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The Horseshoe MAY

30

2013

·

DENTON

HIGH

SCHOOL,

DENTON,

TEXAS

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VOLUME

106

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m e l b o r The P erage d n U h t i w

Underage Hookah Pages 12-13

Three accepted to TAMS (Pg. 3)

King kicks cancer (Pg. 8)

Gray follows in footsteps (Pg. 9)

Taylor’s Final Take (Pg. 21)

Behning (Pgs. 22-23)

ISSUE

7


2

NEWS MAY 2013

After three decades, Grindle rides off into the sunset George Roberson Editor-in-Chief He has coached championship track teams and a football team that made 12 straight playoffs. He has seen Rosa Parks speak in the auditorium. He has taught under five principals. Now, after 36 years of teaching and three decades at Denton High, history teacher Fred Grindle is retiring. “I first got into teaching for the coaching, but I did enjoy the teaching,” Grindle said. “I know it’s a cliche, but I had a great line of coaches that I learned a lot from on the field and in the classroom, and they made me want to coach and teach. If you’re a good coach, you’ll be a good teacher, but teaching is something you’ve got to be dedicated to.” According to him, teaching gets easier over time. “You learn all the tricks of the trade and how not to kill yourself and your students with work,” Grindle said. “I learned holistic grading and I read down the middle of essays now to get an un-

derstanding of their main ideas. I can grade a whole class’ essays in about 90 minutes.” His favorite part of teaching is discussion because he gets to interact directly with the students. “I like to discuss and talk about things,” Grindle said. “If you don’t know something, it’s okay. If I can impart a little knowledge, I think that’s a good thing. There’s nothing wrong with guessing the wrong answer and finding out the right one. If you knew it all, there wouldn’t be any point in going to school. I learned from an old coach long ago; teaching is like passing on the torch.” But students want to have to find out the right answers in order to achieve. “It’s frustrating to see kids underachieve, but I’ve learned that you can take the students to the materials, but you can’t make them choke on them,” Grindle said. Grindle helps out his neighbor across the hall, first-year teacher Mr. John Curtis, whenever he

needs it. “Mr. Grindle is really helpful,” Curtis said. “He’s my go-to when I don’t know what’s going on. If there’s one guy who is going to know everything, it’s Mr. Grindle. I’m going to miss him. I’m going to have to find someone else to annoy constantly.” Junior Sean Burrows is in Grindle’s AP US History class, and considers him one of his favorite teachers. “He’s Father Time,” Burrows said. “He’s the greatest. His lectures are engaging and memorable because he makes them interesting for his students. He prepares us and teaches us very well.” Even though he won’t get emotional over it, Mr. Grindle will still miss teaching at Denton High. “I think there’s always things about places you’ll miss,” Grindle said. “I think you always miss your students. It’s not that you shed a tear over leaving them, but you always have the memories.”

Then and Now: Fred Grindle in 1978-79 (left) and 2010-11 (right). As to what the future holds for him, Grindle says he’s going to keep himself busy. “I’m still going to manage events at Bronco Field, I’m going to help take care of our two grandkids, and I’m going to continue to work track events,” Grindle said. “Part of my decision to retire was my grandkids. I get to see them grow up and help my wife, who is their permanent

baby-sitter. I’m old and I want to be able to enjoy my retirement. My stepfather retired and died within a year. I want to get out and enjoy it.” He’s ready. “My years here were satisfying,” Grindle said. “I had quite a bit of success and hopefully I’ve made an impact on some of the students.”


NEWS 3 Sophomores set out their future MAY 2013

After hours of contemplation, Salimath chooses TAMS Dimitrios Aerts Staff Writer High school is a familiar atmosphere that we’ve all become accustomed to. We have an idea of how every day will go: first block, second block, lunch, third block, etc. However, college is the next step in our lives and most of us have little to no experience with that world. There are a few students in our midst that have planned to jump ahead into that world a little sooner than expected. This year there are three students on campus who will enter the Texas Academy of Math and Science (TAMS) at the University of North Texas. One of them is sophomore Varada Salimath. “I know it’ll be tough to go into college two years early,” Varada said. “But I’m ready for the challenge and I’m really excited. I honestly can’t wait to get started.”

