__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 120

PLAYER INTERVIEW: BRANDT SNEDEKER

BALANCING ACT

Juggling the demands of tournament golf while devoting time to a young family is a skill many pros work hard to develop. Nine-time PGA TOUR winner Brandt Snedeker gives us personal insight

T

raveling with kids to play golf around the world doesn’t always go as planned. Sometimes they get sick and throw up on airplanes when you’re headed to Hawaii, or Australia. Or they wake up crying in the middle of the night in a hotel room when dad has an early tee time the next morning. Like many pros on the PGA TOUR, Brandt Snedeker and his wife, Mandy, have learned to make it work. Once their children—Lily, who is 10, and Austin, 8—were old enough to go to kindergarten, the family’s lifestyle changed. Mandy and the kids now spend most of the school year in Nashville, Tennessee, while Snedeker, a nine-time PGA TOUR winner and 2012 FedExCup champion, remains the family’s road warrior. It isn’t easy being away from his family for weeks on end, but the 40-year-old makes sure the time they get to spend together counts, as he explained recently in this exclusive interview with the PGA TOUR Essential Guide to Golf.

Q: Has being a father helped you as a golfer? SNEDEKER: I tell people all the time, I won one time out here before I had kids, and I’ve won eight times since. Granted, I’ve been on TOUR for probably 10 years now since I had kids and five before, but my kids give me a great perspective on, ‘Okay, golf is done the minute Daddy gets home from the golf course, and we’re on to being a family and having fun and doing those kinds of things.’ 120  PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE  June – December 2021

T19_Tour Interview.v2.indd 120

``

Mandy and Brandt with their then-11-month old daughter, Lily, on the 18th green after the final round of the Farmers Insurance Open in early 2012.

Q: I’m sure there have been times when the kids don’t want you to leave. That must be difficult. SNEDEKER: I think we’ve all had those stages, those stories of being on the road for two weeks, coming home for a day-and-a-half to be able to see your kids, and them grabbing your leg when you’re walking out or sitting on your luggage as you’re getting ready to leave, going, ’Please don’t leave me. Please don’t go yet.’ It rips your heart out because you’re like, ’Oh my gosh, it’s the last thing I want to do.’ But it’s one of those things where you just sit down and try to explain to them,’ This is what Daddy does for work. A lot of dads, they might work 9-to-5, but when I have a week off, I’m home. I’m taking you to school. I’m picking you up, I’m spending more quality time with you than a lot of dads do. ... Our normal is just different, and just trying to explain to them that it’s not a choice that Daddy makes willingly.’ I try to do my best to make sure I’m never on the road for more than two weeks. If I am on the road for more than that I definitely get home or bring them out or do something to be able to see them. Those kinds of conscious decisions have changed a lot. My schedule is definitely a more finite thing than it used to be. It used to be play-it-by-ear. Now, with kid stuff going on and making sure I spend time with them, it’s more of a finite thing, understanding that they’re going to have to come first some of the time and scheduling is taking a back seat to that.

images: PGA TOUR

By Helen Ross

w w w.p gat our.com

05/07/2021 11:47

Profile for Magazine

Official PGA TOUR Essential Guide to Golf: June - December 2021  

The Official PGA TOUR Essential Guide to Golf contains previews of all the PGA TOUR and PGA TOUR Champions Events in the second half of the...

Official PGA TOUR Essential Guide to Golf: June - December 2021  

The Official PGA TOUR Essential Guide to Golf contains previews of all the PGA TOUR and PGA TOUR Champions Events in the second half of the...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded