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PREPARING for GREATNESS

FORGING THE FUTURE

DICKINSON STATE UNIVERSITY 2015: PROGRESS REPORT


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

very committed to an educational process that fosters student success. Our faculty and staff encourage students to become engaged with their classes and involved with our vibrant campus life. Second, DSU is committed to a process that advances academic quality. We have an enduring commitment to excellence within our teaching-learning transactions. In order to advance this hallmark attribute, our academic programs seek to be responsive to the educational needs of learners. Third, DSU is engaged with the community of Dickinson, the larger region and the State of North Dakota. We provide educational experiences that develop and impact the intellectual energy and vitality of North Dakota, and the area beyond. Additionally, we are a vital link that influences the social, cultural and economic well-being of this west river region.

DEAR COLLEAGUES AND FRIENDS: It is a sincere pleasure to greet you within the context of this DSU 2015 progress report. More than two years ago, we launched an extensive planning conversation. Our committee was structured to include multiple perspectives. With more than thirty members, these individuals articulated the viewpoints of faculty, staff, students, stakeholders, community leaders and various constituents. After a year of deliberations, this future-focused planning committee developed a vision for the next five years with seven supporting goals. This conversation and planning process has been nicknamed the “DSU 2015 Plan.” This past academic year, we had more than forty individuals organized into five dedicated teams. With a common purpose, these teams worked to advance our efforts and deliberately realize our vision, mission and goals. Every university experiences an undeniable interconnectedness between its past, present and developing future. We are empowered to reflectively think about the convergence of these experiences and chart a direction that extends our beliefs, attitudes and values toward tomorrow’s opportunities. After more than nine decades of experience, the chronicles of DSU history illuminate at least three major threads of continuity. These enduring themes define the personality and culture of DSU. These ideas or priorities stand as hallmarks of distinction or signature traits. They represent the way we are known to our graduates, friends, alumni and neighbors. Moreover, as we seek to carefully balance continuity with change, these three qualities will remain as core values during the transition that defines our work and propels our trajectory into the future. First, Dickinson State is a student-centered university. We promise to help our students prepare to do great things! We believe in their aspirations and dreams. We want to support their efforts to succeed. DSU is

In today’s higher education environment, there are major jet streams of change sweeping across the country. With limited resources, universities must continually address the changing face of demographics, economics and social interconnectedness. Because of these increased expectations and demands for access, affordability and accountability, it is more important than ever for Dickinson State University to think strategically and position itself for success during the next five years. Our process is intentional and designed to synchronize and achieve an efficiency of effort. Using the five Higher Learning Commission’s Criteria as our planning anchor, we are developing and implementing action plans, assessing our progress and moving forward while we document our ongoing efforts to support North Dakota’s cornerstones, SBHE objectives and DSU’s institutional goals. These major guideposts provide us with a sense of planning direction. Accomplishing these interrelated goals will ensure that DSU increasingly becomes a driving force that fosters innovative teaching, learning and scholarship while also serving as a key contributor to the state’s economic vitality, educated workforce, cultural texture and quality of place. As we move forward, our journey will sustain an abiding commitment to provide accessible and affordable educational programs that advance the intellectual energy of North Dakota. We are optimistic and deeply committed to this trajectory of excellence. We have a shared purpose and we are advocating unity of effort through teamwork. And perhaps most importantly, we are deliberately charting the road ahead with action plans that advance the realization of our vision and mission. I believe we are building a bridge into the future that will sustain our core values and secure our ability to be recognized as a premier university. Thank you for your continued support and commitment to DSU!

Richard J. McCallum, Ph.D. President Richard.McCallum@dickinsonstate.edu


CONTENTS

2 4 7 8 12 16 20 24

PRESIDENTS MESSAGE CHARTING THE ROAD AHEAD Bold vision positions DSU to become a premier university

CORRELATED MATRIX MISSION AND INTEGRITY: HLC CRITERION ONE PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE: HLC CRITERION TWO STUDENT LEARNING AND EFFECTIVE TEACHING: HLC CRITERION THREE ACQUISITION, DISCOVERY AND APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE: HLC CRITERION FOUR ENGAGEMENT AND SERVICE: HLC CRITERION FIVE

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The 2015 Plan is published by Dickinson State University, 291 Campus Drive, Dickinson, North Dakota. For more information, please contact 701-483-2175 or 1-800-279-4295.


BOLD VISION Positions DSU to be a PREMIER UNIVERSITY by Constance Walter

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It started with a conversation. Another followed. And then another and another. Eventually, those conversations grew into a living, evolving document that outlines a bold vision for the future of Dickinson State University. Called the DSU 2015 Progress Report, the document charts a

To meet the increasing need for educational opportunities for the west river area of North Dakota, Dickinson State Normal School was founded. The first classes, attended by 104 students in the summer of 1918, were held at Dickinson High School because the fledgling normal school had no buildings

Accreditation by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools contributed to the credibility of a degree from “The College on the Hill,” officially renamed Dickinson State Teachers College in 1931, became Dickinson State College on July 1, 1963.

North Dakota’s economic vitality, educated workforce, cultural capital, and quality of place all benefit from the driving force of the vigorous and entrepreneurial university DSU has become. The university’s Global Awareness Initiative has engaged DSU students, faculty and administrators in cultural diversity activities with educators at universities around the world.

course for DSU over the next five years. Forged through the efforts of more than 40 individuals from the campus, surrounding communities, businesses and alumni groups, DSU 2015 includes a new Vision Statement, DSU's Mission Statement and seven goals designed to work in concert with the State Board of Higher Education's established cornerstones for North Dakota's higher education system and the North Central Higher Learning Commission's criteria for re-accreditation.

Guided by the Dickinson State University 2015 Plan, DSU is on track to be recognized as a premier university in the Upper Great Plains, educating a diverse and international population through innovative teaching, learning and scholarship that foster responsible citizens who impact the world.

The DSU 2015 Plan results in reaccreditation by the Higher Learning Commission and strategically positions the university for continued success as it approaches its 100th year.

In its centennial year, DSU, in the words of DSU historian Dr. Winifred Stump-DeLong, “evokes the best from those who abide there, and that the concentration of their labors will assure that the university prevails.”


Incorporating these components is a daunting task, but one that has been wholly embraced by an entire region of people who recognize and understand the enduring bond between citizens and their university. When Richard McCallum interviewed for the position of president of DSU, he was asked in a public forum to outline his vision for the regional university. “I’m not sure coming from 1,100 miles away that I have the right to appliqué my vision for your future,” he told the forum. “But I do have ideas.” Those ideas included collaborative discussions about DSU’s past, present and future; for that, McCallum said during his inauguration, is the way we determine where we want to go as a university. "Reflecting upon the past gives us a sense of where we've been and puts us in touch with our legacy," he said. DSU, he added, has a legacy that members of the university and community can be proud of because of its many accomplishments and excellent programs. Likewise, DSU must embrace the present and use it to build the positive momentum that will propel the university into the future.

"DSU is a very good university, but it aspires to be great,” McCallum said. “We want to forge the boundaries of our future."

"The committee's thoughts centered on the idea that premier will be defined as a matter of quality rather than quantity," McCallum said. "DSU wants to be known as an institution of higher education where students truly receive a quality educational experience in a safe and positive environment." The idea of a quality education extends beyond academic excellence to include a rich campus life that offers students the opportunity to participate in intramurals, clubs, organizations, student government and athletics. McCallum added that quality education is a process that develops the individual's character or moral compass. Those character traits in turn serve as a lifelong guide. That vision is rich in part because it also encompasses a deep commitment to diversity, and innovative teaching, learning and scholarship as a way to foster responsible citizenship. "Public higher education has a complex, dual responsibility that must respond to America's clarion call," McCallum said. "First, we are responsible for providing the individual student with a quality educational experience that prepares their heart and mind for future employment and social responsibility.

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In the fall of 2008, just a few months after he began his tenure as president, McCallum launched the Future Focused Planning Committee. Structured to include multiple viewpoints, the committee was charged with developing a Vision Statement as well as goals and objectives that correspond to the HLC criteria and SBHE Cornerstones. "Accomplishing these sets of interrelated goals will ensure that DSU increasingly becomes a driving force of innovative teaching, learning and scholarship and a key contributor to the state's economic vitality, educated workforce, cultural capital and quality of place." The Future Focused Committee, which is comprised of five teams, was asked to think about planning for the next three to five years with each team focusing on different goals. The year 2015 emerged as a focal point for a couple of reasons: it is the year for the next review by the North Central HLC for re-accreditation, and 2015 will be a key planning year as the university launches the 2017-2018 Centennial Celebration. "Planning for the future helps create a roadmap for success," said Dr. Jon Brudvig, director of the Theodore Roosevelt Honors Leadership Program (TRHLP) and co-chair of Team Five. "Institutional planning, especially when it engages stakeholders in meaningful and ongoing conversation, creates a sense of collective ownership that is essential if DSU hopes to achieve the goals set forth in the 2015 planning documents." A work in progress, DSU 2015 outlines seven goals, several objectives for each goal and the strategies that will allow the university to achieve those goals and objectives. The new goals grew from a bold Vision Statement that declares DSU will be "a premier university in the upper Great Plains."

"The vision is rich and really drives us to grow in every aspect of the university," said Karen A. Nelson, K-16 teaching and learning strategist and grant writer for DSU. Nelson also serves as the chair of Team One.


Additionally, because we receive tax payer support, we have a collective responsibility to society, both national and state, to organize and deliver curriculums that are connected, relevant and responsive to the educational needs of society."

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"In the business world, it is often said that you become what your vision is," said Dr. Debora Dragseth, associate professor of business and chair of Team Four. DSU is not the institution it was 92 years ago when it first opened its doors. Over the years, this public, regional university has proven it can adapt to and thrive in a changing world. In his inauguration address back in November 2008, McCallum talked about the history of DSU and marveled at its determination to prevail-even during times of great difficulty. It is that ability to endure, to adapt, to move forward that is the hallmark of a great university. It is this legacy that will launch DSU into a promising future. In the late 1980s, DSU made a commitment to diversity. In the early 1990s, it made a commitment to Global Awareness. Those commitments have resulted in a diverse campus that creates many opportunities for domestic and international students alike. "If you believe today's students are tomorrow's leaders, you realize that the value of enrollment diversity is priceless," McCallum said. "Every major social, political and economic challenge of today and tomorrow is shaped by global trends that are complex and rooted within multicultural belief systems. The solutions to our problems will require leaders who have the ability to understand the different points of view anchored within different value systems." "At DSU, we are enriched by the presence of a diverse student population," McCallum continued, adding that diversity initiatives also help North Dakota businesses and graduate programs. "Students from across the United States and from other countries stay to live and work in North Dakota, while others attend graduate school." Steve Glasser, director of the Strom Center and co-chair of Team Five with Brudvig, believes DSU is "well on the way to achieving its goal of becoming a premier university in the upper Great Plains." As evidence, Glasser points to several DSU initiatives, including the Theodore

Roosevelt Center and Digital Library, the Strom Center, the Theodore Roosevelt Honors Leadership Program, Global Awareness, World Voices and the success of several academic programs, all of which have garnered regional and national praise for the university. "In the business world, it is often said that you become what your vision is," said Dr. Debora Dragseth, associate professor of business and chair of Team Four. "In many ways we already are a premier university. A commitment to quality, intelligent planning and a focused vision will continue to enhance DSU's role as a center of academic excellence."


SYNCHRONIZING OUR EFFORTSand MOVING FORWARD THE HIGHER LEARNING COMMISSION (HLC) CRITERION

NORTH DAKOTA LEGISLATIVE ROUND-TABLE CORNERSTONES

STATE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION (SBHE) 2009 GOALS

DICKINSON STATE UNIVERSITY GOALS

Criterion One: Mission and Integrity

Cornerstone Two: Education Excellence Cornerstone Four: Access

Goal One: Accessibility Goal Three: The NDUS increases the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service.

DSU Mission: provide high-quality, accessible programs; to promote excellence in teaching and learning; to support scholarly and creative activities and to provide service relevant to the economy, health and quality of life of citizens of the State of North Dakota. Goals 1-7

Criterion Two: Preparing for the Future

Cornerstone One: Contribution to Economic Development Cornerstone Five: Funding and Rewards

Goal Two: Affordability Goal Three: Promote the overall vitality of the state Goal Four: The 11 NDUS insitutions work together to achieve the vision effectively.

Goal One: Access and prudently manage significant additional financial resources Goal Three: Strengthen university programs and services Goal Five: Align institutional resources with recruitment and retention

Criterion Three: Student Learning and Effective Teaching

Cornerstone Two: Education Excellence Cornerstone Four: Access

Goal Three: The NDUS increases the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service.

Goal Three: Strengthen university programs and services Goal Four: Attract and retain increasingly diverse and qualified administrators, faculty and staff

Criterion Four: Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge

Cornerstone Two: Education Excellence

Goal Three: Increase the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service Goal Four: The 11 NDUS insitutions work together to achieve the vision effectively

Goal Three: Strengthen university programs and services Goal Four: Attract and retain increasingly diverse and qualified administrators, faculty and staff Goal Six: Provide a safe and positive environment

Criterion Five: Engagement and Service

Cornerstone Three: Flexible and Responsive

Goal One: Accessibility Goal Three: Increase the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service Goal Four: The 11 NDUS insitutions work together to achieve the vision effectively

Goal Two: Build and extend collaborative relationships Goal Seven: Support and enhance the quality of life and economic vitality


HLC CRITERION ONE The organization operates with integrity to ensure the fulfillment of its mission through structures and processes that involve the board, administration, faculty, staff and students.

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MISSION and INTEGRITY

MISSION AND INTEGRITY

The recasting of Dickinson State University’s mission statement in the Vision 2015 Strategic Plan is harmonious with the NDUS Strategic Plan and Objectives and the Legislative Roundtable Cornerstones. DSU’s mission statement is as follows: “DSU will be recognized as a premier university in the Upper Great Plains, educating a diverse and international population through innovative teaching, learning, and scholarship that fosters responsible citizens who impact the world; DSU will provide high-quality accessible programs, promote excellence in teaching and learning, provide service relevant to the economy and quality of life for the citizens of North Dakota.” This mission statement can be found throughout university publications and literature and is the driving force behind the university’s efforts. Indeed, all seven goals of DSU’s Strategic Plan are designed to implement the mission statement; the goals


and the plan, itself, being the public document that drives the actions of the university both externally and internally.

vide high quality programs and promote excellence in teaching and learning.” This matches well with SBHE’s Goal Three.

DSU Mission Statement: Provide high-quality, accessible programs; to promote excellence in teaching and learning; to support scholarly and creative activities and to provide service relevant to the economy, health and quality of life of citizens of the state of North Dakota.

State Board of Higher Education (SBHE) Goal One: The North Dakota University System (NDUS) is accessible, a view held by all North Dakotans.

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DSU’s mission and vision statement directly correlate to the NDUS Strategic Plan Goals One and Three, which require System schools to “be accessible” and “to increase the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education.” DSU’s commitment to these goals is demonstrated through DSU’s expanded online course and program offerings, which have increased to more than 100 courses and five programs through online distance learning. The Extended Learning unit in Bismarck provides 16 major programs to over 400 students annually. The fall 2009 semester had 750 students enrolled in distance education courses through the Office of Extended Learning for a record enrollment through this delivery mode. Just ten years ago in 1999, the enrollment was 23 students in distance education. This increased accessibility by DSU directly supports the SBHE Strategic Plan Goal One. Part of the DSU mission statement is to “pro-

Several educational programs at DSU have been recognized for their quality during the 2009-10 academic year through national accreditation by agencies such as the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (bachelor’s degrees in business administration, accounting, and finance), the National Association of Schools of Music (bachelor’s degrees in music), and the National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council (bachelor’s degree in environmental health). National accreditation is always a hallmark of quality and integrity. Indeed, the entire process of program development, approved by the State Board of Higher Education, and cyclical review of academic programs assures integrity and quality. During the 2009-10 academic year, the following programs were reviewed according to board policy: the bachelor of science in agricultural studies and the associate of science in agricultural sales and service; the bachelor of science in music education, the bachelor of arts in music; the bachelor of arts in art education, and the bachelor of science in art entrepreneurship. A cyclical review and program accreditation assures integrity


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and quality and is one of the primary means to assure educational excellence.

SBHE Goal Three: The NDUS increases the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service. Team One strongly believes that recently developed programs within the past year, such as international business, finance, energy resources, and environmental science, and the increasing number of accredited programs, address the Roundtable Cornerstone of Educational Excellence and Economic Development. Three of the four new programs address the need for skilled workers related to energy extraction, which is a mainstay of southwest North Dakota’s economy. In addition, with the increased

activity of the Office of Extended Learning, Cornerstone Four (Access) has been a constant driving force as DSU strives to meet its mission.

ND Legislature Cornerstone Two: Education Excellence ND Legislature Cornerstone Four: Access Therefore, Team One believes that DSU is well on its way to meeting the HLC Criterion One requirements of integrity and mission through actions and strategies within the institutional mission, as well as the guidelines provided by the System Plan and the Roundtable Cornerstones, especially as they address access and academic excellence.


TEAM ONE

Ms. Karen A. Nelson

CHAIR

Mr. Kevin Moberg Representing: Faculty Department of Teacher Education

Dr. Doug LaPlante

Mr. Kevin Thompson

Representing: President’s Cabinet College of Education, Business and Applied Sciences

Representing: President’s Cabinet Office of Alumni and Foundation

Mr. Eli Turnbough

Representing: Staff Senate Office of Extended Learning

Representing: Student Senate Dickinson State University

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Representing: President's Direct Report Dickinson State University

Ms. Stacy Wilkinson

...the man who really counts in the world is the doer, not the mere

critic–the man who actually does the work, even if roughly and imperfectly, not the man who only talks or writes about how it ought to be done. THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 1891


HLC CRITERION TWO The organization’s allocation of resources and its processes for evaluation and planning demonstrate its capacity to fulfill its mission, inprove the quality of its education and respond to future challenges and opportunities

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PREPARING for the FUTURE

P R E PA R I N G F O R T H E F U T U R E

The Future Focused Planning Committee developed the Vision 2015 Strategic Plan which outlines seven goals that will direct the university’s efforts in the next five years. This plan is a major achievement in the university’s history and has two goals that tie directly into the System Strategic Plan and the Legislative Cornerstones, which provide guidance for the university within a system and state context. The creation of an Office of Institutional Research and Planning during the past year will be the key for much of the university’s response to the HLC reaccreditation Criterion Two and for providing data to the system and state legislature. Goal One in the Vision 2015 plan indicates that DSU will “access and prudently manage significant additional financial resources to support and enhance DSU programs and services.” The increase in Alumni and Foundation revenue over the past year has provided the


resources to continue with a robust scholarship program for DSU students. The DSU Foundation awarded more than $730,000 in scholarships during the 2009-10 academic year.

DSU Goal One: Access and prudently manage significant additional financial resources to support and enhance DSU programs and services. Along with increased scholarship support from the Foundation, DSU held tuition increases to 3.5 percent for the 2009-10 academic year. These two actions allowed DSU to maintain an affordable tuition rate and are in direct response to the NDUS Goal Two, which states: “North Dakotans recognize that the NDUS is affordable at a level that can be sustained.” Finally, the Legislative Cornerstone Two (Funding) is enhanced by this strategy because affordability is maintained.

DSU Goal Three: Strengthen university programs and services to better develop a student body devoted to DSU, committed to lifelong learning and enabled to engage and flourish in a changing world.

DSU Goal Five: Align institutional resources with recruitment and retention to strategically develop a student body, which is consistent with the mission and vision of DSU.

SBHE Goal Two: North Dakotans recognize that the NDUS is affordable at a level that can be sustained. Over the past year, the Strategic Enrollment Planning Committee, comprised of faculty, staff and students, has worked with consultants from the Noel-Levitz corporation to develop the first Strategic Enrollment Plan in the history of the university. This plan was finalized in the spring of 2010 and is now being implemented. Part of the plan is to market the university to students who are likely to succeed and to attract students from outside of North Dakota. This has led to articulation agreements with the Seattle Community College district and Highline Community College in Washington, which will enhance transferability of these students to DSU. Similar agreements are being pursued in California.

SBHE Goal Three: The NDUS increases the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service. The Strategic Enrollment Plan has also targeted international students. New agreements of cooperation and exchange were signed with four universities in China in 2009-10, bringing the total of cooperative agreements in China to 16. Also, a delegation from the university, led by President Richard McCallum, visited Russia, which resulted in cooperative agreements with five Russian universities in the Krasnoyarsk area. As the university seeks new agreements with global universities, recruitment in North Dakota and surrounding states has not been diminished. New campaigns across the state have yielded students from 45 of 53 counties in North Dakota. Enrollment in the Bismarck program included 357 students from Burleigh and Morton counties alone in the fall of 2009, a record enrollment from these counties.

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Institutional resources over the past year have been directed toward enhancing student support services through the Academic Success Center. This Center provides help for students to enhance their classroom performance. In doing so, the ASC “strengthens university programs and services to better develop a student body…committed to lifelong learning,” the key component in DSU’s Goal Three. The planned effort in helping students succeed, followed by the commitment of institutional resources, is a prime example of how institutional planning is crucial for the overall operation of the university.

DSU has embarked on the development of a study abroad program during the past year and applied to the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) to become a member institution. This will be the first time in DSU’s history that an institutional study abroad program has been created for our students and is part of the goal of preparing students to live in a global society.


