Page 1


Flooring system Roof system

Sliding wall system

LIVE

WORK

SHOP

bare

Interior partition system Wall moving through stairs

THESIS_ mutable architecture Michigan_Winter 2009

Advisor_Craig Borum

The world is in flux. The circumstances in which we live change, and so do our needs and wants. With limited resources and limited space, we can no longer build buildings meant for one purpose and to last one generation. We are in need of a sustainable architecture that is able to adapt to change. This thesis seeks to bring the concept of collapsibles to the scale of a commercial buildingcreating a structure that can expand and contract, easily assemble and disassemble, and adapt to different forms and functions in the future: consequently reducing demolition and waste.

glass

Cladding options

privacy/ insulation panel


THESIS_Research Design Exercise KIT OF PARTS: THE SELBY HOUSE

RE-USE: TYPOLOGIES

200 2 x 6 wood studs 32 windows 64 shutters 30 doors

Detroit, MI Built: 1848 Construction: Balloon Frame

Tower

Platform

This study disassembles the Sibley House’s 160 year-old timber frame construction, which is still in excellent condition. The 2 x 4s are reconfigured into different typologies of architecture in order to analyze the construction and to show other structures it could convert to after demolition.


Structure: concertina + assembling

Surfaces: folding

Partitions: hinging + sliding

Circulation: fanning

hinge_endpoint

house --> tower 1 story

hinge_midpoint

house --> platform 2 stories

slide

3 stories

These are initial studies of different types of collapsible structures brought to the scale of a commercial building. The final design ended up incorporating mainly the hinging and sliding design but the hope is that the others could be used as well in future designs.


KIT OF PARTS: THE MUTABLE HOUSE 1,000 2x6 wood studs 12 steel columns/beams 4 large panes of glass 50 metal connector strips x # of bolt connectors 6 sets of interior partitions

interior view of house

1/4 scale model of exterior movable partition


2010- WINTER LIVE

Couple Moves in

WORK Start-up of Business Opening of boutique SHOP clothes store

2010- SUMMER LIVE

Outdoor living space wanted

WORK Quickly growing business

SHOP

New season = new clothes + new arrangement

LIVE

Starts a family

2015

WORK Recession Now OPEN! SHOP Dollar General


Dew Points for New Orleans (in degrees Farenheit)

Summer Sun

humid air

Winter Sun

rain room

rain room

water collected within sturctural members 60 F dew point wall dehumidified air

cooled air dehumidified air

FIRE STATION PAVILION In New Orleans, a shift is necessary in architecture- one that adapts to the whims of nature, as opposed to impositions presumed to overtake nature. Our proposal for the new fire station at MSY works in response to the environmental and geological conditions in New Orleans, as the building itself becomes a machine for water displacement, retention and reuse. The goal is to reduce impact on the regional infrastructure by putting water to work in managing the building’s environmental needs. With humidity being another crucial environmental issue, our building harnesses the surrounding flow of air and water to dehumidify it by natural means through a “dew point wall” before it reaches the program space below.

Water Table Test

site: MSY Airport_New Orleans, LA Michigan_Winter 2009

Jan

45

Feb

46

March

52

April

59

May

66

June

71

July

73

Aug

73

Sept

70

Oct

60

Nov

52

Dec

47


SITE ^ top the MSY airport site

< left MSY region during a 100 year flood. Provided the levees hold, the grade of MSY is intended to stay dry.

^

bottom

Sun shadows, rain and wind shadows for winter (blue) and summer (orange). Dark colors indicate a collection.

Sunlight

Rain (year round)

N

Wind


STRUCTURING The form of main structural pipe system was inspired by Vladimir Suchov’s hyperbolic grid-towers and Felix Candela’s Restaurant at Xochimilco. Felix’s use of mathematical wooden column configuration to support the concrete roof on top was inspirational in terms of its elegance and performance. We wanted to create a structure that is strong at the base and light on the roof, like a root of a tree that grows naturally from ground. Our research ultimately lead us to discover that what gives the structure its strength is not the mass of the material itself but the curves of the shell. The rigidity of the structure is achieved due to the interlaced tubing form in a radial orientation.


TOP MEMBRANE

STRUCTURE

BOTTOM MEMBRANE 3+4 2

CONCRETE ROOF 1

1 5+7 5

CONCRETE ENCLOSURE

BERM 9

8

15

11 + 12

6 13 + 14 10

PROGRAMMING 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7)

Vehicle Rooms Turnout Gear Storage Watch/Alarm Room Fire Department Office Work Shop Area Storage Room Hose-Drying Room

8) 9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15)

Dormitory Lavatory/Showers/Lockers Mechanical Room Dining Room Kitchen Training/Study Day Area Water Retention / Rain Room

diane c. moseley


1) Underground Common Area (above left) 2) Looking into underground common area (above right) 3) Looking north toward runway (below right)

team credits: diane moseley_ team leader, designer, 2D drawings sean houghton_ designer, 3D model, presentation andy fang_3D model, renderings


FASHION RESEARCH INSTITUTE site: corner of Houston + Broadway, New York, NY University of Virginia_Spring 2003 Set on one of the last remaining vacant lots in SOHO, New York City, the site for this project offered many challenges to overcome when planning the design for a 100,000 square foot Fashion Research Institute. Some of these challenges included the oddly triangular shaped site on the corner of a prominent intersection, the integration of a major subway entrance, and that any new construction would block the major signage wall that currently resides there. The program includes an auditorium for fashion shows and presentations, classrooms, studios, as well as a public exhibition and retail space for the products created at the institute.


