax Law in regards to additional company tax, amending the maintenance law to increase the amount payable to dependents and ensuring that the law in Jamaica, with regards to Kenya, should not be changed by reason of that country’s change from dominion to republic status.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Avoid being caught wasting time. You may not feel like engaging in certain responsibilities, but the sooner you put things behind you, the better off you’ll be. Don’t argue when all that’s required is taking care of business. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Check out what everyone else is giving before you promise to contribute. Keeping things equal will also help you avoid becoming disgruntled. Plan to socialise or get out and meet people who share your interests. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You will encounter creative opportunities if you participate. An unusual encounter will bring back memories you’ve been avoiding. Face your past so you can put your baggage behind you and move forward. Don’t be shy; say what you think.

How to play: Fill the grid so that every column, row, and 3x3 square includes all of the digits from one to nine.

LEO (July 23-Aug 22): Embrace change and try new things. Helping others or an organisation you believe in will lead to fabulous connections that can help you make life-altering decisions. Honest communication will resolve issues that have held you back in the past. VIRGO (Aug 23-Sept 22): You’ll get far more accomplished if you work alone and at your own speed. An idea you have or a service you can provide has potential to become a prosperous venture. Don’t let emotional problems rob you of a chance to excel. LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22): An opportunity to gather valuable information and support is apparent, but you must do the legwork. Don’t let laziness be your downfall. Travel will lead to advancement and give you a different perspective on moving forward. SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov 21): You must be careful whom you trust, especially with secret information or financial dealings. Use your imagination, but don’t overspend. Stick to what you know. This is not the time to explore new avenues; tying up loose ends is what’s needed.

Level: Moderate Target: 22 mins For more information on how to play Sudoku, log on to www.sudoku.com. + $ ' <

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22-Dec 21): Push your way into the future with gusto. Utilise your skills to improve your lifestyle and financial future. Put more emphasis on money and forming partnerships. Consider services with a growing demand. CAPRICORN (Dec 22-Jan 19): Stay away from anyone who wants to burden you with responsibilities. Protect what you have and move forward in a practical manner with no regrets. Avoid involvement in an unorthodox lifestyle associated with emotional manipulation or guilt. AQUARIUS (Jan 20-Feb 18): Look at your options. Strive to get out of repetitious situations that lead nowhere. A good budget along with your skills and knowledge will lead to a better future. An agreement with someone you love can help your situation. PISCES (Feb 19-March 20): Watch who you choose to be involved with. Personal problems will develop if you rely on someone to help out. A hobby will ease your stress and can lead to more income. Use intuition when dealing with a relationship.

Phantom ® by depaul & ryan

1968:

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ACROSS: 8, Cla-I-me-d 9, Catches on 13, Aught 5 & 5 ; , 7 0 : (ought) 14, Thin-G 15, Ring-let 16, Concern 17, 2 3 ( 5 $ 7 , 2 1 & 2 ' ( 6 Th-re-e 18, Prior 20, To-p(I)es 22, B-and-it 23, 3 1 < % * 1 / + Posted 25, Ran-sack 27, Fortune 30, Put out 31, 2 8 7 ) , ( / ' ) , ( 6 7 $ 1 1 ( / & 0 Vi’s-age 32, Disc(us)s 35, Sheer 36, A-head 37, , 0 3 8 * 1 1 ( 2 3 / $ 6 0 Has-been 39, Opt-I-mum 41, Lo-tto 42, Leave & $ 0 6 $ / 1 ( 43, Get-a-t-able 44, Ag-it-ate. DOWN: 1, Fla-go-n & / 2 $ . $ 1 ' ' $ * * ( 5 ( 1 ' 8 7 5 + 7 2, List-less 3, Getting back 4, Sang-froid 5, S-C, 0 3 5 ( & , 6 ( : 2 5 6 7 arlet 6, B-ean spro-ut 7, Fool 10, MaS-cot 11, D0 , 6 7 / $ , istant 12, S-to-red 19, Int-ends 21, Prat-t-L-e 24, ( < ( ' * 5 2 8 6 ( 0 2 2 5 Gone through 26, Square meal 28, Tiger lily 29, Man-date 30, Pi-stol 32, Desolate 33, Son-net 34, Oatmeal 38, Ex-acts 40, Thee. '

