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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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FROM YOUR SYMPHONY & CHORALE From the Board President From the Executive Director From the Music Director Music Director Biography 2019-2020 Board of Directors & Staff Midland Symphony Guild Odessa Symphony Guild Ticket Pricing Symphony SoundBites Take 3 Dinner Theatre Fundraiser Music Education Symphony Young Professionals

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OUR SEASON 2019-2020 Season Beethoven Five The Addams Family In Concert Tchaikovsky Five Sounds of the Season

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OUR ENSEMBLES MOSC Chamber Ensembles MOSC Orchestra 2019-2020 Chamber & Choral Concerts

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OUR CONTRIBUTORS / DONORS 2019-2020 Sponsors 2019-2020 Annual Fund Contributors Endowment Fund Contributors Advertiser Index

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FROM THE BOARD PRESIDENT The Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale Board of Directors would like to welcome you to the beautiful Wagner Noel Performing Arts Center for the 2019-2020 season. We hope you are as excited as we are about the wide range of musical selections our Maestro, Gary Lewis, has selected for the 57th season of MOSC. Technology provides most of us unlimited access to music and arts in the palm of our hand. However, enjoying the experience of a live orchestra inspires each of us and allows us to be part of a community experience and revel "in the moment." This season will not disappoint! It begins with the most well-known piece of western music in the world Beethoven's Symphony No. 5. The Masterworks Series also includes Tchaikovsky in November, From East to West, featuring our own Kevin Young on tuba in January, and concludes in April with The Planets. The Pops and Family Series begins in October with the popular Film Concert Live performance of The Addams Family, followed in December by the always entertaining Sounds of the Season. March will feature Rodgers & Hammerstein with Broadway performers and the series will finish in May with a family concert, Wizards, Witches & Fantastic Beasts. I would be remiss if I did not mention our wonderful Chamber Concerts which are usually held on Sunday afternoon. The West Texas Winds, Permian Basin String Quartet and Lone Star Brass provide a wide palette of classical and contemporary music in a more intimate setting. Our amazing Chorale will be performing their concerts in October and April. For specific dates and locations of these performances, please check our website MOSC.org. It is going to be a great season and we hope you will share in the experience. The Midland-Odessa Symphony & Choral graciously recognizes and salutes the generous support of our advertisers, concert goers, friends and patrons. We are excited to bring orchestral music to the community and are forever grateful for the opportunity to bring live music to the Basin. Carolina Keith MOSC Board President

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FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Welcome to Tonight’s Concert! We are so pleased that you have chosen to join us here tonight as your presence supports MOSC as the premiere arts organization in the Permian Basin. You may be surprised to learn that MOSC provides a wide variety of music entertainment and enrichment throughout the season in addition to our Masterworks and Pops & Family Concerts. We have a youth choir (Voices of the Permian Basin) of over seventy voices and an adult choir (Symphony Chorale) of a similar size, both performing concerts throughout the season. Our three instrumental ensembles, Lone Star Brass, Permian Basin Strings and the West Texas Winds perform two chamber concerts per year, participate in our music education programs at ECISD and MISD schools and are available to book for special events. We are so proud to bring quality music to our community and can continue to do so because of your patronage. As the case with most symphony orchestras throughout the United States, MOSC’s ticket revenue covers only 22% of our annual expenses. We rely on our annual fund drive donations, concert sponsorships, guild donations, endowment distributions, annual fundraiser concert revenue and grant revenue to achieve the remaining 78% of our needed revenue. Along with your attendance at our many events, we also hope you will consider supporting MOSC by donating to the annual fund drive or providing a Legacy gift to our endowment that supports MOSC now and in perpetuity. As a non-profit 501(c)3 organization, your support through all our giving-opportunities is tax deductible. To make a donation, use our website at mosc.org or contact Violet Singh, our Development Director who will be happy to visit with you about making a Legacy gift or other financial support. We hope you enjoy our concerts throughout the season as much as we enjoy bringing them to you. Again, thank you for making MOSC such an important presence in the Basin. Jeannette Kolokoff MOSC Executive Director

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FROM THE MUSIC DIRECTOR FROM THE MAESTRO Greetings and welcome to the 2019-2020 season of the Midland-Odessa Symphony Orchestra! We are delighted you can join us for this incredible season of great music. If ever there was a season of “greatest hits,” this is it! We will kick things off with an evening of Beethoven featuring pianist Roberto Plano, former Van Cliburn Competition finalist and Cleveland International Competition winner, performing Piano Concerto No. 3 along with the iconic Fifth Symphony. In November, Austin violinist Brian Lewis returns for his second appearance with us and will perform the beautiful G minor Concerto by Bruch. We will pair that with Tchaikovsky’s majestic Fifth Symphony. East meets west in January as Chinese conductor Jiang Liu, former violinist in the MOSC, returns to the orchestra to share the podium, conducting Overture No. 1 by Chinese composer Guan Xia. The exotic Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun by French composer Claude Debussy helps us transition to the west for Aaron Copland’s Four Dance Episodes from “Rodeo.” We are especially pleased to feature Kevin Young, MOSC’s principal tuba, as our soloist, performing the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto. Our Masterworks series comes to a close in April with virtual trip through the solar system accompanied by Holst’s awe-inspiring “The Planets,” complete with HD video images from space. And I am very pleased we can share the stage with Geraldine Walther, violist with the famed Takács Quartet and former principal viola of the San Francisco Symphony. Geri is truly one of the most gifted and important violists of our time and will be performing one of the greatest works for viola and orchestra, the Bartok Viola Concerto. As always, our Pops and Family Series brings to you a wonderful variety of music and entertainment. When we screened the film The Wizard of Oz with live orchestral accompaniment two years ago, the response was so positive we decided to present another movie this season to get us into the Halloween mood, The Addams Family. The “Sounds of the Season” will once again get the holiday season started in a festive way featuring all of the ensembles and choirs within the MOSC along with special guest vocalists Scott and Nikki Windham. The Pops and Family series continues with a special Rodgers and Hammerstein Celebration, featuring Broadway performers along with our Symphony Chorale. And “Wizards, Witches and Fantastic Beasts,” with music from fantasy movies brings our season to a close. We are so very grateful for your support and patronage as we simply cannot bring this great music to the Permian Basin without your help. Please be sure to also attend the many wonderful performances by the outstanding ensembles of the MOSC, the Chorale, our youth choir The Voices of the Permian Basin, along with the West Texas Winds, Lone Star Brass, and Permian Basin String Quartet. These programs are always inspiring and engaging and you don’t want to miss them! We are happy you are here with us tonight. Plan to bring a friend and join us throughout this season of great music as we continue our mission to change lives in the Permian Basin through great music. I look forward to meeting you at the concert! Gary Lewis Music Director and Conductor,

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GARY LEWIS MUSIC DIRECTOR & CONDUCTOR Gary Lewis is the Music Director and Conductor of the Midland-Odessa (TX) Symphony Orchestra. He is also Director of Orchestral Studies and the Bob and Judy Charles Professor of Conducting in the College of Music at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he conducts the University Symphony Orchestra and oversees the entire orchestra program. At CU-Boulder Mr. Lewis also leads the graduate program in orchestral conducting including both the masters and doctoral level. His former students are currently enjoying success as conductors with professional orchestras and opera companies, university and public school ensembles, and youth orchestras. Prior to his appointment at Colorado, Lewis served on the faculties of Texas Tech University, The Ohio State University, The University of Michigan, and Abilene Christian University. He is equally at home with professional, university, and youth ensembles. He is the Principal Guest Conductor of the Boulder Philharmonic and has appeared with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra, the Colorado Music Festival, Boulder Ballet, Midland Ballet Theater, Ballet Lubbock, the Lubbock Symphony Orchestra, the Abilene Philharmonic Orchestra, the Quad Cities Symphony Orchestra, the New Symphony Orchestra (Sofia, Bulgaria), and the Western Plains Opera Theater. His work with summer music festivals has also been noteworthy including the Interlochen Center for the Arts, Pine Mountain Music Festival (opera and symphonic) and Rocky Ridge Music Center. As a strong advocate of music education, Mr. Lewis has presented many in-service workshops for public school educators, as well as numerous presentations at state and regional music education association conferences. In addition, he has conducted All-State Orchestras and Bands in many states along with the ASTA National Honor Orchestra and the Honor Orchestra of America. In 2010 Mr. Lewis became the founding Artistic Director of the Greater Boulder Youth Orchestras and also served as conductor of the Symphony Orchestra until 2016. Mr. Lewis is also a strong proponent of new music. He has been instrumental in the development and production of contemporary music festivals and his interest in new music has led him to collaborations with composers such as Dan Kellogg, Carter Pann, George Crumb, William Bolcom, John Harbison, Chen Yi, Michael Daugherty, Stephen Paulus, and many others. Gary Lewis is a Yamaha Master Educator.

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MOSC 2019-2020 ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL GARY LEWIS, MUSIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR VIOLIN Sarah Cranor, Acting Concertmaster & Principal Second Endowed in memory of Dorothy Croft by the Midland Symphony Guild Alejandro Gómez Guillén, Acting Concertmaster & Principal Second Yaesolji Shin, Associate Concertmaster Laurel Lawshae, Associate Principal Kevin Crutchfield Sarah Figueroa Nikesha Hailey Amanda Hernandez Lowell Hohstadt Saikat Karmakar Karen McAfee Robert Meinecke Turner Partain Abi Rhoades Jason Snider Nathan Southwick Ariya Tai Erin E. Weber VIOLA Han Dewan, Principal Endowed by Mary de Compiegne & Rosalind Redfern Grover Laura Peña, Associate Principal Catherine Chen Beau Garza Kathy Hohstadt Gil Jarvis Miriam Oddie CELLO Amy Huzjak, Principal Endowed in memory of Walter Osadchuk by Dr. and Mrs. Michael Miller Danny Mar, Associate Principal Maia Cook Ilia De la Rosa Aurelia Rocha David Thomas

BASS Bill DeLavan, Principal Mark Morton, Associate Principal Christopher Arcy Endowed in memory of Mary June Rasmussen by Mr. Kenneth Anderson and Dr. Anne Acreman, MD Alissa Stepro FLUTE Melissa Graham Hansen, Principal Kate Martin, Associate Principal Julia Barnett, Piccolo OBOE Caryn Crutchfield, Principal Abby Yeakle Held, Associate Principal Ann Hankins CLARINET Chris Chance, Principal Tyler Webster, Associate Principal & E-flat Mande Gragg, Bass Clarinet BASSOON Philip Hill, Principal Bill Harden, Associate Principal

TROMBONE John E. Elizondo, Principal Darin Cash BASS TROMBONE Jon James, Principal TUBA Kevin Young, Principal TIMPANI Tim Mabrey, Principal PERCUSSION Erin Martysz Thies, Principal Jacob Adam Garcia Matt Richards HARP Vincent Pierce, Principal PIANO LuAnn Lane, Principal Endowed in honor of Shari Santorelli by Karen & Spencer Beal