public

semi-public

billboard

My inspiration for the design began with an exploration of the connection between the geographic and cultural layers of the city, in which i created a topographic model. When exploring the site, I again began to notice layers in the surrounding areas, and thus became the basis of my design. The layers became floating, cube-like private areas wrapped by a translucent semi-private area and a transparent public area. The stairs became a circulation wrapping around the outer-most layer of signage, which is now relocated to the front of the building, and extends from the subway below to the roof deck above. Another type of circulation became a transparent elevator that cuts vertically through all of the layers.

process

private


12

10 2

11

3

1

4

10

3rd Floor

Ground Floor

5 13 8

12

10 11

9 7 6

5

4

10

7 4

2nd Floor

PROGRAMMING 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7)

Retail/ Exhibition Space Industrial Shop Exterior Workspace Auditorium Runway Lobby Restrooms

4th Floor

7

8) 9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) 15)

7 15

Box Office Fitting Rooms (movable curtain) Classroom Studio Space Storage Balcony Admin. Offices Exterior Roof Deck

14

5th Floor


HOU STON

BROADWAY


HORIZONTALITY vs. VERTICALITY _the re-mix site: Westside Highway, New York, NY Michigan_Fall 2008 What happens when you mix the horizontality of a University campus with the verticality of New York City skyscrapers? What happens when you mix the disciplines of Art and Design with Science and Engineering into one shared building? This design for a University of Michigan satellite campus in NYC seeks to hold a sense of tension between these disparities but also create moments of connections both visually and physically. The site was chosen along the West Side Highway in Manhattan because it also holds a sense of tension and need for connections- land to water, grid to organic, and the railroad and highway cutting through. A second part to the project was using Lightscape to see how natural light can dictate

form and reach deeper into the center of a large building.


School of Atmospheric + Oceanic Science

School of Structural Engineering

Central Meeting Point

Existing Railroad


9

8 Architecture/Art Engineering

7

Fight for Light Section Cut for Light Plan Cut for Circulation

6

Lift Separate Re-Mix

5

Atmospheric + Oceanic Science Architecture Structural Engineering Industrial Engineering Art Financial Engineering Theater/Dance Public Theater + Gallery Music

4

3

LIGHTSCAPE STUDIES

2

1

Views + Light 0

-1

-2

-3

-4

Circulation diane c. moseley


Boolean Tube Lightwell Design Regular Lightwell

Boolean Lightwell North/South Light

East/West Light Mixed Light

ADVANCED LIGHTING _gallery design Michigan_Fall 2008 In a world run by electricity, we have forgotten about the sun’s use as a sustainable and emotionally pleasing light source. We now have the technology to analyze its technical aspects and use this information to manipulate light through built form. For this gallery design, the lightwells are altered to not only follow hourly and seasonal angles of the sun, but also experiment with “mixing” different directions of light. This design proved that it is possible through built form to create a naturally lit space that changes throughout the day and year.

Solar Lightwell Design Summer

noon

8am

4pm

8am

noon 4pm Winter

LIGHTSCAPE STUDIES

Summer Solstice__8am

Summer Solstice__noon


PACE CAPSTONE Location I Size I Role I Awards I

Arlington, VA 6,000 SF Project team + selected all finishes 2007 NAIOP Award Winner: Best Interiors Under 15,000 SF Pace Capstone provides government relations services to a wide array of clients. In their new office, we wanted to create a very open, collaborative environment, which we did by exposing the break room and copy room under a unifying circular ceiling canopy. We also maximized their low construction budget by using polycarbonate panels in lieu of glass to allow the light into the interior space.

diane c. moseley


COLDWELL BANKER_DC HEADQUARTERS Location I Washington D.C. Size I 10,000 SF Role I Lead Designer + Project Manager

diane c. moseley

For Coldwell Bankerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DC Headquarters, they wanted a very high end, modern look. Located in a prime location, along the Georgetown waterfront, the lobby had to be eye-catching. For this, we added a custom-designed, floor to ceiling glass wall with their logo, lit from behind. With an awkward curved floor plate, we wanted to emphasize the curve and create floating ceiling soffits to distinguish entry points of circulationsolid above for the void below.


ACORN MEDIA GROUP Location I Size I Role I Awards I

Silver Spring, MD 9,000 SF Lead Designer + Project Manager 2008 NAIOP Award Winner: Best Interiors Under 10,000 SF The Acorn Media Group provides home video products to the North American, U.K., and Australian markets. They wanted a hip, creative space incorporating their brand colors and image for their US Corporate Headquarters office. The virgin space with exposed ceilings allowed us to play with the ceiling height and floating volumes to create a dynamic environment. In the lobby, we wanted to emulate the drama of a movie theater with uplighting around the conference rooms.


PLAYGROUND COMPETITION_ Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis Team I Matthew Clarke + Diane Moseley Role I Design of the “Maze” and “Ant Farm” pieces + design development drawings for them * All final drawings provided by Lewis Tsurumaki Lewis

Perspective Montage

p g

SECTION VIEW

BOX AGGREGATION

EXPLODED DIAGRAM

BOX ASSEMBLY

+6’ - 0”

ANTFARM

+3’ - 0”

ELEVATION

ELEVATION

“MAZE” DETAILS

“ANTFARM” DETAILS

LTL Architects 227 W 29th Street, FLR 7, New York, NY 10001 www.LTLarchitects.com

LTL Architects 227 W 29th Street, FLR 7, New York, NY 10001 www.LTLarchitects.com


EXCERPTS FROM SKETCHBOOK diane c. moseley

top: Hereford College, University of Virginia bottom: Peter Waldman’’s residence, Charlottesville, VA


CONTACT diane c. moseley 264 Sixth Ave., Apt. 6, New York, NY 10014 email: diane.moseley@gmail.com phone: 941-773-6378

Diane's portfolio  

Samples of my academic and professional work

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