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Millennium File about Hannah Allis   Name: 

Hannah Allis 

Spouse: 

William Scott 

Birth Date: 

1654 

Birth City: 

Hatfield 

Birth County:  Hampshire  Birth State:  Massachusetts  Birth Country: USA  Death Date:  1718  Parents: 

William AllisEllis/, 

Children: 

William Scott  Richard Scott 

 

 


Death: Sep. 26, 1671  Rowley  Essex County  Massachusetts, USA    Burial:  Rowley Burial Ground   Rowley  Essex County  Massachusetts, USA   Created by: Janice Buchanan  Record added: Mar 14, 2010   Find A Grave Memorial# 49699128    Millennium File about Benjamin Scott   Name: 

Benjamin Scott 

Spouse: 

, Margaret Stephenson 

Birth Date: 

1612 

Birth City: 

Rowley 

Birth County:  Essex  Birth State: 

Massachusetts 

Birth Country:  USA  Death City: 

Rowley 

Death County:  Essex  Death State:  Massachusetts  Death Country: USA  Children: 

William Scott 

 

  American Genealogical‐Biographical Index (AGBI) about Benjamin Scott   Name: 

Benjamin Scott 


Birth Date: 1610  Birthplace:  Massachusetts  Volume: 

154 

Page  445  Number:  A genealogical dict. of the first settlers of New England, showing three generations of those  who came before May, 1692. By James Savage. Boston. 1861. (4v.)v.4:443 Gen. Column of  Reference:  the " Boston Transcript". 1906‐1941.( The greatest single source of material for gen. Data for  the N.E. area and for the period 1600‐1800. Completely indexed in the Index.): 10 May 1934,  8438   

  U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560‐1900 about Benjamin Scott   Name: 

Benjamin Scott 

Gender: 

Male 

Birth Place: 

MA 

Birth Year: 

1612 

Spouse Name: 

Margaret Stevenson

Spouse  Birth Place: 

  MA 

Spouse Birth Year:1616  Marriage  Year: 

1634 

 

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s‐1900s about Benjamin Scott   Name: 

Benjamin Scott 

Year: 

1640 

Place: 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Source  Publication  Code: 

1936 


Primary  Immigrant: 

Scott, Benjamin 

Annotation: 

Excellent directory of the first settlers of New England. Drake's additions and corrections  (no. 1666) are found in the G.P.C. reprint and in no. 9151, Tepper, Passengers to  America, pp. 468‐470. 

FARMER, JOHN. A Genealogical Register of the First Settlers of New‐England; Containing  an Alphabetical List of the Governours, Deputy‐Governours, Assistants or Counsellors,  and Ministers of the Gospel in the Several Colonies, from 1620 to 1692; Graduates of  Source  Bibliography:  Harvard College to 1662; Members of the Ancient and Honourable Artillery Company to  1662; Freemen Admitted to the Massachusetts Colony from 1630 to 1662; With Many  Other of the Early Inhabitants of New‐England and Long‐I  Page: 

256 

 

Massachusetts Applications of Freemen, 1630‐91 about Benja. Scott   Name: 

Benja. Scott 

Date: 

3 May 1665 

Residence: 

Rowley 

Original Source:C. R., IV. p. 465.   

The Massachusetts Bay Colony was founded by the owners of the Massachusetts Bay Company, which  included investors in the failed Dorchester Company, which had in 1624 established a short‐lived  settlement on Cape Ann. The second attempt, begun in 1628, was successful, with about 20,000 people  migrating to New England in the 1630s. The population was strongly Puritan, and its governance was  dominated by a small group of leaders who were strongly influenced by Puritan religious leaders.  Although its governors were elected, the electorate were limited to freemen, who had been examined  for their religious views and formally admitted to their church. As a consequence, the colonial leadership  exhibited intolerance to other religious views, including Anglican, Quaker, and Baptist theologies.  Colonial history  In 1630, the colony's population began to grow significantly when the ship Mary and John arrived in  New England carrying 140 passengers from the English West Country counties of Dorset, Somerset,  Devon, and Cornwall. These included William Phelps along with Roger Ludlowe, John Mason, Rev. John  Warham and John Maverick, Nicholas Upsall, Henry Wolcott and others who would become prominent  in the founding of a new nation.[25] It was the first of eleven ships later called the Winthrop Fleet to  land in Massachusetts. Its flagship, the Arbella, arrived on June 12, carrying Governor John Winthrop  and other leading settlers, along with the colonial charter. Winthrop is reputed to have given the famous  "City upon a Hill" sermon either before or during the voyage. 


For the next ten years there was a steady exodus of Puritans from England to Massachusetts and the  neighboring colonies, a phenomenon now called the Great Migration. Many ministers reacting to the  newly repressive religious policies of England made the trip with their flocks. John Cotton, Roger  Williams, Thomas Hooker, and others became leaders of Puritan congregations in Massachusetts.  Religious divisions and the need for additional land prompted a number of migrations that resulted in  the establishment of the Connecticut Colony (by Hooker) and the Colony of Rhode Island and  Providence Plantations (by Williams).  Source: wikipedia    


