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Conscious Living

Oneness Causeless Peace Healthfulness Joyfulness Unconditional Love Mindfulness -

Relationships Yoga, Meditation, The Outdoors Food, Nutrition, Exercise Music, The Arts, Photography Nonprofits, Selfless Acts Science, Medicine, Technology, Psychology


Table of Contents Healthfulness ………………………………….

3 Simply Central Oregon is the newest online-only magazine written and produced exclusively for people who think.

Leek & Brussel Sprout Soup A report on the supplement magnesium GMO - Weird Science Mixed Fruit Crumble w/Basil

Causeless Peace- The Outdoors ………………… 9 Fort Rock State Park An overview of the Patgens Lakes Loop Train

Oneness - Relationships …………………… …. Self Care: Body Scrub Personal Perspective: I am Baba Yaga

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The goal of this publication is to create a whole new online exchange venue aimed at those who are more purposefully engaged in the world. As such, we tend to be spiritually undefinable, outdoorsy types who prefer to grow our own food, volunteer our skills and we likely have a dog or two. We take our health care personally and strive to incorporate self-care into our routine as much as possible. Above all we are in the process of evolving into a better version of ourselves. If that sounds familiar then Simply Central Oregon is for you! Thank you for reading!

Simply Central Oregon is a product of DhyZen Creative Services (www.dhyzen.com). All content is the property of DhyZen Creative Services and may not be reproduced without written permission. Story ideas may be submitted to editor Dhyana Kearly for consideration at dhyzenmedia@gmail.com. Published October 1, 2013

Advertising opportunities are available! Please contact us at dhyzenmedia@gmail.com for details. Are you an expert in your field? We are looking for contributors on subjects including health, science, urban gardening, organic foods, spirituality, psychology, the arts and more! Photography is also welcome! Email us today!


Conscious Living

Healthfulness


Leeks are not only delicious they are notable for the fact that they supply folate which is a key B complex vitamin important for the cardiovascular system, helping to keep the body’s levels of homocysteine in proper balance. Leeks contain important amounts of the flavonoid kaempferol, which is recognized for its ability to help protect blood vessel linings from damage. Interestingly, one of the mechanisms involved in this blood vessel protection may involve increased production of nitric oxide (NO), a naturally occurring gas that helps to dilate and relax the blood vessels.

Leek, Brussel Sprout & Potato Soup Using locally grown ingredients always makes a better soup. Leeks, like garlic and onions, belong to a vegetable family called the Allium vegetables. Since leeks are related to garlic and onions, they contain many of the same beneficial compounds found in these well-researched, health-promoting vegetables.

Ingredients

Directions

3-4 leeks; washed, trimmed and sliced 2 large white or red potatoes; peeled and quartered 12 fresh brussel spouts; thinly sliced 1/2 pound bacon; thinly sliced 1 cup white wine 2-4 cups chicken broth 1 cup half-half

Place quartered potatoes in a steamer and let cook until tender.

Garnish & Finishing Touches 1/2 cup sour cream salt & white pepper to taste

In a large skillet cook bacon until crispy. Remove from pan (set bacon aside for garnish) and sautĂŠ sliced leeks and brussel spouts in reserved drippings on medium heat until almost tender but still slightly crispy. Pour 1/2 to 1 cup of white wine into vegetables, heat through until tender. Combine steamed potatoes, cooked leeks and brussel sprouts in a heavy Dutch oven pot, add chicken broth to cover. Using a submersible blender mix soup until blended to liking (or combine above in a blender and puree to desired texture). Heat through. Add salt and pepper to taste. 10 minutes before serving stir in half-half and sour cream, stir until heated through. Serve with bacon garnish. Enjoy.


