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ARTS & COLLECTIONS INTERNATIONAL

COLLECTIONS I N T E R N AT I O N A L

T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E O F A R T A N D C U LT U R E

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WWW.ARTSANDCOLLECTIONS.COM 20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

VINCENT PETERS: PERSONAL • DAVID HOCKNEY RETROSPECTIVE • INVESTING IN HAUTE COUTURE

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There’s nowhere in the Maldives, or anywhere on earth, quite like it. Coco PrivÊ Kuda Hithi Island is a secluded island paradise all of your own. It is here that any and every dream is recognised and

Discover more at www.cocoprive.com or email yourplace@cocoprive.com

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Boarini Milanesi

The poetry of Italian High Elegance Maison Boarini Milanesi unveils an array of unique creations with a profoundly Italian soul

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reative at heart and passionate purveyors of elegance, Carolina Boarini and Matteo Rodolfo Milanesi open the doors of their Maison, revealing unique and charming handbags and inviting us to be among the first to witness the exquisite craftsmanship of their elegant creations. The Maison, located in Bologna, Italy is the only place where their refined bags and briefcases can be found. They are not on display in stores that look much the same everywhere, nor can they be bought online. For the ethos of Boarini Milanesi is to create irreplaceable masterpieces, and the process of this creation begins with a very personal connection between the client, his or her desires, and the artist who will fulfill them. This deep connection results in much more than just a product: it generates a lasting experience, a contemporary revival of the relationships that were established during the Renaissance between Masters of Italian art and their patrons.

The vision of the Maison draws on the enchanting world of colour. For their creations, Carolina Boarini and Matteo Rodolfo Milanesi breathe new life into the most precious pure pigments of ancient times, such as the Cremisi red of Phoenician gowns and Tiepolo’s very delicate shade of pink, featured in the Venetian painter’s marvelous frescoes. Maison Boarini Milanesi perfectly embodies that unique combination of refinement and authenticity which is deeply rooted in the noble and rich Italian culture. In this dimension, which lies somewhere between cultural heritage and contemporary art, the Maison gives life to a very personal and timeless creation, filled with values and emotions. A masterpiece capable of shining the light of Italian High Elegance on those who choose to make it their own.

Maison Boarini Milanesi Via del Lavoro, 71 40033 Casalecchio di Reno (Bologna), Italia boarini-milanesi@boarini-milanesi.com www.boarini-milanesi.com

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Contents features 14

ANNIVERSARY

24

A BRITISH ICON

44 48 56 59 62 66 71 72 76 79

Once a rebellious pop artist, David Hockney is now considered the greatest living British painter. An upcoming retrospective will showcase a collection of the artist’s celebrated masterpieces from the last six decades.

Cover: photo of Penélope Cruz by Vincent Peters, © Vincent Peters. Turn to page 44 to read about the photographer’s exhibition, Vincent Peters: Personal at the Leica Gellery in Frankfurt.

CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION

A new exhibition at the Royal Academy examines the radical, deeply political art that flourished in the first years of the Russian Revolution.

BACk TO BASICS

In his exhibition, Vincent Peters recaptures the passion that made him fall madly in love with photography.

MY WEApON AgAINST THE ATOM BOMB IS A BLADE OF gRASS

A retrospective in Venice chronicles the career of one of Italy’s most prolific and original artists.

INVESTINg IN HAUTE COUTURE

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56

It’s no secret that high-quality designer goods will retain their monetary value if maintained well, but can high-end fashion also serve as a trusty investment?

NEED FOR SpEED

After seven decades out of production, a much-loved motorcycle brand is back on the road.

INTELLIgENT DESIgN

Design museums chronicle how good design can impact and shape our lives. We look at seven of the best ones to visit.

CITIES OF CULTURE

Arts & Collections explores some of the lesser-known cultural hotspots across the globe.

ExpLORINg LAkE COMO

Lake Como has been a choice retreat for wealthy people and aristocrats since well before modern times—from historic buildings and basilicas to gardens and museums, this destination offers visitors many artistic and cultural gems.

ANTITRADITIONAL ELEgANCE

image © Sotheby’S; vincent peterS; vacheron conStantin / breguet; brough Superior motorcycleS

30

Flick through 20 years of Arts & Collections International’s best covers.

59

Sleek, modern and luxurious, Art Deco’s exuberance influenced furniture, architecture and everyday design.

LURE OF TIME

Switzerland has long been recognised as the world’s centre of luxury timepiece manufacture, but with prices exceeding their tens of thousands, why do these small paragons fare so well in the digital age?

CRUISE CONTROL

Spectacle, luxury and glamour are all to be found in the biggest yacht shows across the globe.

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REGULARS 20 37

IMAGES: SOTHEBY’S; MAUD REMY LONVIS; BANCO DE MEXICÓ, DIEGO RIVERA FRIDA KAHLO MUSEUMS TRUST / VG BILD-KUNST, BONN 2016; JEAN MORAL

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38

HAPPENINGS

Bringing you a mix of the high-minded, eccentric, regal, random, and unmissable events as we look ahead through 2017.

GRAPE EXPECTATIONS

The romantic allure of owning a vineyard exerts a strong pull for many wine lovers, but does it make a sound investment?

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AUCTION HIGHLIGHTS

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TREASURES

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The record-breaking, the eclectic and the unique, we bring you the latest from the world’s most renowned auction houses. Our series highlights a single item of artistry or craftsmanship that is both rare and exquisite.

CHALLENGING THE STATUS QUO

Every age has its own fashion rules and faux-pas, but it is the groundbreaking liberties that continue to transform and evolve the fashion industry.

WHERE TO SPEND IT

From Aston Martin’s first powerboat to artistic Dior bags, the latest luxury goods on our list are a must-have for any collection.

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DamsonMedia Publisher & CEO Kevin J. Harrington Senior Editor Hannah Guinness Sub Editor Annalisa D’Alessio Art Editor Friyan Mehta

Arts & Collections International has partnered with over 120 of the world’s finest luxury and boutique hotels to provide the highest quality coverage of global art and cultural events, as well as auctions of interest and the latest developments in the global art market. It is this blend of interesting and informative editorial that is most appealing to guests at these premier hotels, who have a great interest in admiring and purchasing fine art and collectables.

Editorial Assistant Hanaa Foura Production Director Joanna Harrington Production Coordinator Ellie Hicks Courtney Stephens-Donaghey Production & Administration Adam Linard-Stevens Editorial oFFiCE Arts & Collections International Suite 2 143 Caledonian Road London N1 0SL United Kingdom Telephone: 020 7870 9090 editorial@damsonmedia.com www.damsonmedia.com

images: © sotheby’s; david hockney; state russian museum

CHiCaGo oFFiCE Arts & Collections International 730 N. Franklin St. Suite 604, Chicago, IL 60654, USA ThE OPINIONS ExPRESSED IN ThIS mAgAzINE ShOULD NOT bE CONSIDERED OFFICIAL OPINIONS OF ThE PUbLIShER OR EDITOR. ThE PUbLIShER RESERvES ThE RIghT TO ACCEPT OR REjECT ALL EDITORIAL OR ADvERTISINg mATTER. ThE PUbLIShER ASSUmES NO RESPONSIbILITy FOR UNSOLICITED mANUSCRIPTS, PhOTOgRAPhS OR ARTwORK. ImAgES ARE SENT AT ThE OwNERS’ RISK AND ThE PUbLIShER TAKES NO RESPONSIbILITy FOR LOSS.

© 2017 DAmSON mEDIA ALL RIghTS RESERvED. REPRODUCTION IN whOLE OR IN PART OF ANy TExT, PhOTOgRAPh OR ILLUSTRATION wIThOUT PRIOR wRITTEN PERmISSION FROm ThE PUbLIShER IS STRICTLy PROhIbITED. PRINTED IN ThE UK.

www.artsandcollections.com

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Arts & Collections International’s dedicated website, artsandcollections.com, features detailed information on each of the 120 luxury hotels promoting the publication in their exclusive rooms and suites.

All of the exclusive previews, reviews and expert commentary pieces that appear in the pages of Arts & Collections International are also available to view on artsandcollections.com. In addition, the website provides a directory of upcoming auctions by Sotheby’s and other top auction houses, plus exhibitions and popular cultural events, keeping visitors fully informed, as well as providing a comprehensive resource area for collectors and connoisseurs.

Arts & Collections International is published quarterly and is available on subscription for €40 (Europe) or €45 (worldwide) per annum including post and packaging. Please email editorial@damsonmedia.com for further details regarding subscriptions.

It Figures... 20 years

of Arts & Collections International— covering the unique, the lavish and the eclectic world of arts and luxury lifestyle. Pages 14-19

8.01carats in weight for Cartier’s ‘Sky blue Diamond’ ring which was sold for over $17 million at a Sotheby’s geneva auction. Pages 38-43

200

pieces of artwork and counting make up the Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932 exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts. Pages 30-34

$68million was spent collectively by 30,000 visitors at the Dubai International boat Show in 2016. Pages 79-80

1937

the year David hockney, a british icon in the art world, was born. Pages 24-27

£950,000 was raised at Sotheby’s Paris in their first haute couture auction. Pages 56-57

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My Life. My Self. My Health.

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Tel. +41 (0)81 303 30 30 www.resortragaz.ch

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Conserving art

Editorial

Images © peggy guggenheIm collectIon; soDRac & aDagp 2017, chagall; cnac/mnam/DIst. Rmn-gRanD palaIs/aRt ResouRce, ny. photo géRaRD blot

From political upheaval to our cultural treasures, Arts & Collections International pauses to consider what’s important

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rama, tumult and upheaval were staples of 2016. Brexit dominated the headlines, and although issues such as immigration and the economy are still at the forefront of people’s concerns there are growing worries about what leaving the EU will mean for the arts in this country. The EU-run Creative Europe, for example, has already invested millions of pounds in the U.K.’s creative sector—and losing future funding in a country where local government spending on art and culture development has dropped by 17 percent since 2010 could be catastrophic. There are also worries about the possible restriction of freedom of movement, and what this will mean for artists both here and abroad. 2016 was also a year when we were reminded that the world’s cultural treasures are all too vulnerable, with Isis wreaking destruction on ancient sites of enormous historical and cultural importance—from Nimrud to Palmyra—across Iraq and Syria. Sadly, this has continued into 2017. We can only hope that no more of these irreplaceable gems are destroyed. Art can alter the way we perceive the world, simultaneously reflecting and shaping our reality. It’s an important part of any society and something that should be nourished and protected. Furthermore, our sense of ourselves as a country is rooted in the art and culture

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Above [l-r]: Tancredi Parmeggiani Space, Water, Nature, Sight, 1958 Oil on canvas 170.2 x 200.7 cm Brooklyn Museum, gift of Peggy Guggenheim. Marc Chagall The Blue Circus, 1950-52 Oil on canvas 232.5 x 175.8 cm Nice, Musée National Marc Chagall, on deposit from the Musée Nationale D’Art Moderne—Centre Pompidou, Paris.

that we produce. It forms a crucial part of our collective memory, our heritage, and if past events have taught us anything, it’s that such assets (and those of other nations) need to be cherished and fought for. Arts & Collections International recently celebrated its 20th anniversary, and we firmly believe that what we do—chronicling and celebrating all that is intriguing and interesting in the world of fine art—is more important than ever. We look forward to doing the same for many more issues to come. •

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COLLECTIONS // ANNIVERSARY

years of arts &

COLLECTIONS I N T E R N AT I O N A L

T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E O F A R T A N D C U LT U R E

www.artsandcollections.com

VINCENT PETERS: PERSONAL • DAVID HOCKNEY RETROSPECTIVE • INVESTING IN HAUTE COUTURE

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IMAGES: VINCENT PETERS

We celebrate two decades of covering the fascinatingly eclectic world of fine arts and collectables by looking at some of the best covers we’ve created over the years.