Born Margaret Stevenson in England in about the year 1615, she first appeared in the record books in  1642, when she married Benjamin Scott. Initially the Scotts lived in Braintree, Massachusetts, but later  moved to Cambridge where they had four children between 1644 and 1650. The Scott family arrived in  Rowley (a small town north of Salem) in 1651, where Margaret gave birth to three additional children.         The Scotts lacked the money to purchase their own land, and in 1664 the town donated land to  Benjamin Scott. In March of 1665, Benjamin Scott was convicted of the crime of theft, for which he was  "fined and admonished." However, six months later he took the Freeman's Oath, indicating he was both  a householder and a church member.    Benjamin Scott died in 1671 leaving an estate worth only 67 pounds and 17 shillings, not much by the  standards of that time. Margaret had to live on that estate for the next twenty‐one years, and by the  time of the Salem trials must have been very poor.    The Accusations  At first glance, Margaret Scott seems to have lived an uneventful life, but certain aspects of her  character made her a very likely candidate as a witch suspect. One such aspect was the high infant  mortality rate among her children. Women in New England who had trouble raising children were very  vulnerable to witchcraft charges.     Out of Margaret's seven children, only three made it to adulthood. Only one of her three children born  in Rowley lived to adulthood. The residents of Rowley would have been well aware of her high infant  mortality rate. Still, by the time of the witchcraft trials, 77‐year‐old Margaret Scott had as many as  eleven grandchildren.    Another factor that made her vulnerable to accusations was her status as a widow for twenty‐one years.  Being a widow did not in itself expose a woman to suspicion, but Scott suffered from the economic and  social effects of being a widow for a prolonged period. The most dangerous aspect of being a widow was  the lack of a husband for legal support and influence.     Often widows who were over fifty and not wealthy, were unable to find a new spouse, and were  reduced to poverty and begging. By begging, the widow exposed herself to witchcraft suspicions,  according to what historian Robin Briggs calls the refusal guilt syndrome. This occurred when a beggar's  needs were refused, which caused feelings of guilt and aggression on the refuser's part. The refuser  projected this aggression on the beggar and grew suspicious of her.    Some of the depositions against Scott did involve misfortunes occurring to people who had denied her a  service or food. Perhaps Scott actually used her reputation to receive favors, which could be very  effective. If people believed that Scott was a witch, they might have eagerly given her what she asked  out of fear of retaliation. However, if someone refused Scott and then fell on bad circumstances, 


witchcraft accusations were almost a certainty.    Evidence suggests that Scott's suffering and dependence on begging resulted in part from a lack of  familial support. Only Margaret Scott's son Benjamin stayed in Rowley. When she was accused of  witchcraft, Benjamin, who had six children of his own at the time, probably lacked the time and money  to pursue a legal defense of his mother.    Margaret Scott was formally accused of witchcraft by Rowley's most distinguished citizens – the Wicoms  and the Nelsons. Formal charges were filed after the daughter of Captain Daniel Wicom became afflicted  by witchcraft. The Nelsons helped produce witnesses, and one of the Nelsons sat on the grand jury that  indicted her.    The Trial  By the time Margaret Scott appeared in front of the court, critics of the Salem Witchcraft Trials had  become more vocal, expressing concern over the wide use of spectral evidence – testimony that the  accused witch's spirit (spector) had appeared to the witness in a dream or vision – in the Salem trials.     Both the Nelsons and the Wicoms also provided maleficium evidence – a witch's destruction of one's  property, health, or family – against Margaret Scott. Both testimonies show evidence of the refusal guilt  syndrome.    Of the six depositions presented before the Salem Court on September 15, 1692, four described the  spectral image of Margaret Scott tormenting others. The spectral evidence came from the depositions of  young women who may have been influenced by their paranoia surrounding Indian hostilities, social  pressures, and religious beliefs. Some depositions showed that many people suspected Scott was a  witch long before 1692.     Frances Wicom testified that Margaret Scott's specter tormented her on many occasions. Several factors  may have led to her testimony, including her home environment and its relationship with Indian  conflicts. She undoubtedly heard firsthand accounts of bloody conflicts with Indians from her father,  who was a captain in the militia. New evidence shows that a direct correlation can be found between  anxiety over Indian wars and witchcraft accusations.    Another girl tormented by Margaret Scott's specter was Mary Daniel. Records show that Mary Daniel  probably was a servant in the household of Rowley's minister, Edward Payson. If Mary Daniel worked for  Mr. Payson, her religious surroundings could well have had an effect on her actions. Recent converts to  Puritanism felt inadequate and unworthy, and at times displaced their worries through possession and  other violent experiences.    The third girl to be tormented spectrally was Sarah Coleman. Sarah was born in Rowley, but lived most  of her life in the neighboring town of Newbury. Sarah testified that the spector of Margaret Scott  started to afflict her on August 15, which was only four days before the execution of five other accused 


