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PHOTO BY ROBIn SHERMAn

Stradivarius String Quartet 972.949.4111 www.stradivariusmusic.com

Comprised of full-time professional musicians from the area’s major symphony orchestras, Stradivarius String Quartet offers artistry and commitment to quality, as well as a well-rounded repertoire from Bach to blues. The timbre of this string quartet will add a classic elegance to your special day. a DJ spinning discs, or a jazz musician tickling the ivories. A 30piece orchestra or a rowdy rock band might play “your song.” Just remember to feature a variety of music—slow romantic numbers as well as rousing dance tunes. Music should entertain both younger and older guests. Plan some selections for dancing, others just for listening. The band shouldn’t be so loud as to hinder conversation. At a small wedding, a pianist or jazz trio is a good choice. A “wedding band” is a popular choice— they’re trained to play to all different age groups. when interviewing musicians, find out the size of the group, instruments played, and whether or not they feature vocalists. Ask to see a current song list. You’ll want to have a large variety of music to choose from, including selections from the following categories: Top 40, showtunes, ballads, rock & roll, and country. If possible, catch the band in a live situation for a sneak preview of their performance style.

Make sure the group can accommodate your personal preferences. Indicate songs you’d like played during special moments. You might request one of the groom’s favorite tunes as the wedding party sits down to dinner. Music is also played during the cake cutting, when the bride’s bouquet and garter are tossed, and to signal that it’s time for the bride and groom to leave. You should expect a professional attitude and appearance in the musicians you hire. Ask if one of the band members can act as master of ceremonies, if you need one. Determine how long the band plays and learn how many breaks they will take. Make sure they can provide recorded music during breaks. From setting up the musical equipment to tearing it back down, the band will spend four to six hours at your reception, and they will get hungry. It’s customary to provide them with refreshments—sandwiches and nonalcoholic beverages, or a plate from the buffet. A happy band contributes greatly to the festive

mood of your party. Inform the band manager whom to contact at the reception site so they can check out the facilities ahead of time for acoustics, lighting arrangements, etc. If you’re planning an outdoor reception, decide where the party will move in case of rain. Don’t leave any of the details to chance or memory—write them down in a contract. Your contract with the band should include the date, time, location, set-up time, number and length of sets, payment, overtime fees, cancellation and postponement policies, musicians’ attire, and any special considerations. If live entertainment doesn’t fit into your reception plans, consider hiring a professional disc jockey. These entertainers can provide a great variety of music, from rock & roll to waltzes, usually at a lower cost than a live band. Many disc jockeys can also provide lighting effects and act as a master of ceremonies.•

www.brideandgroom.com

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Bride & Groom Fall 2013  

Dallas & Ft. Worth, TX.

Bride & Groom Fall 2013  

Dallas & Ft. Worth, TX.