HORN Sonja K. Millichamp, Co-Principal Scott Millichamp, Co-Principal Norma Binam Susan Kelley TRUMPET Eric Baker, Co-Principal Ben Fairfield, Co-Principal Endowed in honor of Michael J. Santorelli by Karen & Spencer Beal John Irish

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2019 - 2020 BOARD OF DIRECTORS & STAFF OFFICERS Carolina Keith, President Patrick Canty, Executive Vice President David Lauritzen, Immediate Past President Bryce Swinford, Vice President Fundraising Connie May, Vice President Finance Diann McKee, Vice President Sponsorships Marc Kondrup, Secretary

DIRECTORS Kent Alexander Dee Anna Arellano Joseph Baker John Barkley Dee Carter Steven Dojahn Nicole Dragisic Dr. Deborah Edwards Thomas Elrod Dr. Paul Feit

Mark Germer Dr. Aaron Hawley Tatum Hubbard Fulbright Scott Long Steven Palma Misty Borland Phiffer Betty Ann Prentice Robin Richey Stephanie Rivas David Robbins

Jeryn Roberts Melissa Rowland Caroline Scott Deb Shaw Gregory Smith Jessica Waller Melissa Ware Rebecca Young

HONORARY MEMBERS Mrs. Leland Croft (dec’d) Mrs. James A. Fowler (dec’d) Mr. Don Williams (dec’d) Mr. Josh H. Parr (dec’d) Mrs. Ellen Noël (dec’d)

Mrs. Lois Rochester (dec’d) Ms. Mary Harrington (dec’d) Mr. Don Williams (dec’d) Mr. Fred Trout Jr. (dec’d)

M O S C S TA F F Gary Lewis, Music Director & Conductor Jeannette Kolokoff, Executive Director Violet Singh, Development Director Rino Irving, Operations Manager/Librarian Crystal Radford, Marketing Director

Melissa Graham and Caryn Crutchfield, Personnel Managers Deanna J. Russell, Office Administrator Gregory Pysh, Chorale Conductor Emily Baker, Voices of the Permian Basin Director Bill DeLavan, Music Education Coordinator

F R A N K A . B E L L AWA R D S For contributions and/or services that have significantly advanced the mission of the Midland Odessa Symphony & Chorale, Inc. Ted Hale - April 14, 2007 Frank A. Bell - May 21, 1997 Grace Osadchuk - October 13, 2007 The Beal Family - May 19, 1999 Scott W. Long - May 18, 2013 Robert E. Hunt - August 31, 2000 Mary Harrington - May 16, 2001 15


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2019 - 2020 PRESIDENT, MIDLAND SYMPHONY GUILD Midland Symphony Guild (MSG) is excited to begin its 57th year of supporting the Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale (MOSC). MSG began with the goals of supporting and raising funds for our local symphony music program. Over the past five decades, that effort has grown into a non-profit organization that provides annual financial and volunteer support to MOSC and its various productions and events. MOSC enriches the communities of both Midland and Odessa by showcasing world-class performers, local artists and musicians and featured presentations. MSG is comprised of members who invest both time and money in their local communities. Last year, MSG donated more than 1000 volunteer hours at 700 different events. The majority of these service hours were contributed by our Symphony Belles, daughters of our MSG members. Each Belle is required to complete 15 placements throughout their years in the MSG program (9th-12th grades). This requirement of service fosters both a sense of giving back to the community and appreciation for the talented artists and musicians. In addition, to the MOSC, our Belles volunteer with community organizations such as Safe Place, Midland Festival Ballet, Museum of the Southwest, Arts Council of Midland, Permian Basin Opera, Midland Community Theater and the Wagner Noel Performing Arts Center. We are so proud of our Belles. We sponsor two special events for our Belles each year. We formally present our Freshman Belles at the January Masterworks concert and in early February 2020 we will host our Gala Weekend. This annual tradition is our biggest fundraising event for the year and provides an opportunity to highlight MOSC and the Guild’s connection to fine arts in the Permian Basin, as well as showcase the many accomplishments of our Senior Belles. The weekend includes a black-tie dinner and dance to honor our Senior Belles, along with many members and patrons, for their years of service to MSG and the Midland community. It is my honor to serve as President for Midland Symphony Guild this year. I look forward to working alongside many wonderful men and women while also having the privilege to encounter exceptional musical and fine arts performances. For our Belles, friendships will be formed, a spirit of service instilled, and a love of the arts encouraged. Thank you to the Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale for enriching our lives for another season. Melissa Ware 2019-2020 President Midland Symphony Guild

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2019-2020 MIDLAND SYMPHONY GUILD OFFICERS & BOARD OF DIRECTORS President President Elect VP for Symphony Belles VP for Finance VP for Membership VP for Community VP for Projects Correspondence Secretary Recording Secretary Parliamentarian Nominating Chairman

Melissa Ware JoAnna Low Blanche Wheeless Ashley Grimes Meredith Flowers Natalie Jones Pat Mata/Adrianne Clifton Kimmee Brandon Hannah Jacoby Cassandra Cheek Leslee Day

Website: www.midlandsg.com Facebook: Midland Symphony Guild Midland Symphony Guild is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. We support MOSC financially and through volunteer methods. MSG also works to impact this community via our Belle program. To support MSG or join our mission, please contact us through our website at www.midlandsg.org

4109 N. Midland Drive Midland, TX 79707 (432) 559-1117 www.eyelasikmidland.com

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2019 - 2020 PRESIDENT, ODESSA SYMPHONY GUILD Elton John may have said it best: “Music has healing power. It has the ability to take people out of themselves for a few hours.” For 61 years the Odessa Symphony Guild has been a proud supporter of the Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale because we believe in the importance of growing and sharing the benefits that music brings to a community. It’s a concept that our OSG founders held when they gathered in 1958 to form an organization that would provide volunteer and financial support to local music programs. That passion continues today as we enlighten a new generation to the beauty of professional music. Over the decades, the OSG has grown into a non-profit organization that has raised thousands of dollars to fund MOSC educational programs and concerts. The MOSC brings world-class musicians to our area to enrich the lives of West Texans with their chorale, ensemble, and full orchestra performances. What a gift to our communities! We are proud of the hundreds of young men and women who have served as Belles and Beaux representing the OSG. These 9th through 12th grade students spend their time volunteering as ushers at concerts, hosting receptions, serving musicians breakfast, setting up for SoundBites Suppers and attending concerts. Their families join our OSG Patrons to enthusiastically support MOSC by contributing financially, promoting concerts, and selling memberships. In February 2020, we will host our annual Symphony Gala Ball. This is OSG’s primary fundraiser to benefit the MOSC. This special evening is focused on honoring our senior Belles and Beaux who have served throughout their high school careers. In addition we present the freshman, sophomore and junior Belles and Beaux at the Ball. These students excel academically and give passionately to their community. Each year is an opportunity to see them grow into poised and graceful young adults who have the interpersonal skills to become the leaders of tomorrow. We invite you to join us for this special event. I am honored to serve as the president of the Odessa Symphony Guild this year and look forward to working with a fantastic group of volunteers who are dedicated to our mission of supporting the arts. We congratulate the Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale on their 57th season of enriching our community through beautiful music. Tatum Hubbard Fulbright 2019-2020 President Odessa Symphony Guild

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2019-2020 ODESSA SYMPHONY GUILD OFFICERS AND COMMITTEE CHAIRS EX EC UT IV E BOA R D

President President-Elect Membership VP Project VP Ticket VP Recording Secretary Treasurer Asst. Treasurer Parliamentarian Corresponding Secretary

Tatum Fulbright Stacie Pruitt Connie Grewell Kim Watkins and Amber Barrientes Muffin Navarrete Oryan Womack Joni Robinson Lisset Velasquez Lisa Hill Melissa Carrasco

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STANDING C OMMIT T E E CHA IR S Arrangements Tamara Bavousett and Sandra Rose Belles/Beaux Susan Henry and Alice Salzwedel Bylaws Heather Bland Historian/ Public Relations Julie Drainer Nominating Vanessa Dunn Yearbook Crystal Kiker and Nadine Glasman Patron Liaison Heather Kirk and Jacqui Gore Communications Christin Timmons

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Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale Gary Lewis, Music Director & Conductor

Presents

Beethoven Five

Roberto Plano, piano SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2019 7:30 P.M. WAGNER NOËL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THIS CONCERT IS PROUDLY SPONSORED BY CAROL & TOM CHANDLER MARTHA & PAUL CRUMP

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Beethoven Five 7:30 p.m. Saturday, September 7, 2019 Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center Gary Lewis, conductor Roberto Plano, piano Ludwig Van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Coriolan Overture

Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor I. Allegro con brio II. Largo III. Rondo—Allegro

~INTERMISSION~ Symphony No. 5 in C minor I. Allegro con brio II. Andante con moto III. Scherzo: Allegro IV. Allegro—Presto

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M E E T T H E A R T I S T Roberto Plano, piano First Prize Winner of the 2001 Cleveland International Piano Competition, Finalist at the Twelfth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in 2005, Prizewinner of the Honens International Piano Competition (Calgary, Canada), the Axa Dublin International Piano Competition, the Geza Anda (Switzerland), Iturbi (Spain) and Sendai (Japan) Competitions (after having won First Prizes in several national competitions in Italy), Italian pianist Roberto Plano has performed all over the world. Plano was also named the “Best Ensemble Performer” at the Honens Competition for his performances with cellist Shauna Rolston and soprano Ingrid Attrot; and he was the winner of the "Best Recital" and "Best Performance of a Commissioned Work" prizes at the Dublin International Piano Competition. He has played in important venues in North America including Alice Tully Hall in New York City’s Lincoln Center, where he performed the American premiere of Luis de Pablo’s Retratos y Transcripciones; Severance Hall in Cleveland; Bass Hall in Forth Worth; National Arts Centre in Ottawa, and others. He regularly performs in Europe – notably at Parco della Musica in Rome, Sala Verdi and Teatro Dal Verme in Milan, Teatro Manzoni in Bologna, Teatro Politeama in Palermo, Fazioli Concert Hall (Italy), Auditorium della Svizzera Italiana in Lugano (Switzerland), Salle Cortot in Paris, Wigmore Hall and St. John Smith Square in London; National Concert Hall in Dublin, and at the Herculessaal and Gasteig in Munich. He has been a featured recitalist at internationally acclaimed Festivals such as the Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli Festival in Brescia and the Bologna Festival, Italy, the Chopin Festival in Duszniki, Poland, the Gijon International Piano Festival, Spain, “Les Fetes Musicales” Festival in Biarritz, France; and in the USA, the Ravinia Festival (IL), the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival (MI), the Portland Piano International Festival, the Newport Music Festival, the Savannah Music Festival and the Wassermann Piano festival (UT). Mr. Plano has appeared with orchestras in Italy (Milan Symphony Orchestra "Verdi"), Rome Symphony), Germany (Rheinland-Pfalz), Spain (Valencia Symphony), Czech Republic (Marienbad Symphony), Slovakia (Kosice State Symphony), Romania (Oradea, Sibiu, Targu Mures Symphonies), Switzerland (Festival Strings, Lucerne), the UK (Young Symphony Orchestra), Japan (Sendai Symphony), USA symphony orchestras (Houston, Fort Worth, Spokane, Akron, Illinois S.O., and others), under conductors such as James Conlon, Pinchas Zukerman, Jahja Ling, Marcelo Lehninger, Robert Franz, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Jahja Ling, Enrico Garcia Assensio, Gianluigi Gelmetti, Donato Renzetti, Ari Raisilianen, Kerry Stratton, and Gary Sheldon. In Canada he has been soloist with the Calgary Philharmonic under the direction of Sir Neville Marriner. Roberto Plano's friendly and outgoing personality has made him a favorite for guest appearances on a number of radio stations, including NPR’s Performance Today, WNYC in New York City, WFMT in Chicago, WGBH’s Classics in the Morning (Boston), WCRI (Newport), CBC's In Performance (Toronto), BBC In Tune (London), RadioRai 3 Grammelot, Piazza Verdi (Milan), and Rete 2 (Lugano). As a result of his success at the 2005 Van Cliburn Competition, he appeared in the film documentaries “In the Heart of Music” and “Encores” (together with James Conlon and Menahem Pressler ) which was aired on PBS stations across the United States, as well as in Europe through the satellite channel MEZZO. In 2006, Plano was chosen to participate in the DVD recording “A Masterclass with Jean-Michel Damasse”, filmed in Paris by ARTE at Salle Cortot; and together with Philippe Entremont, a second video project about the music of Mozart, broadcast by NHK in Japan.