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SBHE Goal Four: The eleven institutions comprising the NDUS work together to achieve the vision effectively. Part of the Strategic Enrollment Plan is to develop a new marketing strategy based on university strengths and qualities that will attract students from different backgrounds. Extensive research by the Committee and Noel-Levitz point to the following key factors that bring students to DSU: affordability, quality of programs, size, and location. All of these factors are part of the System Strategic Plan and DSU’s 2015 Plan and will be guiding the university’s efforts in forming the student body of the future. Part of the Higher Learning Commission’s reaccreditation Criterion Two is to “respond to future challenges and opportunities” through planning and resource allocation, which, in turn, should help the System increase the vitality of the state through educational services provided by the university. DSU is effectively meeting this stipulation by developing curriculum that meet the demand for workers in the energy sector and by partnering with Bismarck State College to bring vocational programs to southwest North Dakota. DSU’s new Energy Resource Management Program, which will be launched during the 2010-11 academic year, speaks directly to the energy sector, as well as the Roundtable Cornerstone of Economic Development and the NDUS Strategic Plan goal of “increasing the vitality of the state.” In spring of 2010, DSU and BSC signed a memorandum of agreement that allows BSC vocational programs to be brought to the Dickinson area through a cooperative effort. BSC

has since made plans to bring its vocational welding program to DSU and will begin delivery during the 2010-11 academic year. The partnership with BSC is in direct conjunction with the NDUS Strategic Goal Four which calls for “System institutions to work together in a common effort.” DSU has positioned itself well to respond to opportunities and challenges through a concerted planning effort with BSC. Also developed during the spring of 2010 was a cooperative program with Mayville State University to deliver its early childhood program to Bismarck and eventually to Dickinson. DSU does not have an early childhood program but does have an elementary education program. By combining course work within the two curricula, DSU students can receive the certification necessary for the operation of child care centers and head-start programs, both of which are needed in the state These are two important areas of cooperation that help underscore the university’s role in economic development, Legislative Cornerstone One.

ND Legislative Cornerstone One: Contribution to Economic Development ND Legislative Cornerstone Five: Funding and Rewards This direct allocation of resources in accordance with DSU’s Vision 2015 Strategic Plan and the NDUS Goal Two is in direct accordance with the Legislative Roundtable Cornerstone (Funding) which calls for the “allocation of resources to achieve the vision”; a vision of strategic investment that benefits students, the state and the university.


TEAM TWO

Mr. Hal Haynes

Representing: Faculty - Dept. Chair Department of Nursing

Representing: President’s Cabinet Office of Student Development

Dr. Rebecca Pitkin co-CHAIR

Ms. Marie Snavely

Representing: Faculty Senate Department of Teacher Education

Representing: Faculty Department of Fine and Performing Arts

Ms. Constance Walter

Ms. Shanna Shervheim

Representing: President’s Cabinet Office of University Relations

Representing: Staff Office of University Relations

Dr. Douglas King Representing: Faculty Department of Agriculture and Technical Studies

A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country is

good enough to be given a square deal afterwards. More than that no man is entitled, and less than that no man shall have. THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 1903

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Dr. Mary Anne Marsh co-CHAIR


HLC CRITERION THREE The organization provides evidence of student learning and teaching effectiveness that demonstrates it is fulfilling its educational mission

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STUDENT LEARNING and EFFECTIVE TEACHING

STUDENT LEARNING AND EFFECTIVE TEACHING

The Higher Learning Commission reaccreditation Criterion Three deals with student learning and effective teaching and requires Dickinson State University to demonstrate that these goals are being accomplished within the mission of the institution. Team Three has effectively linked this Criterion to the NDUS Strategic Plan Goal Three (increasing the vitality of the state through exceptional education), the Legislative Cornerstones Two and Four (educational excellence and access to services) and to DSU Goals Three and Four (strengthening university programs and attracting qualified faculty and staff to achieve excellence). The Team believes that great progress has been made during the past year in meeting the requirements of Criterion Three and the goals within the DSU and NDUS Strategic Plan. The faculty and staff charged with examining this Criterion and the associated goals in


the various plans have developed some key insights into how the university is responding to this general challenge of achieving academic excellence and enhancing the state’s economy. As mentioned previously, the addition of new programming in energy resource management, the national accreditation of major programs in environmental health, business administration and music provide ample evidence that DSU is moving forward in providing quality educational services and appropriate programming that will enhance the economic vitality of the state and region.

The increased amount of online courses and the expansion of the programming in Bismarck through the Extended Learning Office continue to provide increased access to DSU’s educational services to the citizens of North Dakota, and in some cases, to students nationally when considering the online program in equine management. This past year, President McCallum created three special initiatives that will enhance the academic programming at DSU as it moves toward excellence. These initiatives provided funding for projects that dealt with continuous quality improvement,

DSU Goal Four: Attract and retain increasingly diverse and qualified administrators, faculty and staff to achieve institutional excellence. The preliminary efforts by DSU business faculty indicate a strong interest from Chinese businesses and industries to take DSU students as interns. This opportunity will provide valuable experience for student who will later enhance the vitality of the state’s economy through their increased knowledge and familiarity with China, one of America’s leading trade partners and a true global economic force. The internship program in China is a prime example of “effective teaching and learning” and meets not only DSU Strategic Plan Goals, but also NDUS Strategic Plan Goals and Legislative Roundtable Cornerstones. During the past year, DSU expended more than $150,000 in faculty development activities that included funding presentations at national conferences, study in prestigious library collections, and participation in nationally recognized seminars such as the Wye Faculty Institute. It is these kinds of activities that help attract and retain the quality instructors that comprise the DSU faculty, a faculty that boasts a high percentage of tenure track faculty

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DSU Goal Three: Strengthen university programs and services to better develop a student body devoted to DSU, committed to lifelong learning and enabled to engage and flourish in a changing world.

innovative teaching, and internationalizing the curriculum. One of the key activities that involved both internationalization and quality improvement was to begin to develop internship opportunities with Chinese companies for DSU students majoring in international business.