witches, which would have brought considerable attention to the Salem proceedings.        Margaret's case included spectral evidence, but it also involved a lot of maleficium evidence, and she  exhibited many characteristics that were believed to be common among witches in New England. To the  judges at Salem, Margaret Scott was a perfect candidate to highlight the court's effectiveness, and  silence the opposition. They might have taken the opportunity to prosecute her to bolster their own  reputation.     In the end, Margaret Scott was found guilty of witchcraft due to prolonged suspicion of her character,  the spectral and maleficium evidence provided at her trial, and the prominence of the accusers in her  community.    The Execution  On September 22, 1692, Margaret Stevenson Scott was hanged by the neck until dead on Gallows Hill,  Salem, Massachusetts – the last of the executions there during the witchcraft trials    In the spring of 1693, Governor William Phipps signed pardons for the accused who were still in prison.  It took until 1697 for the court to admit wrongdoing. The General Court ordered a day of fasting, and  declared the 1692 trials unlawful. During the early 1700s, Salem passed a bill stating that those accused  had their good name and rights as citizens restored – a bit late for those who had been hanged.     SOURCES  Salem Witchcraft  Salem Witch Trials  Salem Witchcraft Trials of 1692  Spectors, Maleficium, and Margaret Scott  The Events and Causes of the Salem Witch Trials    Margaret (Stevenson) Scott of Rowley was a widow aged 71 when she charged with witchcraft, about  Aug. 5. 1692. She was born in England about 1621, married in 1642 to widower Benjamin Scott. She  immigrated from Cambridge to Rowley in 1654. She had six children. Her husband Benjamin died at  Rowley in 1671. She was hanged on Sept. 22, 1692.    Taken From Salem Story: Reading the Witch Trial of 1692, by Bernard Rosenthal:    "In the final rush to gather what witches they could, the court also executed Margaret Scott, Ann  Pudeator, and Wilmot Reed. As with Mary Parker, little about the case against Mary Scott survives. Not  a single name of the Salem Village accusers appears in the record of the proceedings, nor even the 


names of the newly prominent Andover ones. Instead, we have only two documents. One comes from a  girl or woman named Franes Wycum, who gives testimony as if she were experienced at it. On  September 15 she swears that at Margaret Scott's examination on August 5, as well as on earlier  occasions, she had been tortured by her. She also offers the ritual statement that she believes in her  heart that Margaret Scott is a witch. The only other document is of a statement sworn the same day by  Philip and Sarah Nelson that a man who had died had sworn that Margaret Scott had afflicted him for  two or three years prior to his death, and that he would never get well as long as she lived. Although the  makers of legends forged no stories about her, she was among those whose case the legislature in  Massachusetts addressed in 1957 when it cleared the names of six women, although without removing  the attainder from them: After her death, no one had made any claims for judicial redress. At her death,  she had been 75."    Bibliography here:    * Hansen, Chadwick. Witchcraft at Salem. George Braziller, Inc. New York: 1969.   * Kent, Deborah. Salem, Massachusetts. Dillon Press. New Jersey: 1996.   * LeBeau, Bryan F. The Story of the Salem Witch Trials: "we walked in clouds and could not see our way."  Prentice Hall. New Jersey: 1998.   * The Salem Witchcraft Papers: Verbatim Transcripts of the Legal Documents of the Salem Witchcraft  Outbreak, volume I. Da Capo Press. New York: 1977.   *<http://www.salemwitchtrials.com/>  *<http://www.salemweb.com/memorial/stonesintro.shtml>     From‐the Salem witchcraft papers pp.727‐728( I am using more modern spelling)Margaret Scott was  executed September 22,1692 (Frances Wycom v. Margaret Scott)The deposition of Frances Wycom who  testified and said that quickly after the first court of Salem about witchcraft Margaret Scott who I very  well knew: or her appearence(ghost?) came to me and did most grieviously torment me by choaking and  almost pressing me to death :and so she did continue affleting me by times tell the 5th of August 1692  being the day of her examination also during the time of her examination margaret scott did most  grieviously afflect me: and also several times since: and I believe in my heart that Margaret Scott is a  witch and that she has often afflected me by acts of witchcraft.     France Wycom owned:to the Grand Inquest; that the above written evidence is the truth upon  oath.September 15,1692:Juriat in Curia.  Philip Nelson and Sarah Nelson v Margaret Scott‐Philip Nelson and his wife Sarah do testifyand say for 2  or 3 years before Robert Shilleto died we have often heard him complaining of Margaret Scott saying he  would never be well so long as Margaret Scott lived and so he complained of Margaret Scott until the 


day he died.Philip Nelson and his wife affirmed upon their oath to the Grand Inquest that the above  written evidence is the truth.   In the final rush to gather what witches they could,the court executed Margaret Scott,Ann Pudeator and  Wilmont Reed. Thanks to the family of Richard and Linda Roemer for finding this information   She was tried on 17 September and hanged 22 September 1692 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. Frances Wycombe vs. Margert Scott "The deposition of frances wycom who testifyeth and saith that quickly after the first court at (Salem) about wicthcraft margerit Scott whom I very well knew: or hir Apperance came to me and did most greviously torment me by choaking and almost presing me to death: and so she did continue affleting me by times tell the 5'th August 1692 being the day of hir examination allso during the time of hir examination margerit scott did most greviously afflect me: and also severall times sence: and I belive in my heart that margerit Scott is a wicth and that she has often affleted me by acts of wicthcraft." frances Wycom owned: to the grand Inquest: that the above written evidence: is the truth upon oath: Sept'r 15: 1692: Jurat in Curia. [Essex County Archives, Salem - Witchcraft vol2/page45] Phillip Nelson and Sarah Nelson vs. Margaret Scott �[also] phillip Nellson and Sarah his wife doe testifie and say that for Two or Three years be fore #[the said] Robert Shilleto dyed we have often hard him complaining of margerit Scott for hurting of him and often said that she was a wicth and so he continewed complaining of Margarit Scott saying he should never be well so long as margaret Scott lived & so he Complayned of Margret Scott: att times until he dyed� Phillip Nelson and Sarah his wife affirmed: upon their oath to the grand Inquest that the above written evidence: is the truth. Sept'r 15: 1692�������� Jurat in Curia [Essex County Archives, Salem - Witchcraft vol2/pae45]

Comments, sources, various additional :

Vinton, John Adams. �The Giles Memorial � Genealogical Memoirs of the Families Bearing the Names Giles, Gould, Holmes, Jennison, Leonard, Lindall, Curwen, Marshall, Ribinson, Sampson, and Webb; also Genealogical Sketches of the Pool, Very, Carr and other Families with a history of Pemaquid, ancient and modern; some account of early settlements in Maine; and some details of Indian warfare. Printed for the author, by Henry W. Dutton & Son, Washington Street, Boston. 1864. pp 496 � 532.

Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, showing three generations of those who came before May, 1692 on the basis of Farmer�s Register. Baltimore Genealogical Publishing Company, originally published Boston, 1860-1862. Reprinted with "Genealogical Notes and Errata," excerpted from The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XXVII, No. 2, April, 1873, pp. 135-139; and a Genealogical Cross Index of the Four Volumes of the Genealogical Dictionary of James Savage, by O. P. Dexter, 1884. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, 1965,1969,1977,1981,1986, 1990. Electronic version has been adapted under the direction of Robert Kraft (assisted by Benjamin Dunning) from materials supplied by Automated Archives, 1160 South State, Suite 250, Orem UT 84058 (http://genweb.net/~books/savage/savage.htm)


Bates, Samuel A. (Editor; Town Clerk of Braintree). Records of the Town of Braintree Massachusetts, 1640 to 1873. Braintree, Massachusetts 17 June 1886. Facsimile Reprint by Heritage Books. Bowie, Maryland, 1991. ISBN1556133979 �Early Settlers of Rowley� : Scott. ...in Historical Collections of the Essex Institute. Volume XXIII. July, August & September 1886. Nos. 7, 8, 9, pages 237- 240 Harvey Hayes Webb family bible transcript, typed transcript, drafted in the 1950's; courtesy Hazel Skelly Webb Webb, Loren. Diary of Captain Loren Webb, 1861 - 1863, Firelands Historical Society, 1995. Transcribed by Matthew L. Burr.

Written communication with Vinton Phillips and David L. Hester, Huron County, Ohio, January 2001- ongoing. Images of Webb gravestones courtesy of Elizabeth and Vinton Philips. Her husband, Benjamin, must have truly cared about and respected Margaret, even though he had little to send  her way or little in life to provide to her... as is openly reflected in his will:    His Will was proved 26 Sept 1671, he having died shortly before that date.     " I , Benjamin Scott Being very weeake of Body but of competent understanding and memory doe make this my  Last Will and Testament. Imprimis. I will and begueath my Soule unto the hands of the all mighty god that give it  and my body body to the Earth in hope of blessed resurection. And as for my outward estait, my will is that my  littel peece of land the towne gave me at the bricke kill my wife have the benefit of it dureing her widdowhood  so long as she remaine relique to me and after her I will and give unto my son Beniamin. I will also and give unto  hir my bigest cow and all my household stufe I give hir to be wholly hir owne and at her will and despose. Item,  as for my son Beniamin my will is that he have The oxen and the mare and the cart and plough and all the  tackling belonging unto them and the land after the caring of his mother and his own armes. Item. as for my son  John I will give him one cow and one heiffer, the cow is his own and I only give one heffer, he having bond from  me to the obtaining of a good trade. Item. as for my daughter Mary, I will and give hir one cow that is called  Spoferd. Item. my will farther is that my son Beniamin, and John according to his promise be helpfull to the  getting up of a house on the land for the comforth of ther mother. And I make my well beloved wife the solle  executrix of this my last will and Testament.   'Datted and signed the sixt of June (1671)   by his   "Beniamin ~ Scott "   mark X   " Signed in the p' sence of Samuel Brocklebank James Barker"  Massachusetts Clears Five Witches in Salem Trials  New York Times/November 2, 2001  Boston ‐‐ More than three centuries after they were accused, tried and hanged as unrepentant witches, on  Gallows Hill in Salem, Mass., five women have been officially exonerated by the state.     The act, approved by the Legislature, was signed on Halloween by the acting governor, cheering the descendants  of Bridget Bishop, Susannah Martin, Alice Parker, Wilmot Redd and Margaret Scott.     The five were among 20 men and women put to death during the witchcraft hysteria of 1692. ( And over 100  accused, imprisoned, and tortured!)  


"We've had an awful lot of descendants that have been out there working for it," said Shari Kelley Worrell of  Barrington, Ill., an eighth great‐granddaughter of Susannah Martin. The Puritan leader Cotton Mather called her  one of the most "impudent, scurrilous, wicked creatures in the world."     Ms. Worrell said: "I want to make sure that people know she was not a witch. History will now record her as being  what she really was."     Ms. Worrell said she felt pity for her distant ancestor, who could have lived had she admitted to being a witch.  "How would I feel dying as a Christian martyr, having people think I worshiped the devil?" she asked.     The state has tried to make amends before. In 1711, more than two decades after the trials, all the accused were  exonerated and their relatives offered retribution. But, whether out of fear or shame, not all the families came  forward to accept the apology. (Not all were listed for exoneration.)    A 1957 state resolution cleared the name of one more victim, Ann Pudeator, and "certain other persons" who  were unlisted. (Again, not mentioned specifically by name.)    State Representative Paul E. Tirone, who helped shuttle this year's act through the Legislature, said the "other  persons" should be cleared by name. (Finally someone else saw the distinction.    "These people were victims of hysteria, and they paid deeply with their lives," said Mr. Tirone, whose wife, Sharon,  is a descendant of Sarah Wildes, who was exonerated in 1711.     The history lesson, he said, is one that modern Americans should keep in mind in the wake of Sept. 11, if they are  tempted to eye their neighbors with suspicion.     "Sometimes when things like this happen we need to take a breath, and look at it," Mr. Tirone said. "We just can't  paint blame with a wide brush."~ 

