Page 82

There’s a kind of built-in fascination that this kind of tinkering holds for many people. In an earlier moment of online interactivity more people were interested just to see what images they could make, but now I feel like the enthusiasm for exploring and discovering has waned. With the rise of the social networking systems, it takes some effort to get people to spend time outside of the usual online routines like checking email and tuning into tweets.

appeared that almost any use of the Web in the mid-90s was progressive, because of the dominance of broadcast media corporations, but as we move forward, corporate media power now operates through the Internet. I think there’s still potential for tactical media interventions, but the lowhanging fruit is harder to find. With respect to mobile technologies and social networking, I have certainly considered intervening in those contexts. I’ve been tinkering with a version of Glyphiti for cell phones.

Marco Mancuso: About that, you work in direct contact with networking human dynamics, what do you think about the possible future of the Internet? I mean: what do you think about the widespread enthusiasm on web 2.0 dynamics, about its capacity to create connections, sharing & information freedom VS the possible risks of a media controlled Internet? What is your point of view and, why don’t you seem interested in developing artworks using social networks and integrated mobile technologies? We could say many pioneering net-artists don’t seem interested in that…

One thing that’s held me back is the complexity of addressing a universal audience in mobile phones. You’re obliged to choose one company’s products or another’s, and it’s been a headache to avoid becoming a partisan, a “developer” for a particular platform. The WWW sprang rather suddenly from Berners-Lee’s rib and wasn’t calibrated, at first, to meet the marketing objectives of the various media conglomerates. Phones have evolved very differently. Likewise the degree of control and coercion within the social networking systems is stifling. There’s not much

Andy Deck: If we asked the same question about the book, we might observe that it expanded literacy enormously. Is the book counterhegemonic? Does the book get credit for the late 18th century revolutions? Blame for the holocaust? It may have

that falls within the terms of use that I’d want to dedicate a lot of time to building. I’m too attached to autonomy to feel at ease using privatized systems as a basis for my 80

DIGIMAG 52 - MARCH 2010  

Digimag was one of the most important international magazines focused on the impact of media technologies on art, design and contemporary cu...

DIGIMAG 52 - MARCH 2010  

Digimag was one of the most important international magazines focused on the impact of media technologies on art, design and contemporary cu...

Advertisement