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ANNIVERSARY // COLLECTIONS

ARTS&COLLECTIONS INTERNATIONAL

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COLLECTIONS T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E O F A R T A N D C U LT U R E

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SPRING 2012

IMAGES: ROY LICHTENSTEIN, SLEEPING GIRL, COURTESY OF SOTHEBY’S

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CULTURE

LIFE

EVENTS

COLLECTABLES

MARKET VALUES

TRENDS 11/04/2012 15:47

Here at Arts & Collections International we chart the latest and most intriguing developments in the auction world, from high profile sales to record prices. Roy Lichtenstein’s Sleeping Girl, 1964, sold for an astonishing $44.9 million at a Sotheby’s New York auction in 2012.

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COLLECTIONS // ANNIVERSARY

ARTS&COLLECTIONS INTERNATIONAL

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COLLECTIONS T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E O F A R T A N D C U LT U R E

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WWW.ARTSANDCOLLECTIONS.COM AUTUMN 2011

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TRENDS 15/9/11 11:56:05

Hollywood icon, celebrated actress and AIDS activitst Elizabeth Taylor was famed for her magnificent jewellery collection, which was auctioned off after her death in 2011. The highly anticipated sale at Christie’s fetched a staggering $156 million with many items sold for five, 10 or even 50 times their estimate.

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IMAGES: COURTESY OF MPTV IMAGES

ART

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ANNIVERSARY // COLLECTIONS

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ColleCtions T h e i n T e R n AT i o n A l m A g A z i n e o f A R T A n D C u lT u R e

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L

www.ARTSAnDColleCTionS.Com winTeR 2014/15

IMAGES: HORST P. HORST, COURTESY OF THE V&A

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CULTURE

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TRENDS 17/12/2014 13:04

A classic photograph by renowned 20th century photographer Horst P. Horst. A master of light and composition, in a career spanning 60 years his photographs appeared in hundreds of magazines. One of his favourite models, Muriel Maxwell, graces this 1939 American Vogue cover.

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COLLECTIONS // ANNIVERSARY

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D A S I N T E R N AT I O N A L E M A G A Z I N F Ü R K U N S T U N D K U LT U R

COLLECTIONS www.artsandcollections.com

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C U LT U R E

LIFE

EVENTS

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Marilyn Monroe was a master of the iconic image, creating some of the world’s most enduring and captivating photographs. This image is part of photographer Milton Greene’s famous 1954 ‘Ballerina’ series, one of Monroe’s most recognisable collaborations.

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IMAGES: MILTON GREENE, COURTESY OF CHRISTIE’S

ISSUE1 2009

Manufacturing Monroe

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anniversary // collections

ARTS&COLLECTIONS INTERNATIONAL

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COLLECTIONS T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A G A Z I N E O F A R T A N D C U LT U R E

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WINTER 2011

IMAGES: Andy WArhol, Some Like it hot Shoe, courtESy of JulIEn’S AuctIonS

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TRENDS 02/12/2011 12:15

Celebrity memorabilia sales perform well at auction houses, as evidenced by Andy Warhol’s Some Like it Hot Shoe, which he created for Tony Curtis—one of the stars of the 1959 film. The lithograph was sold in an estate auction for the late actor at Julien’s Auctions for $53,125.

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Happenings // events

Happenings

The Influence of MusIc Considered the largest exhibition devoted to the iconic Marc Chagall in Canada, Chagall: Colour and Music explores the deep influence that music had on the artist’s work for the very first time. The varied display, which boasts as many as 340 pieces—including paintings, works on paper, costumes, sculptures, ceramics,

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stained glass, tapestries and architectural projects—is currently being shown at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and will last until 11 June. It also features rarelyloaned masterpieces like Golgotha (1912), Self-portrait with Seven Fingers (1912-12), the Birth (1911-12) and the Green Violinist (1923-24) on loan from some of the most prestigious museums and institutions around the world.

Images: © sodrac & adagp 2017; chagall; archIves marc et Ida chagall, parIs

Bringing you a mix of the high-minded, eccentric, regal, random and un-missable events as we look ahead through 2017 By Annalisa D’Alessio

Marc Chagall Backdrop design for Daphnis and Chloe (Act II), 1958 Gouache, graphite, coloured pencil and tempera on paper 56 × 79.5 cm Private collection.

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EvEnts // happenings

A ChronologiCAl restrospeCtive With this major retrospective—covering 140 paintings, sculptures, drawings and photographs—the Centre Pompidou in Paris is celebrating the impressive career of Cy Twombly, one of the most celebrated American artists of the 20th century. Spread out in three major cycles, Nine Discourses on Commodus, Fifty Days at Iliam and Coronation of Sesostris, this major exhibition—which will run until 24 April 2017—will only be shown in Paris. It features iconic works on loan from private and public collections from all over the globe, some of which have never been put on display in France. Twombly was most famous for merging the principles of abstract expressionism with Mediterranean culture and is best known for his use of exuberant colour schemes, graffiti and his version of minimalist and conceptual art that flourished in the seventies. Left: Cy Twombly Quattro Stagioni: Primavera, 1993-95 Acrylic, oil, coloured pencil and lead pencil on canvas 313.2 x 189.5 cm Tate, London.

Images: © cy twombly foundatIon, courtesy tate, london 2016; cy twombly foundatIon, courtesy archIves fondazIone nIcola del roscIo

Below: Cy Twombly Blooming, 2001-08 Acrylic, wax crayon on 10 wooden panels 250 x 500 cm Private collection.

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Happenings // events

InterventIons Best known for his experimental approach to art, Edward Krasiński is considered to be one of the most prominent Eastern European artists of the 20th century. Born in Ukraine, the Polish artist is best known for challenging traditional notions of art and their meanings, and was a protagonist of the Polish neoavant-garde movement that began in the sixties. Running until 5 March 2017 at Tate Liverpool, this exhibition is the first U.K. retrospective of the minimalist’s work. Some highlights of the display include Krasiński’s famous suspended sculptures from the 1960s, recreations of landmark installations and re-stagings of his iconic Intervention paintings—which feature his trademark blue scotch tape. Above: Edward Krasiński Intervention 15, 1975 Tape and paint on hardboard 699 x 500 x 33 mm Courtesy Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw. Below: Edward Krasiński Spear, Zalesie ca. 1964 Photo by Eustachy Kossakowski Courtesy Paulina Krasinska and Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw.

Le PremIer des ImPressIonIstes

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Images: © the estate of edward krasInskI; hanna ptaszkowska and archIve of modern art warsaw

From 27 February until 2 July, the Musèe Marmottan Monet is opening its doors to present the first monographic exhibition of Camille Pissarro’s work in 36 years. The display will feature 75 of the artist’s most influential paintings and temperas from prestigious museums around the world and the finest private collections—tracing Pissarro’s work from his youth in the Danish West Indies to his stints in London, Paris, Le Havre and Dieppe. Art critics have named Pissarro the undisputed leader of the impressionist movement: he established a collective of aspiring artists, acted as their mentor, and was a father figure to four of the most important post-impressionists: Georges Seurat, Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, and Paul Gauguin.

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EvEnts // happenings

Modernist photography Tate Modern’s exhibition, running until 7 May 2017, is showcasing one of the world’s greatest private collections of modernist photography. The collection—owned by Sir Elton John—features a selection of classic images from the 1920s to the 1950s, and displays over 200 works by more than 60 artists. Entirely made up of rare vintage prints, highlights include portraits of famous figures of the 20th century including Georgia O’Keeffe, Alfred Weston, Jean Cocteau and Igor Stravinsky. The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection marks a pivotal time in the history of photography: when it was used to redefine and challenge visions of the modern world. Left: Man Ray Glass Tears (Les Larmes), 1932 Gelatin silver print on paper 229 x 298 mm Collection Elton John.

Images: © man ray trust/adagp, parIs and dacs, london 2016; bpk / centre pompIdou, mnam-ccI, dIst. rmn-grand palaIs / JacquelIne Hyde

a Battle of the sexes Until 19 March 2017, visitors to the Städel Museum in Frankfurt will be able to attend a major exhibition that explores gender roles, the charged relationship between man and woman and their representation in art. Battle of the Sexes: Franz Von Stuck to Frida Kahlo, which features over 150 works, reveals how controversial both artists were in portraying gender identities by tackling stereotypes through their painting, sculpture, graphic art, photography and film. Divided into 12 chapters—and featuring an unprecedented range of artistic subjects—the exhibition highlights pieces from celebrated artists such as Julius Paulsen, Suzanne Valadon, Edvard Munch, Frieda Kahlo and Franz Von Stuck. The aim of the exhibition, according to co-curator Felix Krämer, is to encourage visitors to reflect on the theme of gender conflict while offering historical insight into this complex topic.

Right: Suzanne Valadon Adam and Eve (Self-Portrait with André Utter), 1909 Oil on canvas 162 x 131 cm Centre Pompidou, Paris, MNAM/CCI.

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COLLECTIONS // arT

A British Icon Once a rebellious pop artist, David Hockney is now considered the greatest living British painter. An upcoming retrospective will showcase a collection of the artist’s celebrated masterpieces from the last six decades By Annalisa D’Alessio

Above: Christopher Isherwood and Don Bachardy, 1968 Acrylic on canvas 83 1/2 x 119 1/2”.