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EASY PUZZLE SOLUTION ACROSS: 8, Sofa bed 9, Faultless 13, Being 14, Rumba 15, Venture 16, Samurai 17, Excel 18, Maori 20, Dingo 22, Nickel 23, Online 25, Surmise 27, Literal 30, Shrink 31, Shield 32, Alias 35, Filth 36, Right 37, Humdrum 39, Triumph 41, Balsa 42, Uncle 43, Redundant 44, Severed. DOWN: 1, Podium 2, Kangaroo 3, Bear witness 4, Vacancies 5, A-levels 6, Blancmange 7, Esau 10, Abused 11, Impeach 12, Revile 19, Origami 21, Neutral 24, Windcheater 26, Mint humbug 28, Thighbone 29, Reptile 30, Safety 32, Armoured 33, Summer 34, Orchids 38, Riches 40, Item.

A new price for the transfer of aluminum has been negotiated between the income Tax Department and Alcan Jamaica and the price is embodied in an agreement signed by the commissioner of income tax, Mr A.F. Smith and Mr A Barker, managing director of Alcan, in the office of the Minister of Finance and Planning Edward Seaga. The new agreement, Mr Seaga says, will result in an increase in the amount of revenue collection through income tax over the amount previously paid by Alcan Jamaica Ltd under the old price arrangement.

1969:

A bill amending the Income Tax Law is passed by the House of Representatives after the report of a select committee is adopted and 13 amendments to the bill approved. There is no debate on the measure as only government members are present, the opposition having remain out after walking out earlier at the super time suspension of the sitting.

1970:

Minister of Public Utilities and

Housing, the Hon Wilton Hill, leaves Jamaica by air for the United Kingdom on a special assignment for the prime minister, Mr Hugh Shearer. Accompanied by his acting permanent secretary, Mr Harley Bent, Mr Hill was seen off at the Palisadoes International Airport by the British high commissioner in Jamaica, Mr Nick Lamour, and officials of the ministry.

1972:

Michael Manley and his wife attends the Independence anniversary communion service at the Coke Memorial Methodist Church in Kingston. Also present were Mr Florizel Glasspole and Mrs Glasspole. Mr Manley read the first lesson, taken from Ezekiel and Mr Glasspole read the second lesson, taken from Romans.

1981:

Air Jamaica president Tony Hylton warns that unless industrial peace can be maintained, all efforts to move the economy from its negative growth will be futile. Mr Hylton is addressing Rotarians at a luncheon held at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston and states that industrial peace is a prerequisite to Jamaica’s economic revival. He also stresses that notwithstanding all the grants, loans and investments, if a sustained period of industrial peace is not experienced the country will still be in trouble. – The Gleaner Archives

Today’s Gem “When time get ‘hard An’ me get desperate, Remine me Lawd!” From: ‘Remine Me Lawd!’ – Strata

ISAAC ASIMOV’S SUPER QUIZ Take this Super Quiz to a PhD. Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the PhD Level.

SUBJECT: CLUBS AND SOCIETIES Identify the club or society. (e.g., Its members are known as ‘Bonesmen’. Answer: Skull and Bones society.)

FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. The square and compass is the group’s single most identifiable symbol. 2. Its name refers to a purported conspiratorial group alleged to mastermind events. 3. Members adopted white costumes: robes, masks and conical hats.

GRADUATE LEVEL 4. Its members have successfully bailed out of a disabled aircraft. 5. The America’s Cup race played a central role in the history of the club. 6. The most influential club in the development of the French Revolution.

PHD LEVEL 7. A gentlemen’s club on the south side of Pall Mall, in central London. 8. More formally known as the Order of the Friars of St Francis of Wycombe. 9. Its name is from a hotel in Holland where the first meeting took place in 1954.

ANSWERS FOR SAT, AUG 4: 1. Persian Gulf 2. Bay of Bengal 3. Hudson Bay 4. Gulf of Carpentaria 5. Gulf of St Lawrence 6. Chesapeake Bay 7. Gulf of Tonkin 8. Great Australian Bight 9. Gulf of Suez 10. San Francisco Bay 11. James Bay 12. Gulf of Aqaba 13. Gulf of Mexico 14. Bay of Fundy 15. Gulf of Aden.