 


Biography Spectors, Maleficium, and Margaret Scott Written by Mark Rice (Copyright, 2005) History 209, An Undergraduate Court, Cornell University Spring Semester, 2003 Revised for presentation to the Berkshire Conference, 2005 Margaret Scott possessed the characteristics that made her a prime suspect for any witch accusation during early New England. However, Scott was unlucky enough to be accused during the Salem witch hunts. As a result, Scott, an orthodox suspect, was thrown into a very unorthodox witch hunt with very little chance of survival. The evidence of Margaret Scott's case highlights the nature of witchcraft accusations in New England and the Salem witch-hunt. In the end, Margaret Scott was accused and executed on charges of witchcraft due to prolonged suspicion of her character, the spectral evidence provided in her trial, the maleficium evidence against her, and the prominence of the accusers in her community. Margaret Scott was the only person to be accused of being a witch from Rowley during the Salem trials. This was mainly due to the fact that community members long thought of her as a witch. She most likely was suspected of witchcraft because of her low stature in the community, the number of child fatalities,long widowhood, and begging; all common traits among people accused of witchcraft.1 Margaret Scott's origins are obscure. Born Margaret Stevenson in England somewhere around the year 1615, she first appeared in the record books in 1642, when she married Benjamin Scott. Initially the Scotts lived in Braintree, but later moved to Cambridge where they had four children between 1644 and 1650. The Scott family arrived in Rowley in 1651 where Margaret gave birth to three additional children. Of all the children, only three lived to adulthood. Still, by the time of the witchcraft trials, the seventy-seven year-old Margaret Scott had as many as eleven grandchildren.2 It is hard to pinpoint the status of the Scott family among the residents of Rowley. Evidence from Essex County records indicates that the Scots were not wealthy and never appeared in any positions suggesting importance or prominence. Benjamin Scott himself was never assigned a high-status title such as Mister or even the lower status title Goodman. The Scotts lacked the money to purchase their own land. Instead in 1664 the town donated land to Benjamin Scott.3 In March of 1665, Benjamin Scott was convicted of the crime of theft, for which he was "fined and admonished." However, six months later he took the Freeman's Oath, indicating he was both a householder and a church member, in short, an upstanding person.4 Benjamin Scott died in 1671 leaving an estate worth only 67 pounds and 17 shillings, not much by the standards of that time. However, Margaret had to live on this estate for the next twenty-one years and by the time of the Salem trials, must have been very poor.5


At first glance, Margaret Scott seems to have lived an uneventful life. However, certain aspects of her character made her a very likely candidate as a witch suspect. One such aspect was the high infant mortality rate among her children. Women in New England who had trouble raising children were very vulnerable to witchcraft charges. In fact, only 7 out of the 62 accused female witches in New England prior to 1692 had a considerable number of children.6 Out of Margaret's seven children, only three made it to adulthood. This does not consider any miscarriages or other problems that Scott may have had. Furthermore, only one of her three children born in Rowley lived to adulthood. The residents of Rowley would have been well aware of her high infant mortality rate.7 Another factor about Margaret Scott's character that made her vulnerable to accusations was her status as a widow for twenty-one years. Being a widow did not in itself expose a woman to suspicion.8 However, Scott suffered from the economic and social effects of being a widow for a prolonged period. The most dangerous aspect of being a widow was the lack of a husband for legal support and influence. Also, Scott, 56 at the time of her husband's death, was forced to live off her husband's small estate for twenty-one years. Often widows who were over fifty and not wealthy, were unable to find a new spouse and thus were reduced to poverty and begging. By begging, Margaret would expose herself to witchcraft suspicions according to what historian Robin Briggs calls the "refusal guilt syndrome". This phenomenon occurred when a beggar's needs were refused causing feelings of guilt and aggression on the refuser's part. The refuser projected this aggression on the begger and grew suspicious of her.9 Some of the depositions against Scott did involve misfortunes occurring to people who had denied her a service or good. Perhaps Scott actually used her reputation to receive favors, which could be very effective. If people believed that Scott was a witch, they might have eagerly given her what she asked out of fear of retaliation. However, if someone refused Scott and then fell on bad circumstances, witchcraft suspicions and accusations were almost a certainty.10 Evidence suggests that Scott's widowhood suffering and dependence on begging resulted in part from a lack of familial support. Only Margaret Scott's son Benjamin stayed in Rowley. When Margaret Scott was accused of witchcraft, Benjamin, who had six children of his own at the time, offered no legal support. He probably lacked the time and money to pursue a legal defense of his mother.11 A careful examination of the depositions and witnesses shows a clear pattern among Margaret Scott's accusers. Many who were wealthy residents of the town who cooperated in the effort to convict Margaret of witchcraft. Captain Daniel Wicom appeared as the central figure among the accusers. As a prominent member of Rowley, any witchcraft affliction that involved Wicom, who filled many town leadership positions, would have led to legal action against Scott.12 According to depositions presented against Scott, the residents of Rowley suspected her of being a witch for as many as twenty years but no action was taken until his daughter became afflicted by her.