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aRT // COLLECTIONS

All IMAGES © DAvID HocknEy

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unning from 9 February until 29 May, this highly anticipated David Hockney exhibition by Tate Britain promises to be one of the most comprehensive to date. Bringing together famous paintings, prints and portraits, the display will celebrate the artist’s accomplishments over the past six decades as he nears an important milestone of his own—his 80th birthday. Born in Bradford, England, in 1937, Hockney knew he wanted to be an artist from a very young age, and art was a passion that both his parents supported and encouraged. During his time as a student at the Royal Academy of Art in London, he won prizes for his creations, and his paintings were purchased for private collections. In his early years as a painter, Hockey experimented with different forms—including abstract expressionism. His material had literary inclinations as he often used quotes and fragments of poems in his work. The British artist’s move to the West Coast of the United States strengthened and defined his artistic style—he was drawn to the colours, heat and light of California,

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and he finally made the move from England to Los Angeles in 1966 when he was in his late 20s. One of his most iconic pieces, A Bigger Splash (1967), features a classic L.A. pool scene: in this masterpiece, the British artist explores how to represent the constantly moving surface of the water. Famously known for using bright colours in his paintings, these vibrant hues represented his support for sexual freedom in the context of an art scene that thought of bright colours as being ‘effeminate’. Most of his paintings from 1960 to 1970 adhered to the principles of naturalism—Hockney was very passionate about finding the perfect balance between skill and art in his representation of this movement. It wasn’t until the early 1980s that Hockney began creating his acclaimed ‘joiners’— intricate photo collages which, according to some critics, recall Picasso’s famous cubist material. An adept photographer, Hockney used the juxtaposition of pictures (or merely

Above: 9 Canvas Study of the Grand Canyon, 1998 Oil on 9 canvases 39 1/2 x 65 1/2” Photo credit: Richard Schmidt.

‘Hockney knew he wanted to be an artist from a very young age’

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COLLECTIONS // arT

Left: Model with Unfinished Self-Portrait, 1977 Oil on canvas 60 x 60”. Below: Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures), 1972 Acrylic on canvas 84 x 120” Photo credit: Art Gallery of New South Wales / Jenni Carter.

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aRT // COLLECTIONS

Polaroid shots in the early days) to create beautiful collages full of movement and fluidity. The artist returned to painting not long after, creating colourful depictions of flowers, seascapes and portraits of loved ones. Hockney is considered an avantgarde painter who is aware of the role that technology can have in the making of art. His unmistakable style is deeply influenced by a range of movements from Baroque to Photorealism and—most recently— computer graphics. In the 90s, he began experimenting with new devices such as laser copiers and fax machines to reproduce his paintings and share his art with others. The relationship between technology and art continued to hold a fascination for Hockney—in 2008, the artist started using Apple’s Brushes app to create lively finger-

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drawn depictions of flowers, landscapes, still life and self portraits. A 2011 David Hockney exhibition at the Royal Museum of Ontario, in Vancouver, Canada, showcased 200 of these paintings presented on iPhones and iPads. To this day, Hockney continues to create and influence—he avidly advocates funding for the arts. Organised in conjunction by Tate Britain, the Centre Pompidou, Paris, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, this retrospective exhibition promises to be a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see such an extensive collection of the artist’s works— some of which have never been seen before in public—together under one roof. • » David Hockney is at the Tate Britain, London, from 9 February 2017 – 29 May 2017. For more information, visit tate.org.uk

Below: Red Pots in the Garden, 2000 Oil on canvas 60 x 76” Photo credit: Richard Schmidt.

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30/01/2017 09:03


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Welcome to the investment immigration era, where freedom of movement, social benefits, better tax planning and tranquility of mind are all being made accessible in exchange for simple and lawful qualifying investments. Global mobility and international migration has become a reality to people who had never even considered that living in another country or moving their assets abroad was possible. But what exactly does ‘mobility’ mean? How can it be attained? Why can it be attractive for an individual or a family? Mobility generally refers to three concepts: mobility of individuals, mobility of assets and mobility of companies. Obtaining the flexibility and the freedom to move individuals, assets and companies, together or individually, are the key reasons to look into investment immigration opportunities. The advantages of obtaining a second or alternative citizenship are diverse. Obtaining citizenship from one of the most popular Citizenship Investment Programs (CIPs), such as Cyprus, Malta, St. Kitts & Nevis, Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica and Grenada unlocks major investment and business opportunities. Moreover, these options can offer an enormous relief to families looking to relocate to a safer country, or for families who are wishing

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COLLECTIONS // arT

Children of the

Revolution

A new exhibition at the Royal Academy examines the radical, deeply political art that flourished in the first years of the Russian Revolution By Hannah Guinness

Above: Kazimir Malevich Peasants, c. 1930 State Russian Museum, St Petersburg.

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aRT // COLLECTIONS

IMAGES © 2016, StAtE RuSSIAn MuSEuM, St PEtERSbuRG; (c) StAtE tREtyAkov GAllERy

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merging across Europe from the early 1850s onwards, avant-garde art prized originality and radical experimentation. Unorthodox by design, it sought to challenge received notions of art, culture and society, whether it was cubism’s innovations of form or futurism’s revolutionary social vision. In Russia it was a diverse and multi-layered movement with an impassioned desire to transform society; utopian ideals that found their greatest realisation in the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the years that followed. The end of Tsarist rule and the state repression that accompanied it inaugurated a period when artists fused sociopolitical concerns with groundbreaking experimentation in painting, sculpture, film, literature, theatre, photography, architecture and the decorative arts. Avant-garde artists sought a break with the past and to articulate a new type of art for the people; a heady mingling of ideas, politics and passion where creative freedom and the possibilities that came with it seemed endless. Eventually, however, it was violently suppressed as Stalin consolidated his grip on the state in the early 1930s, after which socialist realism became the only acceptable face of communist art. In February 2017, to mark the centenary of the Russian Revolution, the Royal Academy of Arts is staging a landmark exhibition that Above: Marc Chagall The Promenade, 1917-18 State Russian Museum, St Petersburg, Russia.

‘Artists fused sociopolitical concerns with ground-breaking experimentation’ will examine this intense period of artistic innovation, starting with the October Revolution of 1917 and culminating in 1932, when art critic and curator Nikolai Punin staged a major exhibition of avantgarde art at the State Russian Museum in Leningrad.

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01/02/2017 08:34


COLLECTIONS // arT

Above: Wassily Kandinsky Blue Crest, 1917 State Russian Museum, St Petersburg, Russia.

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aRT // COLLECTIONS

Above: Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin Fantasy, 1925 State Russian Museum, St Petersburg, Russia. Below: Alexander Deineka Textile Workers, 1927 State Russian Museum, St Petersburg, Russia. Next page: Boris Mikhailovich Kustodiev Bolshevik, 1920 State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia.

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COLLECTIONS // arT

In a first for exhibitions on 20th century Russian art in this country, Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932 will chart the diversity of this period by focusing on both avant-garde and socialist realism artists, from modernist luminaries such as Chagall, Kandinsky, Malevich and Tatlin to socialist realist figures such as Brodksy, Deineka, Mukhina and Samokhvalov. Pieces on show—many of which have never been seen before—will include photography, sculpture, porcelain, film, paintings and posters, from the dynamic abstract compositions of Malevich to the pioneering films of Eisenstein. There will also be a plethora of more prosaic items such as propaganda posters, ration coupons, porcelain, textiles and more. Particular highlights from a collection of over 200 works include a whole gallery dedicated to more than 30 paintings and architectons by Malevich—seen together

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for the first time since 1932—as well as a room dedicated to the work of Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin. Other key pieces include Marc Chagall’s The Promenade, Wassily Kandinsky’s Blue Crest, Boris Mikhailovich Kustodiev’s Bolshevik and Kuzma PetrovVodkin’s Fantasy. The show will also feature loans from the State Russian Museum in St Petersburg and the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow, as well as several international private collections. The Royal Academy’s show aims to interrogate the complex and often turbulent nature of this post-Revolutionary period—where art and politics were often intertwined—by showcasing a wide array of works that will be divided into broad thematic sections. Salute the Leader charts Lenin’s ascent to power and his rise to cult status after death, as well as the arrival of Stalin. Man

and Machine examines how painting, photography and film recorded the efforts of proletarian worker heroes, whose feats promoted the successes of Soviet industry and technology. Brave New World looks at the advent of a new cultural world, and the Fate of the Peasant examines the effect of collective farming on rural Russian life. Eternal Russia tracks the enduring presence of images of old Russia in revolutionary society and New City, New Society looks at urban life under Lenin’s New Economic Policy in the 1920s. Finally, Stalin’s Utopia examines the dictator’s mammoth public projects and the darkening nature of his political vision. • » Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932 runs from 11 February to 17 April 2017 at the Royal Academy. For more information, visit royalacademy.org.uk

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Life Style Art

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Fine Wine // ColleCtions

Grape Expectations The romantic allure of owning a vineyard exerts a strong pull for many wine lovers, but does it make a sound investment? By Hannah Guinness 3. you neeD to Love wine While the practical considerations of buying a vineyard are important, it also needs to be a passion project. ‘There are lots of reasons why someone might want to buy a vineyard but first and foremost you have to have an interest in wine,’ says Alexander. ‘While it is possible to generate a good return on your investment, the rewards of investing in a vineyard are not only financial,’ he continues. ‘For most buyers it is as much about the pleasure and challenges of owning and farming the land as it is about producing a unique and varied product that you can enjoy with others.’

4. Do your research anD pLan, pLan, pLan

F

IMAGES: SHUTTERSTOCK

or wine enthusiasts the cachet of owning your own vineyard or winery can be hard to resist, and it’s an option that has become increasingly popular in recent years. However, it’s important that romance does not overcome reality.

system. Vineyards in the top appellations of the most famous French regions such as Bordeaux, Burgundy and the Rhône Valley are expensive but offer capital protection and, historically, good capital appreciation.’

1. Location is everything

2. Don’t be seDuceD by the fantasy

A vineyard in a popular region will be more expensive than one in a less prestigious area, but the wine it produces is likely to fetch more in price and be easier to sell. ‘Investing in new or lesser-known regions carries much greater risks, even if the land is often cheaper,’ says Alexander Hall, owner of Vineyard Intelligence, which offers advice on vineyard acquisitions in France. ‘The wines are likely to be harder to sell and it may also be difficult to source well-qualified staff. The old adage “location, location, location” also applies to vineyards, although in France you could substitute this for “appellation, appellation, appellation”, given the importance of the AOC

Buying the vineyard is just the beginning—you then have to consider the costs of maintaining it and making it profitable, which can sometimes take years. ‘A vineyard is first and foremost a business so there are many factors to consider,’ Alexander explains. ‘The key factors are: the potential of the vineyard to produce good quality wine and the cost of any necessary restructuring; the adequacy and condition of the winemaking facilities and equipment and the cost of any new or replacement items; the skills and experience of the employees; the quality and reputation of the wine; the pricing and distribution strategy.’

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‘The saying is that to make a small fortune in wine you need to start with a large one. It is fair to say that vineyards are capital intensive and that making and selling wine is a complex and challenging business,’ adds Alexander. ‘However, as with most investments, with sound advice, detailed research and careful planning it is possible to make a good investment that offers much more than just financial rewards.’