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A R T I S T

As a teacher, he has given public master classes in prestigious universities such as Indiana University, University of Houston, Kent State University, Augusta State University, University of Mississippi, Utah State University, University of Dayton, the University of Massachusetts (Amherst), Boston Conservatory, the Cleveland Institute of Music, Alberta Conservatory (Edmonton, Canada), the Conservatory of San Juan (Puerto Rico), the Santa Cecilia Conservatory (Rome, Italy), as well as in Paris at the Ecole Normale Cortot, in Taiwan and in all the major cities of Schlewsig-Holstein, Germany. During the summer he also often presides at the Music International Masterclasses in Portogruaro and at the International Masterclasses Project in Campli, Italy. In previous seasons Mr. Plano made his debut at the, toured Italy playing Beethoven’s Triple Concerto, toured Canada and the U.S. (Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver, Cincinnati, Fort Worth, Austin, Los Alamos, Denver, and New York’s Steinway Hall), played with the Vienna Concert-Verein Orchestra at the Weston Recital Hall in Toronto, and made his debut with the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa conducted by Pinchas Zukerman. Highlights of recent previous seasons include Mr. Plano’s debut with the strings of the Berliner Philarmoniker in Italy, his debut recital at London’s Wigmore Hall, his debut with the Houston Symphony Orchestra, and concerts with the Milan, Fort Worth, Calgary, Bakersfield, Glens Falls, Reading, and Austin (MN) Symphony Orchestras, plus new collaborations with groups such as the St. Petersburg String Quartet. North American recital engagements followed in Pennsylvania, Oregon, Texas, Minnesota, Arizona, New York, Illinois, and British Columbia. In 2011, he performed at SUNY New Paltz’s McKenna Theatre (NY) at the invitation of Vladimir Feltsman’s PianoSummer Festival. In the summer of 2012 he made his recital debut at the prestigious Newport (RI) Music Festival, invited to return in 2015. The 2012-13 season saw him as soloist with the North Mississippi Symphony Orchestra and the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra (NY) – inviting him back in 2015, plus return engagements with the Bakersfield S.O. (CA), and the Boise Philharmonic (ID), the New Bedford S.O. (MA), Glacier S.O. & Chorale in Montana, the Arkansas Philharmonic, Newport Music Festival, and the University of Houston International Piano Festival in Texas. In January 2018, Roberto won First Prize in the 2017-18 American Prize for excellence in the piano solo professional division. As a chamber musician he played with groups such as the Takacs, Cremona, Fine Arts, and St. Petersburg String Quartets, as well as with soloists such as Ilya Grubert (violin), Enrico Bronzi and Giovanni Scaglione (cello) and Gabriele Cassone (trumpet). He has a piano duo with his wife Paola Del Negro and a crossover piano duo project with jazz pianist Paolo Paliaga, with whom he recorded the cd “Inspiration”. He also worked with famous Italian actress Lella Costa performing Liszt’s Melologues. Roberto has been invited as a juror in national and international competitions, including the Cleveland International Piano Competition and the Singapore National Piano and Violin Competition. Mr. Plano’s debut recording of sonatas and rondos by Andrea Luchesi (1741-1801) on the Concerto Classics label in 2012, received 5 stars out of 5 from MUSICA magazine; in February 2013, he performed the world premiere of the composer’s two piano concertos with the Busoni Chamber Orchestra in Trieste, Italy, Massimo Belli conducting. The performance included a never-before heard cadenza written for the concerto by Mozart. Amadeus, the most widely-read music magazine in Italy, featured these events with Roberto’s photograph on the magazine’s cover. The Toledo Symphony (OH), conducted by Stefan Sanderling, and Mr. Plano, gave the Luchesi concertos their North American premiere in March of 2015. In addition to 2 CDs with music by Andrea Luchesi published by the Concerto Classics label, he recorded also for Amadeus, Brilliant, Azica, Arktos, Sipario, and Tau Records. He appeared once more on the Amadeus cover in February, 2015, with a CD of music by Alexander Scriabin. In March of 2016, Mr. Plano’s debut award-winning recording for DECCA Classics was released, featuring the “Harmonies Poétiques et Religieuses” by Liszt, which have not been recorded by Decca since the 60s.

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In 2011, he created in Italy the Music Association “Alfred Cortot”, which he chaired, and the Academia Musicale Varesina, with the purpose of spreading the joy of classical music in all its aspects and giving priority to the musical education of young people. Recent events include soloist performances with the Royal Camerata at the Athenaeum Theater in Bucharest (Romania), with the Boston Civic Symphony, and recitals and chamber music concerts at the Stellenbosh Symposium, South Africa; at the Yamaha Center (Taiwan), at the Vivace Vilnius Festival in Lithuania; Gijon International Piano Festival in Spain, and at the Boston Athenaeum in the USA. His hometown in Italy, Varese, awarded him several Prizes, including the Lumen Claro, given in the past to influential people like Ottavio Missoni and Mario Monti. In 2016 he was elected Honorary Member by the Lions Club Varese Prealpi. A recital at the Janet Wallace Fine Arts Center in St. Paul, MN, for the Frederic Chopin Society was marked by the St. Paul Pioneer Press critic Ron Hubbard describing his performance among the top ten events of the year. Mr. Plano has been described by The Chronicle in Glens Falls, NY, the “Pavarotti of the Piano” for his lyricism, and also defined by the Chicago radio commentator Paul Harvey, Jr. as the heir to Rubinstein and Horowitz. NY Times music critic Anthony Tommasini has written: “This Italian pianist showed artistic maturity beyond his years… there was a wonderful clarity and control of inner voices in his performances…” In August, 2018, Mr. Plano joined the faculty at Indiana University’s Jacobs School of Music as Associate Professor of Piano and lives in the Bloomington area with his wife, pianist Paola Del Negro, and their 3 daughters: Elisa, Anna, and Sofia. More information about Mr. Plano can be found at www.RobertoPlano.com

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BEETHOVEN FIVE Masterworks: Beethoven Five Program Notes Dr. Martin King © 2019 Ludwig van Beethoven b. Bonn, baptized on December 17, 1770. Bonn, Germany d. March 26, 1827. Vienna.

more perfect in me than in others, a sense which I once possessed in highest perfection, a perfection such as few surely in my profession enjoy or have enjoyed.” The letter ends with Beethoven both laying out his will and telling his brothers that his art will sustain him for the rest of his life. After writing this letter Beethoven worked even harder and entered the most productive and famous period of his career. It was during this time that he wrote the three pieces featured on this program.

Coriolan Overture Composed: 1807 Premiered: June 15, 1807. Vienna, in the palace of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz The Work in Context • 1805: Lewis and Clark sight the Mississippi for the first time • 1806: The world’s first commercial steamboat service begins • 1807: Beethoven premieres Coriolan Overture on a concert with his fourth piano concerto and fourth symphony. • 1808: First typewriter invented by Pellegrini Turri The story of Ludwig van Beethoven’s personal crisis in dealing with his progressing deafness is quite well known. Although scholars do not know exactly when his affliction began, he mentioned the progression of his hearing loss in a letter to a personal friend in Vienna in 1801. It is difficult to imagine the mental and emotional toll that impending deafness would take on a composer who was in the process of coming into increasing fame and fortune. In May of 1802, Beethoven went to the town of Heiligenstadt to rest from the stresses of dealing with his health. In Heiligenstadt, Beethoven wrote a letter to his brothers that has become known as the Heiligenstadt Testament. In the letter, dated October 6, 1802, Beethoven attempts to explain his difficulty dealing with his deafness and why it had affected his family relationships. When discussing why he had kept his deafness a secret, he writes: “how could I possibly admit such an infirmity in the one sense which should have been

Although not known as a composer for the stage, Beethoven wrote one opera, Fidelio, and incidental music for several plays. The Coriolan Overture was written as part of a set of incidental music for the play Coriolan by Heinrich Joseph von Collin. The play was briefly popular in Vienna from 1802-1805 but did not rise to the quality or longevity of Shakespeare’s play of the same name. The play portrays the main character, Coriolanus, within the German trope of the tragic hero. The Coriolanus of Roman legend was a general who lead an outnumbered band of warriors to take the city of Corioli, but he was later exiled by the Senate and taken in by the city he once defeated. He then led an attack on Rome until he was talked out of his siege by his mother Veturia and his wife Volumnia. Coriolan Overture was premiered on a subscription concert in the palace of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz, one of Beethoven’s most important patrons. The concert also included his first four symphonies (the premiere of the fourth), the premiere of his Piano Concerto No. 4 in G, and several arias from Fidelio. The work contains two main themes. The first is an angular and martial theme in c minor, which seems to depict to Coriolanus’s warlike nature. The second theme, in Eb major, represents the pleading of Coriolanus’s mother for her son to spare Rome. Only this pleading theme returns at the recapitulation. The opening, martial theme finally returns, but this time as a lament, which be allusion to the tragic end of the play in which Coriolanus, in trying to be virtuous, has betrayed both Rome and Corioli and decides to take his own life.