To apply, Varada had to send d iin n a transcript filled with a high GPA GP PA and a load of extracurricular activitivities and score considerably high on her Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). She also had to take two math tests and participate in a group interview with other TAMS students and faculty. “During TAMS, my first priority will be my classes, but I also want to do some scientific research in neuroscience on campus,” Varada said. “Since I’ll be a college student, I can pretty much h do whatever I want that UNT can n provide.” Varada’s parents were very exxcited for her when they heard she he had been accepted into the TAMS MS program. They believe that she is ready for the challenge but would uld

have accepted any decision she had made. made “She has been advanced in her “S school work since middle school sc and a I was very happy that she made it into such a competitive program,” Manjula Salimath, Varada’s mother said. “We were just absolutely happy for her.” Varada spent many hours contemplating her decision and with t all a her friends, family and teachers e encouraging her to go, she had h a lot of help deciding. “If I stayed at DHS I wouldn’t have to say goodbye,” Varada said. h “Everything would be familiar, “ but b I knew I shouldn’t let fear of the t unknown ruin an opportunity n I couldn’t pass up and move on o to bigger and better things.” As she leaves the halls of DHS

for the last time, Varada will miss many things especially the people she has come to know and love. “I’ll miss the comfort of DHS the most,” Varada said. “I have all my friends and teachers here to guide me. It’s more comfortable here and less stressful than TAMS will be.” Varada is grateful for the support of her parents, friends, and teachers in the difficult decision to leave behind the familiarity of high school for the new challenge of college. “I want to thank my friends for making my time at DHS more comfortable,” she said. “Lastly I would like to thank my teachers, especially the ones that wrote really nice recommendations and offered words of wisdom on this journey, and some really phenomenal teachers that I got so much from out of my time in high school.”

Brothers take next step, make life changing decision Floribel Núñez Staff Writer Standing on the podium receiving a gold medal at a regional swim meet is a dream that will never happen again for current sophomore Andy Ye. Andy was faced with one of the hardest decisions in his life yet to date once he was accepted into the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science (TAMS). Once he was accepted he had to make a choice of whether to leave his swimming career and all the accomplishments as well as the things that lie ahead of him at DHS or move on. Andy made the tough choice to pursue the next part of his life and head to TAMS. “It wasn’t an easy choice for me and I don’t think it is for anyone,” Andy said. “You have to weigh both

side of the issue and decide what’s best for you in the long run. There will be a lot of things I will miss about DHS, but there are also so a lot of opportunitiess that TAMS will give me I couldn’t have gotten as well.” TAMS is a unique residential program for high schoolaged Texas students who are high achievers and interested in n mathematics and science. Students who enroll in the program live in McConnell Hall over the next two years on the University of North Texas campus. Students in this program complete a rigorous academic curriculum of college coursework. There are no high school courses taught, but students enjoy many of the activities of high school and the company of age

mates who are intellectual peers. “The hardest thing about applying into TAMS is that you have T to t consider that you might not be able to play sports that you would wish to play,” Andy said. “But at the same time it gives you a chance to meet people who are interested in the same things.” s Andy won’t be attending the program without a familiar face by his side. His brother Kevin will also be enrolling in the program. “The benefits about TAMS is that you get to finish high school and get college credits at the same time while you are in college,” Kevin said. “A benefit of being in this program is if you don’t like people in high school you don’t

have to deal with them and you get to be with students that have interests in academics like you.” Kevin is looking forrward to the program and d getting to meet new people in classes that share the same interest. “I’m not excited about living at the UNT because I will miss my mom, I won’t be able to go home,” Kevin said. “I’m also not looking forward to having less free time due to studying.” TAMS simulates college life as you take college-level courses complete with a college-like schedule. “It is pretty busy and yet casual at the same time. You have harder classes but your time is flexible,” Andy said. “You might have a class in the morning but after the class you