5. consiDer aLL your options Some vineyards offer shared ownership schemes, where would-be vintners can try their hand at winemaking without making a large financial commitment. ‘In France there are shared ownership schemes such as the GFV (“Groupement Foncier Viticole”)—although these are principally of interest to French residents given the tax advantages,’ says Alexander. ‘More recently there have also been some crowdfunding initiatives in the sector, such as winefunding.com, which offer investors either an equity participation or a wine dividend.’  vineyardintelligence.com

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01/02/2017 11:32


AUCTION HIGHLIGHTS // NEWS

Auction

Highlights The record-breaking, the eclectic and the unique, we bring you the latest from the world’s most renowned auction houses By Annalisa D’Alessio

FANCY VIVID BLUE

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IMAGES: © SOTHEBY’S

A mesmerising, rare blue diamond was the true centrepiece of Sotheby’s Geneva’s November auction, Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels. The Cartier ‘Sky Blue Diamond’ ring—weighing 8.01 carats—sold for over $17 million (around $2.1 million per single carat) against a $15-25 million initial estimate. Presented in an extremely elegant square emerald cut, the diamond has been graded ‘Fancy Vivid Blue’ by the Gemological Institute of America—the highest possible colour grading only awarded to around one percent of blue diamonds. The precious stone was also given Type IIb status, which represents less than 0.5 percent of all diamonds. 

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news // auction highlights

BRIDLINGTON’S MULTI-MILLION pOUND LANDSCApE Setting a new record for British artist David Hockney, Woldgate Woods (2006) has sold for $11.7 million at Sotheby’s New York. This vibrant depiction of trees near Bridlington, which is three metres wide and made up of six connected canvases, was originally estimated to bring in $9 million. Hockney, who is well known for his bright and colourful scenes of LA life, began painting the landscape at Woldgate, in East Yorkshire, 10 years ago. The painting had previously been shown as part of the Royal Academy’s 2012 exhibition, David Hockney: A Bigger Picture. Previously, the British artist’s auction record was held by his Beverly Hills Housewife (1966-67) masterpiece, which sold for £5.2 million in 2009. 

MONUMENTAL BRITISH ART

IMAGES: © SothEby’S

A sculpture created by celebrated artist Dame Barbara Hepworth fetched £3.8 million at Sotheby’s auction of modern and post-war British art in London. Parent I, the 20th century sculpture initially estimated at £2 million, belongs to a collection of a series of carvings that critics deem the ‘crowning achievement’ of Hepworth’s final years. According to the artist, the 270 centimetre-high bronze sculpture represents the ‘universal’ mother figure. Considered one of the most groundbreaking sculptors—a reputation that no other female had previously held—Hepworth was one of the few female artists in her time to achieve international recognition. 

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auction highlights // news

AIR POWER

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IMAGES © SothEby’S

David Bowie’s personal art collection auctioned by Sotheby’s attracted thousands of bidders and gave spectators an insight into the mind of one of the greatest and most loved performers of our time. Air Power, an 1984 acrylic and oilstick piece by Jean-Michel Basquiat, was the undisputed highlight of the auction: the vibrant work sold for over £7 million, more than double the initial £2.5-£3.5 million estimate. Bowie had originally purchased the painting in 1995 for around $120,000—this dramatic hike in value, and the painting’s appeal, may have been intensified by the fact that Bowie played Andy Warhol in Basquiat, the 1996 film based on the American painter’s life. 

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31/01/2017 10:44


F.N. Voirin, Paris, c.1875-78

Cello by Matthew Hardie Edinburgh c.1800

Cello by Joseph Hill, London c.1770-1780

LONDON’S CELLO SPECIALIST

Cello by Albert Caressa Paris, c.1926

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Victor Fetique, Paris, c.1925

Eugene Eugene Sartory Sartory Eugene Sartory Paris, Paris, c.1930 c.1930 Paris, c.1930

www. t om wood scel l os. com + 44 ( 0) 20 7362 1812

Nicolas Nicolas Leonard Nicolas Leonard Tourte Leonard Tourte Tourte Paris, Paris, c.1785-80 c.1785-80 Paris, c.1785-80

Cello by Louis Guersan Paris, c.1760

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auction highlights // news

MONET’S GRAINSTACK

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IMAGES © chrIStIE’’S

A new record was set for the French impressionist Claude Monet: the artist’s Meule—or ‘Grainstack’—sold for $81 million at Christie’s New York. The 1891 canvas, estimated at $45 million, was bought during the auction house’s impressionist and modern art sale. It is one of a series of 25 paintings depicting grainstacks created between 1890 and 1891, with the majority housed in some of the world’s most prominent museums. Previously, the auction record was held by one of the painter’s iconic water lilies scenes, Le Bassin Aux Nymphéas (1919), which sold in London for £40.9 million. Prices for examples of Monet’s work have soared over recent years, with demand driven by the growing passion for classic impressionist paintings from collectors around the globe. 

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news // auction highlights

Treasures Our series highlights a single item of artistry or craftsmanship that is both rare and exquisite

T

he first-ever Chinese firearm with an imperial reign mark offered at auction was sold by Sotheby’s London for just shy of £2 million. The musket, an exquisitely designed gun, was crafted for the Qianlong Emperor of the Qing dynasty—considered the greatest collector of the arts in Chinese history. In addition to the imperial sign, the elegant firearm also sports four incised characters which indicate its unique ranking. The exceptional grading, te deng di yi—which translates to ‘Supreme Grade, Number One’—makes it one of the most important firearms ever produced for the Emperor. Created using luxurious materials, imperial guns were made in very small numbers. The Qianglong Emperor, who is also considered to be the longest-reigning emperor in Chinese history, is unlikely to have ever held a gun in battle but is said to have regularly used muskets whilst out hunting. •

IMAGES © SothEby’S; julIEn’S AuctIonS

THE MONROE LEGACY The iconic ‘Happy Birthday Mr. President’ dress, which was worn by Marilyn Monroe when she famously sang to President John F. Kennedy at New York’s Madison Square Garden in 1962, was sold by Julien’s Auctions for the record price of $4.81 million—around $1.8 more than it was estimated to fetch by the Los Angeles auction house. The stunning dress, presented on the custom-made mannequin designed to match Monroe’s body measurements, was just one of the many personal and career items belonging to the legendary actress offered at the auction—which raised nearly $11 million in total. Throughout the three auction days in November, bidders from around the world made an offer on items from costumes to personal notes of one of the most famous screen stars of all time. 

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COLLECTIONS // PHOTOGRAPHY

Back to Basics In his exhibition, Vincent Peters recaptures the passion that made him fall madly in love with photography

IMAGES: vIncEnt pEtErS

By Annalisa D’Alessio

Above: Vincent Peters, Cindy Crawford, 2007, Los Angeles.

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PHOTOGRAPHY // COLLECTIONS

Above: Vincent Peters, Emma Watson, 2015, London.

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COLLECTIONS // PHOTOGRAPHY

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legant, glamorous and exquisite, Vincent Peters’ style of photography diverges from commerciality and takes inspiration from fine art. Vincent Peters is considered one of the most prominent fashion and celebrity photographers of recent times. He has worked with major publications such as Vogue, GQ, Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar, and boasts a portfolio packed with stunning portraits of Hollywood’s most famous and beautiful people—from Laetitia Casta and Michael Fassbender to Emma Watson, Scarlett Johansson and Charlize Theron. The Bremen-born photographer—who has also worked with major luxury brands such as Louis Vuitton, Guerlain, La Perla and Cartier— describes his personal artistic style as being very traditional: ‘I use classic techniques and styles. I love photography and I’m stubborn. But I’m not the techno DJ…I’m more the guy with the piano,’ he says simply. To Peters, the perfect picture can be compared to a melody. ‘My favourite part of photography is being able to show the theatre in my head to others. Sometimes there is a harmony that moves us, that remains in the head,’ he explains, ‘There are always many pictures of a story but there is also always one picture that is the story— that is how we remember it.’ Vincent Peters’ interest in photography flourished from a very young age: ‘I was kicked out of school at age 16 and needed something to get into. Art school was the only “university” who took people without a finished school diploma.’ His career officially began in the 1980s, when he started taking pictures of his travels in Thailand. In 1989 he moved to New York to work as a photographer assistant; he then decided to make his own mark and pursue his own vision—but the photography industry has greatly evolved since then. According to the artist, nowadays there is a real fixation with perfection—a phenomenon that can’t help but take away from the concept of real, untampered beauty. ‘There is an obsessive competition of perfection and retouching these days and I keep asking myself “is this what women really want to look like?” living behind filters and a glass wall? Beauty needs some truth,’ Peters says. Running from 20 January until 18 March 2017, the Leica Gallery in Frankfurt will showcase a number of new works by the photographer over a space of 1000 square

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metres. This exhibition, Vincent Peters: Personal, named after his second book, is a much more intimate display of his art. ‘My job pulls you in all different directions and influences. I wanted to get back to what got me into this, to remind myself why I love photography. I’ve done a kind of “detox”,’ says Peters. ‘I threw everything out that isn’t me and created a “personal” selection.’ To the photographer, this exhibition is a confrontation between what he has done and accomplished so far, and what he loves to do: ‘This is also guiding me now, and helping me to keep my direction. I shoot film, I like real skin and texture.’ The stunning solo display will invite visitors and art lovers to get to know a more intimate side of the photographer. Viewers at the Leica Gallery will be taken on a breathtaking journey through Vincent Peters’

impressive portfolio that will feature emotive ballet scenes influenced by the great Edgar Degas and eye-catching, powerful portraits of Hollywood’s most prominent headliners. The exhibition will feature a range of works from fashionably styled images and elegant nudes in minimalist settings to tension-filled hotel scenes and intimate close-up shots—all images will showcase Peters’ use of analogue photography and trademark skilled lighting.  » Vincent Peters: Personal will run from 20 January until 18 March 2017 at the Leica Gallery Frankfurt. For more information, visit vincentpetersphotography.com

Below: Vincent Peters, Trianon, Paris, 2015, from the book Personal.

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01/02/2017 09:30


PHOTOGRAPHY // COLLECTIONS

Above: Vincent Peters, Sonia Trianon, 2014, from the book Personal.

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COLLECTIONS // arT

My Weapon Against the Atom Bomb is a

Blade of Grass A retrospective in Venice chronicles the career of Tancredi Parmeggiani, one of Italy’s most prolific and explosively creative artists By Hannah Guinness

Above: Untitled, 1953 Pastel, gouache and graphite on paper 70 x 99.8 cm Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice.

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aRT // COLLECTIONS

IMAGES © ThE PEGGy GuGGEnhEIM CollECTIon

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Above: Country Day, 1961 Tempera and collage on canvas 195 x 129.5 cm Courtesy Galleria Milano.