SCORING: 24 to 30 points – congratulations, doctor; 18 to 23 points – honours graduate; 13 to 17 points – you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 5 to 12 points – you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 4 points – enrol in remedial courses immediately; 0 points – who reads the questions to you?


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

D6

STORY O F T H E S O N G:

Lords of Federation, Independence TRINIDADIANS RECORD JA’S FEELINGS BEFORE, AFTER AUGUST 6, 1962 atmosphere and the campaigning around the issue, ahead of the national referendum in September 1961.

Mel Cooke Gleaner Writer

I

N THE land that has produced five popular music forms which have made an impact worldwide – ska, rocksteady, reggae, dub and dancehall the irony of a calypso song being immensely popular in the year of Jamaica’s independence has long been noted. In addition to that, however, is the situation of Jamaica’s feelings about Federation – the political union of Caribbean nations that failed to survive in the face of Jamaica’s nationalism – as well as Independence being captured in song by two Trinidadians. The Independence song was Independent Jamaica by Lord Creator, while Lord Laro delivered Referendum Calypso. Kenneth ‘Lord Laro’ Lara – who described himself as a “strong federationist” in a telephone conversation with David Brown as Brown did a Reggae Month 2012 lecture at the Institute of Jamaica – wrote about the referendum which ended Jamaica’s involvement in Federation. He starts the song with the general

For the referendum Is the talk all around Anywhere you pass You could hear a loudspeaker blast Busta say Federation aint good for the country But I getting a different view when I listen Norman Manley The chorus is strictly about the impasse between the two political leaders, Bustamante heading up the Jamaica Labour Party’s (JLP) charge against federation and Manley on the People’s National Party (PNP) championing the cause of Caribbean unity. If the amount of time given to each viewpoint in the chorus is any indication of Laro’s preferences, then his stance on federation was clear a long time ago. Laro sang: Busta bawling no, no, no, Federation no But when I listen Manley he aint shouting so All he supporters with Federation sig on they chest And if you hear them yes, yes, yes, Federation yes

Lord Creator

Laro goes on to describe the atmosphere at a “Busta meeting”, where “Bongo drum was playing/then he started speaking/if Jamaica join the Federation/all the small islanders will come and pluck up the land”. Ironically, despite its larger size Jamaica has ended up far down the economic ladder in the Caribbean. On the pro-Federation side, “Manley say is our last chance, Jamaicans use all your brain/Cause this opportunity might never come back again”. The chance at unity went and, by regional referendum, Federation ambitions were officially dashed in January 1962. In that year another Trinidadian, Kentrick ‘Lord Creator’ Patrick, came to Jamaica. He did not know much about Jamaican politics but, as published in a Gleaner story on June 24, 2012, he was asked by Vincent ‘Randy’ Chin (patriarch of VP Records) to do a song about Jamaica’s independence. A Gleaner article helped immensely for Creator’s half-hour of writing.

Sir Alexander Bustamante (left) with Norman Manley.

PHOTOS BY RUDOLPH BROWN/ PHOTOGRAPHER

Henry ... Where is the movement to take the arts to the people again, to make it live again?

FILE

Lord Laro performs at ‘Tribute To The Greats’, held at Curphey Place, Swallowfield Road, in July 2006. The result was Independent Jamaica, Creator speaking to the leaders’ visit to England and a synopsis of what took place there. He states his position as an observer from the outset, singing:

Also me and you Independence is great for the whol population Including your children too.” He moves into the first person to sing:

Jamaica has got their independence and everyone is happy So now I will tell the story and please listen carefully With the matter of the referendum settled, Laro sang: “Now independence is good for the young and the old

So I believe that if we try our best It will be a great success So let us live in unity ... . Whether or not that unity has been achieved, despite the current outpouring of black, green and gold pride concurrent with the Olympics, remains to be seen.