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BEETHOVEN FIVE (continued) Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor Composed: 1800 Premiered: April 5, 1803. Vienna, with Beethoven at the piano The Work in Context • 1800: US Congress meets for the first time in Washington, DC. Beethoven writes Piano Concerto No. 3 • 1801: Ireland and Great Britain form the United Kingdom • 1802: The United States Military Academy is founded by Congress • 1803: Piano Concerto No. 3 premiered; Louisiana Purchase completed • 1804: First locomotive runs for the first time in Wales, UK Ludwig van Beethoven may have begun writing his third piano concerto as early as 1800, while in the middle of coming to terms with his hearing loss. On April 2, 1800, Beethoven put on his first of many public concerts. He was originally scheduled to premiere his Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, but for some unknown reason, he did not. Instead, he included a symphony by Mozart and one of his earlier concertos. Beethoven premiered the piece on April 5, 1803 with his Symphony No. 2 and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives. Beethoven was the piano soloist for the premiere. His friend, Ignaz von Seyfried, turned pages for Beethoven in the performance. Seyfried wrote of the music he was reading over Beethoven’s shoulder in the performance: “I saw almost nothing but empty pages; at the most, on one page or another a few Egyptian hieroglyphs wholly unintelligible to me were scribbled down to serve as clues for him; for he played nearly all the solo part from memory since, as was so often the case, he had not had time to set it all down on paper.” The key of C minor was something of a favorite of Beethoven. Like the other two works on this program, Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 is in this key. Comparisons to Mozart’s C minor concerto (K. 491) are inevitable, especially given the more 36

classical musical style Beethoven employees in this piece. It would be wrong, however, to accuse Beethoven of simply imitating Mozart. Beethoven develops his themes, writes an expansive slow movement, and connects the second and third movements with the originality that have made Beethoven the monumental figure he is in Western music. The first movement contrasts the main theme in C minor with a second theme in the relative key of E-flat major. The second movement, marked Largo, is in the very unrelated key of E major. These two keys share no notes in common, which makes the transition between the two movements quite unsettling. The movement is much slower than many second movements of the era. Beethoven once again proves himself a master orchestrator with the flute and bassoon duet over plucked strings in the middle of the movement. The finale starts in C minor and, much like the fifth symphony, ends in a glorious C Major. The sonata-rondo form of the final movement is lively and witty, with excursions into unrelated keys and back again in ways unique to the creative courage of Ludwig van Beethoven. Symphony No. 5 in C minor Composed: 1804-1808 Premiered: December 22, 1808. Vienna. Conducted by Ludwig van Beethoven The Work in Context • 1804: Lewis and Clark expedition begins; Beethoven begins composing Symphony No. 5 • 1805: Horatio Nelson wins the battle of Trafalgar but is mortally wounded in the victory • 1806: Holy Roman Empire officially dissolves • 1807: US Congress bans the slave trade, slavery still remains legal in the South • 1808: Symphony No. 5 premieres Although not as initially popular as the wildly successful Symphony No. 3 “Eroica,” Ludwig van


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BEETHOVEN FIVE (continued) Beethoven’s fifth symphony is quite possibly the most famous piece of music ever written. The four-note motive that opens the first movement is iconic in a way that few works of art ever achieve. Beethoven began work on this symphony in 1804, just over a year after the evidence of his resolve to continue his creative striving despite his deafness found in the Heiligenstadt Testament. Many critics and musicians see the piece as a tour de force. Hector Berlioz wrote that the symphony was “his [Beethoven’s] own intimate thought that is developed; and his secret sorrows, his pent-up rage, his dreams so full of melancholy oppression, his nocturnal visions and his bursts of enthusiasm furnish its entire subject, while the melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, and orchestral forms are there delineated with essential novelty and individuality, endowing them also with considerable power and nobility." The piece begins in C minor and ends in a glorious C Major, which has frequently been interpreted as signifying the hero’s victory over all obstacles. Symphony No. 5 did not begin its life in the musical world under the best possible circumstances. The piece was written during a period of incredible productivity for Beethoven. From 1804-1808, he composed the Sonatas op. 53, 54, and 57, the Fourth Piano Concerto, the “Razumovsky” Quartets, the Violin Concerto, the opera Fidelio, the Mass in C, and the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Symphonies. The fifth symphony shared its premiere on a very long concert (even for Beethoven) with the premieres of the sixth symphony, excerpts from the Mass in C, a new aria from Fidelio, the fourth piano concerto, the Fantasia for Solo Piano, and the Choral Fantasy. Beethoven served as composer, conductor, and impresario for the concert. He had to book the hall, promote the concert, and hire the musicians in addition to his musical responsibilities as conductor and soloist. The premiere was not the success he hoped for. Beethoven only left time for one rehearsal, in which he intimidated and berated the soprano soloist. The orchestra was very

underprepared, the hall was very cold, and the audience was exhausted by the length of the program. By some accounts, Beethoven even had to stop the music and start again during the Choral Fantasy. However, critics withheld judgement until the piece was performed again and the score was published. E.T.A. Hoffman wrote a glowing review that not only praised the work, he also provided an analysis that was very popular in explaining the musical rhetoric of the piece. A prominent characteristic of the fifth symphony is its organic nature. The whole work seems to grow out of the four-note motive that opens the work. Beethoven allegedly told his assistant that this motive represents “fate knocking at the door.” The first movement is in the traditional sonata form, but with all of Beethoven’s innovative twists and turns. The movement is a compositional tour de force, with a tight structure that seems to not contain a single note too many. The second movement, marked Andante con moto, is a double variation, meaning that it presents two themes that go through a series of variations. The third movement is one of Beethoven’s trademark Scherzos. The movement opens with a sinuous melody in the low strings answered by the winds. The horns loudly interrupt with the main theme of the movement. The third movement is relatively short and transitions directly into the fourth movement in an absolutely ingenious piece of composition. The final movement, begun without pause after the third movement, is in a glorious C Major. Trombones, piccolo, and contrabassoon join the orchestra for the first time in the piece to expand the orchestra and bring the piece to a forceful conclusion.

Program notes by Martin D. King For more information, please visit www.martinking.music.com

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Midland – Odessa Symphony & Chorale Gary Lewis, Music Director & Conductor

THE ADDAMS FAMILY IN CONCERT

Saturday, October 5, 2019 7:30 p.m. Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center THE POPS & FAMILY SERIES IS PROUDLY SPONSORED BY Lissa Noël Wagner with Frances Brown THIS CONCERT IS PROUDLY SPONSORED BY

Diann & John McKee

Tonight's program is a presentaon of the complete film The Addams Family with a live performance of the film’s enre score, including music played by the orchestra during and aer the end credits. Out of respect for the musicians and your fellow audience members, please remain seated unl the conclusion of the music.

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THE ADDAMS FAMILY IN CONCERT Midland – Odessa Symphony & Chorale Gary Lewis, Conductor PARAMOUNT PICTURES presents a SCOTT RUDIN producon

ANGELICA HUSTON

RAUL JULIA

CHRISTOPHER LLOYD

THE ADDAMS FAMILY Music by MARC SHAIMAN The Addams Family Theme by VIC MIZZY Director of Photography OWEN ROIZMAN, A.S.C. Editor DEDE ALLEN, A.C.E. Co-Producer JACK CUMMINS Execuve Producer GRAHAM PLACE Wrien by CAROLINE THOMPSON & LARRY WILSON Based on the Characters Created by CHARLES ADDAMS Produced by SCOTT RUDIN Directed by BARRY SONNENFELD Moon Picture, Artwork, Photos © 1991 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved. “The Addams Family” licensed by Paramount Pictures and Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios. This Program licensed by Paramount Pictures and Metro Goldwyn Mayer Studios.

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THE ADDAMS FAMILY IN CONCERT (connued) ABOUT THE COMPOSER Marc Shaiman Five-me Oscar nominee—and Emmy and Tony Award winning composer—Marc Shaiman has wrien original songs and scores for a wide range of projects spanning film, television, and Broadway. His film works include Flipped, Hairspray, The Bucket List, South Park: Bigger Longer & Uncut (Academy Award nominee), A Few Good Men, Patch Adams (Academy Award nominee), George of the Jungle, In & Out, First Wives Club (Academy Award nominee), Mother, The American President (Academy Award nominee), City Slickers, Sister Act, The Addams Family, Sleepless in Seale (Academy Award nominee), When Harry Met Sally, and Mary Poppins Returns (Golden Globe nominee). His stage work includes the Broadway hit Hairspray (Tony Award winner), Fame Becomes Me, The Odd Couple, Catch Me if You Can and most recently Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Shaiman received his eighth Emmy nominaon for his original song “Hang the Moon” for the NBC musical series Smash, which Shaiman execuve produced with Steven Spielberg. Shaiman’s recent film works include the score to long-me collaborator Rob Reiner’s film LBJ, a song for the Annapurna Pictures film Wiener-Dog which premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Fesval and the Golden Globe nominated main tle song for The Star which he co-wrote with Mariah Carey. His most recent work is the sequel of Disney’s beloved classic, Mary Poppins Returns, which earned him both Golden Globe and Oscar nominaons for Best Original Score, along with an Oscar nominaon for Best Original Song for “The Place Where Lost Things Go”. A nave of New Jersey, Shaiman established himself early as a theatre music director and skilled accompanist, forging a collaborave relaonship with Bee Midler. As a musician on Saturday Night Live, he connected with Marn Short and Billy Crystal, soon leading him to Hollywood. He has been recognized with numerous awards, and both his sweeping romanc themes and unforgeable songs have earned a permanent place in the culture’s memory bank.

COMPOSER NOTE When they first asked me to score The Addams Family, I was sure of one thing: Danny Elfman must be too busy. But I was happy to dine on his sloppy seconds, what a fantasc film to get to score, what a delicious style to get to join in on with director Barry Sonnenfeld and all our collaborators. And that cast! Heaven! Or should I say Hell? 42


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THE ADDAMS FAMILY IN CONCERT (connued) Well, the best part of scoring a film is the me spent with the orchestra. Even though, in my naive youth (The Addams Family was only my second film as a composer), I didn't really know how to write music for string players that allowed them to play it without contorng themselves (I’m afraid I sll don't!). And so, I fear tonight you might see more than a few violinists stand up during the movie and curse my name, while throwing the music to the ground as they storm off, arms hanging limply at their sides. String secon forgive me! Everyone else, enjoy! Mamushka!

PRODUCTION CREDITS The Addams Family In Concert produced by Film Concerts Live!, a joint venture of IMG Arsts, LLC and The Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency, Inc. Producers: Steven A. Linder and Jamie Richardson Producon Manager: Rob Stogsdill Producon Coordinator: Sophie Greaves Worldwide Representaon: IMG Arsts, LLC Technical Director: Mike Runice Music Composed by Marc Shaiman The Addams Family Theme by Vic Mizzy Music Preparaon: Jo Ann Kane Music Service Film Preparaon for Concert Performance: Epilogue Media Technical Consultant: Laura Gibson The score for The Addams Family has been adapted for live concert performance. With special thanks to: Marc Shaiman, Dan Butler, Eric Ybanez, Pam Reynolds, Lori Silfen, Mark Graham and the musicians and staff of the Midland – Odessa Symphony & Chorale.

