Page 1

The Art of

SCULPTURE Diana Reuter-Twining’s Recent Releases Including: “THE WATER SERIES”


Exhibitions

American Women Artists Artists for Conservation Society of Animal Artists Bennington’s Art and the Animal Kingdom National Sculpture Society’s Annual Awards Exhibition Leigh Yawkey Woodson’s Birds in Art National Sculpture Society’s Wings of Hope Wings of Peace National Sculpture Society’s Animals in the Atrium Gilcrease Museum, Collector’s Reserve Exhibition and Sale Western Visions, National Museum of Wildlife Art Scottsdale Artists’ School/ Best and Brightest The Bennington Collective

Publications

Fine Art Connoisseur, July/August 2015: “3D: A Snapshot of Sculpture Today” Virginia Living, June 2010: “Wild Emotion” by Lisa Antonelli Bacon Middleburg Eccentric, January 2010: “No Creature Too Small for Diana Reuter-Twining” Wildlife Art, January/February 2006: “Sculptor Champions Africa’s Wildlife” by Myrna Zanetell Élan, December 2005/January 2006: “Discoveries in Bronze” by Sally Pfoutz. vol. 1, no. 9 Inform Art, Fall, 2005: “Four Sculptors Stretch Their Imaginations” by Myrna Zanetell vol. 16, no. 4 Teton Valley Top to Bottom, Spring/Summer, 2001: “Art and Soul” by Patti Layser

Collections

The Metropolitan Club of the City of Washington, 1700 H St NW, Washington, DC 20036 Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Avenue, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Boulevard, Bowling Green, KY 42101 Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, 700 North 12th Street, Wausau, WI 54403 The Bennington Center for the Arts, Bennington, VT

Awards

National Sculpture Society 84th Annual Awards...Fred and Cheryl Newby Patrons Award for Maestro ... 2017 Women Artists 2016 Exhibition... Grand Prize for Tyto... 2016 Gilcrease Museum/ The Collector’s Covey... Peoples’ Choice Award for Three Pears ... 2015 American Women Artists 2015 Exhibition... Honorable Mention for Grasshopper Vase... 2015 Scottsdale Artists’ School/ Best and Brightest... First Place Sculpture

The Art of

SCULPTURE

CONTENTS

The Water Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Mandolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Mandarin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Nest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Mezza Luna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Grasshopper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Swift. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Honeycomb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Tyto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Daddy Long Legs . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Maestro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Diana, Goddess of the Wild . . . . 26 Peacock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Imagine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Wild Emotion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 The Art of Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 About Diana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Affiliations

Member of the Salmagundi Club Society of Animal Artists Artists for Conservation American Women Artists The American Institute of Architects To contact Diana Reuter-Twining Mail may be sent to: P.O. Box 552, Aldie, Virginia, 20105 Phone: (803) 824-9123 Website: www.bronzed.net Diana’s gallery is located in Aldie, Virginia.

(*Please call ahead if you would like to meet Diana at the gallery)

Studio photography by Brandon Webster Magazine design by Pam Owens Design


The Water Series

MANDARIN II

Available at any size Stainless steel or bronze

Water has long inspired me. I am particularly captivated by the riffles created when waterfowl swim over still water. In this series I have explored that geometry. Mandarin was the first of the series. Here I showed how the riffle extended below the water’s surface in a gentle arc that perpetuates the triangular riffle. Mandarin Wall Hanging allows the geometry to be seen on a vertical wall surface. Note that I have added a semi circle in front of the duck in this piece, taking into account that the duck is actually swimming inside a circle that is moving forward with it, while trailing a triangle behind. Mandarin II is the resolution of Mandarin. Mandolin takes the concept of a musical instrument, the mandolin, and works on the concept of music as water. The head of the mandolin has a circle that initiates the flow of a single thread (or string) of water that connects to the body of the instrument, where two ducks are swimming in overlapping concentric circles. Their movement approximates the harmony that might be associated with the mandolin. I chose to cast the ducks in a high polished nickel. This mirror-like finish creates a dynamic of movement through reflection.

