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The Yellow Papers Series

The New State of America What the 2010 Census Will Reveal About the Evolution of the United States of America


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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It’s hard to escape news about the 2010 Census. It’s hard to escape news about the 2010 Census. Besides multiple mailings to every household in the country, the government has also launched a major advertising campaign with a budget of over one hundred million dollars.

But what does the 2010 Census mean to the advertising and marketing community? •

What can we expect to learn from the 2010 Census?

What will it reveal about the composition of the United States and Hispanics, the fastest growing minority group?

How can we use this data to improve our marketing efforts?

Isaac Mizrahi is SVP, Managing Director at Alma DDB, the network’s U.S. Hispanic arm. He is an an award-winning international marketing executive with more than 18 years of experience in Asia, Europe, Latin America, U.S. General and Multicultural Marketing. In 2006, Isaac was recognized as Hispanic Marketer of the Year by the Ad Week’s “Marketing y Medios” as a result of his work heading Sprint-Nextel’s Multicultural Marketing efforts with successful integrated marketing programs.

Howard T. Konig is a twenty plus year veteran of the advertising/ marketing business. He has held positions in media and research at DDB, Doner and J. Walter Thompson. He has been a featured speaker at conferences and colleges and published articles on Television. Originally from Baltimore, Howard began his career in Radio.


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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The role of the census has expanded beyond anything the founders could have imagined. It began in the late 18th century. The United States was looking for a new way to balance the need for a strong federal ruling body with the rights of the individual states. The solution was a system that would represent the actual population distribution of the people in the House of Representatives and the voice of each individual State in the Senate. In order to fulfill this promise, the founders needed a way to count the population. The answer was in Article I, Section II of the US Constitution.

[

]

Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers... The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct.

The U.S. Census counts every resident in the United States, and is required by the Constitution to take place every 10 years. The first enumeration (counting) occurred in August of 1790 under the direction of Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson with the help of an estimated 650 enumerators (census employees). There were 6 questions and it was administered at a cost of $44,000. The US population at the time was only 3.9 million. Flash forward to the 21st century. The census bureau is now an official government agency operating under the auspices of the Department of Commerce. The last census (2000) cost an estimated $6.5 billion dollars and involved over half a million enumerators. The role of the census has expanded beyond anything the founders could have imagined. Besides its official role to define legislature districts, school assignment areas and other important functional areas of government, the census has also become one of the most critical tools in marketing.


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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The 2000 Census

4%

13%

12% 2%

Hispanic Black Other White Asian/PI

69%

The last census was conducted ten years ago. 9/11 and the horrors of the terrorist attack were still over a year away and the Department of Homeland Security did not exist. The U.S. population was 281.4 million, a 13% increase over the prior 1990 decennial census. The traditional white population accounted for 69% of the total. At 35 million and 13% of the population, Hispanics were the largest minority group. The dominance of Hispanics was a new phenomenon in the 2000 census. Just 10 years prior in the 1990 census, the story was somewhat different. 29 million African Americans represented 12% of the 249 million U.S. population while the 22 million Hispanics accounted for only 9%.

The dominance of Hispanics was a new phenomenon in the 2000 census.


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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The Last Ten Years While the full national census is only conducted every ten years, marketers have been using a number of sources over the past decade to project growth. Most notable of these is the Census Bureau’s own American Community Survey (ACS). The ACS is conducted every year based on a rolling sample of approximately 2.5 percent of the population. It includes all the questions in the decennial census as well as a wide range of other questions covering income, education, housing, jobs, and more.

Traditionally, the type of information now included in the ACS was a subset set of the regular census and was commonly referred to as the “long” form. In 2000, there were two census forms: a short one containing 7 questions and the long one with 52 questions. Starting in 2010, the decennial census itself will only consist of a single 10 question form. (The annual ACS will still be conducted separate from the mainstream census.)

Other key sources of information are the CDC (birth data) and the Department of Homeland Security (immigration data). Based on all of these sources, there is already a great deal of information regarding the expected growth of Hispanics. First of all, Hispanics are younger than the population as a whole. Already in 2000, an overwhelming majority of Hispanics were under the age of 35 versus only half of the total population. Only 5% of Hispanics were over 65 versus 12% of the US.

2000 Census Age Distribution 67%

Hispanics Total Pop.

50%

33% 50%

Age <35

Age 35+

Another key factor is birth rate. Hispanics have larger families and are more likely to have children. In 2005, the CDC reported that close to one in 4 births were to a Hispanic mother. This is significant considering Hispanics themselves only represented 15% of the population at the time. Immigration is a further mitigating factor. 34% (3.5 million) of foreigners who became legal permanent residents (LPR) from 2000-2009 were Hispanic. Additionally, the 2008 ACS reveals that almost half of the foreign born population in the US is Hispanic.

2005 CDC Birth Data

24%

Hispanic Non-Hispanics

76%


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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The 2010 Census Based on the latest estimates, projections place the US population at 310 million in 2010, a 10% increase over 2000. Hispanics are anticipated to have grown by 41% versus 2000, a greater rate than any other minority group. At 50 million, the Hispanics will be firmly established as the largest minority group in the United States. Comparatively, there will be 30% more Hispanics than African Americans, the second largest minority group. [At 11% growth, the 38 million African American minority group is holding its own at 12% of the US population - the same percentage as in the 2000 census. While this groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth is ahead of the overall population, it does not compare with the much higher growth rate of Hispanics and Asians.]

Population Growth: 2010 Population vs. 2000 Census

10%

Total US

41%

Hispanic White Black

4% 11% 38%

Asian/PI

The non-Hispanic White population is still projected to be the largest group at 65%, however, this majority is shrinking with only a 4% growth in the past ten years. In 2010, it is projected that approximately one in three people in the United States will belong to a minority group. Barely twenty years ago (as reflected in the 1990 census), Whites represented 76% of the population and less than one in four people were in a minority group.