Reclaiming your right Supplement Report:

Magnesium: The Wonder Supplement Ever since I can remember I’ve noticed women around me complaining of ‘power surges’ or ‘hot flashes’ and the closer I myself got to the wise woman era of life, the more these same woman would ask me if I am bothered by them, too. And honestly I can say that I’m not – at least very seldom and only for short periods of time. I truly believe that the reason I don’t have hot flashes while other women my age are plagued by them is due to the fact that I take magnesium supplements. It’s as simple as that.

magnesium are much more likely to suffer from symptoms of inflammation which is also associated with major health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, certain cancers, osteoporosis and high blood pressure. Magnesium deficiencies are most likely to occur in people such as those who: Ÿ Suffer from kidney disease Ÿ Have digestive issues including Crohn's disease, Celiac and gluten intolerance

And before I launch into why magnesium is so good for you, let me ask you a question; do you suffer from the terrible twitching eye syndrome? You know … that annoying moment when you’re talking to someone and out of nowhere your left (or right) eye will begin to tremble and flicker like crazy and for no reason? It’s only a minor tremble to be sure, but it makes you feel so self-conscious you immediately slink off to the nearest ladies room to try and get a handle on the situation before you embarrass yourself all to pieces. Well, long story short – twitching eye syndrome is a symptom of low magnesium levels and to be sure, if you suffer from hot flashes you may also suffer from twitchy eye … and vise versa. Just sayin’ … Magnesium, one of the four most important minerals in your body is important for the proper functioning of more than 300 different chemical reactions, according to the Office of Dietary Supplements. Magnesium is important for muscle and nerve function, regulating heart rate, promoting a healthy immune system and sustaining bone health. It also helps to regulate blood sugar and blood pressure and works to build protein. The National Institutes of Health has several research projects underway to study magnesium and how it works to prevent hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.

Ÿ Are taking antibiotics or drugs to treat issues such as diabetes and cancer Ÿ Are seniors Ÿ Drink alcohol in excess Ÿ Have parathyroid problems Good places to find magnesium naturally include: ·

Green leafy vegetables, like spinach, kale, beet greens, etc.

·

Nuts such as almonds

·

Beans, peas, and soybeans, brown rice

·

Whole-grain cereals, bran

Adequate levels of magnesium are essential for the absorption and metabolism of calcium and vitamin D. Magnesium converts vitamin D into its active form so that it can aid calcium absorption.

Magnesium also stimulates the hormone calcitonin, which helps to preserve bone structure and draws calcium out of the blood and soft tissues back into the bones, lowering More and more experts are coming to the conclusion that the likelihood of osteoporosis, some forms of arthritis, heart attack and kidney stones – all important issues for we aren't eating enough of the right foods to gain the women. proper amount of magnesium in our systems. Adults who consume less than the recommended amount of


to … A

ccording to Dr. Carolyn Dean Medical Director of the nonprofit Nutritional Magnesium Association, there is a growing amount of scientific evidence pointing to high calcium– low magnesium intake leading to calcification, or hardening, of arteries (atherosclerosis—the number one cause of death in the US), osteoporosis and osteoporotic bone fractures. To top all of that off, there is growing evidence that proper magnesium levels can lead to increased brain power. But, like all supplements you take, it’s important to know the healthy limits. HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH MAGNESIUM? Too much magnesium in the blood stream can cause nausea, cramps and diarrhea. Magnesium supplements often cause softening of stool, which can be helpful for people who have trouble going, but can be a problem for folks with compound digestive issues. Magnesium in excess may not be safe for people who are currently taking prescription diuretics, heart medicines or antibiotics. As always, if you are taking any medication or if you have any chronic health issue be sure to check with your health care provider before taking magnesium. Signs of a magnesium overdose can include nausea, diarrhea, low blood pressure, muscle weakness, and fatigue. At very high doses, magnesium can be fatal.


GMO - Weird Science The genetically engineered food we're eating today has never been safety tested for human consumption, using reliable, independent long-term testing methods. Yet the International Food Information Council (IFIC), which opposes the premarket safety testing of GMOs, insists that the lack of safety testing is evidence of safety.

entry to the IFIC's GMO Newspeak Dictionary, on behalf of the FDA: "Lack of premarket safety testing is food additive safety."

According to the American Medical Association (AMA), GMOs have been "consumed for close to 20 years, and during that time, no overt consequences on human health have been reported and/or substantiated in the peer-reviewed literature." So, no scientist has proven that GMOs are causing disease in humans. Does that mean that GMOs don't cause disease? Is it proof that GMOs are safe?

According to a study published in 2011 in the , genetically engineered DNA survives in our bodies and is passed on to our children before birth. The study found that 93 percent of pregnant women and 80 percent of their babies have genetically engineered DNA in their blood.

