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I’LL DRINK TO THAT: THE TRADITION OF TOASTS No matter how informal the party may be — it’s traditional to toast the bride and groom at their wedding reception. The festive air that toasting lends to pre- or postwedding celebrations creates a feeling of shared good will for everyone present. Toasts are a tribute to the bridal couple and the wedding party. Champagne is usually used for toasting — the bubbly brew is synonymous with romance and gaiety. If alcohol is not a part of this party, well-wishers can toast with sparkling cider or ginger ale. Toasting can begin after the receiving line breaks up, and can be made all throughout the reception. At a less formal function,

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al. Give your caterer the pertinent data — date, time, place, reception style, budget, and the number of guests attending. For food service, most caterers charge a flat fee per person; liquor costs are usually by the bottle or per drink. Waiters may be paid by the hour or be included in the package. Your caterer can help you determine the kind of food to serve, and provide china, glasses, and everything else you need. He or she can usually arrange for servers, bartenders and valet parking services as well. Be sure charges for these services are included in your cost estimate. Check to see if gratuities are automatically added to the final bill. Your contract should specify the food and beverages to be served and the guest count. Look into postponement and cancellation policies before you sign. A deposit is usually required when you sign the contract. By all means, comparison shop — it’s important to get the most for your money. Just make sure the caterer you choose has a reputation for quality and service — the success of your reception depends on it!

Coyote Ridge Golf Club, Carrollton 1640 Hebron Parkway 972.395.0786 toasts are presented just before the cutting of the cake. The best man acts as master of ceremonies, offering the first toast. This toast may be just for the bride, or aimed at both newlyweds. The best man gets everyone’s attention by clinking on his glass. He may introduce himself and others in the wedding party, and explain his relationship to the newlyweds. At this time he may tell an amusing anecdote about the bridal couple, making a wish for their future happiness. The toast may be in the form of a poem, quotation or the like — it should be brief and sincere. Those offering toasts should plan what they wish to say ahead of time. It’s important to speak loudly and clearly when making the toast — everyone wants to hear this! After the best man’s tribute, the groom usually responds with toasts honoring his wife, parents and new in-laws. The bride may then rise to offer toasts to her husband, the couple’s families, attendants and guests. (A special thank-you is expressed particularly well in the form of a toast.) The fathers of the bride and groom may propose toasts to their new

son and daughter, and other members of the wedding party may then offer their own toasts. When you’re the object of a toast, remain seated, and don’t sip from your glass — you’re allowed to imbibe between toasts. Smile and nod at who¬ever is offering the toast. The tradition of toasting is one to treasure — long after your wedding day, you’ll look back and smile when you think of those ¬special words: the funny stories the best man told about you; the love your parents expressed as they welcomed your spouse into the family. Above all, remember the tide of good wishes from all those present as they raised their glasses and drank to your happiness ¬during every toast that was made. TOASTS WITH THE MOST Best Man To Couple “And now, ladies and gentlemen, I shall ask you to rise.” Give guests adequate time to respond. If they are already standing, say: “I now ask you to raise your glasses.” Turning to the couple, say: “May your www.brideandgroom.com

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Bride & Groom Fall 2013  

Dallas & Ft. Worth, TX.

Bride & Groom Fall 2013  

Dallas & Ft. Worth, TX.