MANDARIN

MANDARIN WALL HANGING

MANDARIN II

4 The Art of Sculpture

MANDOLIN

The Art of Sculpture 5


MANDOLIN I have been long fascinated by watching the riffles that ducks form while swimming. This sculpture is one of a series that explores that geometry. Two mandarin ducks swim around one another, forming two overlapping circles and creating a more complex geometry which is reflected in the polished nickel of the ducks. I used the mandolin as a base into which this composition rests to emphasize the underlying sense of harmony. At the head of the instrument is a circle from which a single line connects to the riffles: implying an unending line which constantly regenerates itself.

5.5" H x 32" W x 13"D (14 x 82 x 33 cm)

Fused nylon, copper & nickel on aluminum

6 The Art of Sculpture

The Art of Sculpture 7


MANDARIN The mandarin duck seems almost too pretty to be outside. I chose it to accentuate the riffle all ducks create while swimming on still waters. One cannot disassociate the duck from the pattern following it on ponds, lakes and rivers. 6" H x 36.5" W x 21.5" D (91.4 x 92.71 x 54.6 cm) Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition/9: each signed and numbered

8 The Art of Sculpture

The Art of Sculpture 9


In the historic gardens at Glenstone, near Aldie, Virginia, Diana has showcased many of these sculptures in both formal and informal settings. She has played with the idea of enlarging a grassphopper, for example, to a monumental scale and taken the concept of a hornet’s nest and a honeycomb to contemporary abstract forms in her sculptures of the same name.

THE NEST

I am fascinated by nests. Hornet’s nests are bold and delicate at the same time. As they decay they become nests for other creatures. Here twigs grow out of the center and I see its abstract beauty. 66" H x 30" W x 30" D (167.64 x 76.20 x 76.20 cm) Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition/12 each signed and numbered Provenance provided

10 The Art of Sculpture

The Art of Sculpture 11


MEZZA LUNA

The owl is an elusive, mysterious raptor seeming to dwell between worlds. Mezza Luna means eclipse of the moon. This sculpture explores that aura of half sleep/half wake, twilight/night which an eclipse symbolizes. This sculpture was enlarged to be in appropriate scale for a private garden in Virginia, as shown on the facing page. The bronze measures 36 inches high by 30 inches wide and is resting on a hickory burl base with overal dimensions of 72 inches high by 48 inches wide.

12" H x 16" W x 12" D (without stand) (31 x 41 x 31 cm) Stand: 48" H x 12" W x 12" D (122 x 31 x 31 cm) Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition/12: each signed and numbered Provenance provided

The Art of Sculpture 15


GRASSHOPPER

Grasshopper is part of my series called “Into the Garden�. It is an homage to the insect world. In producing this sculpture I was in awe of the incredible mechanics of this bug. Every part is so beautifully articulated: at times I felt as though I was working on a mechanical toy. This sculpture is available in two sizes: display and monumental. Display size: 23" H x 32.5" W x 8.5" D Monumental size: 54" H x 66" W x 24" D Bronze on a stainless steel base Edition of 24

16 The Art of Sculpture


SWIFT

HONEYCOMB

The chimney swift is both elegant and sculptural in this silhouetted study.

Honey bees are nature’s architects. How incredibly rich in texture and structure is the honeycomb with each cell designed to receive one drop of honey.

17" H x 8" W x 4" D (43 x 20 x 10 cm) Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition/50 each signed and numbered Provenance provided

51" H x 70" W x 16" D (130 x 178 x 41 cm) Bronze on stainless steel base Edition/9: each signed and numbered Weight 450 lbs.

18 The Art of Sculpture

The Art of Sculpture 19


TYTO Tyto was a barn owl I photographed one day while attending The Artists for Conservation Annual Exhibition in Vancouver, British Colombia at the Grouse Mountain Resort. I was so captivated by this exquisite bird. After countless photographs I chose this pose to sculpt. In this stretch he captured it all for me; mystery, grace, agility and strength. 65.5" H x 13" W x 10" D (166 x 33 x 25 cm) Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition/9 each signed and numbered Provenance provided

The Art of Sculpture 21


DADDY LONGLEGS I spent every summer of my childhood on our family farm in Virginia and I can say with all honesty that I shared each one of them with a Daddy Longlegs. I learned early on that they really aren’t spiders but members of a family of insects called Harvestman. All I cared about were that they were pretty and smart. My great aunt Georgianna showed me how to hold them in such a way that one leg would point to answer a myriad of questions ranging from, “Which ways the cows were heading?” to “Where is my true love?” In making this sculpture I hope to be able to capture the delicate beauty of this incredible creature. 12" H x 4" W x 2" D (31 x 10 x 5 cm) Bronze (Cire perdue)