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Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale Gary Lewis, Music Director & Conductor

Presents

Tchaikovsky Five

Brian Lewis, violin SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2019 7:30 P.M. WAGNER NOËL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER THIS CONCERT IS PROUDLY SPONSORED BY

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Tchaikovsky Five 7:30 p.m. Saturday, November 2, 2019 Wagner NoĂŤl Performing Arts Center Gary Lewis, conductor Brian Lewis, violin Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) Magic Flute Overture

Max Bruch (1838-1920) Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor I. Vorspiel: Allegro moderato II. Adagio Finale: Allegro energico

~INTERMISSION~ Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893) Symphony No. 5 in E minor I. Andante—Allegro con anima II. Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza III. Valse. Allegro moderato IV. Finale: Andante maestoso

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T H E

A R T I S T

BRIAN LEWIS - VIOLIN One of the most versatile and charismatic violinists today, Brian Lewis is an exceptionally dedicated and gifted performer whose passionate artistry has been heard and embraced around the world. "There are a lot of fine violinists on the concert stage today, but few can match Lewis for an honest virtuosity that supremely serves the music,” reports the Topeka Capital-Journal. Acclaimed performances include concerto debuts in both New York's Carnegie Hall and Avery Fisher Hall, as well as performances with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, the Berlin (Germany), Louisiana, Kansas City, Hartford, Syracuse, Odense (Denmark), Lima (Peru), Boulder, Guadalajara (Mexico), Sinfonia Toronto (Canada), and American Symphony orchestras, among many others. Internationally, Mr. Lewis has been a featured recitalist in Australia, Canada, the French West Indies, Puerto Rico, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, France, England, Denmark, Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Peru, Chile, and Brazil. As a dynamic and engaging teacher, Mr. Lewis is committed to growing the legacies of the great pedagogues Dorothy DeLay and Dr. Shin’ichi Suzuki for future generations. Mr. Lewis currently holds the David and Mary Winton Green Chair in String Performance and Pedagogy at the University of Texas at Austin, serves as Artistic Director of the Starling-DeLay Symposium on Violin Studies at Juilliard, and is Artistic Director and faculty member of the Brian Lewis Young Artist Program in Ottawa, KS. Recognized for his vast outreach success including working with and performing for more than 165,000 children in the Houston area, Mr. Lewis taught community engagement courses at the Yale University School of Music during 2010-12 as the Class of '57 Visiting Professor of Music. Mr. Lewis has recorded numerous CDs, including the world premiere recording with the London Symphony Orchestra of a commissioned work, Elements, by American composer Michael Thomas McLean. Mr. Lewis has served as a distinguished juror for many competitions, most recently for the 2014 Menuhin International Violin Competition. Awards for his musical contributions include the Instrumentalist Award by the 2014 Austin Critics’ Table, two Teaching Excellence Awards at the University of Texas, ING Professor of Excellence Award, Medal of St. Barthélemy, Texas Exes Teaching Award, Fredell Lack Award, 1998 Young Audiences Artist of the Year, Peter Mennin Prize,William Schuman Prize, SONY ES Fellows Award, Audio Magazine Award, Waldo Mayo Talent Award, and two Elizabeth B. Koch Fellowships. More information about Mr. Lewis can be found at www.BrianLewisViolin.com

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TCHAIKOVSKY FIVE Masterworks: Tchaikovsky Five Program Notes Dr. Martin King © 2019 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart b. January 27, 1756 in Salzburg, Austria d. December 5, 1791 in Vienna Overture to The Magic Flute Composed: Mozart dated the overture September 28, 1791 Premiered: September 30, 1791 in Vienna, just two days after its completion The Work in Context • 1789: Citizens of Paris storm the Bastille, beginning the French Revolution • 1790: President George Washington delivers the first State of the Union Address • 1791: Premiere of The Magic Flute, Mozart dies less than three months later • 1792: Kentucky becomes the 15th US State The name Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart has become synonymous with classical music, especially the music of Classical era Vienna. A child prodigy, the young Mozart began playing the piano at the age of four and composing at the age of five. His father, a musician in his own right, began taking young Wolfgang and his older sister Nannerl on performing tours when Wolfgang was just six years old. The children performed in the Imperial Courts in Vienna and Prague and in the cities of London, Munich, Mannheim, and Paris. He continued touring throughout his childhood and teenage years. Mozart was employed as a court musician in Salzburg by the age of 17 and left acrimoniously for Vienna in 1781. It was in Vienna that Mozart established his reputation as a composer and, unlike many of his contemporaries, composed in all the popular genres of the day. Due to Mozart’s tragic death at the age of 35, he only spent ten years in Vienna. His last several years were marked by disappointment and financial struggles. He began to borrow money to sustain his family’s lifestyle. He began to tour more around Europe hoping to improve his financial situation,

but these tours were only marginally successful. Mozart’s final year, 1791, saw a modest improvement in his financial circumstances and an increase in compositional output. He composed the majority of The Magic Flute in early 1791, but he put the work on hold when he was commissioned to write the opera La clemenza di Tito for the coronation of Emperor Leopold II. He composed at a breakneck speed to finish this new opera in time for its premiere on September 6, 1791. As soon as the premiere was over, Mozart rushed back to Vienna for the final rehearsals of The Magic Flute. The opera, written for a commercial theater and not on commission, was immediately successful. Huge crowds attended the performances, and the opera reached its milestone 100th performance in November 1792. Unfortunately, Mozart was not able to appreciate his final opera’s success. His final illness began while he was in Prague for the premiere of La clemenza di Tito. He continued working, conducted the premiere of The Magic Flute, but had to stop working on November 20th and passed away just two weeks later. The Magic Flute is an example of the sub-genre of opera called singspiel. Works in this category are in the German language, contain spoken dialogue, and often have comic or romantic plots. The libretto, or text of the opera was written by Emmanuel Schikaneder, a multi-talented writer who also produced the singspiel and sung the part of Papageno. The opera tells the story of Prince Tamino, who sets out, at the request of the Queen of the Night, to rescue her daughter Pamina from her imprisonment by the priest Sarastro. In a major (and controversial) plot twist, Tamino learns that Sarastro is actually the good guy, falls in love with Pamina, and vanquishes the Queen of the Night. The overture begins with three forceful chords by the orchestra. Mozart had a large orchestra at his disposal for this piece, so the trumpets, horns, and trombones he included add a glorious element to the opening statement. After a slow introduction, a lively opening melody begins. Late in his career, Mozart engaged in careful study of the counterpoint in the music of Bach and Handel. The entire overture is a fugue-like working out of this one melody, where Mozart presents this same melody played by a variety of instruments in a variety of contexts. The quick tempo is disrupted by 51


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TCHAIKOVSKY FIVE (continued) the return of the slow introduction. When the lively melody returns, however, it comes back in a minor key. The music transitions back to major and, through a long crescendo, builds up to a big finish with rolls in the timpani and a forceful closing statement accented by the brass. The Magic Flute is one of Mozart’s most performed works, and this overture is often heard on concert stages. Max Bruch b. January 6, 1838 in Cologne, Germany d. October 2, 1920 in Berlin, Germany Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor III. Vorspiel: Allegro moderato IV. Adagio V. Finale: Allegro energico Composed: 1864-1867 Premiered: Original version: April 24, 1866. Revised version (current form) January 7, 1868 in Bremen, Germany. The Work in Context • 1864: Abraham Lincoln elected to his second term as US President • 1865: Robert E. Lee surrenders at Appomattox, American Civil War Ends • 1866: First transatlantic telegraph message sent, premiere of the original Bruch violin concerto.

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• 1867: Russia sells Alaska to the United States for two cents per acre • 1868: The stapler is patented, premiere of revised Violin Concerto No. 1 The son of a singer and a police officer, Max Bruch began his music education with his mother at age nine and won his first composition prize at 14. After traveling around Germany in his early career, Bruch settled in Mannheim. He wrote works in a variety of genres, but his most famous works are his choral music, the opera Die Loreley, and his violin concertos. Max Bruch was something of a musical conservative. In the famous “War of the Romantics” in the mid 1800s, Bruch sided with the Schumanns, Brahms, and Mendelssohn against the radicals like Liszt and Wagner. This was a battle over programmatic music and musical form that raged in the 1850s, but Bruch hung onto his resistance to the radical romantics for decades after the musical world had moved on from these controversies and continued to evolve. For this reason, his latest compositions sound similar to his earlier works. Max Bruch passed away in 1920 after a long career as a composer, conductor and teacher. Although Bruch had the misfortune of being overshadowed in his compositional prime by Johannes Brahms, his Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor is an absolute jewel of the Romantic repertoire. Bruch proceeded cautiously with his violin concerto, withdrawing the work after its


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TCHAIKOVSKY FIVE (continued) premiere for revisions. He sent the manuscript to Joseph Joachim, an all-time great violin virtuoso, for comments. Joachim was a friend of Brahms and the Schumanns and was an ally in Bruch’s musical conservatism. Max Bruch forbade the publication of all of his correspondence with Joachim, as he feared that he would look too depended on his colleague for his help. After at least, in the composer’s own words, “half a dozen” rewrites, the work was premiered in its current form with Joseph Joachim as soloist. The concerto was enthusiastically received and was performed by all the great violinists of the day. Unfortunately, Bruch sold the work outright, not just the publishing rights, to his publisher, so he made no royalties off of the success of his most popular work. Max Bruch believed that the violin could “sing a melody better than a piano, and melody is the soul of music.” His first violin concerto demonstrates the truth of his statement. The work opens with an introduction that features two short cadenzas (unaccompanied solos) in the violin to which the orchestra responds. The main theme of the first movement is incredibly virtuosic, with frequent double stops. This technique, in which the performer plays two notes at the same time, requires an incredible amount of precision from the performer. This theme stands in contrast to a lush second theme that highlights the romanticism of the sound of the violin. The short cadenzas return, followed by a soaring melodic moment from the orchestra that directly transitions into the second movement. The opening of the second movement is stunning in its simplicity and beauty. Bruch handles the contrast between gentle melodies and bravura sections without the music ever sounding difficult. The movement ends with a lovely duet between the horn and the violin. The third movement opens with what sounds like a folk dance, once again featuring an extended series of double stops. The second theme is another gorgeous melody from the violin soloists. The dancelike theme returns as the tempo of the music gradually speeds up to virtuosic fireworks at the end. The entire work shows Bruch’s skill as a composer of melodies and the soloists’ mastery of both technique musical expression. It is little wonder that this fantastic piece remains Bruch’s most enduring work.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky b. May 7, 1840 in Kamsko-Votkinsk, Russia d. November 6, 1893 in St. Petersburg, Russia Symphony No. 5 in E minor V. Andante—Allegro con anima VI. Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza VII. Valse. Allegro moderato VIII. Finale: Andante maestoso Composed: May-August 1888 Premiered: November 7, 1888 in St. Petersburg with Tchaikovsky conducting The Work in Context • 1886: After a four-year chase, American troops capture Apache chief Geronimo • 1887: Ethiopians repel Italian attempts at colonization • 1888: George Eastman invents the Kodak camera, Symphony No. 5 premieres • 1889: North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Washington become US states Although trained as a lawyer, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky could not keep himself away from music. He graduated from law school in 1859 and began to practice in St. Petersburg. He may have never become the composer we know and love if the St. Petersburg Conservatory had not begun offering classes in 1860. Russian composers of the previous generation, such as Mussorgsky and Rimsky-Korsakov, were distrustful of European influence and the new conservatories. Tchaikovsky took the opposite course, embraced his education, and grew into a mature composer in a few short years. Tchaikovsky moved to Moscow in 1866 to teach music theory at the new Moscow Conservatory, where is reputation as a composer gradually grew into prominence. Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 is one of his later works, written just five years before his death. His work with the Russian Music Society and as a director had brought him begrudgingly into the spotlight. He became very busy with conducting and organizing concerts in Moscow, and his increased time in the spotlight led to Tchaikovsky becoming more comfortable as a conductor. He did not begin the fifth symphony until ten years after the premiere of the fourth, and he wrote that 53