The Wicoms were not the only prominent family of Rowley involved with the accusations against Margaret Scott. The Nelson family also played an active role in the trial. Thomas and Phillip Nelson were brothers; Sarah was Philip's wife. Their father, Captain Philip Nelson, passed away in 1691 leaving an estate of 500 pounds suggesting that both Thomas and Philip were well off themselves. Unfortunately, records fail to distinguish between Philip the father and Philip the son. However, the prominence of the name of Philip Nelson in town records suggests that the family was wealthy and powerful.13 What is notable among the many appearances of Nelsons and Wicoms in the Essex County records is actually what did not occur. While the two families appear in many land disputes, they never appear as opponents. While one cannot assume that both families were friends, it is safe to say that they were not enemies. Philip Nelson gave testimony that supported Daniel Wicom in a 1679 trial and in 1680 the two men sided together in another court case. 14 The connection between the Wicoms and the Nelsons as Margaret Scott's chief accusers continued with the deposition of Philip and Sarah Nelson who testified to the affliction of deceased Robert Shillito, who lived in Daniel Wicom's tithing district. Wicom would have collected Shillito's taxes, been in contact with him, and have been very familiar with his supposed affliction. The final connection occurred in the deposition of Thomas Nelson. At the end of his testimony, the record indicated him as a member of the grand jury giving him the power to determine Margaret Scott's fate extending the Nelson-Wicom connection to nearly all aspects of the trial. 15 The depositions offered against Margaret Scott highlight the rumors about her reputation and the common beliefs that circulated about witches in early New England. Of the six depositions presented before the Salem Court on September 15th, four described the spectral image of Margaret Scott tormenting others. Some depositions given showed that many people suspected Scott was a witch long before 1692. The spectral evidence came from the depositions of young women who may have been influenced by their paranoia surrounding Indian hostilities, social pressures, and religious beliefs. According to the evidence, Margaret Scott's specter first attacked Frances Wicom at the beginning of the trials at Salem around the tenth of June and continued to do so until the date of her examination on August 5th. The seventeen year old Frances gave her deposition to the court at Salem on September 15, 1692. Describing afflictions that were believed to be very common Frances stated that Margaret Scott "came to me and most grievously torment me by choacking and almost presing me to death".16 Several factors may have led Frances Wicom to testify to such a terrible experience including her home environment and its relationship with Indian conflicts. She undoubtedly would have heard first hand accounts of bloody conflicts with Indians. New evidence shows that a direct correlation can be found between anxiety over Indian Wars being fought in Maine and witchcraft accusations. In such a tense environment where New England was tormented by Satan through witches and Indians, who were thought to be servants of the devil, young girls would have been willing to accuse any one who was remotely suspicious making Scott, who already had a shady reputation, an easy target.17


Frances's family's high status in Rowley may have made also have made her a likely candidate for being "afflicted". The Wicoms's affluence would have made Frances the object of attention in Rowley society. Being afflicted gave Frances an outlet so she could say and do anything without any consequences providing a great release for a girl who lived in such a proper setting as the Wicom household and Puritan society in general.18 The second sufferer from spectral torture, Mary Daniel, also presented her deposition at the trial in Salem on September 15. It too listed many painful torments at the hands of Margaret Scott.19 No records of Mary Daniel's birth or parents exist. The first time Mary Daniel entered the record books was for her baptism on December 6, 1691. She next appeared for her accusations of Margaret Scott. There was a good chance that Mary Daniel was actually a servant in the household of Reverend Edward Payson, minister of Rowley at the time of the trials. 20 He obviously would have encouraged her to become a member of the Puritan faith.21 If Mary Daniel worked for Mr. Payson, her religious surroundings could well have had an effect on her actions. Recent converts to Puritanism felt inadequate and unworthy and at times displaced their worries through possession. Although Mary Daniel was never possessed, her baptism only a few months before the Salem witch hunt presumably increased the pressures of her religion. These feelings would only have been heightened if she in fact served in the household of the local minister.22 The third piece of spectral evidence against Margaret Scott came from another young woman, Sarah Coleman, who deposed that Scott's specter had tortured her on August fifteenth "by pricking, pinching, and choaking of me." Although born in Rowley, the twenty-two-year-old Coleman lived in neighboring Newbury with her parents for the previous nineteen years. The senior Colemans probably knew of Margaret Scott's reputation for witchcraft before they moved to Newbury; that knowledge, combined with the region-wide gossip about Scott's more recent malefic activities, undoubtedly in 1692 led their daughter to accuse their former townswoman.23 Two Rowley residents, Phillip and Sarah Nelson, testified about conversations with Robert Shilleto. The Nelsons deposed that Shilleto believed himself a victim of Margaret Scott's afflictions and "we have often heard him complaining of Margaret Scott for hurting of him, and often said that she was a witch." The Nelsons also described how his affliction lasted for two or three years before Shilleto passed away in 1687 showing that Scott was suspected of being a witch long before the Salem Witch Hunt occurred.24 Spectral evidence was not the only tool that accusers used in Margaret Scott's trial. Two depositions presented at her September 15th appearance before the court examined how Scott tormented people through maleficium, a witches's harming of one's property, health, or family. Of the depositions offered both presented examples of the refusal guilt syndrome among the accusers. The depositions also showed how an ability to predict the future, and damage to livestock raised suspicions against an individual. 25 The deposition presented to the Salem court on September 15th by Daniel Wicom provided evidence of maleficium. His testimony described an encounter with Margaret Scott that occurred