2010 Projections: Population Size / Share of the Population

202mm 50mm

65%

16%

Hispanic

White

38mm

12%

14mm

Black

Asian/PI

6mm

Other


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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Hispanics in 2010 One key factor that has not changed much in the past ten years is that Hispanics continue to be a younger group than the population at large. The Hispanic population has aged slightly since 2000 (with 62% projected to be under the age of 35 versus 67% in 2000). However, one third of the Hispanic population will still be under the age of 18 and only 6% over the age of 65.

Age Distribution: Hispanics vs. Total Population 33% 24% 10%

<18

11%

13%

18-24

18%

15%

25-34

15%

15%

35-44

Total US

11%

45-54

11%

13% 6%

6%

55-64

65+

Hispanic

At 69%, Mexicans will represent an even greater share of the Hispanic population in 2010 than in 2000. A number of contributing factors are immigration and natural growth. 17% of new legal permanent residents (LPR) in the last ten years were Mexican. This is almost one half of all the new Hispanic LPRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Additionally, Mexicans have an even higher birth rate than the already high Hispanic rate of 23.1 births per every 1000 women 15-44. According to the CDC in 2005, the 24.7 Mexican birth rate is almost double the average of 14.0 for the United States. Comparatively, the birth rate for Puerto Ricans is 17.2 and 10.2 for Cubans.

Hispanic Ancestry: 2010 Projection vs. 2000 Census 69% 58%

28% 18% 4%

10%

4% Cuban

Mexican 2000

9%

Puerto Rican 2010

Other


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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Top Hispanic Markets Los Angeles is projected to once again be the largest Hispanic market in 2010. The 8 million Hispanic residents of this market (DMA) also represent almost half (45%) of the total Los Angeles population. Although the top ten Hispanic markets in 2010 will be the same as in 2000, the order of the markets has changed. Houston and Chicago are now larger Hispanic markets than Miami. Dallas and Phoenix have also moved up and are now larger than San Francisco and San Antonio, respectively. The aforementioned market ranking is only one example of how the Hispanic market group continues to move into new parts of the country. While the top 10 markets account for just over 50% of Hispanics, the other half is spread throughout the US. In 2010, there will be 64 markets with Hispanic populations of one hundred thousand or better.

2010 Top Hispanic Markets (DMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Los Angeles New York

8.0mm

Hispanic Pop: 45% of Total Population 4.5mm

Hispanic Pop: 21% 2.2mm

Houston

Hisp: 35%

Chicago

Hisp: 21%

2.0mm

Miami-Ft.Laud.

Hisp: 47%

2.0mm

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Hisp: 28%

San Francisco

H: 23%

Phoenix

H: 30%

San Antonio

55%

Harlingen

89%

2.0mm 1.6mm 1.5mm 1.3mm 1.1mm

Hispanic Population

Although Hispanics represent 16% of the population overall, the composition of the United Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest minority group is even higher in 40 markets. Based on the latest 2010 projections, there will be 19 markets where Hispanics represent over a third of the DMA population. Additionally, 15 markets will have market compositions of over 40%. The list of DMAs with the greatest Hispanic growth includes expected markets such as Orlando and Tampa, but also markets not typically viewed as Hispanic such as Charlotte, Atlanta and even Salt Lake City.

Markets with Largest Hispanic 2000-2010 Growth [Among 100k + Growth Markets] Charlotte

+145M

Atlanta

+400M

Ft. Myers

+138M +131M 97% +286M 94%

Las Vegas W. Palm Beach Washington DC Salt Lake City

115%

+334M 97%

Orlando Raleigh-Durham Tampa

123%

+303M 85% +153M 85% +327M 74% +158M 73%

Hispanic Population

144%


The Brave New World of Consumidores... The Yellow Paper Series

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The New Definition of Minority 2010 is only the beginning of redefining the meaning of minority in the United States. While nationally, minorities are projected to represent 34% (over a third) of the population in 2010, the situation is even more pronounced in certain regions. There will be 4 states plus the District of Columbia where the white portion of the population represents the minority (less than 50%).

2010 Minority Dominated States

47%

Texas

California

43%

New Mexico

41%

District of Columbia

Hawaii

38%

38%

45%

34%

26%

White

9%

9%

Hispanic

Black

Asian/PI

Other


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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At the DMA level, there will be 19 markets where the minority is the majority. In most of these areas, Hispanics are the driving force. They are the dominant minority group in 3 of the states and 15 of the DMAs.

Population Growth: 2010 Population vs. 2000 Census

Laredo Harlingen-Weslaco-Br-Mc El Paso (Las Cruces)

5%

95%

9%

89%

17%

79%

Honolulu

26%

Yuma-El Centro

27%

Miami-Ft.Lauderdal

9% 68%

30%

47%

Greenwood-Greenville, MS

34%

Corpus Christi

35%

Los Angeles

36%

Fresno-Visalia

37%

San Antonio

37%

Bakersfield

2% 60% 45% 51% 54%

39%

Palm Springs

42%

Albuqurque-Santa Fe

43%

Houston

44%

San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose

46%

Monterey-Salinas

46%

Odessa-Midland

47%

52% 52% 41% 35% 23% 45% 48%

49%

Jackson, MS

White

2%

Hispanic

Black

Asian/PI

Other


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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Household Size The average household size in 2010 is projected to be 2.6 persons per home. Overall, all minority groups have larger households than the US total. Non-Hispanic Whites are the only group with a smaller household size. Of all minority groups, Hispanics have the largest households with an average of 3.6 people per home. Even among second and third generation US Hispanics, family size remains large. The average Hispanic family size has only decreased from 3.8 to 3.6 in the last twenty years.