Disparate J’can dreams CULTURE EXPERTS OBSERVE LACK OF COHESIVE GOAL AT JAMAICA’S landmark 50th anniversary as an independent nation, members of a panel of cultural experts and analysts assembled recently by The Gleaner found consensus on the lack of a cohesive concept of a Jamaican dream. With this state, Barbara Gloudon, stalwart of the Little Theatre Movement and veteran of print and broadcast journalism, observed the deflection of energy and lack of purpose. “A lot of what we are doing now is a cosmetic cover-up, but deep down it is not happening,” she said. Professor Carolyn Cooper of the University of the West Indies and Gleaner columnist pinpointed land ownership as a central aspect of the Jamaican dream. “We have dreams about material property. We want to step up inna life,” Cooper said. “To me, the house is a symbol of the Jamaican dream, to put a stamp on the world.” This comment comes in the context of a shortfall in middle income housing solutions, as recently reported in The Gleaner. Member of Parliament and Opposition Spokesperson on Culture Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange went back to her childhood in west Kingston – a major physical focal point in the development of Jamaican popular music – in presenting her view

Crawford ... I do not think as a society we have a dream that is sufficiently motivating that we have to act on it.” of the Jamaican dream. Grange described herself as a bridge, coming “from what was considered the worst part of Kingston, in front of Coronation Market”. Her grandmother lived in Chocomo Lawn, the dancehall central of the music movement and, Grange said, “I resented uptown. The intellectuals were studying us. We felt like guinea pigs”.

Having long moved from the observed to a shaper of Jamaican culture, Grange said, “I have a dream that I think should be the Jamaican dream. I want to see class is not an issue, colour is not an issue, politics is not an issue.” Dancer Kerry-Ann Henry of the National Dance Theatre Company turned to the younger generation in defining their aspirations from the perspective of involvement in the arts. “They want to see themselves ... They want to earn,” she said, noting that they also want to be credited for their contribution. However, she asked, “Where is the movement to take the arts to the people again, to make it live again?” And Damion Crawford, minister of state in the Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment, spoke somewhat to the lack of that impetus when he said that “a dream is a burning idea” that one has to act upon ... I do not think as a society we have a dream that is sufficiently motivating that we have to act on it.” Gloudon also had a snappy comment on news about rapper Snoop Dogg’s recently publicised documentary on Jamaican culture, and his move to release a reggae album under a new moniker. “The dog is not selling, is the lion,” Gloudon said. – Mel Cooke


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

RUDOLPH BROWN/PHOTOGRAPHER

Ibo Cooper (right), lecturer at Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts and head of the Jamaica Reggae Industry Association, speaks during a recent Gleaner Editors’ Forum at the company’s office. Listening is Damion Crawford, state minister in the Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment.

No place for politics at 50 Mel Cooke Gleaner Writer

O

N THE trailing edge of the tiff between the governing People’s National Party (PNP) and opposition Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) over the selection of an official song for the Jamaica 50 celebrations, politics came up for discussion at a Gleaner Editors’ Forum on culture. Minister of State in the Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment Damion Crawford and Opposition Spokesperson on Culture Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange were on opposite sides of the table, their physical positions not reflecting animosity in a friendly airing of views. And Grange observed, “I think it is most unfortunate when politics interferes with our culture.” And from her position as a former minister and also from her private-sector involvement in popular music production and management, she also stated: “Government, as a whole, is not interested in entertainment and culture.” However, Grange stated, “We are also fortunate that they are not. It is the individuals who are given the responsibility to have that non-partisan approach.”

“Don’t watch who is in power and who is not in power. Be true to yourself,” Grange advised. Still, Professor Carloyn Cooper was of the opinion that “we need to recognise Government does have a role to play.” She broached the possibility of a high school of the performing arts. Cooper used the example of the now-incarcerated Vybz Kartel, saying if there had been a studio at Calabar, he would not have had to miss school to go to a recording facility. In terms of funding, Grange said, “There was never enough money to do what was needed for culture. ... We can facilitate as government. We can take some of the Tourism Enhancement Fund money and do it.” But Jamaica Reggae Industry Association Chairman Ibo Cooper raised the issue of independence, asking, “Can we get the music to be less dependent on private sector and Government? There was a time, one artiste put on a show without a sponsor and make a profit. Now a bag a artistes need a sponsor. “The entertainment industry needs to examine itself,” Cooper said.