about five or six years before the trial when he did not give Scott corn. He reported that Scott predicted that he would be unable to harvest corn that evening and immediately oxen started to act in a strange way making it unable for Wicom to harvest his fields. 26 Wicom's deposition provided an example of refusal guilt syndrome where he initially denied a good to Margaret Scott only to suffer an inconvenience directly related to what Scott was begging for. This testimony also provided evidence that described Scott's ability to predict the future, which was a trait thought to be used by witches.27 More evidence centering on maleficium came from Thomas Nelson, whose statement was also influenced by refusal guilt syndrome. Nelson testified that when Margaret Scott was "Earnest she was for me to bring her wood" and he refused to deliver it immediately one of his cows acted in a strange way and another died.28 Nelson's deposition not only describes many classic characteristics of maleficium, but also includes information about his loss of cattle which was a symbol of status, common in many witchcraft accusations in New England. In attacking his livestock Thomas Nelson believed that Margaret Scott was a threat to his position among the other men in the town.29 In his deposition, Nelson testifies that after the death of his cows he "had hard thoughts of this woman."30 Major events in Margaret Scott's case coincided with important dates of the Salem witchcraft court. When compared to the testimony against Scott, clear patterns can be found between the evidence brought against her and the timing of the Salem court.31 Evidence from the girls' testimony was synonymous with important events in the Salem trials. Frances Wicom was the first girl to experience spectral torment in 1692 "quickly after the first Court at Salem." Frances also testified that Scott's afflictions on her stopped on the day of her examination, August 5. Mary Daniel deposed on August 4 that Margaret Scott afflicted her on "ye 2d day of the week last past," which would have coincided with Scott's arrest. The third afflicted girl, Sarah Coleman, testified that the specter of Margaret Scott started to afflict her on the 15th of August, which fell ten days after the trials of George Burroughs and Scott's own examination. Additionally, the 15th was only four days before the executions of Burroughs, John Proctor, John Willard, George Jacobs, and Martha Carrier; accused who were not "usual suspects" that brought considerable attention to the Salem proceedings.32 Once Margaret Scott's case came before the Salem court, the magistrates were eager to prosecute her for witchcraft. At the same time that Margaret Scott appeared in front of the court, critics of the proceedings had become more vocal expressing concern over the wide use of spectral evidence in the Salem trials. The court probably took the opportunity to prosecute Margaret Scott to help its own reputation. Margaret Scott's case not only involved spectral evidence, but also a fair amount of maleficium evidence. Scott exhibited many characteristics that were believed common among witches in New England. Additionally, the spectral testimony given by the afflicted girls bolstered the accusers' case. With a combination of solid maleficium and spectral evidence against her, the proceedings took only one day to complete. To the judges at Salem, Margaret Scott was perfect candidate to highlight the court's effectiveness. By executing Scott, the magistrates at Salem could silence critics of the trials by executing a "real witch" suspected of being associated with the devil for many years.33


Margaret Scott was executed at Salem as a result of a suspicious reputation, the combination of spectral and maleficium evidence against her, the close relationship among her accusers, and the timing of her trial. Margaret Scott's downfall resulted from a series of misfortunes that she could not avoid. Impoverished and isolated from her long widowhood, Scott's shady reputation made her an easy target for witchcraft suspicions. Her accusers' depositions describe many typical beliefs about witches in early New England built up over a prolonged period of time. Even the actions taken against her by the prominent families of Rowley were not uncommon in New England witchcraft. Margaret Scott simply could not avoid the key factor in her condemnation; her profile as a "usual suspect". Unlike many of the other accused before the court, Scott was faced with an equal amount of spectral and maleficium evidence. The proponents of the court saw the opportunity to use Margaret Scott to their advantage. Her case showed the court relieving a community of a long believed witch and distracted attention from other defendants who were convicted on much more questionable evidence. Endnotes 1. Traits common among accused witches are described by Robin Briggs, Witches and Neighbors (New York, 1996) Chapter 1; John Putnam Demos Entertaining Satan (Oxford, 1982) Chapter 3. 2. Marriage record comes from John Noble, Ed., Records of the Court of Assistants of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay Volume II (Suffolk, 1904), 125 It is notable that Margaret's name appears first in the court's decision. This implies that the controversy of the case revolved around Margaret and not Benjamin; biographical and birth records come from George Brainard Blodgette and Amos Everett Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, Massachusetts (Salem, MA, 1933), 329-30. 3. Blodgette and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, Massachusetts, 329. iv In both records, it is hard to determine which Benjamin Scott the courts are referring to. The Scotts had a son named Benjamin who would have been nineteen in 1665. However, someone the age of nineteen seems a little too young to be eligible to take an important oath so the Benjamin in question is probably the father. The record about the theft is provided by George Francis Dow, Editor, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Volume I (Essex Institute, 1911) 387; the record of the freeman oath is provided by George Francis Dow, Editor Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Volume III (Essex Institute 1913) 275. 5. Records from the Probate Records of Essex County Massachusetts, Volume II 1665-1674 (Salem, MA, 1917) 238-9. 6. Data based on John Putnam Demos, Entertaining Satan, 72-3. 7. Information on the Rowley children comes from Blodgett and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, Massachusetts, 329-30. 8. Data and opinions from both Demos, Entertaining Satan, 72; and Briggs, Witches and Neighbors, 263-4.