2010 Household Size 3.6

3.4

3.6

Asian/PI

Other

2.7

2.6

2.4

Total

White

Hispanic

Black

Moving Towards the Future Based on the growth of Hispanics in the past ten years, it is clear to see the direction the country is heading. When the next census is conducted in 2020, minorities are expected to account for 40% of the country. Hispanics will be at close to 20% of the total population and 60% larger than African Americans, the next largest minority group.

2020 Projection

5% 19%

60%

12% 4%

Hispanic Black Other White Asian/PI


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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Before the mid-point of the century (in 2045), minorities are expected to be larger than the traditional White population. By 2050, the Hispanic minority group will represent almost a third (30%) of the population and will be larger than all other minorities combined.

2025 - 2050 58%

2025

21%

56%

2030

23%

53%

2035

25%

50%

2040

28%

46%

2050 White

30% Hispanic

Black

6%

12%

6%

12%

27%

49%

2045

12%

7%

12%

7%

12%

7%

12% Asian

SOURCES •

U.S. Census Bureau / American Community Survey (ACS)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics

U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Geoscape - American Marketscape DataStream™ 2010 Series

8% Other


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

Key Marketing Implications The Hispanic population is redefining the General Consumer Market (GCM). Hispanics already represent more than 40% of the population in 15 DMAs and over 30% in more than 10 others. Moving forward, it will be impossible to target the GCM without accounting for the fastest growing minority group. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not targeting Hispanics, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not targeting the GCM. Hispanic marketing support cannot be an incremental effort, but must be part of your core advertising plans.

Any marketing plan targeting youths must take into account Hispanics. The facts are clear: over 60% of Hispanics are under 35, 1 in 5 young adults are Hispanic and a quarter of all US births today are to Hispanic mothers. To truly understand todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth and the trends of the future, it is important to understand the Hispanic marketplace.

Marketing plans must recognize that many Hispanics live in multi-generational households. With multiple age groups living under one roof, the old rules of targeting may no longer apply. The way Hispanic youth impact the technology decisions of their elders is just one example. There are many other categories where parents impact their children. It is critical to account for how the different generations influence each other.

Hispanics are no longer just a key marketing consideration in the traditional Latino markets. Charlotte and Atlanta are two of the fastest growing Hispanic markets. Over 30 markets saw their Hispanic populations increase by more than one hundred thousand Hispanics each in the past 10 years. The implications of the growing Hispanic population go beyond just advertising/marketing and will impact issues such as distribution, sales training, customer service, etc.

US born Hispanics will require marketing campaigns that take into account their unique cultural background. While the census is expected to reveal the growth of the overall Hispanic marketplace, the ACS will most likely show that over 60% of Hispanics are native born. The Hispanic minority group can no longer be viewed as a marketplace of immigrants. It is critical to develop marketing plans that go beyond just language and place of birth. The Young Fusionista, the Hispanic consumer of the future, is growing up in a blended culture that is a mix of their dual heritages. Alma DDB has published an in depth Yellow Paper on the Young Fusionistas.

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The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

Appendix •

Top 50 Market Segmentation

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Hispanic Population

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Composition

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Hispanic Growth (2000-2010)

13


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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Top 50 Market Segmentation The top 50 markets have been split into 5 segments based on size and growth over the past decade •

Core Markets Larger/Traditional Hispanic Markets

Growth Markets Larger Markets with Above Average Growth

Future Growth Markets Mid-Ranked Hispanic Markets with Above Average Growth

Basic Support Markets Smaller Hispanic Markets with Above Average Growth

Markets to Monitor Smaller Hispanic Markets with Lower Growth

Top 50 Market Segmentation | % Hispanic Growth 2000-2010 SMALLER MARKETS / HIGHER GROWTH

LARGER MARKETS / HIGHER GROWTH

+150%

Charlotte

+140%

Future Growth

+130% Atlanta +120%

Ft. Myers

+110% Raleigh-Durham

+100%

Orlando Las Vegas

+90%

W. Palm Beach

Basic Support

Wash. DC

Salt Lake City

Oklahoma City

Minneapolis

Kansas City

Palm Springs Milwaukee

Portland Seattle

+70% +60%

Detroit

Yakima

Amarillo

Hartford

Odessa Laredo Colorado Springs Santa Barbara

Markets to Monitor

Tucson

Monterey

Corpus Christi

+30% +20%

Higher Ranked Markets Boston

Fresno Harlingen San Diego Albuquerque

El Paso +10%

Houston

Sacramento Denver

+40% Yuma

Dallas

Philadelphia

+50%

Lower Ranked Markets

Phoenix

Austin

Bakersfield

Waco

Growth

Tampa

+80%

Chicago Miami

Los Angeles

SanAntonio San Francisco

Core Markets

New York

+0%

SMALLER MARKETS / LOWER GROWTH

LARGER MARKETS / LOWER GROWTH


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

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Core Markets 2010 Hispanic Population DMA

2010 vs. 2000 DMA Comp.

US Pop.

% Hisp.

Pop.

% Total

Pop.

% Pop.

Rank

% Hisp.