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unning until 13 March 2017, this long-awaited show at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection places the luminous art of Tancredi Parmeggiani in the spotlight. Tancredi was the only artist, aside from Jackson Pollock, that the influential art collector Peggy Guggenheim ever placed under contract. His ferocious creativity and lyrical expressionism fuelled a rapid rise in the art world that was nourished and encouraged by Guggenheim. The variety and prolific nature of his work, ranging from early portraits to collages, will be shown through 90 carefully curated pieces in the exhibition. The display starts at the beginning of Tancredi’s artistic evolution, showing youthful portraits and self-portraits as well as his first forays into painting on paper in 1950-51, with his famous Springtimes. The early 1950s were marked chiefly by his career-defining meeting with Guggenheim, who made him her protégé and set him up in a studio at her home, Palazzo Venier dei Leoni in Venice. It was this patronage that really catapulted Tancredi to international acclaim at such an early age, a period when he developed his distinctive ‘molecular’ style— fragmentations of the pictorial mark and a vivid palette—resulting in expressive abstract pieces that hummed with life and intensity. ‘Tancredi, through his painting, creates a new poetic philosophy for those who have neither telescopes nor rockets: how lucky we are to have such crystallisations that transport us safe and sound toward other worlds,’ said Guggenheim of the artist. From the late 1950s onwards Tancredi’s work radically changed as he wrestled with a creative crisis in his painting. The human figure returned to his work, albeit in a form far more grotesque than his early pieces. He became enraptured with northern painting and the passionate angst-ridden art of Edvard Munch, as well as the figuration and irony of his friends in the Anti-Proces art movement. His art became charged with political and existential resonance, concerns that

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COLLECTIONS // arT

Above: Untitled (Flowers 101% Painted by Me and Others No. 5), 1962 Mixed media and collage on canvas, with pencil and watercolour on paper 81 x 65 cm Matteo Lampertico, Milan.

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aRT // COLLECTIONS

Above: Untitled (Long Live Abstract Painting), 1960 Tempera on lined paper 153 x 180 cm Private collection, Milan.

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COLLECTIONS // arT

expressed themselves in a fiery streak of polemic that inspired the epigram of this exhibition: My Weapon Against the Atom Bomb is a Blade of Grass, which was Tancredi’s response to contemporary global conflicts—from Vietnam to the Cold War. This new approach is exemplified in his Hiroshima series of 1962, reassembled in the exhibition for the first time in decades. The final part of the exhibition looks at Tancredi’s collage paintings, such as Hometown Diaries and Flowers 101% Painted by Me and by Others. Produced in the last years of his life before he killed himself in 1964, aged 37, these pieces are drenched in colour and full of verve, marking the final flowering of a short but extraordinary career. • guggenheim-venice.it

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Left: Untitled (Self-portrait), 1946 Pencil on paper 27.7 x 22.2 cm Private collection, Mestre. Below: Untitled (Harmonious Memory), 1952 Tempera on board 79.5 x 121.7 cm Courtesy Mazzoleni London—Turin.

www.artsandcollections.com

31/01/2017 10:21


“If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration” -Nikola Tesla

Peter Janík is a worldwide-awarded contemporary European “star” of the collectible visionary Haute Jewelry Art (1st. prize winner International Tahitian Pear Competition, New York). His work was exhibited at the prestigious selective international exhibitions of art and design in the recordbreaking 29 countries; and his art jewellry are a part of the museum and private collections in Europe, Scandinavia, the USA, Australia, and Japan. His revolutionary artistic creations, designed individually as the artistic, signed “personal adornment” made for the VIP private clients, is revised to the lines copying the ergonomics of a body, utility shapes working with the light of optical metal fins that reflect the light penetrating from calibrated brilliant diamonds, but also the rarest “tailor-cutted” gems, colored diamonds in both, the traditional and innovative cuts, made by the world’s top, multi award-winning studios, with which he cooperates and develops innovative progressive avant-garde forms of gems of revolutionary settings, the effects of which outdo any of those you’ve seen before. He creates his copyright prototypes with his own hands as bespoke - made one - of - a - kind art piece; so, through their rarity and originality, his works are unique sculptures, with the individual seals as unique as a DNA, or as an original oil painting or sculpture of a world renowned artist. His innovative creation of original jewels, inspired by the Nordic and Japanese essentialist purism, with a “less is more” philosophy, concentrates his creative energy on the iconic ultimate core of the form, revised to the completely elementary lines, the border of which can no longer be crossed by simplifying it. As he says: “I’m looking for the evolutionarily most perfect essence of form, which is becoming an Ark of raw beauty of a natural gem that is cut partially uniquely and individually, which I elevate to a revolutionary signed, collectible most valuable “masterpiece”, while maintaining its unique natural structures and apparent imperfections, such as inclusions, conjoined druses of crystals, fusions of several colored minerals that are a naturally formed, inimitable artistic creation, and which I synchronize with metal structures and a shape of the HAUTE artistic jewel.” His artistic work reflects the rich history of the Slovak Republic, an intersection of the Europe’s most important trade routes in the “heart of Europe”, the museum artifacts of which dig deep into prehistory of more than 130,000 years ago, a country corrugated from a prehistoric bottom of the Tethys Ocean lagoons. By merging prehistoric idols and high-tech forms, he creates iconic objects, with no comparable equivalent in the world’s jewelry art. He has become a world leader in variable jewels, where he created concepts of most variable jewels of the world, presented by him at the designer shows in Japan, Germany, Slovenia, the USA, and Italy. If you are looking for an exceptional jewel for a rare opportunity, with a world-unique collectors’ value, you can see his work on.

www.peterjanik.com | mob. +421.948.443317 graphic design: www.bokun.si

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DE LASZLO HOUSE FITZJOHN’S AVENUE, NW3 An exceptional three bedroom apartment set within a stylish bespoke development, designed by award winning Dandi Living. The apartment offers excellent living and entertaining space, including a spacious reception room leading to a terrace spanning the width of the apartment. Fitzjohn’s Avenue is located within walking distance of the shops and amenities of Belsize Park and Finchley Road. Accommodation: Entrance hall, reception room, dining area, kitchen, master bedroom with ensuite bathroom and dressing room, further bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms, guest cloakroom. Amenities: Garden, underground parking.

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£3,450,000

Rosy Khalastchy

Leasehold 995 years

rosy@beauchamp.com

Joint Sole Agents

+44 (0)20 7722 9793

www.beauchamp.com

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24 Curzon Street, London W1J 7TF

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+44 (0)20 7722 9793

31/01/2017 14:33


COLLECTIONS // arT

Investing in

Haute Couture It’s no secret that high-quality designer goods will retain their monetary value if maintained well, but can high-end fashion also serve as a trusty investment? By Annalisa D’Alessio

I

t’s exclusive, custom-made for each client, and handcrafted with the highest quality fabrics and materials. Haute couture has seen a dramatic increase in interest from the international market, with high-profile vintage auctions making frontpage news and designers such as Jean Paul Gaultier closing their ready-to-wear lines to focus on making couture for their client base. Luxury clothing items and accessories can soar in value over the years and are often regarded as collector’s objects as well as potential investments. According to baghunter.com, the value of Hermes’ iconic Birkin handbags has increased over 500 percent in the last 35 years, historically making the luxury accessory a ‘safer’ investment than the stock market. Last year, a pink crocodile skin Birkin broke the record sale for a single handbag, fetching around $223,000. Chanel’s medium classic flap bag seems to be following the same phenomenon. The luxury bag’s value has only ever increased since its launch in 1955, outperforming housing prices and even the S&P 500. The first haute couture auction at Sotheby’s Paris raised over €950,000—three times the pre-sale estimate—and included vintage pieces from the likes of Balmain, Christian Dior, Yohji Yamamoto and John Galliano. The highest bid of the night went Right: Lot 143 Pierre Cardin Haute Couture, 1962 A green gazar evening gown with slash-effect rear bodice and trained skirt Estimate: €2,000-3,000 Lot Sold: €41,250

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aRT // COLLECTIONS

to a pink Balenciaga dress covered in ostrich feathers, which was acquired for €56,250 against the €6,000-€8,000 estimate. A green Pierre Cardin evening gown sold for €41,250, dramatically surpassing the initial €2,000-€3,000 evaluation. All the 20th century pieces auctioned by Sotheby’s were sold in impeccable condition, packed with historical significance and symbolised an individual moment in history or a past designer’s personal style—all factors which considerably increased their worth. Another auction that made headline news revolved around three pairs of boots elaborately handmade in Italy by a team of 30 people using materials from three different suppliers and working in three separate factories. The three pairs of Alexander McQueen boots, recreated and auctioned by Christie’s New York for charity, were estimated to raise €10,000-€15,000 each but actually sold for a combined €295,000. Couture is a style statement for clients and a platform for fashion houses to show off their ultimate craftsmanship and creativity. Collectors and buyers alike view it as a potentially fruitful long-term investment, and not at all as a dying art—in spite of its somewhat limited clientele in the world today. As a status symbol for the elite, the most important factors affecting the haute couture market is desire and the correlation between supply and demand, as the exclusivity of luxury garments and accessories only adds to their value. A Charles James evening dress, which was one of only eight ever made, soared from $29,000 to $49,450 in just two years—a 65 percent increase in value which emphasises the impact of scarcity on price. It is not unheard of that a change in a high fashion brand’s creative director can also increase the value of designer pieces as well as their collectability. After the departure of directors Alber Elbaz from Lanvin and Raf Simons from Christian Dior back in 2015, billing for both luxury brands increased by 29 and 25 percent respectively in just a few months. If a designer’s influence was deeply felt while at a fashion house, the chances of buying pieces and having them retain or increase their value are very good. Kate Osborn from Kerry Taylor Auctions, a leading expert on vintage fashion and the UK’s premier vintage auctioneer, recommends doing some research before investing in haute couture: ‘The pieces worth

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investing in are those by the best designers at the peak of their careers. For example, Christian Dior Paris couture from the 1950s, Balenciaga from the 1960s, Yves Saint Laurent in the mid-1960s and seventies. Know the key collections and make sure to check for alterations and condition as this will also affect the value.’ The resale potential of haute couture can be significant—for people willing to bid farewell to their pieces, of course. Styles can change dramatically, in turn making vintage couture adopt an iconic status of sorts. At a time when high fashion prices are steadily rising faster than inflation, treating haute couture as a financial investment has the potential to make a lot of economic sense. •

Below: Lot 29 Balenciaga Haute Couture A/W 1965-66 A fine pink silk evening gown entirely covered in ostrich plumes, with ribbon belt Estimate: €6,000-8,000 Lot Sold: €56,250