Here's how two different doctors' associations answer that question: The AMA has a glass half-full approach, but they acknowledge that the reason we think everything's fine is that we haven't adequately addressed the potential harms of bioengineered food. The AMA wants U.S. regulators to do something they've never done before: require companies to submit to mandatory pre-market safety assessments instead of relying on the current voluntary notification process. The American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) has a glass half-empty approach. While the AMA talks about "potential harm," the AAEM talks about "probable harm." Just like the AMA, the AAEM supports a change in U.S. law to require mandatory pre-market safety testing. But in the meantime, rather than wait another decade or two for federal agencies to require pre-market testing, the AAEM encourages doctors to recommend non-GMO diets. Despite the difference in policy positions between the two groups of doctors, there's one thing they can both agree on: GMOs haven't been safety-tested yet. And they need to be. IFIC says: "Consuming foods produced through biotechnology is safe for children and women who are pregnant or nursing." Wow, that's reassuring. Wouldn't we all love for that to be true? But now that we know that to IFIC "safe" just means "hasn't been safety tested," let's look into this. IFIC's reference for that statement is: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Genetically engineered plants for food and feed, 2012. I wasn't aware the FDA had issued a statement on GMOs in 2012, so I clicked the link.

So what do we know about the safety of GMOs for children and pregnant or nursing women?

Is this causing disease? We don't know yet. The researchers in this study said that babies developing in the womb are highly susceptible to the adverse effects of xenobiotics, chemicals found in an organism which are not normally produced or expected to be present in it. In this case, they're talking about crops that are genetically engineered to produce their own insecticides inside the plant. The researchers warn that GMOs could disrupt the biological events that are required to ensure normal growth and development. They say we need a new field of multi-disciplinary research, combining human reproduction, toxicology and nutrition.

Better nutrition from foods with no nutritional value? Now, one question you might have is, if we label GMOs, and more people start eating non-GMO diets, could we be steering people away from healthy food? Is there nutrition that only GMO plants provide? IFIC says: "Food biotechnology is being used to improve nutrition." Not really. Unless you think high fructose corn syrup, partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and refined sugar provide nutrition. Genetically engineered crops are used to make the worst junkfood ingredients. GMOs are primarily used to produce highfructose corn syrup made from genetically engineered corn, refined sugar made from genetically engineered sugar beets, and partially hydrogenated vegetable oils made from genetically engineered corn, soy, canola and cotton. If you don't think you're eating cotton, look at the ingredients on a box of Ritz crackers.

Beyond talking about what genetic engineering might produce someday in the future, there's really no way for IFIC to spin the fact that genetic engineering hasn't produced any uniquely I found the old FDA statement of policy that hasn't been nutritious foods. IFIC's list of "Foods from Crops & Animals updated since 1997. I had read it before. But I read it again, Raised Using Biotechnology" is "sweet corn, papaya, dairy and found that it says absolutely nothing about the safety of products [from cows given genetically engineered growth biotechnology for children or women who are pregnant or hormone], sweeteners (e.g. corn syrup, sugar), vegetable oils, nursing. But I did notice something I hadn't before. A little corn starch, soy protein, and more." By "more" they mean asterisk at the bottom of the page that says, "Effective June 18, more processed food ingredients made from corn, soy, cotton, 2001, the Office of Premarket Approval is now the Office of canola and sugar beets. Where's the "improved nutrition" on Food Additive Safety." that list? Once the FDA had decided against putting GMOs through premarket safety tests, the agency could no longer claim to have an office of premarket approval. I suggest an additional

Alexis Baden-Mayer is the political director for the Organic Consumers Association. More information is available at: http://www.organicconsumers.org/


Mixed Fruit Crumble With a Hint of Basil Topping:

Basil is used by some in treatment of diabetes, respiratory disorders, allergies, impotence and infertility mostly likely because basil contains cinnamanic acid which has been found to enhance circulation, stabilize blood sugar, and improve breathing in folks with respiratory disorders.

7 T. unsalted butter, softened, plus more for the baking dish 1/2 cup rolled oats (optional) 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup packed dark brown sugar Pinch of salt

Pinch of salt 2 T. cold butter, cut into small pieces ½ fresh lemon squeezed & zested 6-8 fresh basil leave gently chopped

Filling:

Directions

6 cups (about) mixed fruit chopped to bite sized pieces. Include any combination of apples, berries, peaches, cherries, blueberries, etc. 3 T. granulated sugar 2 T. all-purpose flour 2 tsp. vanilla extract Âź tsp. nutmeg Âź tsp. cinnamon

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Butter a 2-quart shallow baking dish or eight 6-ounce ramekins. Topping: Whisk the oats (if used), flour, brown sugar and salt in a bowl. Work in the butter with a fork or your fingers until evenly moistened.