Index

%

Rank

Change

Change

Change

483,777

1.0%

24

8%

47

2.1%

8

38%

134,120

6%

Fresno-Visalia

1,026,994

2.1%

12

52%

326

0.6%

40

37%

280,014

19%

Chicago

2,022,363

4.1%

4

21%

128

3.2%

3

35%

524,764

6%

Harlingen-Wesl.-Br-Mc

1,122,351

2.3%

10

89%

555

0.4%

64

31%

265,795

28%

San Antonio

1,329,351

2.7%

9

55%

339

0.8%

32

29%

297,250

22%

Miami-Ft. Lauderdale

2,015,301

4.0%

5

47%

293

1.4%

16

28%

439,597

8%

Boston (Manchester)

San Diego

953,371

1.9%

13

31%

195

1.0%

23

27%

202,380

8%

San Francisco-Oak.-SJ

1,620,678

3.3%

7

23%

143

2.3%

6

26%

332,036

6%

Los Angeles

7,968,199

16.0%

1

45%

281

5.7%

2

23%

1,501,344

9%

New York

4,514,154

9.1%

2

21%

133

6.8%

1

20%

763,196

5%

762,763

1.5%

17

41%

253

0.6%

44

20%

127,750

11%

773,081

1.6%

15

85

19%

125,632

14%

24,592,383

49.4%

Albuquerque-Santa Fe El Paso (Las Cruces)

79%

492

0.3%

32%

196

25.2%

12 critical Hispanic markets

Represent close to 50% of all US Hispanics

Lower relative Hispanic growth, but higher growth than the overall US population

Growth Markets 2010 Hispanic Population

2010 vs. 2000 US Pop.

% Hisp.

Pop.

% Total

Pop.

% Pop.

Rank

% Hisp.

Index

%

Rank

Change

Change

Change

Atlanta

724,941

1.5%

18

11%

67

2.2%

7

123%

399,934

30%

Orlando-Dayt. B.-Melb.

678,034

1.4%

20

19%

115

1.2%

20

97%

334,084

25%

Las Vegas

591,180

1.2%

22

30%

185

0.6%

39

94%

286,457

41%

Tampa-St. Petersburg

658,434

1.3%

21

15%

94

1.4%

15

85%

302,651

18%

DMA

Washington, DC

DMA Comp.

766,879

1.5%

16

12%

76

2.0%

9

74%

327,379

15%

Phoenix

1,544,166

3.1%

8

30%

186

1.7%

11

72%

645,209

32%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2,012,283

4.0%

6

28%

172

2.3%

5

71%

837,516

26%

584,479

1.2%

23

30%

189

0.6%

42

70%

239,761

40%

Houston

2,164,786

4.3%

3

35%

215

2.0%

10

53%

749,968

25%

Sacramento-Stock.-Mod.

Austin

1,048,602

2.1%

11

26%

161

1.3%

18

53%

362,565

18%

Denver

881,440

1.8%

14

21%

133

1.3%

17

51%

298,911

19%

Philadelphia

706,991

1.4%

19

9%

55

2.6%

4

51%

238,611

5%

12,362,215

24.8%

21%

129

19.3%

Larger Hispanic markets (All DMAs in the top 25)

Markets all grew at a greater percentage than the overall Hispanic population

Jointly account for almost one quarter of all US Hispanics


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

16

Future Growth Markets 2010 Hispanic Population DMA

Pop.

2010 vs. 2000

DMA Comp.

% Pop. Rank

US Pop.

% Hisp.

Pop.

% Total

% Hisp.

Index

%

Rank

Change

Change

Change

Charlotte

245,731

0.5%

38

8%

51

1.0%

24

144%

144,871

25%

Ft. Myers-Naples

257,554

0.5%

35

22%

138

0.4%

70

115%

137,798

27%

Raleigh-Durham

266,466

0.5%

34

9%

56

0.9%

26

97%

131,280

23%

West Palm Beach

332,893

0.7%

31

18%

111

0.6%

45

85%

152,804

17%

Salt Lake City

374,480

0.8%

29

12%

77

1.0%

25

73%

158,375

26%

Portland, OR

384,430

0.8%

28

12%

75

1.0%

22

69%

156,462

16%

Seattle-Tacoma

388,970

0.8%

27

8%

50

1.6%

13

65%

153,488

14%

Bakersfield

391,153

0.8%

26

52%

323

0.2%

103

61%

147,986

27%

2,641,677

5.3%

13%

79

6.7%

Mid-ranked Hispanic markets with above average growth

Markets jointly gained over 1 million Hispanics in the last 10 years

Basic Support Markets 2010 Hispanic Population DMA

2010 vs. 2000 DMA Comp.

US Pop.

% Hisp.

Pop.

% Total

Pop.

% Pop.

Rank

% Hisp.

Index

%

Rank

Change

Change

Change

Oklahoma City

161,092

0.3%

50

9%

56

0.6%

47

72%

67,381

11%

Kansas City

172,946

0.3%

48

7%

44

0.8%

33

71%

71,578

10%

Minneapolis-St. Paul

205,391

0.4%

41

5%

28

1.5%

14

68%

83,283

10%

Palm Springs

234,936

0.5%

39

52%

323

0.1%

137

59%

87,432

42%

Milwaukee

204,797

0.4%

42

9%

55

0.7%

36

53%

71,149

5%

Waco-Temple-Bryan

197,415

0.4%

43

20%

126

0.3%

86

43%

59,764

17%

1,176,577

2.4%

9%

59

4.0%

Smaller Hispanic markets with above average growth

While the markets are currently small, they are growing


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

17

Markets to Monitor 2010 Hispanic Population DMA

2010 vs. 2000 DMA Comp.

US Pop.

% Hisp.

Pop.

% Total

Pop.

% Pop.

Rank

% Hisp.

Index

%

Rank

Change

Change

Change

Yuma-El Centro

253,158

0.5%

36

68%

420

0.1%

153

38%

69,244

24%

Yakima-Pasco-Rich.-Ken.