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D11

The Jamaican dream,

ECONOMICS DRIVEN long ‘drop pan’ line all in the effort to ‘step up inna life’. In a recent forum at The Gleaner, Professor Carolyn Cooper said the desire to be successful and in possession of something that one can say defines who they are has always been a part of the Jamaican dream. One such dream that she believes many Jamaicans share and is one of our entrenched cultural traditions is to own a house.

Hasani Walters Gleaner Writer

“ALL MANNER of things, hold tight/ An a want unuh shock out pon dis one yah/ ’Cause we rule, and everything come after.”

F

LOURGON’S WE Run Things holds much truth about what the Jamaican dream may be.

“We run things, things nuh run we/ Anything wi dun it haffi dun properly/ Hear mi now, We run things, things nuh run we/ Anything wi dun it haffi dun properly.”

DEFINING YOURSELF

The dream to be someone is very Jamaican, the dream to ‘run things’, the dream to ‘run mi own show’, the dream to ‘row mi owna boat’. Much like the American dream that sings of the opportunity for prosperity, success and

FLOURGON

COOPER upward social mobility through hard work, the Jamaican equivalent is, when put in simple terms, to ‘mek it’, becoming somebody the hard way or the easy way, it doesn’t really matter which. We go to school, ‘hustle’, or join the always

DANCES CONTINUED FROM D3

on campaigns to improve its reach to potential students. “We have performances at the school that we provide outside of the college via outreach programmes. We have a marketing department and a career day, when we invite the high schools to the college to talk

FILE

In this 1968 file photo, the Supreme Court is being beautified. That beautification project included a free-standing mural that is there today.

Losing art ARTISTS GO MISSING FROM JA’S HISTORY OVER THE years, there has been little impact made by the initiatives to expose the visual arts to the younger generation who have had no obvious access to them. This has resulted in efforts such as the the Institute of Jamaica and the Culture, Health, Arts, Sports and Education Fund (CHASE) partnering to launch Jamaica’s first virtual museum in June 2012. Hopefully, the tech-savvy youth of today’s Jamaica will access the arts this way. In a press release sent to The Gleaner around the time of the museum’s launch, information technology manager at the Institute of Jamaica, Tendi Henry, said that the museum “will provide an engaging application through which our youth can learn about their culture in a more stimulating and contemporary way”. Henry also made mention of one of the goals of the virtual museum. The idea, she explained, was to take Jamaican culture and heritage to the Jamaican people and the world in an engaging and attractive way, thus enticing the user to want to learn more about Jamaica, its national treasures and to visit the actual “brick and mortar” museums. Veteran journalist Barbara Gloudon addressed the topic of Jamaicans losing touch with their art

which that is the case today, an example of our failure,” she said. She pointed to one she could think of, in the form of a freestanding mural located on King Street commissioned by Edward Seaga. It is now run-down with faded colours due to a lack of maintenance. “I don’t think you could find three buildings that have any input anymore because we talk a lot about the success of the performing arts, but very little is talked about the visual arts because the visual arts have almost died,” said Gloudon.

WHY HAVE LIMITS?

RUDOLPH BROWN/PHOTOGRAPHER

Herbie Miller believes there needs to be more spaces for culture and music but believes the blueprint has already been laid. in a Gleaner Editors’ Forum recently. She added a bit of history to the mix. Gloudon said that in the days of Norman Manley’s and subsequent government administrations, an agreement was reached that all government buildings should have included some amount of art from Jamaican artists. “I cannot find two buildings in

She questioned whether we should limit the acceptance of what is Jamaican artistic expression to only people who are from Jamaica, as foreigners – as well as Jamaicans overseas – have done a lot to highlight the country on the international stage. The brilliance of Jamaican artists such as Ras Daniel, one of the most replicated Jamaican artists around the world, was also mentioned during the forum. Curator of the Jamaica Music Museum, Herbie Miller, supported Gloudon’s statements, saying that the impact that Jamaican artists have had is significant, pointing to Ebony Patterson, among others. – H.W.