The Art of Sculpture 23


MAESTRO Dressage is a discipline of horse and rider requiring extreme strength, grace, balance and will. It is often associated with the famous white Lipazzaners of the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, Austria. I chose to pay homage to this in my sculpture, Maestro*. In studying the horse I found that proportionally the horse in this gesture approximated the Golden Ratio or Divine Proportion in mathematics. Leonardo Da Vinci’s association with this ratio inspired his illustrations for Luca Pacioli’s book The Divine Proportion, in which he showed examples of how Phidias, a Greek sculptor and mathematician, applied it to the design of sculptures for the Parthenon. Euclid proved that the diagonals of the regular pentagon cut each other in “extreme and mean ratio”. The Fibonacci spiral, which is etched in the sculpture’s base, is the result of taking this ratio and drawing circular arcs connecting the opposite corners of squares which is often found in nature as evidenced by the chambered nautilus which, if allowed to grow, would expand to infinity in the same proportion. Throughout art and architecture this ratio has been applied to the layout of paintings and architecture in order to achieve divine harmony. It is shown that DaVinci applied Divine proportions to “The Annunciation” and Michael Angelo to “The Creation of Adam”. Phidias (given credit for discovering this proportion was honored by its moniker, phi) proved this in his design of the elevation of the Parthenon which is considered one of the great masterpieces of classical architecture for this reason.

26" x 20" x 7" 50 lbs. Edition/9 Bronze on bronze base

24 The Art of Sculpture

GOLDEN RATIO

a+b a = = a b

ø = 1.61803

a

a

b

Applied The Divine Proportion

*This sculpture was inspired by my dear friend Katy Browne and her magnificent horse Maestro.

The Art of Sculpture 25


DIANA, GODESS OF THE WILD The Amazonian Goddess, Artemis, was known to have helped defend the Hellenic Greeks on horseback while carrying her bow thus conjuring up an image of women with the lower body of a horse and the upper body of a woman. This may explain the evolution of the image of the astrological sign of Sagittarius. I chose to depict, Artemis, Diana Goddess of the Hunt as one such centauride. I am drawn to this image of the feminine form as one so closely allied to an animal in the lower body but having maintained the human, rational aspect of the form in the upper body. In folk lore and mythology, Diana was Goddess of the Hunt, Goddess of the Moon and Goddess of the Wild and turned her brother Apollo into a stag as he hunted her. The poem, Goddess of the Wild, by Kimberly Moore inspired me.

Heed Me Hear Me run to Me Burst out of your casing shrug off normal mundane and Come with Me Hunt with Me Run with Me ‘Til the breath screams from our lungs and our muscles are nothing but adrenaline Come with Me and when you cannot take one more step I will pull you from the bindings of your humanity ……………………………. Give me your fears your sense of being prey with the copper reflections of silent terror in your mouth Give it to me Be the Huntress and we will send your demons fleeing for their existence as you sound the horn and release the wild in you until triumphant you have no-thing but the wild in you.

Sculpture without base : 18”H x 16”W x 12”D (58.4 x 33 x 33 cm) Base: 36”H x 6”W x 6”D Bronze (Cire perdue) 26 The Art of Sculpture

The Art of Sculpture 27


PEACOCK

I have studied the peacock for years and realized that its fanned tail actually detracts from the pure line of its silhouette. I chose, therefore, to show the tail “at rest” and realized the beautiful classic S shape of the form allowed me to study the whole. Using a rich gold patina stippled over the entire composition enabled me to emphasize its stylized geometry and make reference to the Art Deco period. This sculpture is available in two sizes: display and monumental.

View any of Diana’s sculptures in your own garden with her new “Imagine” service

Display size: 24" H x 11" W x 5.5" W (61 x 28 x 14 cm)

The enlargement of a sculpture in proportion to its landscape requires study. Diana uses photo manipulation to do this and offers a service called “Imagine” in which any sculpture in her collection may be "Photoshopped “into a digital image.