196,634

0.4%

44

30%

184

0.2%

118

38%

53,722

16%

Tucson (Sierra Vista)

432,294

0.9%

25

36%

222

0.4%

66

37%

117,199

21%

Detroit

188,054

0.4%

46

4%

24

1.6%

12

34%

47,978

-1%

Hartford & New Haven

288,245

0.6%

33

11%

68

0.8%

31

34%

73,508

4%

Odessa-Midland

194,227

0.4%

45

48%

296

0.1%

147

29%

43,170

9%

Laredo

247,475

0.5%

37

95%

589

0.1%

172

28%

54,832

27%

Amarillo

164,231

0.3%

49

31%

195

0.2%

131

28%

35,623

2%

Colorado Springs-Pueb.

174,068

0.3%

47

19%

119

0.3%

91

26%

36,097

15%

Santa Barbara-SM-SLO

220,567

0.4%

40

32%

200

0.2%

114

25%

43,716

6%

Monterey-Salinas

330,146

0.7%

32

45%

282

0.2%

107

17%

47,606

2%

Corpus Christi

339,178

0.7%

30

60%

373

0.2%

127

8%

26,460

2%

3,028,277

6.1%

22%

136

4.5%

â&#x20AC;˘

Smaller markets with lower Hispanic growth

â&#x20AC;˘

Although small, markets still grew greater in Hispanic population than total population


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

18

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Hispanic Population

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Hispanic Population 2010 Hispanic Population

DMA

2000 DMA Comp.

Pop.

% Pop.

Rank % Hisp. Index

Total US

49,804,061

100.0%

--

16%

Los Angeles

7,968,199

16.0%

1

New York

4,514,154

9.1%

Houston

2,164,786

Chicago

US Pop.

Hispanic Population

Pop.

DMA

%

Rank

% Pop. Rank % Hisp.

100

100.0%

--

35,238,481 100.0%

--

13%

45%

281

5.7%

2

6,466,855

18.4%

1

40%

2

21%

133

6.8%

1

3,750,958

10.6%

2

19%

4.3%

3

35%

215

2.0%

10

1,414,818

4.0%

5

28%

2,022,363

4.1%

4

21%

128

3.2%

3

1,497,599

4.2%

4

16%

Miami-Ft. Lauderdale

2,015,301

4.0%

5

47%

293

1.4%

16

1,575,704

4.5%

3

40%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2,012,283

4.0%

6

28%

172

2.3%

5

1,174,767

3.3%

7

20%

San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose

1,620,678

3.3%

7

23%

143

2.3%

6

1,288,642

3.7%

6

19%

Phoenix (Prescott)

1,544,166

3.1%

8

30%

186

1.7%

11

898,957

2.6%

9

23%

San Antonio

1,329,351

2.7%

9

55%

339

0.8%

32

1,032,101

2.9%

8

51%

Harlingen-Weslaco-BrownsvilleMcAllen

1,122,351

2.3%

10

89%

555

0.4%

64

856,556

2.4%

10

88%

Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto

1,048,602

2.1%

11

26%

161

1.3%

18

686,037

1.9%

13

20%

Fresno-Visalia

1,026,994

2.1%

12

52%

326

0.6%

40

746,980

2.1%

12

45%

San Diego

953,371

1.9%

13

31%

195

1.0%

23

750,991

2.1%

11

27%

Denver

881,440

1.8%

14

21%

133

1.3%

17

582,529

1.7%

16

17%

El Paso (Las Cruces)

773,081

1.6%

15

79%

492

0.3%

85

647,449

1.8%

14

75%

Washington, DC (Hagerstown)

766,879

1.5%

16

12%

76

2.0%

9

439,500

1.2%

18

8%

Albuquerque-Santa Fe

762,763

1.5%

17

41%

253

0.6%

44

635,013

1.8%

15

38%

Atlanta

724,941

1.5%

18

11%

67

2.2%

7

325,007

0.9%

23

6%

Philadelphia

706,991

1.4%

19

9%

55

2.6%

4

468,380

1.3%

17

6%

Orlando-Daytona Beach-Melbourne

678,034

1.4%

20

19%

115

1.2%

20

343,950

1.0%

22

12%

Tampa-St. Petersburg (Sarasota)

658,434

1.3%

21

15%

94

1.4%

15

355,783

1.0%

19

10%

Las Vegas

591,180

1.2%

22

30%

185

0.6%

39

304,723

0.9%

26

22%

Austin

584,479

1.2%

23

30%

189

0.6%

42

344,718

1.0%

21

25%

Boston (Manchester)

483,777

1.0%

24

8%

47

2.1%

8

349,657

1.0%

20

6%

Tucson (Sierra Vista)

432,294

0.9%

25

36%

222

0.4%

66

315,095

0.9%

24

32%


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

19

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Hispanic Population (continued) 2010 Hispanic Population

DMA Total US

Pop.

2000 DMA Comp.

% Pop. Rank % Hisp.

US Pop.

Index

%

Rank

Hispanic Population

Pop.

49,804,061

100.0%

--

16%

100

100.0%

--

BakersďŹ eld

391,153

0.8%

26

52%

323

0.2%

103

243,167

Seattle-Tacoma

388,970

0.8%

27

8%

50

1.6%

13

Portland, OR

384,430

0.8%

28

12%

75

1.0%

Salt Lake City

374,480

0.8%

29

12%

77

Corpus Christi

339,178

0.7%

30

60%

West Palm Beach-Ft. Pierce

332,893

0.7%

31

Monterey-Salinas

330,146

0.7%

Hartford & New Haven

288,245

Raleigh-Durham (Fayetteville)

DMA

% Pop. Rank % Hisp.