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with terminal degrees (65 percent). During 2009-10, students and faculty continued to be actively involved in collaborative research projects in a wide range of subject areas at DSU. In April, the campus hosted the eighth annual Undergraduate Research Conference. Students had poster presentations on such topics as driver aggression, family practice in Russia versus the United States, environmental factors on wildlife populations, and the effects of lycopene-rich diets on the incidence of cancer. This is the kind of student/faculty research that provides an exceptional learning experience for students and helps to prepare them for success in their chosen career fields.

SBHE Goal Three: The NDUS increases the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service. There is no doubt that the past year’s activities support the North Dakota Legislative Cornerstone dealing with Education Excellence. However DSU’s ongoing commitment to the further study of and career development in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) areas is one of the hallmarks within this Cornerstone and directly supports the HLC Criterion Three regarding student learning and effective teaching. DSU hired a STEM coordinator and four math/science tutors in 2009. With the help of DSU’s math and science faculty, the STEM coordinator

developed a series of workshops for K-12 students designed to generate interest and enthusiasm for these areas of learning. Other activities included a summer energy camp and science day which involved not only area K-12 students and teachers, but also DSU students and faculty.

ND Legislative Cornerstone Two: Education Excellence ND Legislative Cornerstone Four: Access Providing access to outstanding learning experiences for students, faculty and area K-12 teachers, and students through these activities fits well with the Legislative Cornerstone Four. Indeed, academic programming and activities offered by DSU to the citizens of southwestern North Dakota have continued to increase over the past year.


TEAM THREE

Dr. Alan Church

Dr. Ken Haught

CHAIR Representing: Faculty - Dept. Chair DSU Department of Language and Literature

Representing: Faculty - Dept. Chair Department of Fine and Performing Arts

Mr. Arlan Hofland

Ms. Michelle Stevier

Representing: Faculty Department of Health and Physical Education

Representing: Staff Academic Success Center

Ms.Cheryl Lantz

Ms. Rita Ennen

Representing: Faculty Department of Nursing

Representing: Staff Office of Library Services

Dr. Eric Brevik

Ms. Silvia Vigier

Representing: Faculty Department of Natural Sciences Department of Agriculture and Technical Studies

Representing: Staff Office of Enrollment Services

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It is no use to preach to [children] if you do not act decently yourself. THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 1903


HLC CRITERION FOUR The organization promotes a life of learning for its faculty, administration, staff and students by fostering and supporting inquiry, creativity, practice and social responsibilty in ways consistent with its mission

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ACQUISITION, DISCOVERY and APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE

A C Q U I S I T I O N , D I S C O V E R Y A N D A P P L I C AT I O N O F K N O W L E D G E

The organization promotes lifelong learning for its faculty, administration, staff and students by fostering and supporting inquiry, creativity, practice and social responsibility in ways consistent with its mission. Within the past year, DSU has moved forward through planning and actions to meet the goals within Vision 2015, thereby supporting the SBHE Strategic Plan and Legislative Cornerstones, and laying the foundation for a positive response for HLC Criterion Four. Perhaps the leading indicator of DSU’s commitment to the “acquisition and discovery of knowledge” is the newly established Theodore Roosevelt Center in Stoxen Library. This center’s purpose is to discover and digitize every document written by and about Theodore Roosevelt and, in effect, become the digital presidential library for the 26th President of the United States. In August 2009, U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan visited the TR Center to celebrate the completion of the digitization of 250,000 documents held at the Library of Congress. The university also has


partnered with the National Park service to digitize documents and artifacts, and in the spring of 2010, Harvard University agreed to add their materials to the Theodore Roosevelt Digital Library. Once completed, the collection will contain more than 600,000 items and become a major resource for DSU students and faculty, as well as national scholars. Already, DSU students are helping with the digitizing project and gaining invaluable experience through internship opportunities.

The TR Center, which was officially approved by the State Board of Higher Education in September 2009, has received financial support from several entities. It is partially through Senator Dorgan’s efforts that the university received $600,000 in federal funding for the TR Center. Additionally, the North Dakota Legislature appropriated $150,000 in the 2007-2009 biennium, and another $750,000 for the 2009-2011 biennium. In December 2009, the National Endowment for the Humanities awarded a $500,000 challenge grant to the university. The university’s role in establishing the TR Center is a demonstration of its commitment to “acquisition and discovery of knowledge” and educational excellence. Cooperative research between faculty and stu-

DSU Goal Four: Attract and retain increasingly diverse and qualified administrators, faculty and staff to achieve institutional excellence. The university sponsors an annual undergraduate research symposium and also participates in the national Honors Program poster contest, which highlights student research activities. Having an active agenda of research helps students gain practical experience and preparation for a career or graduate school. The investment in faculty development over the past year included funding for several research projects that involved students. This kind of research and learning activity helps attract and retain young faculty with research agendas. A university that values research and the academic freedom that this entails provides a positive environment that promotes teaching and learning among students, which should be at the core of what all colleges do. Moreover, DSU has embarked upon an effort to create a multi-cultural environment on campus and to internationalize the curriculum. DSU students need to be able to function in a global society and experience the world. To this end, the Department of Business and Management is establishing internship opportunities in China for students majoring in international business.

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DSU Goal Three: Strengthen university programs and services to better develop a student body devoted to DSU, committed to lifelong learning and enabled to engage and flourish in a changing world.

dents has increased and includes such topics as driver aggression in psychology and cancer research with scar-tissue cells in biology. It also includes the development of new protocols of exercise using sophisticated machines and routines for students in exercise science.


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Also during the past year, the Department of Social Science has embarked upon a cooperative venture with the University of the Virgin Islands in the Caribbean that may result in a student exchange program.

DSU Goal Six: Provide a safe and positive environment in which students, faculty and staff demonstrate civility, respect, honor and integrity to develop responsible global citizens. For the past two years, DSU has sponsored a lecture series that stresses responsible citizenship. Presenters of the lectures have been Dr. Aaron Thompson from the University of Kentucky and Dr. Tom Osborne from the University of Nebraska, both exemplary leaders throughout their careers. In March 2010, Joseph Marshall III, noted Native American actor and author of “The Lakota Way,” presented a lecture at the Native Voices symposium. He also led a seminar on the “power of four” and leadership of the famous Ogallala Sioux chief, Crazy Horse, to the Theodore Roosevelt Honors Leadership Scholars. Through such events, the university provides the example of responsibility and leadership to the entire community and is in keeping with institutional goals and the university’s mission statement.

SBHE Goal Three: The NDUS increases the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service.

The outstanding research capabilities provided by the TR Center perfectly matches with this SBHE Goal.

SBHE Goal Four: The eleven institutions comprising the NDUS work together to achieve the vision effectively. Bringing international students to campus provides an opportunity for faculty, staff and students to learn about different cultures the world over. DSU has students from more than 30 different countries enrolled in courses. One of the President’s special initiatives this past year allowed business faculty to travel to China to establish internships for students majoring in international business. Both of these initiatives bring the world to DSU and promote global understanding and civility. In many ways, this is “exceptional education” because it is based on a world view of the future in which DSU students will have to live.

ND Legislative Cornerstone Two: Education Excellence During the past year, DSU has continued to engage in a partnership with the University of North Dakota that provides support for research on chemicals and cancer cells, which is led by DSU professor Dr. Lynn Burgess. Dr. Burgess utilizes the talents of DSU students by including them in his research and provides a unique way for these students to gain insights into scientific research.


TEAM FOUR

Dr. Debora Dragseth

CHAIR Representing: Faculty Senate Department of Business and Management

Ms. Kimberly Schaible

Mr. Anthony Willer

Dr. Phillip Stephens

Representing: Staff Office of Extended Learning

Representing: Faculty Department of Teacher Education Academic Success Center

Dr. Francis Varney

Ms. Kelly Steffes Representing: Staff Senate Theodore Roosevelt Honors Leadership Program

Ms. Kimberly Weismann

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Dr. Stacie Varnson Representing: Staff Academic Success Center

Dr. Chip Poland Representing: Faculty - Dept. Chair Department of Agriculture and Technical Studies

Representing: Faculty Department of Fine and Performing Arts

“

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars, but remember to keep your feet on the ground. THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 1904

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FOCUS ON THE FUTURE 2015

Representing: Faculty Department of Social Sciences

Representing: Student Senate Dickinson State University


HLC CRITERION FIVE As called for by its mission, the organization identifies its constituencies and serves them in ways both value.

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ENGAGEMENT and SERVICE

ENGAGEMENT AND SERVICE

The HLC Criterion Five (Engagement and Service) indicates that the organization identifies its constituencies and serves them in ways both value according to the institution’s mission. Certainly the Legislative Cornerstones that address access, contribution to economic development of the state, and meeting workforce needs would be encompassed in Criterion Five, as would the SBHE Goals of increasing the vitality of the state’s economy, providing access, increasing the vitality of the state, and working cooperatively within the NDUS to accomplish these goals. Dickinson State University has integrated Legislative Cornerstone Three (Flexible and Responsive) and SBHE Goals One, Three and Four (Accessibility, Exceptional Education, System Cooperation) into its Strategic Plan, which calls for building collaborative relationships and enhancing the quality of life in the broader community (DSU Strategic Plan Goals Two and Seven).


DSU Goal Two: Build and extend collaborative relationships to strengthen institutional and student opportunities. One of the key factors in establishing cooperative relationships locally and in southwest North Dakota is the Strom Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, one of the NDUS’s Centers of Excellence. The Strom Center works with local businesses and industries to enhance production and management techniques. It has

also helped communities with regional planning efforts. The annual Strom Conference, held in April, showcases entrepreneurial and business tools designed to prepare regional businesses to weather times of economic stress. A combination of local entrepreneurs, such as Gregg Vanourek, North Dakota Entrepreneur of the Year, and nationally known speakers such as Barry Maher, consultant for several national organizations including Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Verizon, provided insights and knowledge to an audience of over 150 people, including many students from DSU. The Strom Center provides leadership and resources to local businesses and industries that not only strengthen the state’s economy, but also provide service to the community and educational opportunities to students. In so doing, the Strom Center is a prime example of how DSU is meeting Legislative Cornerstone Two: increase the economic vitality of the state.