“Yuh have to have a house spot. Yuh have to build a little house. And I think that could be taken as a metaphor for possession of land, ownership of something that you can say defines who you are,” Professor Cooper explained. “I think Jamaican people are very ambitious and we have dreams about material prosperity. We want to step up inna life. The only people who don’t want to step up inna life are those who get damaged somewhere along the way and lose ambition. To me the house is a symbol of the Jamaican desire to put a stamp on the landscape, to mek a mark in the world, and be able to mind your children,” said Cooper. Opposition spokesperson on culture, Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, also shared with the forum, stories from her life as a youth from the inner city. Grange spoke about her experiences at the then popular Chocomo Lawn dancehall, and the values she learnt that inspired her to want more. She wanted to be someone.

about programmes,” he said. The college has also partnered with ���Dancin’ Dynamites’ and has given scholarships to participants of the annual dancing competition. Simms also thinks parents should provide moral support for their children even when their career choice is not traditional. “Parents need to go through the orientation process as well because their children need their support. Every parent will have an

idea what they want their children to become and want a traditional role, but this is what your child wants to do so you have to listen and understand your children. The market is challenging and some parents are just not willing to let their children take that risk, but there are various jobs available in dancing. Many have come back to Edna Manley to teach – even the principal is a graduate of the college,” Simms said.


THE GLEANER, MONDAY, AUGUST 6, 2012 | SPECIAL INDEPENDENCE EDITION

D12

Above: From Nigeria to Jamaica husband and wife Lesley and Kuumba Aeesunloye enjoyed Dream Weekend’s Twisted Spiritz at Rainforest in Negril. Left: Hilary and her husband Romy Heaven have a good time in Twisted Spiritz, VIP Lounge on Friday.

PHOTOS BY SHEENA GAYLE

Friends party together in Negril, and this group out of Kingston, Jamaica, and New York love every moment of Twisted Spiritz.

Twisted Spiritz lives up to billing Sheena Gayle Gleaner Writer

WESTERN BUREAU: HE ENTERTAINMENT, decor, high-quality mixed drinks from Smirnoff liquors

T

and the food, meant Smirnoff Twisted Spiritz in Negril was more than just a party, it was an experience. The Smirnoff Dream Weekend event is among the signature events of the six-day party series and continues to offer memorable party

Annie Gordon (left) and Yanique White enjoyed the LIME VIP BlackBerry Jazz Booth at Smirnoff’s Twisted Spiritz Dream Weekend event on Friday in Negril. experiences in Negril each year, making it very popular amongst partygoers. Dubbed Jamaica’s number-one mixology event, Twisted Spiritz is famous for its premium and creative mixed drinks and innovations. The ambience for entertainment was palpable, the promoters intent to ensure partygoers were pleased was obvious. Three mega bars strategically located at accessible points at the venue allowed patrons unencumbered access. The Grace Cock Soup detox area gave persons an opportunity to taste some of Grace’s flavourful soups. Needless to say, it was visited regularly. The giant Smirnoff centrepiece was an interesting dancefloor concept, consensus coming from the number of persons who found it more interesting to use it.

LUXURY The VlPs at Twisted were in for some luxury with a private hasslefree bar stocked with premium liquor and an array of finger foods that enticed the palate. International disc jock Mix Master David from Atlanta was well received on the turntables. His set included quite a bit of Jamaican music, a move appreciated by his audience. Thrilling the capacity-filled venue was easy for Coppershot and renowned DJ Nicco from Kingston. They teased, mixed and had the crowd exhausted from dancing.


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D13

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D14

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Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Grieve For Me Author: Unknown

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grieve for me, for now I'm free; I'm following the path God laid for me. I took His hand when I heard Him call; I turned my back and left it all.

462 MOTOR CARS

1 0 0 SERVICES 155 PERSONAL SERVICES PROFESSIONAL MALES ONLY!!

6 0 0 LEGAL BMW 335i Convertible, 2008, LHD 3.0 Twin Turbo, Excellent Condition, $5.5 million. Inspect @ 20 South Avenue, Kingston 10. Call 906-6102-3, 997-3632

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BUSINESS/ FINANCE

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255 FINANCIAL LOANS

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LOANS FOR:

Medical expenses School fees Home repairs Motor vehicle repairs Emergencies Loans for any purpose * Conditions apply Call today for details

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2a Kensington Crescent, Kingston 5

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Corporation Limited

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AUTO PARTS FOR SALE/ WANTED

TOYOTA HIACE 1991. Price $300,000. Crashed Refrigerated Hiace for sale as is Negotiable, 3L engine, super custom. 457-8394