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TCHAIKOVSKY FIVE (continued) he was “dreadfully anxious to prove not only to others, but also to myself, that I am not yet played out as a composer.” From his writings we know that the fifth symphony did not come easily to Tchaikovsky. After four months of intense and painstaking work, the symphony was finally complete. In the later part of the 1800s, many symphonies and symphonic works were published with a subtitle or story, called a “program,” to explain the music. Tchaikovsky, much like the younger Gustav Mahler, had become uncomfortable with providing an extra musical story to his audience. Tchaikovsky sketched out a program for the piece, but never completed or published the text. The one fragment of text that seems unambiguously associated with the work is the line “a complete resignation before fate, which is the same as the inscrutable predestination of fate.” The work opens with a fanfare-like motto theme in the clarinets that makes an appearance in each movement of the symphony. The movement is rich in beautiful melodies and builds up to a strong climax before fading away to the end of the movement. The first movement is marked by extreme dynamic contrast, as is typical of Tchaikovsky’s orchestral works. The second

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movement opens with a stunning horn solo that is one of the most beloved moments for that instrument in the orchestral repertoire. The motto theme from the beginning of the symphony returns forcefully halfway through the movement. The third movement is a lively waltz featuring a lovely, flowing melody. Listen carefully for the motto theme in the low woodwinds at the end of the movement that gives the music a sense of foreboding at the conclusion of the movement. The final movement opens with the motto theme stated at forte in the strings, harmonized in a major key. The music builds and builds as Tchaikovsky presents the motto theme in a variety of contexts. Once the tempo picks up, the movement drives to a dramatic, forceful conclusion. Although critics did not unanimously appreciate this work, Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 has been a hit with audiences since its premiere, and it isn’t difficult to understand why. The melodies are beautiful, the movements are exciting, and the music is imbued with the emotion and passion that mark all of Tchaikovsky’s works. Program notes by Martin D. King For more information, please visit. www.martinking.music.com


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Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale with Lissa Noël Wagner and Frances Brown Present

SOUNDS OF THE SEASON

Gary Lewis, conductor Featuring Scott & Nikki Windham

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2019 7:30 P.M. WAGNER NOËL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Featuring the MOSC Symphony Orchestra, Chorale, Voices of the Permian Basin, Lone Star Brass, Permian Basin String Quartet, West Texas Winds and Scott & Nikki Windham as Santa & Mrs. Claus!

THIS CONCERT PROUDLY SPONSORED BY CLAIRE & JIM WOODCOCK

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T H E

A R T I S T S

Nikki Windham Nikki is a native of Southern California and has participated in many shows throughout her life. Various roles include Rizzo in GREASE, Rosie in BYE, BYE BIRDIE, Laurie in OKLAHOMA! and the Dragon & Mama Bear in SHREK, THE MUSICAL, as Winifred Banks in MARY POPPINS and as Ursula in THE LITTLE MERMAID. She has been seen on stage locally at the Permian Playhouse as Cathy in THE LAST FIVE YEARS, Daniella in IN THE HEIGHTS, Desiree in A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC, Miss Hannigan in ANNIE and herself in SMOKEY JOE'S CAFE. Nikki’s regional credits include The Miracle Theater where she originated the role of Martha in THE MIRACLE, Abigail Barrington in REBEL CRY & Ensemble in Riverside Civic Light Opera’s production of JOSEPH. Scott & Nikki have been married for almost 16 years and are the crazy parents to two blond haired, blue eyed divas in training and a handsome little boy.

Scott Windham Scott is a West Texas boy, raised in Odessa and graduated from Odessa High in '98. He then moved to Virginia where he graduated from Liberty University. Scott has been seen locally at the Permian Playhouse as Charlie Brown in YOU'RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN, Frederick in A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC, and as Frankie in FOREVER PLAID and as Shrek in SHREK, THE MUSICAL at MCT. Other local credits include Younger Brother in RAGTIME, Hal in PROOF and Jim in GIFTS OF THE MAGI. Scott has also performed professionally in NYC as Dave in THE FULL MONTY, Narrator/Mysterious Man in INTO THE WOODS, Pirate King in PIRATES OF PENZANCE and Curly in OKLAHOMA! Scott has also enjoyed directing IN THE HEIGHTS, TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE, ANNIE, and GODSPELL at The Permian Playhouse. He worked in various regional theaters along the East Coast where he originated the roles of Peter in THE MIRACLE, Cecil Barrington in REBEL CRY and Marshall Everett in RIBS FOR DINNER. Scott has been married to his incredible bride, Nikki, for almost 16 years & they are the proud parents to 3 incredible little elves!

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Because music matters to us, too. At FirstCapital Bank of Texas, we put your well-being above all else. That’s why we’re a proud supporter of the Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale’s mission to enhance the quality of life for all of us . . . one beautiful note at a time.

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S P O N S O R S

POPS & FAMILY SERIES SPONSOR LISSA NOËL WAGNER WITH FRANCES BROWN PLATINUM ($10,000) Anadarko Midland Symphony Guild Odessa Symphony Guild GOLD ($5,000) Cimarex Energy Co. Community National Bank Concho Resources FirstCapital Bank of Texas Lithia All American Auto Group Shamrock Steel Sales Claire & Jim Woodcock SILVER ($3,500) Cotton, Bledsoe, Tighe & Dawson P.C. Plains Marketing L.P. Martha and Paul Crump BRONZE ($2,500) Aghorn Energy Brazos Door & Hardware Frost Bank Carol and Tom Chandler Ann & Ken Hankins, Jr. Dr. James & Sharon Humphreys Diann and John McKee West Texas National Bank

CHAMBER & CHORAL CONCERTS ($500) Shamrock Steel Sales Dee and Susan Carter Chris and Fred Newman Ann Parish Betty Ann Prentice MUSIC EDUCATION SPONSORS Ann Parish Betty Ann Prentice ECISD MISD MEDIA, LODGING & TRANSPORTATION SPONSORS DoubleTree by Hilton Hotels at Midland Plaza Rogers Ford Lincoln Midland Reporter-Telegram Odessa American Basin PBS CBS7 West Texas Radio Group KWEL Radio Midland Living Magazine

The Odessan

Thank you to all sponsors of this remarkable 57th season. The critical role played by our sponsors year after year allows the Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale to stay true to its mission of Enriching Lives Through Music. For sponsorship opportunities please contact MOSC Development Director Violet Singh at development@mosc.org or 432-563-0921. 64


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2019 - 2020 FUND DRIVE CONTRIBUTORS The Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale is very pleased to acknowledge the generosity of those who place high value on the presence of live symphonic, chamber and choral music in the Permian basin. Through their monetary commitment or through other unique forms of support they enable MOSC to fulfill its mission of Enriching Lives Through Music for a 57th season! Listed below are the gifts and pledges received for the 2019-2020 season as of August 1, 2019. DIAMOND BATON SOCIETY ($10,000+) City Of Midland (HOT) J.C. Ferguson Foundation Midland Symphony Guild Odessa Symphony Guild PLATINUM BATON SOCIETY ($7,500) Scott Long GOLDEN BATON SOCIETY ($5,000+) Karen and Spencer Beal Maridell Fryar Kay and George Smith Claire and Jim Woodcock SILVER BATON SOCIETY ($2,500+) Exploration Geophysics / Lee A. Miller Ken Anderson & Anne Acreman, M.D. Nancy Anguish Michael & Dana Ashton Carolina and Ronny Keith Dr. Ed & Suzanne Rathbun Rosemary and Max Wright FORTISSIMO ($1,000) Brazos Door and Hardware / Diann and John McKee Barry & Cliffy Beal Sherry and Phillip Bell Dale Brown Susan and Dee Carter Drs. Richard and Roberta Case Mary Lou Cassidy Roger Corzine Martha and Paul Crump Betty Rae and Paul Davis

Marion & Robert Frazier Rosalind Redfern Grover Betty P. Gulledge Ann & Ken Hankins, Jr. Dr. James & Sandra Huston Patricia and Leon Jeffcoat Mary Kim Doris Casey Mason Red and Juandelle Lacy Roberts Douglas Scharbauer Lura and C. Richard Sivalls Carole V. Warren

FORTE ($500) Anonymous Chaparral Bolt & Supply / Keith and Norma Binam Penny and Ernie Angelo Kirk & Suzie Boyd Richard & Sherry Buck Juana Christesson Betty Dale Judia Foreman Jeff and Lou Nelle George Richard Gilliam 65


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2019 - 2020 FUND DRIVE CONTRIBUTORS Patti and Tevis Herd Dr. Thomas A. & Anne B. Hyde Dianne & William Jones Julie and Donald Judson David & Sarah Lauritzen Chris and Fred Newman Ann Parish Mary & Craig Payken Elizabeth Prentice Randee and Jack Rathbone Gary Brednich & Robin Richey Floyd & Kathy Rountree Gregory Smith Bryce Swinford Dr. Carol Ann Traut Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Whatley MEZZO FORTE ($250) Mike & LaNelle Agee Marilyn & Don Andjulis Dottie Barker Fredda Black Dr. Deborah Edwards Dr. Paul Feit Dee Griffin

Judith Hayes Caroline Ater Howard Shirlee and Alexander Kent Susan and Ted Kerr Stephen J. Kroger LaDoyce Lambert Lynn Mashburn Terry and Zahir Noormohamed Eric Panzer Bob & Ruth Price Neva Rousselot Joyce Sherrod Violet and Mark Singh James & Allison Small Todd Stallings Carrol and Georgia Thomas Jessica Waller Ludie and Eben Warner Bill & Patti Watson Richard and Deeann Werner CRESCENDO ($125+) Tierra Company, L.P. Network For Good Cindy and John Barkley

Julia Cobb Monsignor Larry Droll Mary and Bill Garay Mark Germer Elizabeth Greaves Dr. William and Edna Hibbitts Ron & Sarah Holcomb Jack and Carolyn Laschkewitcsh Patti and Rod MacDonald Dr. Tulsi and Claudette Singh PIANO ($75+) Jewish Philanthropic Union Mary & Joseph Baker Em Carnett Steven Dojahn Arlen Edgar Anita Elms Jacqui and Mark Gore Jill and Wes Pearson Caroline Scott Dick and Pat Snyder Sue Solari

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ENDOWMENT FUND CONTRIBUTORS

You, Your Legacy and the music of the MOSC

For over 56 years, the music of the Midland-Odessa Symphony & Chorale has been presented as planned; despite the economic conditions in the Permian Basin, the music continued and no season (or part of a season) has ever been canceled. What a testament to residents of the Permian Basin and their determination to include live symphonic and choral music as an integral part of the cultural landscape of West Texas. Your gift to the MOSC Endowment Fund allows you to join generous contributors whose gifts go immediately to work and provide critical funding for the quality programming the MOSC offers season after season for residents of all ages. For further details on how you can play your part in assuring that the MOSC continues to Enrich Lives Through Music well into the future, please contact Violet Singh, Development Director at development@mosc.org (432) 563-0921.