Monumental size: 72" H x 33" W x 16.5" D (183 x 84 x 42 cm)

You may find more examples of this on her website www.bronzed.net under the title “Imagine”.

Bronze (Cire perdue) Edition/12: each signed and numbered

STEP 1: Send a photo of where you would like a sculpture.

28 The Art of Sculpture

STEP 2: The photo comes back to you with a sculpture of your choice in place.

The Art of Sculpture 29


Reprint of Virginia Living article

JUNE 2010

ARTS

Wild Emotion Sculptor Diana Reuter-Twining specializes in bronze works that reflect the “beauty, mystery and grace” of the animal world. BY LISA ANTONELLI BACON

Sculptor Diana Reuter-Twining is puzzled. “I can’t decide what to do with it,” she says, surveying a hefty, seven-foot-long peacock hide she keeps in the barn that is her showroom on Bull Run Farm in rural Aldie, Va. Dressed fashionably in black (save for light brown cowboy boots and brown belt with silverand-turquoise buckle), the petite, animated brunette seems more amused than perplexed as she fingers the ethereal feathers, which are tufted in five or six pounds of leathery, avian epidermis. However long it takes ReuterTwining to decide how best to transform the peacock hide into a piece of art, the resulting work likely will capture the essence of the animal. Trained as an architect and practiced as a photographer, Reuter-Twining in recent years has emerged as a sculptor distinguished for her acute observations of wildlife, from rabbit and river otter to fox and cheetah. Her bronze representations are sometimes large and, often, lifelike. “I’m inspired by the natural world,” says Reuter-Twining, “its beauty, mystery and grace.”

30 The Art of Sculpture

Her work has appeared in numerous exhibitions—including the National Museum of Wildlife Art, the Society of Animal Artists and the National Sculpture Society, and clients on three continents have bought her pieces. Typically, it takes her about six months to complete a sculpture. “She is very innovative,” says Jack Summers, owner of the Lovetts Gallery in Tulsa, Oklahoma, who has several Reuter-Twining animal pieces on display. “I’ve done quite well with her work.” The average price, he estimates, is $4,500. Summers says that the sculptor’s style can be “somewhat traditional with some pieces and very contemporary with others. You could own several and not know it’s the same artist.”

In sculpture, the sketch establishes a gesture, and the gesture evokes an emotion. Integrating those elements is the challenge.” The artist, who also produces figuratives and objets d’art, has had ample opportunity to observe animals. She grew up on a farm and, when young, followed her father to exotic locales. He is a retired surgeon and professional photographer who did freelance work for National Geographic magazine.

Reuter-Twining has lived most of her 58 years on two adjacent farms that have been in her family for more than a century. Now she and husband Ned Twining (whom she calls an “enlightened philanthropist”) divide their time between their farm, Bull Run (across the road from her family homestead, Glenstone Farm), and their ranch in Savery, Wyoming. Reuter-Twining works primarily in the animalier style, a movement centered on the realistic portrayal of animals and made popular around the turn of the 20th century by Italian artist Rembrandt Bugatti. But realism is not the sole aim. The sculptor seeks to capture a subject at an emblematic moment in time, when it moves or poses in a defining way. Think the first lazy stride of a cheetah descending a plateau, for example, or the final lift of a goose’s wings before touchdown. How does she know when to freeze the subject? “Observation,” she says. “Drawing is the basis for all design.

After graduating from Hollins College (now University) in 1973 with a degree in art history, she landed a job as an interior designer for an architectural firm in Alexandria. In spare time, she took art classes at the Torpedo Factory. After two years, she enrolled in the graduate architectural program at Catholic University. After earning the degree, she worked for a couple of architectural firms and then, with a partner, opened her own shop in Washington. It wasn’t until the

mid-90s, while on a trip to Africa, that her joy for photography and drawing took a turn. After sketching a family of baboons, she told Ned that the drawing might lend itself to three-dimensional representation, and that, once back in the states, she might commission someone to turn the drawing into a sculpture. “Ned said, ‘Do it yourself,’” she recalls. She did. But not before enrolling in a program at the Corcoran School of Art, where she learned the fundamentals of sculpture, welding and making molds. “It allowed me to get to another level in my art,” she says. Within a year, she entered her first show, in Charleston, S.C. “I was a little surprised I was admitted,” she confesses. But it inspired her to focus on individualizing her style, and it wasn’t long before she’d earned a spot in the award show of the National Sculpture Society, a prestigious group founded by architects. Now 12 years into her sculpture career, ReuterTwining seems in a good artistic place because she likes working in threedimensional space. “Space is a medium, and it can be manipulated,” she says. “With painting, you’re dealing with [only] the illusion of space.” Last November, Reuter-Twining started a spin-off business. She introduced a jewelry collection that includes miniature reproductions of some of her animal works, as well as other more whimsical original pieces, cast mostly in silver and gold. Might that mean a peacock brooch is in the offing? Maybe, but first she intends to do something larger with the hide in her barn.