DSU Goal Seven: Support and enhance the quality of life and economic vitality of the broader community in which DSU exists. The activities cited above, all of which occurred during the past year, are driven by DSU’s Goal Seven: to support and enhance the quality of life and economic vitality of the broader community in which DSU exists. Service to the broader community is, by definition, providing accessibility and, hence, is in keeping with the SBHE Goal of accessibility. DSU has been a leader in providing accessibility to area students and residents for the past ten years.

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DSU’s collaborative relationships with NDUS schools have provided students educational opportunities that could not have been provided without these partnerships. In spring 2010, DSU established an articulation agreement with Minot State University to provide a linkage program of courses that allow students at DSU to complete Minot’s program in social work. Also, the groundwork was laid with Bismarck State College to begin providing vocational programs in Dickinson utilizing resources on the DSU campus. Finally, a collaborative agreement with MSU was completed in the spring that provides DSU students the opportunity to secure a major in early childhood education through courses delivered by Mayville. The ongoing cooperation with BSC allows DSU to deliver 16 major programs to the Bismarck/Mandan area by building on the associate degrees provided by BSC. These are all examples of cooperative efforts that have strengthened partner institutions and provided greater opportunities for educational services to more students statewide.


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One of the prime examples of expanding DSU’s services to the broader community is the Office of Extended Learning, which is responsible for distance, online and off-campus education. This office has expanded the number of online courses to more than 100 during the past year and now has 16 major programs that are delivered to the Bismarck/Mandan and Williston, North Dakota areas. DSU continues to expand its online course and program offerings as the demand presents itself and to provide easier access for those students who are place-bound.

SBHE Goal One: The NDUS is accessible, a view held by all North Dakotans. As proof of this commitment to accessibility, more than 200 off-campus students from the Bismarck area graduated last year; many of whom were employed in the area and could not attend courses on the Dickinson campus. Additionally, the West River Teacher Center, housed on the DSU campus, offered 61 in-service training events for K-12 teachers in 2009-2010, which included more than 3,000 participants.

SBHE Goal Three: The NDUS increases the overall vitality of the state through exceptional education, research, training and service. By providing accessible educational services, partnering with private and public agencies, and working through the Strom Center, DSU has, over the past year, met SBHE Goal Three and has had a positive impact on the vitality of the state. The following are specific examples of activities during the past year: Web boot camps, financial literacy, and social networking courses were initiated last fall through the Strom Center, with more than 100 area residents taking advantage of the programs. In addition, the Leadership/Entrepreneurship program offered to Killdeer Mountain Manufacturing employees through the Strom Center was completed this spring. Both of these activities involved DSU faculty and students and gave them the opportunity to work with employers and employees in the business/industry community, and to share, discover and apply knowledge together, all of which is a powerful experience that breeds community responsibility and a sense of lifelong learning. Finally, DSU received major funding from the state

legislature last year to initiate an interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) careers at the K-12 and post secondary levels. DSU employed a STEM coordinator to work with K-12 instructors to bolster math and science skills and promote careers in STEM fields. Partnerships with K-12 area districts and teachers are important for DSU and the region, as a whole, and part of the university’s commitment to service.

SBHE Goal Four: The eleven institutions comprising the NDUS work together to achieve the vision effectively. DSU formed a partnership with North Dakota State University to collaboratively offer the first two years of four engineering programs on the DSU campus. The first courses were offered this spring and a reception was hosted by President McCallum to bring students and potential employers together. This is an important new program that should help meet the growing need for engineers in area businesses and industries. During the past year, DSU has entered into a new partnership with BSC to bring two-year vocational programs to Dickinson, including welding and certified nurse assistant, to meet a growing need for these skilled workers. DSU has always been a good partner in the University System and will continue to collaborate with system colleges and universities to better serve the educational needs of its service area.

ND Legislative Cornerstone Three: Flexible and Responsive DSU is fully engaged with local and state partners to provide access to educational services and develop the region’s workforce to enhance the vitality of the state’s economy and meet the needs of the university’s constituents. All of the above accomplishments during the past year speak to the Higher Learning Commission’s Criterion involving engagement and service. DSU is truly engaged as a full-fledged partner in advancing the local and state economy and providing service to students and citizens in countless ways. Again, this is an integral part of the mission of a regional public baccalaureate institution of higher education. The Committee believes that DSU will fare well in providing examples that DSU has met this Criterion and in so doing, also has met DSU’s institutional goals, the SBHE goals, and the Legislative Cornerstones.


TEAM FIVE

Dr. Jon Brudvig co-CHAIR

Mr. Josh Nichols

Representing: Faculty - Honors Program Theodore Roosevelt Honors Leadership Program

Representing: Staff Senate Student Support Services

Mr. Steve Glasser co-CHAIR

Representing: Faculty Department of Business and Management

Representing: Staff Strom Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Mr. Kostas Voustas

Ms. Marty Odermann-Gardner

Representing: Student Senate Dickinson State University

Ms. Sharon Kilzer

Dr. Charles Conrick

Representing: Staff Theodore Roosevelt Center

Representing: Faculty Senate Department of Business and Management

Dr. Corinne Brevik Representing: Faculty Department of Natural Sciences

“

The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem.

Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others. THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 1907

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Ms. Amber Lien

Representing: Staff Office of Extended Learning

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DSU 2015 PROGRESS REPORT, AUGUST 2010

Dickinson State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.


http://www.dickinsonstate.edu/uploadedFiles/Offices/President/2015%20book