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Founded in 1912, Maison Tamboite Paris creates remarkable bespoke bicycles, conventional as well as electrical, strictly tailor-made and handcrafted in its Parisian workshop, combining technological innovation and perfect craftsmanship. For four generations, our collections have celebrated the skills and talent of Parisian artisans, and a certain notion of art, at the service of urban mobility and timeless elegance. Maison TAMBOITE Paris 20 Rue Saint Nicolas, 75012 Paris – France Tel: +33.1.40.21.94.18 | www.maisontamboite.com

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ClassiC motorCyCles // COLLECTIONS

Need for Speed After seven decades out of production, a much-loved motorcycle brand is back on the road By Hannah Guinness

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rough Superior is back on the tarmac. This venerable British brand, first established in 1919, produced powerful, stylish motorcycles that were widely acclaimed, owned by everyone from T. E. Lawrence (he purchased seven of them in a row) to George Bernard Shaw and Jay Leno. The most well-known model in Brough Superior’s stable was the muscular SS100, which formed a core part of the brand. The numbers of Brough bikes referred to their warranted top speed, and each SS100 from 1925 onwards came with a written guarantee that it had been timed at 100mph or more over the flying quarter mile. It was this speed that made the SS100 so alluring to mileage addicts such as T. E. Lawrence, who would often leave Brough’s works in Nottingham on a Friday night with an SS100 and return on Monday morning with the tires worn down to the canvas and another 1,000 miles on the clock. An exercise in functional elegance, the Brough Superior excelled in every type of competition, from races, sprints, hill climbs and trials to tarmac, sand, shale and even ice. It was, however, a short-lived success. From the launch of the brand in 1919 the brand produced some 3,000 motorcycles before ceasing production in 1940. It lay dormant for 68 years until 2008, when classic motorcycle enthusiast Mark Upham bought the rights to the brand name. In 2013 he met fellow Brough Superior fan Thierry Henriette, a motorcycle designer and constructor. A new company was formed, with plans to produce a new generation SS100 revealed that same year.

Right: Plans to produce a new generation SS100 were unveiled in 2013.

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COLLECTIONS // ClassiC motorCyCles

The company has now begun production of the new SS100 in earnest. Each machine will be custom built and made to order, with a choice of three finishes. Evoking the style of its Jazz Age forebear as well as being constructed out of the latest cutting edge components, it’s a supremely beautiful motorcycle that makes no compromises when it comes to quality and design. • » Brough Superior’s U.K. supplier is Moto Corsa, Unit 6, South’s Farm Yard, Noade Street, Ashmore, nr Shaftesbury, Dorset, SP5 5AA; 01747 811196; motocorsa.co.uk. To find out more about purchasing an SS100 contact Jeremy Kerr at jeremy@motocorsa.co.uk Right: Brough Superior machines, dubbed the ‘Rolls-Royce’ of motorcycles, have been owned by some of the world’s most rich and famous people.

IMAGES © brouGh SupErIor MotorcyclES

Below: The new SS100 combines classic design with cutting edge technology.

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Brough Superior Combining a classic design and impeccable heritage with the latest cutting edge technology, the new generation SS100 marks the revival of a much-loved British brand.

To find out more about the superb SS100, please contact Moto Corsa sales on 01747 811196 or sales@motocorsa.co.uk: Unit 6 South’s Farm Yard, Noade Street, Ashmore, nr Shaftesbury, Dorset, SP5 5AA

motocorsa.co.uk

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12/01/2017 15:51


Tourism // arT

Intelligent Design Design museums chronicle how good design can impact and shape our lives. We look at seven of the best to visit

D

esign museums are places where people can learn about the objects and designs that have shaped our world. We’re familiar with famous examples such as London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, but there are many others across the globe— from Berlin to Toronto—worth visiting.

The Design MuseuM, LonDon The London Design Museum’s eagerly anticipated new home opened in High Street Kensington late last year, a striking Grade II* listed building—once the Commonwealth Institute—that offers three times the space of the museum’s previous setting in Shad Thames. A decade in the making, the £83 million project, masterminded by architectural designer John Pawson, restored the shell of the 1960s-built building (including its unusual copper-covered hyperbolic paraboloid roof) and redesigned the interiors, resulting in a sleek minimalist space. What should we see? The opening exhibition showcases 11 multidisciplinary new installations created by some of the most exciting designers and architects working today. Fear and Love: Reactions to a Complex World (until 23 April 2017) explores the connections between design and issues that inspire fear and love, covering everything from networked sexuality to sentient robots. designmuseum.org

Right: The new London Design Museum, designed by John Pawson, opened in November 2016.

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aRT // Tourism

The ViTra Design MuseuM The striking white edifice of the Vitra Design Museum, with its odd, unexpected angles and swooping lines, is located in Weil am Rhein in Germany. Designed by Frank Gehry it opened in 1989, just a few days before the Berlin Wall fell. Initially a small private collection, today the museum is a haven for interior design and furniture nerds, showcasing the crème de la crème of the design greats, including the likes of George Nelson, Alexander Girard and Charles and Ray Eames.

and beyond was huge. Today, the work of this influential German school of design is housed in a striking structure fittingly designed by Bauhaus founder, Walter Gropius. The building’s distinctive silhouette, with its shed roofs, has made it one of Berlin’s landmarks and a treasure trove of Bauhaus pieces—from sculpture and furniture to ceramics. Plans are now in place to construct a new building to supplement the museum’s exhibition space in time for the centenary of the founding of the Bauhaus in 2019.

Below: Vitra Design Museum, Frank Gehry, 1989. Photo: Thomas Dix Patriot Radio, 1940, Cooper Hewitt. Designed by Norman Bel Geddes (American, 1893–1958). Gift of George R. Kravis II, 2014 10 1. Photo: Matt Flynn Braniff Airways Model 66310 Armchair, Cooper Hewitt.Designed by Alexander Hayden Girard (American, 1907–1993) for Braniff International Airways. Gift of George R. Kravis II in honor of Caroline Baumann, 2013 37 1. Photo: Matt Flynn

What should we see? The Brutalist Playground (14 January to 11 April 2017) takes as its subject the rugged, controversial aesthetic of post-war brutalist architecture in the U.K. In particular, it focuses on the unconventionally designed playgrounds erected in residential areas across the country—which this exhibition recreates. design-museum.de

IMAGES © GARETH GARDNER; VITRA DESIGN MuSEuM; SMITHSoNIAN DESIGN MuSEuM

Cooper hewiTT, sMiThsonian Design MuseuM Founded in 1897, this venerable design institute was extensively refurbished in 2014: the new and improved museum, housed in the iconic Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Fifth Avenue in New York City, offers a fascinatingly immersive experience. Visitors can now interact with the museum’s collection—which comprises some 210,000 objects spanning 30 centuries—using touchscreens and digital pens. This technology allows visitors to immerse themselves in the collections, from examining objects in minute detail to drawing wallpaper designs and seeing them projected on the wall. What we should see? Scraps: Fashion, Textiles, and Creative Reuse (until 16 April 2017) examines differing approaches to solving textile waste by showcasing the work of three different designers who put sustainability at the heart of the design process. cooperhewitt.org

The Bauhaus arChiVe/MuseuM of Design Despite only existing for 14 years—from 1919 to 1933—the Bauhaus’s impact on art, architecture and design in the 20th century

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Tourism // arT

What should we see? Modernism on the Main (until 27 February 2017) looks at the work of the Frankfurt Art School, founded in 1923, and its relationship with the Bauhaus. The show will exhibit works by teachers and students—some of which haven’t been shown in public before. bauhaus.de

The MuseuM of The IMage What do we do with images and what do images do to you? This is the question that the Museum of the Image, located in Breda in the Netherlands, poses to its visitors. Focusing chiefly on graphic design but encompassing everything from film and photography to science and gaming, it recently merged with Breda’s Museum— resulting in a destination that will focus on both the heritage of the city and visual culture. The new Stedelijk Museum Breda is set to open this spring. motimuseum.nl

DesIgn exchange

Below: Marcel Breuer, Children’s Chair, 1924. Bauhaus Archive Berlin. A display at the Design Exchange in Toronto.

What should we see? Evolution (until 28 April) looks at biomimicry and how designers are increasingly looking to nature for their design solutions, from breathing buildings and honeycomb architecture to mussel-inspired soy adhesives. A fascinating look at how nature can solve man-made problems. dx.org

The chIcago aThenaeuM It’s fitting that this design museum is located in Chicago, a shrine to feats in modern art and architecture. Dedicated to chronicling architecture, industrial and product design, graphics, urban planning and more, the museum is on a mission to educate the public about the value of good design—‘from the “spoon to the city”’—and how it can benefit the human environment. • chi-athenaeum.org

IMAGES © dESIGn ExchAnGE; BAuhAuS ArchIvE, Photo: FotoStudIo BArtSch

Dedicated to cataloging design excellence and demonstrating its relevance to everyday life, the Design Exchange is housed in

Toronto’s handsome old Stock Exchange. It’s a multidisciplinary museum that hosts collections spanning over five decades of industrial design, with some 450 objects covering textiles, electronics, furniture, fashion and more.

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01/02/2017 09:56


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Tourism // Culture

Cities of

Culture

Arts & Collections International explores some of the lesserknown cultural hotspots across the globe

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ondon, Paris, New York, Rome— these cities have always been celebrated for the breadth and depth of their artistic and cultural offerings. Because of this, it’s easy to overlook other locations that can present an equally rewarding experience for the culturally discerning visitor.

Charleston Gracious southern hospitality, carriage rides, antebellum architecture and the scent of blooming jasmine—the romantic charm of Charleston makes it a destination for millions of tourists every year. You can happily while away the hours strolling down the beautiful waterfront or exploring the French Quarter but there are also some cultural gems worth a visit, including the Gibbes Museum of Art—housed in a beautiful Beaux-Arts building—and the elegant Dock Street Theatre. There are also over 50 galleries to explore, numerous cultural events throughout the year and a live music scene that’s surprisingly vibrant for so small a city.

BarCelona Gaudí is often the first name that springs to mind when it comes to Barcelona, yet while his distinctive, instantly recognisable architectural works—such as the Park Güell and the Sagrada Familia—are a

Above: The Gibbes Museum of Art and the Dock Street Theatre are only a few of Charleston’s cultural gems. Right: Historic Barcelona neighbourhoods such as El Born and the Gothic Quarter are full of street art.

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Culture // Tourism

must-visit, they’re not the only thing to explore in this buzzing Catalonian city. Famous museums such as the Museu Picasso—containing one of the biggest collections of Picasso pieces in the world—can’t be missed but do make sure you also investigate the city’s thriving, eclectic contemporary arts scene, taking in galleries and museums such as Artevistas, Miscelänea, the MACBA Centre, Espai (b) and +R Galería. If you like to wander, explore historic neighbourhoods such as El Born and the Gothic Quarter, both full of street art.