might have the rest of the day off.” Though the Ye twins will be getting a jumpsstart on their college eeducation, they will miss many things about Denton High. “I will miss several teachers, my friends, and being able to be in so many clubs,” Andy said. “I won’t be able to do extra curricular like music and sports and being able to participate in UIL. So there is a downside.” However, one of the upsides of attending TAMS is the fact that their mother, Lucy Ye, will live near the campus, and also works at UNT. “We live fifteen minutes away, so if they ever need help or need anything I’ll

be able to get there with there with no troubles,” Lucy said. Kevin and Andy both applied online in November and got an acceptance letters in February. “Andy and Kevin are ready, they are doing well in their AP classes and they are confident about going to TAMS,” Lucy said. “I wasn’t surprised when both got accepted. They both had all the requirements.” Having already taken rigorous classes, it will be a simple transition for the boys. “The process was pretty simple, you just have to be consistent with your work and try your best every time,” Kevin said. “Many gifted students apply there. It shows that they are looking for challenges and trying to take another step in their education.”


FEATURE

5

MAY 2013

Teaching more than life lessons Amber Cowles Staff Writer Boy Scouts can teach you a lot about who you are and that has been the exact case for several students who have worked their way up through the ranks over the past decade. Loyalty, trustworthiness, friendliness, helpfulness, courteousness, kindness, obedience, cheerfulness, thriftiness, courage, and reverence is what being a boy scout has taught senior Patrick Herrera. “I expected it to be fun and it was,” Herrera said. “It did have its up and downs though. But overall I learned a lot about myself and how to work with other people and help them. I think I’m better off today, because of what I learned.” These ‘downs’ Herrera mentions, refers to certain individuals in a troupe and not the boy scout program itself. “Sometimes when the adults aren’t around when we are camping some of the boys can be a bit mean at times,” Herrera said. “Each time they cover for each other for being mean. It taught me how I want to be treated and should treat others.” Yet even seemingly negative events that occur in Boy Scouts could have a positive outcome. And that is something that junior Garrett Reaves believes in wholeheartedly. “I’ve learned to be patient with myself and with others,” Reaves said. The Boy Scout program however is not defined by the mini-feuds that may occur between boys at camp outs but rather its service to young men and the community. “We help the community. We handle and help distribute food donations and we do service projects,” junior Tyler Joss said. Being a part of the Boy Scout program isn’t just a hobby for these young boys; it’s a commitment, and for twin brothers Shawn and Tyler Joss the commitment has something they have known since age six. “I have remained committed to the program because a lot of people have invested in me and I think I have a lot of people backing me and I don’t want to let anyone down,” Joss said. Yet everyone’s reason for committing to the program is different. “I’m probably not as committed as a lot of people, but I’ve been working on

Tyler and Shawn Joss are seen in the woods during a scout activity. (Cynthia Panteleon)

that,” Tyler said. “Eagle Scouts looks really good on a resume.” ‘Eagle Scout’ is the highest level of Boy Scout. Boy scouts rise in rank by earning certain badges. They earn these badges by completing specific tasks. “Being an Eagle Scout can be a very rewarding experience,” Reaves said. However, not all scouts feel the same positivity about the program. “It isn’t for everyone,” Reaves said. “But everyone could join and succeed.”


6

FEATURE MAY 2013

Q&A Built Ford tough

Mr. Dan Ford has led Denton High for just over a year now. His perspective on DHS is shown through the high-fives he shares with students throughout the halls. He sat down with us to explain how his year has gone and how his relationships with his students and staff members have grown.

How was your first year working here?

As a principal what are the pros and cons?

Awesome. Really getting to know the students better there is a lot of students that just come in my office and write on my board. It’s a great opportunity to get to know the students it is also been starting to build relationships with the staff when you get to know stories it opens up the doors for people’s Bronco Nation to move forward.

The main pro is being able to work with 2,000 students, 200+ staff members, parents, community workers, business leaders and we’re all working together for the same cause… you.