35,238,481 100.0%

--

13%

0.7%

28

41%

235,482

0.7%

29

6%

22

227,968

0.6%

30

8%

1.0%

25

216,105

0.6%

31

9%

373

0.2%

127

312,718

0.9%

25

57%

18%

111

0.6%

45

180,089

0.5%

35

11%

32

45%

282

0.2%

107

282,540

0.8%

27

40%

0.6%

33

11%

68

0.8%

31

214,737

0.6%

32

9%

266,466

0.5%

34

9%

56

0.9%

26

135,186

0.4%

44

6%

Ft. Myers-Naples

257,554

0.5%

35

22%

138

0.4%

70

119,756

0.3%

48

13%

Yuma-El Centro

253,158

0.5%

36

68%

420

0.1%

153

183,914

0.5%

34

61%

Laredo

247,475

0.5%

37

95%

589

0.1%

172

192,643

0.5%

33

94%

Charlotte

245,731

0.5%

38

8%

51

1.0%

24

100,860

0.3%

52

4%

Palm Springs

234,936

0.5%

39

52%

323

0.1%

137

147,504

0.4%

38

46%

Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-San Luis Obispo

220,567

0.4%

40

32%

200

0.2%

114

176,851

0.5%

36

27%

Minneapolis-St. Paul

205,391

0.4%

41

5%

28

1.5%

14

122,108

0.3%

47

3%

Milwaukee

204,797

0.4%

42

9%

55

0.7%

36

133,648

0.4%

45

6%

Waco-Temple-Bryan

197,415

0.4%

43

20%

126

0.3%

86

137,651

0.4%

43

17%

Yakima-Pasco-Richland-Kennewick

196,634

0.4%

44

30%

184

0.2%

118

142,912

0.4%

39

25%

Odessa-Midland

194,227

0.4%

45

48%

296

0.1%

147

151,057

0.4%

37

40%

Detroit

188,054

0.4%

46

4%

24

1.6%

12

140,076

0.4%

40

3%

Colorado Springs-Pueblo

174,068

0.3%

47

19%

119

0.3%

91

137,971

0.4%

42

17%

Kansas City

172,946

0.3%

48

7%

44

0.8%

33

101,368

0.3%

51

5%

Amarillo

164,231

0.3%

49

31%

195

0.2%

131

128,608

0.4%

46

25%

Oklahoma City

161,092

0.3%

50

9%

56

0.6%

47

93,711

0.3%

54

6%


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

20

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Composition

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Composition 2010 Hispanic Population

DMA

2000 DMA Comp.

Pop.

% Pop.

49,804,061

100.0%

--

16%

247,475

0.5%

37

1,122,351

2.3%

El Paso (Las Cruces)

773,081

Yuma-El Centro Corpus Christi

US Pop.

Hispanic Population

%

Rank

100

100.0%

--

95%

589

0.1%

172

192,643

10

89%

555

0.4%

64

1.6%

15

79%

492

0.3%

253,158

0.5%

36

68%

420

339,178

0.7%

30

60%

San Antonio

1,329,351

2.7%

9

Fresno-Visalia

1,026,994

2.1%

Palm Springs

234,936

BakersďŹ eld Odessa-Midland

Total US

Rank % Hisp. Index

Pop.

DMA

% Pop. Rank % Hisp. --

13%

0.5%

33

94%

856,556

2.4%

10

88%

85

647,449

1.8%

14

75%

0.1%

153

183,914

0.5%

34

61%

373

0.2%

127

312,718

0.9%

25

57%

55%

339

0.8%

32

1,032,101

2.9%

8

51%

12

52%

326

0.6%

40

746,980

2.1%

12

45%

0.5%

39

52%

323

0.1%

137

147,504

0.4%

38

46%

391,153

0.8%

26

52%

323

0.2%

103

243,167

0.7%

28

41%

194,227

0.4%

45

48%

296

0.1%

147

151,057

0.4%

37

40%

2,015,301

4.0%

5

47%

293

1.4%

16

1,575,704

4.5%

3

40%

330,146

0.7%

32

45%

282

0.2%

107

282,540

0.8%

27

40%

7,968,199

16.0%

1

45%

281

5.7%

2

6,466,855

18.4%

1

40%

Victoria

36,745

0.1%

108

42%

260

0.0%

203

32,976

0.1%

89

39%

Albuquerque-Santa Fe

762,763

1.5%

17

41%

253

0.6%

44

635,013

1.8%

15

38%

Lubbock

160,470

0.3%

51

38%

235

0.1%

144

138,006

0.4%

41

34%

San Angelo

52,755

0.1%

91

36%

226

0.0%

196

44,593

0.1%

78

32%

Tucson (Sierra Vista)

432,294

0.9%

25

36%

222

0.4%

66

315,095

0.9%

24

32%

2,164,786

4.3%

3

35%

215

2.0%

10

1,414,818

4.0%

5

28%

Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-San Luis Obispo

220,567

0.4%

40

32%

200

0.2%

114

176,851

0.5%

36

27%

Amarillo

164,231

0.3%

49

31%

195

0.2%

131

128,608

0.4%

46

25%

San Diego

953,371

1.9%

13

31%

195

1.0%

23

750,991

2.1%

11

27%

Austin

584,479

1.2%

23

30%

189

0.6%

42

344,718

1.0%

21

25%

1,544,166

3.1%

8

30%

186

1.7%

11

898,957

2.6%

9

23%

591,180

1.2%

22

30%

185

0.6%

39

304,723

0.9%

26

22%

Laredo Harlingen-Weslaco-BrownsvilleMcAllen

Miami-Ft. Lauderdale Monterey-Salinas Los Angeles

Houston

Phoenix (Prescott) Las Vegas

35,238,481 100.0%


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

21

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Composition (continued) 2010 Hispanic Population

DMA Total US

Pop.

2000

DMA Comp.

% Pop. Rank % Hisp.

US Pop.

Hispanic Population

Index

%

Rank

Pop.