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Pamper yourselves today in a candle lit setting Mani, Pedi, Tweezing, Facial and Massages complimentary Coffee, Juice. Private & professional environment. Call: 385-4232

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462 MOTOR CARS FOR SALE

LEGAL 601 NOTICES

I could not stay another day, To laugh, to love, to work or play. Tasks left undone must stay that way; I found that place at the close of day. If my parting has left a void, then ďŹ ll it with remembered joy. A friendship shared, a laugh, a kiss; Ah yes, these things, I too, will miss. Be not burdened with times of sorrow; I wish you the sunshine of tomorrow. My life's been full, I savored much; Good friends, good times, a loved ones touch. Perhaps my time seemed all too brief; Don't lengthen it now with undue grief. Lift up your heart and share with me; God wanted me now, He set me free.

PNO. 2012P00033 ESTATE: Beatrice Williams LATE OF: Wakefield, Linstead, St. Catherine DECEASED INTESTATE APPLICATION FOR ADMINISTRATION HAS BEEN MADE BY Alfred Simeon Williams of 5 Olympic Way, Kingston 11, St. Andrew, son of the deceased whose address for service is in c/o Lyncook, Golding & Co., Attorneys- at- Law of 18A Duke Street, Kingston, Attorneys-at-Law for and on behalf of the applicant herein. PERSONALTY: Nil REALTY: $1,000,000.00 GROSS ANNUAL VALUE OF REALTY: $100,000.00 APPLICATION FILED: January 10, 2011 M. Kelly (DEP.) REGISTRAR 29th June 2012

673 GENERAL

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462 MOTOR CARS FOR SALE

BMW Mini Coop 2005, Grey, $2.2 million. Inspect @ 20 South Avenue, Kingston 10. Call 906-6102-3, 997-3632

ARTICLES FOR SALE

Toyota Crown Royal Saloon 1990, 3.0 Litre $350,000.00. Inspect @ 20 South Avenue, Kingston 10. Call 906-6102-3, 997-3632

Vulcan Deep Fryer New For Sale $120,000 neg. Call: 454-4923

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=SYVSTTSVXYRMX]XS QIIXTISTPI JVSQEPP SZIV2SVXL%QIVMGE ERHXLI9RMXIH /MRKHSQ

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Toyota Highlander 2012 Limited 4x4, Leather Interior, Sunroof, Reverse Camera, $6.4 million. Inspect @20 South Avenue, Kingston 10. 906-6102 / 997-3632 Toyota Landcruiser 2006, White, V8 engine, $5.3million. Inspect @ 20 South Avenue, Kingston 10. Call 906-6102-3, 997-3632 Toyota Prado 2006, Excellent Condition, 125km, $2.8 Million. Inspect @ 20 South Avenue, Kingston 10. Call 906-6102-3, 997-3632

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This is to notify the public that I Laurel Ewart am no longer cohabiting with my wife Cherry Ewart as man and wife by reason of unresolved matrimonial differences, and I do not intend to accept responsibility for any debts she may hereafter incur. Laurel Ewart Auldays Dist, Byfileds, Westmoreland

H*OHDQHU 7KH 5HDOO(VWDWH &ODVVLILHGV  /22.,1* *)25 $-2%" &+(&.7+(67$5 &/$66,),('6 72'$<

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IN LOVING MEMORY OF

MOTHER

BROTHER

TO A SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS!

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Gloria Millicent Buchanan (nee Whittaker) Nov. 11, 1928 - Aug. 5, 2008

Gone is the face we loved so dear Silent is the voice we loved to hear Too far away for sight or speech Your memories will live on in our hearts forever.

KINGSTON

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Shop #4 & 5, Manor Park Plaza Tel: 925-4695

104 Hagley Park Road, Kingston 10 Tel: 923-0833, 923-0631

THE GLEANERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ADVERTISING SALES AGENT

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Owen Lionel Whittaker Feb. 16, 1947 - July 26, 2003

You left us suddenly without saying goodbye And although we can no longer see your face or hear your voice We will keep the memories of you in our hearts forever.

Sadly missed by: Children Kirk, Junior, Michael & Michelle, siblings Phillip, Sylvia, Phyllis & Donald, grandchildren, nieces, nephews and other relatives.


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