Filling: Peel the apples and cut into 3/4-inch chunks. Toss with the other bite sized fruits, lemon juice and zest, granulated sugar, flour, vanilla, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt in a large bowl. Transfer the filling to the prepared dish or ramekins and dot with 2 tablespoons butter squares. Top with fresh chopped basil. Squeeze handfuls of the crumble mixture and scatter on top of the fruit. Bake until golden and bubbly, 40 to 45 minutes. Cool for at least 10 minutes before serving. Top with vanilla ice cream, if desired.


Causeless Peace

The Outdoors


Ancient Landscape: Fort Rock State Park

Fort Rock is an awesome place visit, and a particularly fun place to hike if you enjoy wide open spaces with few people to mar the landscape. Whether you’re a roadside geologist or just someone who loves Oregon’s high desert landscapes this is one spot you won’t want to miss. Fort Rock is essentially a big, old, dried up volcano - and certainly still hot in the peak of summertime.. Getting there is not difficult but it does require some drive time. The turn-off is from Hwy 97 (the Fremont Hwy 31) at La Pine and Fort Rock is about 27 miles east from the junction. Fort Rock is simply out in the middle nowhere, in the land of open sagebrush fields and farmland. It appears as a low hump out on the horizon as you drive towards it, but the closer you get, the larger it becomes. The actual lava formation is somewhere between 50-100,000 years old depending on which geological source your read, and from the wear on the rocky structure, it looks to be at least that old. If you can just imagine 900 miles of lakes, 150 ft. deep surrounding the currently arid landscape of Ft. Rock, you’ll get an idea of how much the terrain has changed since this volcano tuft was born. As you drive up to the Ft. Rock parking lot (complete with picnic area and nice restrooms) Ft. Rock starts to look impressively monumental as it juts out of the ground 325 feet into the unobstructed blue sky. There are several hiking and walking trails into and around the extinct volcano, and they’re all worth exploring. It’s pretty

much mandatory in my mind that you walk into the center of the structure and plan to stay awhile, even just a short while. There is a quiet calmness at the center of this old beast that just can’t be explained – but is certainly felt once you get there. Several trails lead into and up to the rim where you can get a good view of the surrounding flatlands. What you’ll see: Hikers and hiker-dogs, volcano and geologic enthusiasts, tourists and a camp host in the summertime. There is a variety of wildlife at Fort Rock including pigeons, birds of prey, and commonly prairie falcon as well as antelope and smaller ground animals such as jackrabbits and squirrels and an assortment of lizards. If you plan a trip to Ft. Rock you can fill up your day by scheduling a tour of the local Ft. Rock Cave open April 1 to Nov. 1, but you need to make reservations in order to take that in. There is also the Crack in the Ground which is nearby and certainly worth touring if you want to make a full day of adventure. Don’t miss the Fort Rock Homestead Village Museum which you will pass on your way to the volcano, just down the road from the park. The local historical society has preserved homestead-era structures which they moved from their original more or less nearby locations to the museum site just west of the town of Fort Rock. The tours are self guided and there’s a small admission fee to pay before visiting the village, but it’s well worth the price and time.


Get Patjens Lakes Loop Trail Patjens Lakes Loop Trail begins at Big Lake in the Mt. Washington Wilderness Area – 5.6 miles.

This is a dense pine forest leading into some rather ‘refreshing’ elevation gains along the way. The left fork just after the trailhead takes you to the Wear lightweight pants as you’ll need to do some lakeshore, the right leads to Patjens (hidden) bushwacking to get to these tiny lakes. Carry plenty Lakes. of bug spray unless you are hiking when there’s still snow on the ground because there are loads of Patjens four smaller Lakes will be hidden in the mosquitoes out there. Pack water and lunch or a pines as you venture along the trail and you’ll want light snack to enjoy during the 2nd half of your to keep on your toes in order to not miss them. walk. Wading is possible in the smaller lakes as Watch for openings in the forest and prepare to they are so shallow and not much good for mash through the bushes to glimpse these hidden swimming (save that for your return to Big Lake on treasures. the loop back). This trail is moderately challenging and at certain points you’ll wonder where those lakes went to, but


out!

after you get over that first elevation gain and begin to loop back around the trail you will catch some glimpses of water. Head in that direction.