Washington D.C. Aside from being the stage for America’s political power players, Washington D.C. is also a museum lover’s dream, with a lot to choose from—the Smithsonian Institute has 19 alone. With many conveniently located along or near the majestic Mall, they cover everything from classic front page headlines at the Newseum to confronting slavery and oppression at the recently opened National Museum of African American History—there’s even an International Spy Museum. As well as hosting many prestigious cultural venues such as the Kennedy Centre, Washington—fitting for a place that the likes of Duke Ellington and Shirley Horn called home—is also a jazz hub, with multiple clubs centred on the U Street Corridor.

Kyoto

IMAGES © 123RF

From cherry blossoms to a multitude of exquisitely crafted Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines, the ancient capital of Japan is an aesthete’s dream, with beautiful architecture and exquisite food to boot. Since the 1990s, it’s also been challenging Tokyo’s position as king of Japan’s contemporary arts scene. The city is crowded with lots of independent galleries that champion local talent such

Above: Gaudí’s unmistakeable architectural influence is one of the many reasons why art lovers visit Barcelona. Right: The famous Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. is made up of 19 museums.

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Tourism // Culture

as the Kodama Gallery, which promotes Kyoto and Osaka artists, and En Arts, set in the beautiful surrounds of Maruyama Park. Museums range from traditional heavyweights such as the Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art to quirky examples like the wonderful International Manga Museum.

Marrakech Whether it’s thronging your way through the mayhem of the Djemaa el-Fna with its street performers and food stalls, hunting for treasures in the labyrinthine souks or sipping mint tea at a terrace top cafe there’s plenty to see and do in vibrant, bustling Marrakech. While the country as a whole abounds in exquisite examples of ancient Islamic and Berber art, Marrakech in particular is a hub for Morocco’s contemporary art scene. Try the likes of the acclaimed Marrakech Museum for Photography and Visual Arts, the Matisse Art Gallery (a platform for both international and Moroccan artists) and funky Galerie Rê, to name a few. Special mention should also go to the Jardin Majorelle, located on the outskirts of the medina. Painted

Above: Kyoto has been challenging Tokyo’s position as Japan’s premier contemporary arts scene. Left: The busy Djemaa el-Fna in Marrakech.

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A

u n i q u e

h o t e l

e x p e r i e n c e

At the foot of the Atlas Mountains, away f rom the hustle of the medina, what seemed like only a mirage has become a reality: Selman Marrakech, a palace of distinct, sublime and alluring charm. Km 5 Rou t e d'A m i zm i z - 4 0 160 M arrakech +212 524 45 96 00 - res ervations @ s elman-marrak ec h. c o m www.s elman-marrakech.com

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Tourism // Culture

a vivid electric blue this exquisite house and gallery, set in beautiful botanic gardens, was once the home of the late French designer Yves Saint Laurent.

St PeterSburg The former imperial capital, once the seat of the Romanovs, is now a dynamic cultural metropolis crammed with mustsee sights—from the world-renowned ballet and opera at the Mariinsky Theatre to the treasure troves that are the Hermitage and the sprawling State Russian Museum, the latter spread out over four luxurious palaces. There’s also a burgeoning independent arts scene that covers everything from scrappy little galleries to the modern Erarta Museum— the biggest contemporary art gallery in Russia. A particular highlight is the city’s famous White Nights in the summer, when the sun never sets and the whole city comes out to indulge in festivals, concerts and parties all night long. •

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Above: The sun never sets during St Petersburg’s famous White Nights in the summer.

Below: Must-see sights in St Petersburg include the Mariinsky Theatre, the Hermitage and the State Russian Museum.

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TRAVEL // COLLECTIONS

Exploring Lake Como

MAIN ATTRACTIONS Lake Como has been a choice retreat for wealthy people and aristocrats since well before modern times—from historic buildings and basilicas to gardens and museums, this destination offers visitors many artistic and cultural gems. Admire the impressive collection of historic bikes at the Moto Guzzi Museum, explore the historic Villa del Balbianello—the old home of a famous explorer who led the first Italian expedition to Mount Everest—and its elaborate gardens, or walk through what is considered to be one of the last Gothic cathedrals ever built in Italy—the

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Duomo di Como. Piazza Cavour will be the ideal destination for shopping lovers. The traditional Italian square in Como offers various shops, restaurants, bars and even a fresh food market on certain days of the week with a stunning view over the lake and mountains.

GETTING THERE Lake Como is accessible to visitors from all over the world. Milan Malpensa airport is perhaps the closest airport, as it is roughly 25 miles from the town of Como. The airport is serviced by airlines such as Delta, British Airways, KLM, Scandinavian and many more.

After arriving at Milan Malpensa, visitors will be able to reach the Lake District by taking the train, bus or renting a car.

WHERE TO STAY Exceptional views and elegant rooms with balconies make Filario Style Hotel an ideal destination for holidaygoers wanting to stay in Lake Como. The luxury residences, decorated impeccably, offer stunning views of the Comacina Island, Villa del Balbianello and Tremezzo. For more information, visit filario.it • Above: Lake Como is one of the biggest lakes in Europe with an area of 146 square kilometres.

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STYLE AND DESIGN // ART HISTORY

Antitraditional

Elegance

Sleek, modern and luxurious, Art Deco’s exuberance influenced furniture, architecture and everyday design By Annalisa D’Alessio

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IMAGES: SothEby’S; 123rf

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lourishing in the 1920s, the bold Art Deco style took its name from the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes held in Paris in 1925—an event that celebrated modernism and avant-garde styles in architecture and applied art. Influenced by the geometric irregularities of Cubism, the bright colours of Fauvism, Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes and the earlier Art Nouveau movement, Deco is an euphoric blend of many different artistic styles—often conflicting—that are neatly united by the desire to be contemporary. The beginning of this exuberant style was connected to the rise in status of artisans: craftsmen and furniture, textile, jewellery and glass designers started to be considered artists in their own right. Art Deco fast developed into an international movement, spreading to the rest of Europe, the U.S., Russia, Asia and Latin America. The style represented sophistication in architecture and applied art—ranging from exquisitely manufactured objects made out of rare materials to mass-produced, streamlined items accessible to the ever-growing middle class. Perhaps one of the most visible and best-known examples of the movement belongs to the iconic New York skyline. The Chrysler building, considered one of the finest in the Big Apple, is a classic model of the geometric, simple and angular shapes characteristic of the Art

Above: Clément Rousseau A Macassar ebony and kingwood veneered, oak, shagreen, mother-of-pearls and ivory chest, circa 1925, signed.

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ART HISTORY // STYLE AND DESIGN

Deco style. During the 1930s, it took over Miami Beach, creating the area now famously known as the Art Deco district in Miami, Florida. Deco painting was—by definition— decorative, and very few painters limited themselves exclusively to the movement. Tamara de Lempicka, a Polish artist born from an aristocratic family, is the painter most closely associated with the Deco style. Her dynamic, geometric paintings— like La Musicienne (1929) and Idyll (1931) to name a few—garnered worldwide fame and recognition. Colourful and dramatic, the Art Deco style also translated to the graphic arts: magazines such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and Vanity Fair used Deco’s bright and linear posters on their front covers, further popularising the artistic movement in the U.S. Although this distinct style quickly went out of fashion during World War II, the 1960s brought with them a renewed interest in Art Deco. Today, it continues to be a beacon of inspiration for 21st century art, jewellery design and fashion. 

‘Art Deco is an euphoric blend of many different artistic styles—often conflicting—that are united by the desire to be contemporary’

Left: The Chrysler building, a classic example of Art Deco architecture, was designed by William Van Alen and completed in 1930.

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STYLE AND DESIGN // FASHION

Challenging the

Status Quo

Every age has its own fashion rules and faux-pas, but it is the groundbreaking liberties that continue to transform and evolve the fashion industry

Above: Swimwear competition, Molitor swimming pool, Paris, 1946, Micheline Bernardini in a Louis Réard Bikini.

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IMAGES: Afp photo; brIdGEMAn IMAGES; jEAn MorAl; Guy MArInEAu; ShuttErStock

By Annalisa D’Alessio

Facing page: Thierry Mugler, Haute Couture Autumn/Winter, 1997-1998.

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fashion // STYLE AND DESIGN

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iniskirts, women in trousers, baggy jeans, female tuxedos and men in skirts. When first introduced, these fashion ‘breakthroughs’ were received with widespread criticism as they challenged the vestimentary norms of their time. Even sometimes banned when they first appeared, they transgressed the established order and changed the fashion industry—forever. Tenue Correcte Exigée, Quand le Vêtement Fait Scandale, showing from 1 December to 23 April 2017 at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, revisits the scandals that have made sartorial history and marked iconic turning points in the fashion industry. Featuring over 400 garments and accessories, portraits, caricatures and objects, this original exhibition will explore three major themes: Dress Codes, Girl or Boy? and Provocative Excess. Every age, season, culture, and economic status has its distinct fashions. In JudeoChristian culture, clothing has always been related to original sin—Adam and Eve lived naked in the Garden of Eden, and were only cast out when they became conscious of their nudity and covered themselves with garments. As a result of this, from the Middle Ages to the 18th century clothing had to be sober and discreet—fashion has long been restricted by made-up rules and conventions. Dress Codes will look into how society is expected to comply with these ‘strict’ rules of decorum: dress codes exist for events such as a baptism, communion, marriage, dinner, or reception—even royalty is expected to follow them. A scandalous painting of Marie Antoinette by famous artist Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun was deeply criticised; it was deemed ‘unseemly’ because the French queen was portrayed wearing a negligee—a sheer dressing gown. Why does a man wearing makeup cause such a stir? The androgynous look, and exchanges between male and female wardrobes have often been received with furore. Elsa Schiaparelli, a celebrated Italian designer, became famous for the jumpsuit, and in 1966 Yves Saint Laurent’s tuxedo introduced trousers to the female wardrobe. Men have also tried to adopt garments regarded as ‘feminine’ and some, such as the skirt, are still not accepted: Girl or Boy? explores the—almost-demolished—gender boundaries and stereotypes in fashion.

www.artsandcollections.com

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Provocative Excesses, on the other hand, looks into the fashion industry’s love for excess. Every period of time has had them: heels that were too high, miniskirts that were too short, breeches that were too wide, garments that were too transparent, necklines that were too revealing, and dresses that were far too figure-hugging. By shedding new light on dress codes and fashion taboos, this original and colourful exhibition will seek to answer the age-old question: ‘How should we dress?’. From past to present, the display will show how little known moments in fashion history have marked significant turning points of change for this ever-evolving form of art. 

Below: Marlon Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951.

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31/01/2017 10:30


ColleCtions // Timepieces

Lure of Time Switzerland has long been recognised as the world’s centre of luxury timepiece manufacture, but with prices exceeding their tens of thousands, why do these small paragons fare so well in the digital age?