49,804,061

100.0%

--

16%

100

100.0%

--

196,634

0.4%

44

30%

184

0.2%

118

142,912

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2,012,283

4.0%

6

28%

172

2.3%

5

Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto

1,048,602

2.1%

11

26%

161

1.3%

San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose

1,620,678

3.3%

7

23%

143

Abilene-Sweetwater

68,050

0.1%

77

22%

Ft. Myers-Naples

257,554

0.5%

35

Denver

881,440

1.8%

New York

4,514,154

Chicago

DMA

% Pop. Rank % Hisp. --

13%

0.4%

39

25%

1,174,767

3.3%

7

20%

18

686,037

1.9%

13

20%

2.3%

6

1,288,642

3.7%

6

19%

139

0.1%

165

56,985

0.2%

66

18%

22%

138

0.4%

70

119,756

0.3%

48

13%

14

21%

133

1.3%

17

582,529

1.7%

16

17%

9.1%

2

21%

133

6.8%

1

3,750,958

10.6%

2

19%

2,022,363

4.1%

4

21%

128

3.2%

3

1,497,599

4.2%

4

16%

Reno

144,873

0.3%

56

20%

126

0.2%

112

92,280

0.3%

55

15%

Twin Falls

36,227

0.1%

112

20%

126

0.1%

190

23,463

0.1%

108

15%

Waco-Temple-Bryan

197,415

0.4%

43

20%

126

0.3%

86

137,651

0.4%

43

17%

Colorado Springs-Pueblo

174,068

0.3%

47

19%

119

0.3%

91

137,971

0.4%

42

17%

Orlando-Daytona BeachMelbourne

678,034

1.4%

20

19%

115

1.2%

20

343,950

1.0%

22

12%

West Palm Beach-Ft. Pierce

332,893

0.7%

31

18%

111

0.6%

45

180,089

0.5%

35

11%

Tampa-St. Petersburg (Sarasota)

658,434

1.3%

21

15%

94

1.4%

15

355,783

1.0%

19

10%

Tyler-Longview (Lufkin & Nacogdoches)

108,392

0.2%

61

15%

93

0.2%

109

65,371

0.2%

61

10%

SpringďŹ eld-Holyoke

97,980

0.2%

67

14%

87

0.2%

113

75,396

0.2%

59

11%

Chico-Redding

71,193

0.1%

76

14%

85

0.2%

130

48,328

0.1%

74

10%

Grand Junction-Montrose

26,299

0.1%

128

14%

84

0.1%

186

16,627

0.0%

122

11%

Cheyenne-Scottsbluff

18,480

0.0%

140

13%

83

0.0%

198

16,367

0.0%

124

12%

Boise

94,709

0.2%

68

13%

81

0.2%

106

57,322

0.2%

65

10%

Wichita Falls & Lawton

51,072

0.1%

93

13%

78

0.1%

148

42,349

0.1%

81

10%

Wichita-Hutchinson Plus

147,609

0.3%

54

12%

77

0.4%

68

106,473

0.3%

50

9%

Salt Lake City

374,480

0.8%

29

12%

77

1.0%

25

216,105

0.6%

31

9%

Yakima-Pasco-RichlandKennewick

35,238,481 100.0%


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

22

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Hispanic Growth (2000-2010)

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Hispanic Growth (2000-2010) 2010 Hispanic Population DMA Total US

Pop.

2000

DMA Comp.

% Pop. Rank % Hisp. Index

US Pop. %

Rank

2010 vs. 2000

Hispanic Population Pop.

% Pop.

35,238,481 100.0%

DMA

%Hisp.

Pop.

%Total

Rank

% Hisp.

Change

Change

Change

--

13%

41%

14,565,580

10%

49,804,061

100.0%

--

16%

100

100.0%

--

Ft. Smith-Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers

99,029

0.2%

66

12%

77

0.3%

98

40,948

0.1%

82

6%

142%

58,081

22%

Atlanta

724,941

1.5%

18

11%

67

2.2%

7

325,007

0.9%

23

6%

123%

399,934

30%

Greenville-Spartanburg-Asheville-Anderson

105,141

0.2%

62

5%

30

0.7%

37

47,466

0.1%

75

2%

122%

57,675

11%

Nashville

145,082

0.3%

55

5%

34

0.9%

30

66,036

0.2%

60

3%

120%

79,046

18%

Ft. Myers-Naples

257,554

0.5%

35

22%

138

0.4%

70

119,756

0.3%

48

13%

115%

137,798

27%

Indianapolis

129,627

0.3%

58

5%

29

0.9%

29

61,835

0.2%

64

2%

110%

67,792

6%

Greensboro-High Point-Winston Salem

154,642

0.3%

53

9%

56

0.6%

50

76,031

0.2%

58

5%

103%

78,611

11%

Orlando-Daytona Beach-Melbourne

678,034

1.4%

20

19%

115

1.2%

20

343,950

1.0%

22

12%

97%

334,084

25%

Raleigh-Durham (Fayetteville)

266,466

0.5%

34

9%

56

0.9%

26

135,186

0.4%

44

6%

97%

131,280

23%

Las Vegas

591,180

1.2%

22

30%

185

0.6%

39

304,723

0.9%

26

22%

94%

286,457

41%

Jacksonville

103,127

0.2%

63

6%

37

0.6%

49

54,951

0.2%

68

4%

88%

48,176

18%

Tampa-St. Petersburg (Sarasota)

658,434

1.3%

21

15%

94

1.4%

15

355,783

1.0%

19

10%

85%

302,651

18%

West Palm Beach-Ft. Pierce

332,893

0.7%

31

18%

111

0.6%

45

180,089

0.5%

35

11%

85%

152,804

17%

Washington, DC (Hagerstown)