The Art of Sculpture 31


The Art of Jewelry

On display as art Diana worked with Richard Waller, the acclaimed frame maker Middleburg, Virginia, and together they designed prototypes for frames which would showcase her necklaces. Using the Tuscan Tabernacle Frame as found in the quatrocento the two were able to establish a prototype for these and future works. Diana is showing her work as wearable art— when it is not being worn it is displayed as traditional art would be, on a table in the living room or hanging on the wall. By weighting the frames on the bottom Mr. Waller’s frames are stable enough to sit safely on any surface. They may also be hung on the wall.

Diana’s jewelry is inspired by her sculptures. The shape and forms repeat themselves in these beautiful designs following her intricate study of subject. More information can be found on her website at www.bronzed.net.

TEMPTATION NECKLACE (left, shown in frame) 18k white gold tree and base, with buds of freshwater pearls and cognac diamond accents, 18k yellow gold monkey, 16 freshwater rice pearls, 1 freshwater boulder pearl, 84 champagne diamonds.

FOX NECKLACE 18k green gold fox face, set with (2)~.50ct marquise emerald stone eyes, suspended from a leather cord with complimentary green gold accent stations on the cord, and end in an 18k green gold toggle clasp. 5 inches x 2. 5 inches. Earrings available.

PEAR NECKLACE Two 18k gold pears, one rose gold and one yellow gold, pave set with 35 pave set sapphires per pear accented with a white gold leaf with veins of pave set orange sapphire. The overlapping white gold stems make up the necklace, adorned with buds of carnelian with yellow sapphire accents, ending in an integrated clasp. Earrings available.

GRASSHOPPER NECKLACE Two 18k yellow gold grasshopper rest on an 18k white gold vase, with a base and lip of 18k yellow gold, pave set with 18 yellow sapphires, 26 yellow sapphires pave set on top. The grasshoppers eyes are sapphires and their antenna come together to form an arch over the vase as well as the gold neckwire, and end in an 18k yellow gold toggle clasp. Earrings available.

HONEYCOMB NECKLACE 18k yellow gold honeycomb set with 13 honey colored hexagon citrines, adorned with 18k yellow gold bee, 48 pave set yellow sapphire wings, 44 mixed size orange-to-yellow gradient pave sapphire body, yellow sapphire stinger and 2 carnelian cabochon eyes. The necklace is made up of gradient color citrine beads accented by a honeycomb element, finished with an 18k yellow gold toggle clasp. Earrings available.

The Art of Sculpture 33


Recent Titles by Diana Reuter-Twining Available at Blurb.com

Diana Reuter-Twining

bronzed

bronzed

Contemporary Naturalist

Into The Garden Diana Reuter-Twining

Into The Garden Diana Reuter-Twining

Diana and her husband Ned Twining divide their time between Aldie, Virginia and Savery, Wyoming. Their work in the fields of conservation have taken them to Southern Africa and the American West. In each case their philosophy of enlightened philanthropy was expressed as an investment in a charitable outcome rather than a gift.

Having been trained first as an architect and photographer, Diana has the vantage point of an intimacy with space and nature, which is made evident through her use of a bold stroke and a quick eye.

Mount Chocorua Publishing

www.bronzed.net www.drtjewelry.com www.edmundstwining3rd.com

Diana Reuter-Twining

The Art of Jewelry and Sculpture Diana Reuter-Twining

In this book Diana original sketches an them to create her

Her work is produc wax method of bro the sculptures in th edition bronze.

Mount Chocorua Publishing

Mount Chocorua Publishing

34 The Art of Sculpture

Drawn From Nature

It all starts with the for Diana is the exp emotion and memo a sketch.