What you’ll see: a few trail hikers, a few fellow trail dogs, lots of bugs, great views of Patjens Lakes, Mt. Washington and Big Lake, tons of forest pines including lodgepole pine, western hemlock, and Again, if you visit this trail after the snow has melted alpine fir. At Big Lake you’ll see loads of boaters, and after the bugs have bloomed, you’ll be very water skiing, campers and fishermen, depending on grateful you did not forget your bug spray. And, in the season, of course. which case, now is a good time for a quick picnic or just a pause to take in the views and snap a few Overall, it’s a pleasant hike, somewhat challenging photos. and the dogs will enjoy the experience. You will need to be watchful of deer and keep your pooch in The trail back offers some great view of Big Lake check. And be sure to pack water for the canines and nearer to the trailhead some spectacular shots and keep your leash handy for potential fellow-hiker of Mt. Washington, back over your shoulder. encounters.


Oneness

Relationships


Self Care

Body Scrub

This body scrub is so easy to make and smells amazing. It leaves your skin feeling refreshed but not too minty as the soft vanilla bean aroma lightly perfumes your skin. Honey is a luxurious ingredient that helps moisturize, nourish, and protect the skin with its antioxidant, antimicrobial, and humectant properties. In fact, I love to use honey alone as a face mask several times a month. If you’re collecting recipes for this year’s herbal handmade holiday gifts, this one will be perfect for the vanilla lovers out there! Ingredients 1 cup fine sea salt or fine organic sugar 1/2 cup organic sunflower or sweet almond oil 1/4 cup raw organic honey 1 organic vanilla bean, split and scraped 10 drops organic peppermint essential oil 1 tsp organic vanilla extract (optional)

Since 1987 Mountain Rose Herbs has placed a priority on our general health and well-being, and in this time we have completely removed all conventionally grown materials from our product line entirely. More information is available at their website.


Personal Perspective: Aging in a time of youthful persuasions.

I am Baba Yaga Introspection is part of my daily routine, and as such the older I get the more I find myself thinking about Baba Yaga -- and the more I discover about her, the more I think she is whispering in my ear and has been doing so for quite some time. Who is Baba Yaga A friend of mine once traveled to Russia, but before embarking on his trip he asked if he could bring me back anything from that part of the world. I immediately thought about Baba Yaga and asked him to see if he could find a small effigy of her to bring back. I later found out that when he asked local merchants where he could find such a thing, they responded with a worried look and explained that Baba Yaga is much too ugly for any sane person to want to have a representation of her in their home. Clearly Baba Yaga is a most misunderstood character, even in the region she would call home. My research reveals that Baba Yaga is the Arch-Crone, the Goddess of Wisdom and Death, the Bone Mother. Wild and untamable, she is a larger than life nature spirit bringing wisdom and death of ego, and through death, rebirth. To give you a little background, let’s just say that Baba Yaga is most commonly portrayed as a witch-like character (Phyllis Diller without the sense of humor perhaps) with fantastic and terrifying powers. She is depicted in folklore as a wilily old crone, but she also plays the role of helper and wise woman. As the designated Earth Mother, and like all forces of nature, she is often wild and untamed. In her guise as wise hag, she sometimes gives advice and magical gifts to heroes and those pure of heart. Heroes or heroines seek her out in search of wisdom, knowledge and truth. She is allknowing, all seeing and all-revealing to those who have

the courage to ask. She is said to be a guardian spirit of the fountain of the Waters of Life and of Death. The 21st Century Baba Yaga From my perspective Baba Yaga is a rather flamboyant representation of everything it means to become an enlightened mature female woman living on planet earth. My deeper sense of the character tells me that the reason she is so often depicted as repulsive has to do with the fear that kind of profound life-given knowledge cast into the minds of early Christian leaders – all male, of course