THE FOUNDERS

Mrs. Keleen Beal

Millennium Club ($25,000+) MEMORIALS: Walter Osadchuk Dr. & Mrs. Michael S. Miller Mary June Rasmussen Mr. Kenneth Anderson & Anne Acreman, MD Anonymous Karen & Spencer Beal Davidson Family Charities Estate of Dollie Neal Ballenger Mary de Compiegne Estate of Mary Louise Gilmour Rosalind Redfern Grover William Randolph Hearst Endowment for Music Education Midland Symphony Guild MOSC Board of Directors Harvey & Harriet Herd John & Doris Mason Estate of Alice B. Moxey David Austin Stephens

Beethoven Society ($10,000-$24,999) In Memory of Charles Tracy Sivalls Mrs. C.T. Sivalls In Honor of Ruth McFarland Midland Symphony Guild Estate of Mary Harrington Anonymous (2) Nancy & Buddy Anguish Drs. Terry & Elvira Burns Dr. & Mrs. J. Terry Carpenter Mr. & Mrs. Nance G. Creager Marion E. Luper, Jr.

Mr. & Mrs. Louis Rochester

Dr. & Mrs. William L. McGavran III Beverly Pevehouse Mr. & Mrs. T.G. Roden Mr. & Mrs. Earl Rodman

Mozart Society ($5,000-$9,999) In Honor of Ted Hale Anonymous MEMORIALS: Nelson Allison Marion E. Luper, Jr. Jared A. Barlage Marion E. Luper, Jr. Roy E. Campbell Mrs. Viola Campbell HONORARIUMS: Ted Hale Anonymous Michael J. Santorelli Modesta and Clayton Williams J.C. Ferguson Foundation The Midland Musicians Club Drs. Richard & Roberta Case Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Cole Roger B. Corzine Dr. & Mrs. Bart Mayron Phil & Susan Parker Mr. & Mrs. C. Richard Sivalls Mr. & Mrs. George S. Smith Mr. & Mrs. Mark D. Wilson

Bach Society ($1,000-$4,999) MEMORIALS: Anne K. Anson Robert D. Anson

Robert D. Anson Drs. Richard & Roberta Case Tyler T. Burns Bobby & Denise Burns Johnny “Cactus Jack” Dowdle Nash Dowdle Marguerite W. Davis Ludie & Eben Warner John M. Grimland, Jr. Mrs. John M. Grimland, Jr Neal H. Johnson Berniece Johnson Vera Osadchuk Bea & Bob Angevine Walter Osadchuk Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Covington Josh H. Parr Anne & Jim McLaughlin Victoria Parr Ehrlich Mary June Rasmussen Dr. & Mrs. Terry Unruh Fred A. Stout, Jr. Kathlene N. Stout Martha Tompkins Dianne & Mark Tompkins Bob Winkler & Clayton Taylor Winkler Carolyn Winkler HONORARIUMS: Dorothy Davis Dr. & Mrs. Terry Unruh Michael J. Santorelli Penny and Ernest Angelo Carole V. Warren Shari Santorelli Penny and Ernest Angelo Betty Rae and Paul Davis

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ENDOWMENT FUND CONTRIBUTORS (continued) The MOSC Chorale Carole V. Warren ExxonMobil Foundation Marshall & Winston. Inc. Mobil Foundation, Inc. Shinn Industrial Sales/Barbara & Don Shinn TXU Electric The Midland Musicians Club Anonymous (3) Nelson Allison Dollie Neal Ballenger Dr. & Mrs. John E. Bauman Karen & Spencer Beal Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Boothe Mrs. M.O. Boring, Jr. David and Vicki Brown Bob & Julia Chandler Mr. & Mrs. K. Michael Conaway Paul & Martha Crump Betty & Albert Dale Mr. & Mrs. Roy H. Davidson Mary & Henri de Compiegne Kimberly B. Dollens Betty & Don Ewan Celeste Fasken Frances Gilliland Elizabeth A. Greaves Elizabeth Harvey Karl & Cathy Herzog Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd Innerarity Mrs. Stan Jacobs Mr. & Mrs. Bob L. Jones Marian & Charles E. Jones V. Wayne & Joann Jones Mr. & Mrs. James W. Lacy Dr. Ron Larson & Pat Paxton Larson Stephanie Latimer Jane C. Lea Robert M. & Prudie Leibrock Scott W. Long LaNelle McBee Mr. & Mrs. Stephen McHaney Rusty & Alyson McInturff Mr. & Mrs. James D. McLaughlin Walter & E. Grace Osadchuk Dr. E. Grace Osadchuk

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Mr. & Mrs. Josh H. Parr Dr. & Mrs. Jess Parrish Margaret L. Peer Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Perry Mr. & Mrs. Robert Pollard Mike and Sue Potter Mr. & Mrs. Robert R. Rice Mr. & Mrs. A.W. Rutter, Jr. Rick & Debbie Schneider Violet & Mark Singh Dr. Roger M. Traxel Bill & Patti Watson Harold & Jacquelyn Williams Jane Wolf Mr. & Mrs. Max Wright Contributors (Up to $999) HONORARIUMS: Bea Angevine Jane & Don Samples Katherine Bash & Duncan Kennedy Harriet A. & Gene Motter Jack “Dug” Belcher Dortha & Ronald Bennett Dortha & Ronald Bennett & Barbara Shinn Ms. Judy DeWees Brad Bullock MOSC Board of Directors Marin & Ashlin Bullock Brad & Crista Bullock Chris Chance Pamela Howell Carol Chandler MOSC Board of Directors Jo Ann Collett The Midland Musicians Club Kimberly Corman Janet Williams Pollard Ann Countryman Larry & Gwen Roberts Mrs. D. Pat Darden Betty M. Scott Gary Edmiston Employees of Security State Bank Karen Elliott Jane Wolf

Trisha Faubion Karen Watson Maridell Fryar Bea Angevine Jane & Don Samples Sue Solari Louise M. Garay Bill & Mary Garay Luis de la Garza, III Pamela Howell Richelle Gengler The Midland Musicians Club Dr. Ted Hale Anonymous Carol, John & Caroline Deats Edith C. Hardy The Midland Musicians Club Lee Harley Flo White Sharon Hickox Mark & Janet Krause Dr. Thomas A & Anne B. Hyde Violet and Mark Singh Peggy C. Jones The Midland Musicians Club Abigail Kauffman Mary Macferran Jeannette Kolokoff Crystal Radford Ann Parish Betty Ann Prentice LaDoyce Lambert MOSC Board of Directors David Lauritzen MOSC Board of Directors Martha Lewis The Midland Musicians Club John and Melissa Madura Violet and Mark Singh Reba McHaney Mr. & Mrs. Stephen H. Parker Tim Young & Sharon Hickox Edward McPherson Jeannette & Mark Kolokoff Vera Osadchuk The Midland Musicians Club


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ENDOWMENT FUND CONTRIBUTORS (continued) Dr. Henry Page The Midland Musicians Club Mr. & Mrs. Walter Pope Midland Symphony Guild Richy Puga Jennifer & John C. Harper Gregory Pysh Chapter Gd P.E.O. Connie May Russell J. Ramsland Midland Symphony Guild Jay Reynolds MOSC Board of Directors Red & Juandelle Lacy Roberts Violet & Mark Singh Elizabeth Roweck The Midland Musicians Club Jane Samples Bea Angevine Michael J. Santorelli Violet and Mark Singh Janet Stafford Carol Symonette Shari Santorelli Craig and Doris Anderson Connie May Violet and Mark Singh Janet Stafford Carol Symonette Cliff & Joyce Sherrod Violet & Mark Singh Violet Singh Alynda Best Joanie Holt Rev. Jon & Dale Stasney Sue Smith & Jim Huddleston Alathea & Jim Blischke Violet and Mark Singh Sue Solari Jane & Don Samples

Mark & Jeannette Kolokoff Bill & Mary Garay Herb and Pat Stanley Violet and Mark Singh Cindy Walton Amy A. Walton Jane Wolf Memorial Christian Church Billy T. Schulze Beverly Wise The Midland Musicians Club Gene & JoAnn Wyatt Risa Brown MEMORIALS Nelson Allison Michael & Dana Ashton Bob & Kay Bivens Karl & Cathy Herzog Joan McCown Sue & Buddy McDonald Violet & Mark Singh Dr. & Mrs. Steve Wiehle Anne Anson Mr. & Mrs. Kevin D. Durham Arlen Edgar Betty & Clem George Robert D. Anson Thomas K. Anson Ms. Francene Breckenridge Edith Libson Andrew W. Austin & Cynthia K. Stewart Eldon Basney Midland Symphony Guild Ms. Beverly K. Cunningham Dr. E. Grace Osadchuk Mr. & Mrs. Michael Tandy Emma Burnett Violet and Mark Singh Jane Wolf

Jack E. Brown Jeannette and Mark Kolokoff Warren Burnett Paula & Ruff Ahders Ms. Judy DeWees Mr. & Mrs. Jim Leeton Mr. & Mrs. Michael Tandy Jane Wolf Anne Caldwell Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Jones Clarence E. Cardwell, Jr. Eric Leibrock Mrs. Ethel Chapman Truman & Doreen McCreless Viola Campbell The Midland Musicians Club J. Dan Carpenter Alan and Susan Leshnower Marcella Christensen Katherine Grella Doris Cooper Cowan Hill Bond Agency Mullis Newby Hurst Ronald Bennett Howard Cowan Janet Hayes Bob & Pam Leibrock Violet & Mark Singh Mary Nixon Tighe Dorothy Croft Caroline Ater Howard Chancy & Toni Croft Barbara Davis Alan & Susan Leshnower Mary McKeown Davis Pat & Herb Stanley Perry Davis Melissa Burnett & Wayne Warren