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he first mechanical timepieces were being made across Europe in Germany, France, Italy and the Netherlands around the 14th century and were originally worn as large necklaces. The watchmaking trade developed in Geneva decades later, with artisan goldsmiths birthing creations of intricate filigree, engravings and complex miniature mechanics. These exquisite designs are historically a representation of class and social status— and this remains true today. In an age where smartphones—thanks to satellite technology—are considered to be the most accurate time-keeping models,

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the market for luxury Swiss-made timepieces is still thriving. Pieces crafted by well-known horologists such as Vacheron Constantin, Jaeger-LeCoultre and Breguet are valued from $4,000 for a basic wristwatch, exceeding $100,000 the more complex the design. In 2015 alone, the world bought 28.1 million Swiss watches with a combination value of 21.5 billion Swiss francs. Swiss-made timepieces have sold at auctions like Sotheby’s, with a JaegerLeCoultre watch selling for a low $37,500 and an A. Lange & Söhne watch selling for $47,500 in 2015. It is generally accepted that profitable returns on luxury timepieces are

the exception and not the rule. Forbes states that only Rolex and Patek Philippe collections really increase in value after purchase—if you do decide to invest, then these would be the smart option. Luxury timepieces are for those who value artistry. Brands other than Rolex or Patek Philippe tend to lose their monetary worth or, at very best, retain their retail value. According to articlesofstyle.com, the time displayed on a mechanical watch is less accurate than its digital counterpart and apparently loses up to an hour each year. If digital means of time-keeping are more precise and the chance of profitable return on a mechanical watch is fairly slim,

IMAGES: VAchEron conStAntIn / BrEGuEt

By Kayley Loveridge

www.artsandcollections.com

01/02/2017 10:46


Timepieces // ColleCtions

what exactly is it about these lustrous instruments that continues to lure the timepiece connoisseur? Like cheese or fine wines whose legal constraints are bound to the regions they are produced in, Swiss laws govern the designation of the label ‘Swiss’ on a timepiece under very particular conditions. The movement of the timepiece must be entirely Swiss, meaning it must be assembled in Switzerland and at least 50 percent of the movement value must be of Swiss manufacture. Further, the timepiece must also only be inspected in Switzerland. The term ‘Swiss’ or ‘Swiss-made’ engraved in a timepiece is a mark of recognised quality, making this luxury a commodity in popular demand. Swiss-made timepieces celebrate the governance of time in accordance to the movement of the earth, moon and stars. Jaeger-LeCoultre, especially, exhibits this in charming celestial designs with moonphases and annual calendars that are typical of their horological masterpieces. Vacheron Constantin boasts some of the most expensive timepieces ever made. The oldest watchmakers in the world fashion open-worked transparent designs whose aesthetic is founded in 19th century European architecture. These skeletal pieces display a scene of superior craftsmanship, a complex movement of miniature cogs, gears and springs, and light-reflecting precious stones. These luxury timepieces are built by horologists using in excess of a thousand pieces. They represent centuries of skill, ingenuity and heritage that digital watches or smartphones simply cannot match. Swissmade timepieces offer a visual presence that is inherently timeless in nature; their classic ticking sounds a reminder of a notso-distant human past in a modern world of robots. 

Facing Page: Vacheron Constantin, Métiers D’art Mécaniques Ajourées Collection in Black. Right: Vacheron Constantin, Métiers D’art Mécaniques Ajourées Collection in Blue. Bottom Right: Breguet, Original Marie Antoinette Pocket Watch, 1827, stolen in 1983.

www.artsandcollections.com

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01/02/2017 10:33


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TRAVEL // COLLECTIONS

Cruise Control Spectacle, luxury and glamour are all to be found in the biggest yacht shows across the globe

IMAGES: DEAn WESt

By Hannah Guinness

Above: Running from 25-28 May 2017, the Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show will showcase the latest trends in the yachting world to some 40,000 guests.

www.artsandcollections.com

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01/02/2017 11:33


COLLECTIONS // TRAVEL

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SANCTUARY COVE INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW Every year the picturesque Sanctuary Cove Resort on Queensland’s Gold Coast becomes the setting for this long-running boat show—due to celebrate its 29th anniversary in 2017. Some 40,000 visitors will spend four days exploring the latest designs and industry trends in the yachting world, as well as enjoying the charms of the many restaurants and bars in the surrounding resort. 25-28 May 2017; sanctuarycoveboatshow.com.au

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DUBAI INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW One of the Middle East’s most important boat shows combines a leisurely pace (unlike most yacht shows, this event starts in the late afternoon and continues into the night to avoid the desert heat) with a striking setting—Dubai’s arresting cityscape. 2016’s event showcased over 450 superyachts and leisure crafts to more than 30,000 visitors, who collectively spent $68 million on purchases. Next year’s event, which celebrates the show’s 25th anniversary, promises to be even bigger. 28 February to 4 March 2017; boatshowdubai.com

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FORT LAUDERDALE INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW It’s one of the biggest boat shows in the industry, set in the self-proclaimed yachting capital of the world. This year’s event, the 57th of its kind, showcased billions of dollars’ worth of boats—from catamarans to superyachts—in an event that, impressively, covered five separate locations. showmanagement.com/fort_lauderdale

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SINGAPORE YACHT SHOW As well as superyachts—of which you’ll find plenty—this increasingly popular event is also known for its nightlife and high-end parties. Set in the glamorous ONEº15 Marina Club, visitors will also be able to shop luxury timepieces, jewellery and cars. 6-9 April 2017; singaporeyachtshow.com

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THE MONACO YACHT SHOW This event is the place to go for seriously impressive superyachts of every kind—typically at least 125 one-off luxury behemoths are showcased every year, with 40 of them making their debut at the show. Combine this with a glamorous setting in the iconic Port of Hercules in Monaco—what’s not to like?  27-30 September 2017; monacoyachtshow.com

Above: The Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show, held every year on Queenland’s Gold Coast. The Australian boat show will be celebrating its 29th anniversary in 2017.

www.artsandcollections.com

01/02/2017 10:35


WHERE TO SPEND IT // COLLECTABLES

Where to

SPEND IT

From Aston Martin’s first powerboat to artistic Dior bags, the latest luxury goods on our list are a must-have for any collection By Hanaa Foura

RACECAR FOR THE SEA A match made at sea: Aston Martin have partnered up with Quintessence Yachts to bring you their first powerboat. The state-of-the-art boat is described by Quintessence Yachts as the perfect blend of high-end technology and craftsmanship that is able to hit up to 50 knots. Designed by the world-renowned team at Mulder Design, the AM37 series features a streamlined aesthetic with leather details and seats that can accommodate up to eight passengers. ‘Our goal has been to make sure that every part of the AM37 has been refined and optimised. Each function of the boat has a rationale behind it. Nothing is merely “there”,’ explained Mariella Mengozzi, CEO of Quintessence Yachts. The 37-foot powerboat is fitted with mood lighting, a refrigerator, air conditioning and a wrap around windscreen for a seamless appearance.

quintessenceyachts.com

CRYSTAL DECANTER

IMAGES: © QUINTESSENCE YACHTS; MONTBLANC; MAUD REMY LONVIS

HISTORY OF A TRAVEL WRITER Paying homage to the famed explorer and writer Marco Polo, Montblanc has released a collection of limited edition writing instruments to celebrate his life of inspirational discoveries. The collection includes four pens commemorating the highlights of his travels with the ‘Homage to Marco Polo Silk Road LE69’ being the first pen to have Damask steel incorporated into the cap. Alongside this, the pen features contrasting rosewood and a beautiful deep blue lapis lazuli stone. The Homage to Marco Polo collection is a great addition for any traveller who wants to note down their stories. montblanc.com

www.artsandcollections.com

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Earlier this season, Penfolds teamed up with luxury French glassmaker SaintLouis to commemorate their flagship Grange and the first release of five limited edition 2012 Grange six-litre bottles. The collaboration between Saint-Louis and Penfolds created the exquisite Penfolds Aevum Imperial Service Ritual, which was crafted for the 2012 Grange Imperial to give the perfect pour. Penfolds and St-Louis have also released a smaller limited edition Penfolds Aevum Crystal Decanter. The hand-blown crystal piece features the striking diamond cut signature of SaintLouis. penfolds.com

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COLLECTABLES // WHERE TO SPEND IT

STYLISH ART Dior has released their limited edition ‘Dior Lady Art’ collection, collaborating with seven well-known artists. Each made their own interpretation of the iconic Lady Dior bag, creating pieces that combine personal flair with the classic lines of this much-loved design. Artists included Mat Collishaw (pictured), Ian Davenport, Matthew Porter, Chris Martin, Daniel Gordon, and Jason Martin. Expect to see metallic details, vibrant photographic designs and striking prints.

dior.com

GLOBAL ESPRESSO Illy have teamed up with the Italian fashion house Emilio Pucci for a beautiful collaboration to add to their well known illy Art Collections. Taking inspiration from Emilio Pucci’s famed ‘Cities of the World’ hand print scarf designs, the cups illustrate six different global metropolises: Rome, Florence, Milan, Paris, New York and London. With whimsical prints and bright colours, they’ll make for a particularly chic morning coffee. Each are numbered and signed as part of a limited edition collection. They are sold in sets of six and are available worldwide. illy.com

100 YEARS OF COLONIA Acqua Di Parma celebrated their 100th anniversary with the limited edition Colonia Centenary. Inspired by the decorations of the Royal Theatre of Parma, this exquisite perfume sits in a precious 925 carat silver Art Deco-crafted case designed by the prestigious Italian jewellery brand Damiani. The Colonia perfume is a refined and elegant scent that dates back to 1916. Notes include Sicilian orange, Calabrian bergamot, Damask rose, verbena, rosemary, vetiver, sandalwood and patchouli. Only 100 bottles are available and jewellers have engraved a number on each unit. harrods.com

This handmade creation by expert Italian artisans has transformed driftwood into an elegant modern lamp. Exclusively made in Italy, it’s constructed from sea wood and is paired with gold, granite and gem finishings. Now available upon request and order from

boutiquesardiniadesign1850.com

DRIVE IN STYLE Rolls Royce has just unveiled their new fashioned-inspired SS17 automobile collection. The ‘Dawn—Inspired by Fashion’ collection features an all-white canvas to showcase the vibrant colours of fiery mugello red, cool cobalto blue and mandarin that are highlighted subtly throughout the interior detailing and roof. rolls-roycemotorcars.com

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IMAGES: ACQUA DI PARMA; DIOR; ROLLS ROYCE MOTORCARS; EMILIO PUCCI X ILLY ART COLLECTION; BOUTIQUE SARDINIA DESIGN 1850

SEAWOOD LAMP

www.artsandcollections.com

01/02/2017 10:46


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Arts & Collections: 20th Anniversary Issue