Diana Reuter-Twining

www.bronzed.net www.drtjewelry.com www.edmundstwining3rd.com

Diana and her husband Ned Twining divide their time between Aldie, Virginia and Savery, Wyoming. Their work in the fields of conservation have taken them to Southern Africa and the American West. In each case their philosophy of enlightened philanthropy was expressed as an investment in a charitable outcome rather than a gift.

Diana Reuter-Twining

Diana and her husband Ned Twining divide their time between Aldie, Virginia, Savery, Wyoming and Ehrhardt, South Carolina. Their work in the fields of conservation have taken them to Southern Africa and the American West. In each case their philosophy of enlightened philanthropy was expressed as an investment in a charitable outcome rather than a gift.

An excerpt from Bronzed II: Drawn from Nature It all starts with the line. Sculpture for me is the exploration of gesture, emotion and memory. Working with a camera allows me to focus and frame subjects from all angles but it isn’t until I am in my studio with my sketchbook and pencil that all of that begins to synthesize.

bronzed II

Drawn From Nature

Working in Southern Africa with her husband, Ned Twining, exposed her to the philosophy of conservation science which forever changed her life. Through her art Diana hopes to engage people in becoming stewards of their own environments. She is always looking to partner with groups or individuals who share the same vision. She will donate a portion of her sales to qualifying organizations.

Published 2010

The Art of Jewelry and Sculpture

Living in rural communities in the Southern United States and the American West has given Diana the opportunity to study in detail that which has become the focus of her work: the natural world.

While this book I thought how little we see of Inspired byorganizing the countless sculptures she grew up with throughout Washington, contemporary sculpture in gardens today. When we see DC, Diana challenges us to step back and think of sculpture as a dynamic art form. sculpture it tends to be copies of Renaissance figures in As a sculptor with exterior space as studied poses. Ironically however, after the Renaissance her medium, she leads by example and hopes to show, like the Mannerists came period ofbe art which acknowledged the Age of before her,a that sculpture might judged by the questions asked. Reason, which came to be known as Mannerism. It was As a designer she encourages sculpture to center an exterior frame a that artists played with the new reality during thisspace, period view or become the focal point to a path, garden or pool. This collection that man was no longer “the center of the universe” and shows her use of the natural world as palette. inherthis age of discovery a sculpture’s purpose might be to ask a larger question of how he fit into this new world.

Front cover: Detail of Honeycomb; Back cover: View of GrassHopper and THe nesT in the Grey-Green Garden at Glenstone

bronzed II

Her formal studies in art and architecture initially took her to Paris with Hollins College where she received a degree in Art History. She then went on to Catholic University where she received her Masters of Architecture. She studied sculpture at the Corcoran School of Art, Loveland Academy of Fine Arts and Scottsdale Artists’ School.

An excerpt from Bronzed: Into the Garden

Diana is grateful for the opportunity of her lifetime to have her parents’ gardens at Glenstone as her stage.

www.bronzed.net www.drtjewelry.com www.edmundstwining3rd.com

Diana’s interest in art and architecture may have started after she assisted her father on a photographic assignment for the National Geographic. Diana went on to apprentice as a photographer with the magazine. She later became a registered architect.

Published 2009

Front cover: Tom

Published 2012

An excerpt from The Art of Jewelry and Sculpture Diana’s jewelry is wearable art. When it is not being worn it is displayed as traditional art would be: on a table in the living room or hanging on the wall.

Having been trained first as an architect and photographer, Diana has the vantage point of an intimacy with space and nature, which is made evident through her use of a bold stroke and a quick eye. Her formal studies in art and architecture initially took her to Paris with Hollins College where she received a degree in Art History. She then went on to Catholic University where she received her Masters of Architecture. She studied sculpture at the Corcoran School of Art, Loveland Academy of Fine Arts and Scottsdale Artists' School. Diana's bronzes are found in private collections and gardens throughout the world. Front cover: fox necklace Back cover: peacock

The Art of Sculpture 35


Profile for dianatwining

The Art of Sculpture 2018  

Contemporary naturalist Diana Reuter-Twining shares her love of nature through sculpture.

The Art of Sculpture 2018  

Contemporary naturalist Diana Reuter-Twining shares her love of nature through sculpture.