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ENDOWMENT FUND CONTRIBUTORS (continued) Jean Grisham Dean Jeff & Lou Nelle George Opal Dobbs Ludie & Eben Warner Gretchen Estes The Midland Musicians Club Marie Finical Chris Newman John Foster Kay & Robert Bivens Kathleen Freeman Lyn Fishman Maridell Fryar Ann Parish Betty Ann Prentice Fay Griffin Betty & Stuart Awbrey Marshall C. Gulledge Marilyn J. Craig Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Neill Frankie Simmons Mary Harrington Odessa Council for the Arts & Humanities Odessa Symphony Guild Nancy Anguish Karen & Spencer Beal Bobby & Denise Burns Emma H. Burnett Melissa Burnett & Wayne Warren Karl & Cathy Herzog Tim Young & Sharon Hickox Melissa Hirsch Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Jones Charles Milby Hartwell Barbara Hartwell Mayor Dan Hemphill Melissa Burnett & Wayne Warren Harriet Herd Midland Symphony Guild

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Alathea & Jim Blische Jeannine Donnelly Kenneth Herrick Elizabeth & Preston Black Myrna Herrick The Preston Black Family Mayor Bill Hext Bobby & Denise Burns Jacque Nell Hunder Holland Marc and Kay Maddox Rose Ann Houghton Joanie Holt Robert Hudson Jane Wolf Billie Hunt Pam & Bob Leibrock Pat Innerarity Jim & Barbara Clack Mary B. Kennedy Rebecca Sawyer Janet & Paul St.Hilaire Neal Johnson Ms. Judy DeWees Marian Jones Bob & Nancy Dott Betty & Harvey Dunn Alan & Susan Leshnower Sally McGuffey Esther D. Bird Jane Knox Jeannette & Mark Kolokoff Phyllis Kvasnicka Beverly Muire & Family Dick Lambert LaDoyce and Gloria Lambert Gloria Lambert Barry and Mary Beck Jeannette and Mark Kolokoff Violet and Mark Singh

Merceda Layton Audrey Chartier Katherine Leeton Fowler Melissa Burnett & Wayne Warren Katherine Linehan Mr. & Mrs. W.R. Berger Mr. & Mrs. Jack E. Blake Alva D. Butler Mr. & Mrs. Frank Cahoon Elinore Chase Harvey & Harriet Herd Patty & Tevis Herd Sue Houghton Dan M.Leonard Jan & Bill Setzler Mrs. E.M. Seydell Barnie Snure Mrs. George Lovett Audrey Chartier Geraldine MacCabe Chastain Jheri Fleet Marjorie Sue McLelland Emma H. Burnett Maurice “Mo� Martel W.M. Champion Sammie K. Rogers Grace Osadchuk Jan Artley, Jane Samples, Patty Smith, Lucinda Windsor, Maridell Fryar Melissa Burnett & Wayne Warren Mr. & Mrs. D. N. Ewan Chris & Fred Newman Rebecca Sawyer Schatzie & Charlie Tighe Vera Osadchuk Rino Irving Pam & Bob Leibrock Lynch Chappel Alsup Ed Magruder


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ENDOWMENT FUND CONTRIBUTORS (continued) Suzanne Martin Bill & Sheila Morrow Violet & Mark Singh Sue Solari Bill Stella Jan & Paul St.Hilaire The Midland Musicians Club Jane Wolf Walter Osadchuk Vera Osadchuk Barbara Parr Anonymous Rebecca Atwood Victoria Ehrlich Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Jones Josh H. Parr Anonymous Rebecca Atwood Mrs. Coy Best Victoria Ehrlich Delia Griffin V. Wayne & Joann Jones Mr. & Mrs. James D. McLaughlin John O’Hern Dr. Jess Parrish Kay and Bob Bivens Harold Rasco Audrey Chartier Victor Rede Melissa Burnett & Wayne Warren Charles Roberts Mr. & Mrs. George F. Harley Betty Lloyd Ross Frank & Getchen Bell Rebecca Bell

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Cahoon Ms. Sarah C. Hardwick Dr. & Mrs. Charles Simmons Violet and Mark Singh Russell F. Sanders Emma H. Burnett Sue Bob Smith Jeannette Kolokott Elizabeth Prentice Violet and Mark Singh Junia Stoddard Helen Parsons Adhers Sally Stella Chris Newman David Austin Stephens Davis, Gerald & Cremer Stubbeman, McRae, Sealy, Laughlin & Browder Mary Lou Cassidy Permian Basin Landmen’s Association Violet & Mark Singh Nan & Alan Zeman Deane Stoltz & Susan Stoltz Tirey Kay & Robert Bivens Emma H. Burnett Wanda Campbell Kathleen Stout Midland Symphony Guild Twentieth Century Study Club Capt. & Mrs. William E. Clark Berniece Johnson Charlene Shults Kay & Robert Bivens

Sheila Thompson The Midland Musicians Club Naomi Tillett Mary & Barry Beck Alva D. Butler Mr. & Mrs. Frank Cahoon Elinore Chase Capt. & Mrs. William E. Clark David & Sarah Lew Grimes Sue & Ted Kerr LaDoyce & Gloria Lambert Mary Ann McRae Mr. Mrs. Charles L.Tighe Earl Van Stavern Midland Symphony Guild Thomas Welch Schatzie & Charles Tighe Bill J. Whitfield Dee Griffin Rita Williams Ronald & Dortha J. Bennett Berniece Johnson Dr. & Mrs. Paul H. Johnson AT&T Foundation The Bosworth Company Chapter Gd P.E.O. Tierra Company / Bill Musar Stanton Music Club Twentieth Century Study Club Anonymous (4) Dr. & Mrs. Clayton Alred Jim & Sandra Alsup Mr. & Mrs. George Alther Mr. & Mrs. John F. Armstrong Joyce R. Barthelemy

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ENDOWMENT FUND CONTRIBUTORS (continued) Cliffy & Barry Beal Helen B. Beal Chrys & Kelly Beal Cheryl Becker Frank & Gretchen Bell Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Bellows Virginia Berry Elizabeth & Herb Blankinship Berry & Jane Breining Ken & Cathy Burgess Mr. & Mrs. William C. Bynum Mr. & Mrs. Frank Cahoon Mr. & Mrs. Jack C. Cartwright Edward & Cassandra Cheek Mr. & Mrs. Bill Clifton Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Cooke Margaret Cowden Enid W. Davis Tom & Dorothy Davis Bill & Mary Anne Dingus Mary Margaret Donelson Mr. & Mrs. Lynn D. Durham, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Curtis Erwin, Jr. Paul Feit Iris & John Foster Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Frazer Jeff & Lou Nelle George Richard D. & Iola Gillham Dan Green Sarah & David Grimes Mr. & Mrs. M.C. Gulledge, Jr. Barbara Hales Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Halpert Billie C. Halstead Mrs. Thornton Hardie

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Phil & Judy Hayes Patty & Tevis Herd Dr. & Mrs. William M. Hibbitts Melissa Hirsch Brittie N. Holster Dr. Jim Huddleston & Sue Smith Dr. & Mrs. James Humphreys Patricia & Leon Jeffcoat Barbara J.H. Johnson Maureen Johnson & Todd Torczon Jo Ann Jonsson Al & Elayne Karickhoff Sherry Keisling Niran E. Kellogg Lee & Bob Kennedy Mary B. Kennedy Mr. & Mrs. William D. Kleine Jane Knox Sarah & David Lauritzen Pam & Bob Leibrock Edith H. Libson Buddy & Anita Lintzen Mr. & Mrs. J.K. Lytle Beverly Martin James H. Miller, D.D.S. Darla V. Mueller Kelvie Williams Muhlbauer Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Nail Mr. & Mrs. Jim Nelson Mr. & Mrs. Fred Newman James & Jerri Nickel Ann Parish Steve & Diane Parker Bill Peyton Rod & Jane Phares

Margaret & James H. Purvis Jane B. Ramsland Randee and Jack Rathbone Lynn Renaud Jane & Ray Riddle Mary G. Ritchie Mr. & Mrs. Larry J. Roberts Mr. & Mrs. Hal Roegner Mrs. Donald A. Ross Rita Rusnak Dee Ann & Jeff Salehi Rebecca Sawyer Lisa and Geoffrey Schaffer-Harris Mrs. Suzanne Seright James & Alison Small Sally & Bill Stella Harley R. Stimmel John & Barbara Swart Mr. & Mrs. Phillip Szenasi Mr. & Mrs. Michael Tandy John J. Taylor Mr. & Mrs. L.B. Terrell Mr. & Mrs. Charles L. Tighe William A. Townsend Julia E. Vaughan Mary Edith Waddell Orin Wade Mr. & Mrs. Edward Wallace Rev. & Mrs. Robert Walter Jenna H. Welch Mr. & Mrs. Richard Werner Jann & Dr. Stephen Wiesenfeld Mike Willson


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ADVERTISER INDEX Aghorn Energy, Inc. All About Hearing, Inc. Al's Water American Momentum Bank Basin PBS Becky's Flowers Brazos Door & Hardware Canopy, The Carter Financial Group Cathy Eastham Fine Jewelry Cece's Adornments Boutique Chandler, Carol & Tom Cimarex Clack Co. Concierge Pharmacy Community National Bank Concho Resources Corey Sly Electric Cotton, Bledsoe, Tighe & Dawson Crenshaw Flooring Crump, Paul & Martha Doubletree by Hilton Earlene Smith - Rodan & Fields Exquisite Catering Eye LASIK Midland Fast ER Care First Presbyterian Church FirstCapital Bank of Texas Frost Bank George W. Bush Childhood Home Grub Kitchen and Bar Hankins, Ann & Ken Hemingway, The Hospice Odessa Humphreys, Dr. James & Sharon Jewish Philanthropic Union Kay Bivens - Legacy Real Estate KWEL - CDA Broadcasting, Inc. Lissa Noël Wagner & Frances Brown Lithia All American Auto Group Mark Knox Flowers 94

45 85 93 56 59 88 89 88 34 52 86 89 19 56 54 62 78 45 70 88 5 57 75 17 3 77 62 57 89 92 91 57 56 85 87 80 89 6 87 86

Marsh & McKennan Agency McKee, Diann and John Midland Community Theatre Midland Festival Ballet Midland Independent School District Midland Living Midland Plastic Surgery Center Midland Reporter-Telegram Midland Storytelling Festival Name Droppers N-Tune Music & Sound Odessa American Odessa Arts Odessa College Music Department Odessan Magazine, The Patches & Scraps Permian Basin Area Foundation Permian Basin Opera Plains All American Pipeline, LP ReGen Clinic of West Texas Rogers Ford Lincoln Sam L Majors Shamrock Steel Sales Sherrod's Piano Service Sims & Guess, Realtors Susie's South 40 Texas Sun Winery Trinity School Turner Eye Clinic UTPB - Music Program Victoria Printz Team Realtors, The Village at Manor Park, The Village South at Manor Park Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center West Texas Dermatology Center West Texas National Bank West Texas Radio Group West Texas Urology Window Source, The Woodcock, Claire & Jim

63 85 81 55 86 82 91 90 47 57 27 83 61 2 84 92 66 79 73 71 18 7 80 72 57 74 92 67 95 76 96 46 46 21 76 60 91 45 80 60


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Midland-Odessa Symphony & Choral  

2019-2020

Midland-Odessa Symphony & Choral  

2019-2020