9. Information regarding the status of widows from Demos, Entertaining Satan, 75; refusal guilt syndrome from Briggs, Witches and Neighbors, 140-1. 10. Information from Briggs, Witches and Neighbors, 156. 11. Information about begging from Briggs, Witches and Neighbors, 276; biographical information about the Scotts provided by Blodgette and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, Massachusetts 329-30, As for the occupation of John Scott, Blodgette and Jewett cite Benjamin Scott's will, which lists his son as "having been away to get a good trade" which can be interpreted as a merchant or sailor. 12. Theory on social structure found in Demos, Entertaining Satan, 291. The court records from April 1677 are found in George Francis Dow, ed. Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Volume VI (Essex Institute 1917) 269; Records from September 1677 from Dow, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County Volume VI 327; Daniel Wicom's appointment as town attorney is found in Dow, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Volume VII (Essex Institute, 1919) 213; The court case from 1679 is found in Dow, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County Volume VII 169-70; Daniel Wicom is listed as deputy marshal in a court case found in Dow, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Volume IX (Essex Institute, 1975) 578. 13. Biographical information on the Nelson Family from Blodgette and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, Massachusetts 243-4; Philip Nelson is listed as a town recorder in Dow, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County. Volume III (Essex Institute, 1921) 267. 14. The 1679 case in which Daniel Wicom sued Samuel Phillips for "reflecting and reproaching authority" can be found in Dow, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Volume VII: 184-6; The 1680 court case in which Wicom and Nelson disagree with John Person Jr. over land divisions in the town can be found in Dow, Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Volume VII: 352. 15. Information on Robert Shillito is provided by Bodgette and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, Massachusetts, 343; Thomas Nelson is listed as "one of ye Grand Inquest" proving he is a member of the jury in Gage, The History of Rowley, 174. 16. This deposition, along with the others from Margaret Scott's examination, comes from a reliable account of the proceedings by Thomas Gage, The History of Rowley (Boston, 1840) 175. 17. Theory on Indian War connection to witchcraft at Salem provided by Norton, In the Devil's Snare, 122. 18. Biographical information about the Wicom family from Blodgette and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, 408; The argument that girls used their afflictions and fits as a release is argued by Demos, Entertaining Satan 159. 19. Deposition printed by Gage, The History of Rowley, 172-3.


20. Biographical information provided by Blodgette and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, 93; Trial testimony from Edward Payson printed by Gage, The History of Rowley, 173. 21. Biographical information on Payson provided by Gage, The History of Rowley, 20-1; I must repeat that the assumption that Mary Daniel is Payson's servant is a guess based on the available evidence. 22. Possession theory argued by Richard Godbeer, The Devil's Dominion (Cambridge, 1992) 114. 23. Deposition quote from Gage, The History of Rowley, 174-5; Information about the Coleman family provided by Blodgette and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, Massachusettts, 81; the importance of gossip in the spreading of the Salem crisis is described by Norton, In the Devil's Snare, 146-9. 24. Deposition quote and description from Gage, The History of Rowley, 175; Robert Shillito was buried 21 August, 1637 according to Blodgette and Jewett, Early Settlers of Rowley, Massachusetts 343. 25. A good definition of maleficium on which this is based is given by Norton, In the Devil's Snare, 8. 26. Deposition from Gage, The History of Rowley, 171-2. 27. The refusal guilt syndrome is discussed earlier in this paper, but is proposed by Briggs, Witches and Neighbors, 140-1; information about suspicion of people who predicted the future given by Briggs, Witches and Neighbors, 173-4. 28. Deposition from Gage, The History of Rowley, 174. 29. The theory about the importance of livestock and cattle in the men's New England society is found in Demos, Entertaining Satan, 145-6. 30. Deposition from Gage, The History of Rowley, 174. 31. Dates from depositions listed in Gage, The History of Rowley, 169-75 Frances Wicom's deposition states that she is first afflicted at the first trials of Salem, which was June 2nd, therefore Scott could have been named as a witch any time between then and her arrest. 32 Testimony from Gage, The History of Rowley, 169-75; evidence of the August 19th executions from Bernard Rosenthal, Salem Story (Cambridge University Press, 1993) 108. 33. Doubt about spectral evidence was voiced by some ministers. Their concerns are described in Norton, In the Devil's Snare, 281-2; testimony of the afflicted girls of Salem is given in Gage, The History of Rowley 173-4.


American Genealogical‐Biographical Index (AGBI) about Margaret Stevenson   Name: 

Margaret Stevenson 

Birth Date:  1620  Birthplace:  Massachusetts  Volume: 

168 

Page  Number: 

517 

Gen. Column of the " Boston Transcript". 1906‐1941.( The greatest single source of material  Reference:  for gen. Data for the N.E. area and for the period 1600‐1800. Completely indexed in the  Index.): 15 Jan 1932, 2939   

Millennium File about Margaret Stephenson   Name: 

Margaret Stephenson

Spouse: 

Benjamin Scott 

Birth Date: 

1616 

Birth City: 

Cambridge 

Birth County:  Suffolk  Birth State: 

Massachusetts 

Birth Country:  USA  Death Date: 

22 Sep 1691 

Death City: 

Rowley 

Death County:  Essex  Death State:  Massachusetts  Death Country: USA  Children: 

William Scott 

 

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560‐1900 about Margaret Stevenson   Name: 

Margaret Stevenson


Gender: 

Female 

Birth Place: 

MA 

Birth Year: 

1616 

Spouse Name: 

Benjamin Scott 

Spouse  Birth Place: 

MA 

Spouse Birth Year:1612  Marriage  Year:   

 

1634 


justus scott line p3