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– and all terrified of what true female power might do to them. So, similar to what was done to many archetypal characters at the time (such as turning Bacchus from the god of wine and generosity into the cloven hoofed devil), Baba Yaga was cast into a likeness that would naturally repel good Christian followers (or those of a ‘pure heart’), hoping that her story soon would be lost. I must also say that there is a real sense of freedom coming from the mind set represented by Baba Yaga such that as a wise woman you can just let loose and be wholly who you are – particularly appealing today in a society that favors glitzy ‘reality’ shows, youthfulness and ‘body sculpting’ over a wise mind, craggy wrinkles and arthritic fingers. How she speaks to me Baba Yaga and I share a few key characteristics, even more profoundly now that I begin to inhabit an aging body that morphs my sense of personhood on a daily basis. I also personify a mystical frame of reference that includes an appreciation for the wildness of nature, an awareness of Gaia and a fondness for 2nd dimensional divas and elementals – ideas that don’t always quite fit into the modern 21st century world of geeks, aging yuppies and Generation X&Y upstarts. My years spent caring for the dying while volunteering for hospice gave me the opportunity to peek into the deep well of knowledge and understanding only a Goddess of Wisdom and Death can share. A personal and lifelong quest for spiritual equilibrium has taken me ever closer to squelching the ego and brought me nearer to rebirthing my true self - also Baba Yaga’s territory. And I would bet that my interest in herbals and vibrational medicine would resonate with all of the earthy ideals embodied by the classic Baba Yaga.

background noise filled with sad feelings consumed with death and dying. And more recently, a concern over my grandsons’ sinus infection had me waking up in the middle of the night, completely and unexplainably congested and unable to breath. In pondering this phenomenon I realized that there have been many times I’ve absorbed other people’s aches and pains as an automatic extension of sharing healing energy, but I’ve never really thought about how such a thing came about until recently. Personifying the dark aspects of healing Since I meditate on a daily basis, I began to notice this old woman as she popped into my awareness during my quiet times. And as part of the overall experience of putting my full attention on her I received information that the blind, crippled up old woman was a healer in her own lifetime – which was a very long time ago. She chose her particular expression of life as penance for previous lifetimes when she was overly cruel and hateful. As a way to karmically pay her ‘debt’ she chose to become a healer, and the way she healed people involved physically taking on every disease, affliction, pain and physical suffering that she lifted from her clients. The vision I have of her reminded me vividly of Baba Yaga, only in a very dark sense. This person may have been a healer in life, but she was quietly filled with a twisted sense of ‘dutiful pain’ – something she seemed to savor in a warped and almost perverted sense. Once I realized this spirit had somehow become attached to me, either via a shared past life, or through some errant and unconscious vibration I was unknowingly transmitting – I became determined to cast her out of my field.

Casting out attachments is a fairly easy process – and one I am sure any reader who is familiar with meditation and the cutting of nonphysical cords knows about. So, my morning meditation revolved around peeling this spirit’s A visit from a Baba Yaga wannabe attachments off and away from my energy field – and Baba Yaga came to mind one morning recently as I began along with the individual attachment came an even larger vortex of energy filled with dark matter. It’s the dark to realize that the energy of a long dead, blind old crone matter that continues to fuel this spirit’s insatiable lust has been pressing herself into my nonphysical field of awareness –and she’s been invading my space for several for sickness. Awareness is half the battle when dealing with your own spiritual ‘stuff’ and so it was a pretty years now, though just under the surface and straightforward process to cast out these negative unbeknownst to me. energies and watch them spin harmlessly out of my energy field. After the dust cleared (so to speak) what As an active though unofficial energy healer it finally was left was a healthy archetypal representation of the dawned on me that for some weird reason rather than powerful old woman character, and as a result, Baba flowing healing energy to people in need I have been actually and physically taking on the ills and ailments of Yaga has come to life once again in my awareness. the people around me, though perhaps to a lesser degree I will no doubt continue to ponder the positive aspects of of severity. For example a friend of the family told me a tapping into the archetype of a wildly wise old crone, and couple years ago all about her painful breast ailment, I willing and joyfully embrace the possibility that I too which I dutifully and quite unconsciously absorbed into will be able to express myself with abandon and my own experience. Another friend of mine mentioned purposefulness – just like Baba Yaga in the forest of my something about ‘thinking too much about death’, and dreams. wha-lah – months later my life is consumed by


Bowman Museum is located at the corner of Main and 3rd Street in Prineville. Call 541-447-3715 for more information.



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