766,879

1.5%

16

12%

76

2.0%

9

439,500

1.2%

18

8%

74%

327,379

15%

Salt Lake City

374,480

0.8%

29

12%

77

1.0%

25

216,105

0.6%

31

9%

73%

158,375

26%

Oklahoma City

161,092

0.3%

50

9%

56

0.6%

47

93,711

0.3%

54

6%

72%

67,381

11%

Phoenix (Prescott)

1,544,166

3.1%

8

30%

186

1.7%

11

898,957

2.6%

9

23%

72%

645,209

32%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2,012,283

4.0%

6

28%

172

2.3%

5

1,174,767

3.3%

7

20%

71%

837,516

26%

Kansas City

172,946

0.3%

48

7%

44

0.8%

33

101,368

0.3%

51

5%

71%

71,578

10%

Austin

584,479

1.2%

23

30%

189

0.6%

42

344,718

1.0%

21

25%

70%

239,761

40%

Portland, OR

384,430

0.8%

28

12%

75

1.0%

22

227,968

0.6%

30

8%

69%

156,462

16%

Minneapolis-St. Paul

205,391

0.4%

41

5%

28

1.5%

14

122,108

0.3%

47

3%

68%

83,283

10%

Seattle-Tacoma

388,970

0.8%

27

8%

50

1.6%

13

235,482

0.7%

29

6%

65%

153,488

14%

Bakersfield

391,153

0.8%

26

52%

323

0.2%

103

243,167

0.7%

28

41%

61%

147,986

27%

Palm Springs

234,936

0.5%

39

52%

323

0.1%

137

147,504

0.4%

38

46%

59%

87,432

42%


The New State of America... The Yellow Paper Series

23

Top 50 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Hispanic Growth (2000-2010) (continued) 2010 Hispanic Population DMA

Pop.

Total US

2000

DMA Comp.

% Pop. Rank % Hisp. Index

US Pop. %

Rank

2010 vs. 2000

Hispanic Population Pop.

49,804,061

100.0%

--

16%

100

100.0%

--

Reno

144,873

0.3%

56

20%

126

0.2%

112

92,280

Milwaukee

204,797

0.4%

42

9%

55

0.7%

36

Houston

2,164,786

4.3%

3

35%

215

2.0%

Sacramento-Stockton-Modesto

1,048,602

2.1%

11

26%

161

Denver

881,440

1.8%

14

21%

Philadelphia

706,991

1.4%

19

Providence-New Bedford

158,282

0.3%

Waco-Temple-Bryan

197,415

Boston (Manchester)

DMA

% Pop. Rank % Hisp.

Pop.

%Total

Change

Change

Change

--

13%

41%

14,565,580

10%

0.3%

55

15%

57%

52,593

17%

133,648

0.4%

45

6%

53%

71,149

5%

10

1,414,818

4.0%

5

28%

53%

749,968

25%

1.3%

18

686,037

1.9%

13

20%

53%

362,565

18%

133

1.3%

17

582,529

1.7%

16

17%

51%

298,911

19%

9%

55

2.6%

4

468,380

1.3%

17

6%

51%

238,611

5%

52

10%

61

0.5%

53

109,450

0.3%

49

7%

45%

48,832

2%

0.4%

43

20%

126

0.3%

86

137,651

0.4%

43

17%

43%

59,764

17%

483,777

1.0%

24

8%

47

2.1%

8

349,657

1.0%

20

6%

38%

134,120

6%

Yuma-El Centro

253,158

0.5%

36

68%

420

0.1%

153

183,914

0.5%

34

61%

38%

69,244

24%

Yakima-Pasco-Richland-Kennewick

196,634

0.4%

44

30%

184

0.2%

118

142,912

0.4%

39

25%

38%

53,722

16%

1,026,994

2.1%

12

52%

326

0.6%

40

746,980

2.1%

12

45%

37%

280,014

19%

432,294

0.9%

25

36%

222

0.4%

66

315,095

0.9%

24

32%

37%

117,199

21%

2,022,363

4.1%

4

21%

128

3.2%

3

1,497,599

4.2%

4

16%

35%

524,764

6%

288,245

0.6%

33

11%

68

0.8%

31

214,737

0.6%

32

9%

34%

73,508

4%

Harlingen-Weslaco-Brownsville-McAllen

1,122,351

2.3%

10

89%

555

0.4%

64

856,556

2.4%

10

88%

31%

265,795

28%

San Antonio

1,329,351

2.7%

9

55%

339

0.8%

32

1,032,101

2.9%

8

51%

29%

297,250

22%

247,475

0.5%

37

95%

589

0.1%

172

192,643

0.5%

33

94%

28%

54,832

27%

2,015,301

4.0%

5

47%

293

1.4%

16

1,575,704

4.5%

3

40%

28%

439,597

8%

953,371

1.9%

13

31%

195

1.0%

23

750,991

2.1%

11

27%

27%

202,380

8%

San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose

1,620,678

3.3%

7

23%

143

2.3%

6

1,288,642

3.7%

6

19%

26%

332,036

6%

Los Angeles

7,968,199

16.0%

1

45%

281

5.7%

2

6,466,855

18.4%

1

40%

23%

1,501,344

9%

New York

4,514,154

9.1%

2

21%

133

6.8%

1

3,750,958

10.6%

2

19%

20%

763,196

5%

762,763

1.5%

17

41%

253

0.6%

44

635,013

1.8%

15

38%

20%

127,750

11%

Fresno-Visalia Tucson (Sierra Vista) Chicago Hartford & New Haven

Laredo Miami-Ft. Lauderdale San Diego

Albuquerque-Santa Fe

â&#x20AC;˘

Excludes markets with less than 48K in Hispanic growth

35,238,481 100.0%

%Hisp.


24

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What the 2010 Census Will Reveal About the Evolution of the United States of America The Yellow Papers Series But what does the 2010 Census...