Was it different at this school from other schools? Yes, it’s different. Every school has a unique culture; the challenge is to keep the healthy traditions. While strengthening the culture of the school. What advice do you give students? Don’t give up, don’t settle for mediocrity, be involved in any possible club or organization as that builds a cohort of friends that will help you through your high school years.

What have you learned about DHS? I’ve learned that if we take the time to invest in our students, our students will return the investment back. What is your view on family and what made you decide to move to Denton? I’ve always commuted to the schools I have worked and the distance is not very far however after spending a year at Denton High School my wife and I wanted to get more involved in the community since my daughter will be a freshman next year and my other children are planning to go to Denton as well. We felt it would best for our family if we moved into Denton so our children can start making friends and my wife and I can start giving back to the community.


FEATURE

7

MAY 2013

Seeley impacts students with tough love Dimitrios Aerts Staff Writer The work, the lectures, the passion for English, Julie Seeley’s class is overwhelming. She challenges her students beyond what they believe they are even capable of, and most of the time it works. Her students are pushed past their limits and they thank her for it, in fact, she was one of the most thanked teachers on the senior questionnaire. “She expects the most of us,” senior Emily Curran said. “Actually, I’ve tested out of 12 hours of college English and she helped a lot with that.” Seeley goes in depth with various works of literature like Beowulf, Hamlet, and Pride and Prejudice. It is challenging but the hard work is definitely worth it. “I took away a lot of stuff for my college career,” senior Omar Ali said. “I feel I’ll be more prepared for writing papers in college.” Mrs. Seeley only accepts her students’ best effort, she won’t take sub-par work, but occasion-

ally steers off course with her lectures into a fun little story. “I really liked her off topic rambles, they lightened the somewhat strict atmosphere,” Curran said. “But her best quality is her dedication to English Literature.” The English department recognizes Seeley as a very knowledgeable and valuable teacher. “Writing is difficult to teach and it’s even more difficult to get students interested,” English Department Chair Matt Rainey said. “It takes a good teacher to tap into a student’s creative potential, and everyone knows Ms. Seeley is a good teacher. Seeley, who likes to prepare her students for the real world is humbled by how much her they appreciate her. “I’m very fortunate that I have students that are such hard workers,” Seeley said. “I just try to prepare them in the best way possible for college in the field of writing.” Seeley’s red pen marks can be seen everywhere on her student’s papers, but the student’s

Senior English Teacher Julie Seeley talks to her class about the importance of literature. Seeley goes in depth with pieces of work such as Beowulf, Hamlet and Pride and Prejudice. While all say her class is hard, they come out prepared for college English.(photo by Alex Meimers)

value her time and opinion and rise to the occasion to turn in quality work on time. That can be proven by letters from three students who over the past several years that have finished in the top of their classes.

“I had heard the frightening legend of the intimidating AP English IV teacher as soon as I began my freshman year at DHS,” former student Macy Koontz writes. “Although Mrs. Seeley is every bit of demanding

and intimidating as I had been led to believe, those characteristics are precisely what make her the superlative teacher that she proves to be each day.” Sometimes the accomplishments and improvements come years later, but after some time has passed, Seeley’s students see the value in her lessons. “While I may have worried a little before every class, wondering if I’ve done all my homework, I looked forward to the lesson each day,” former student RJ Ponder wrote in a letter presented to Seeley. “There was never a wasted day, and she taught every class with enthusiasm, humor, and importance.” Regardless of when her students realize the true impact of her class, Seeley is overjoyed when she hears positive feedback on her method of teaching. “Watching them when they are happy with a job well done brings joy to me,” Seeley said. “If they’re happy about their accomplishments and improvement, that’s the best part about being a teacher.”

Valdez gets accepted to team of her dreams Mwape Chintankwa Staff Writer Beads of sweat begin to form on the dancers’ focused faces as they try to perfect and perform all of their dance movements. Each pirouette and jete requires precision, powered by an intense surge of energy that explodes from a dancer’s core, surging through every fiber of their body. Senior and former Fillies Lieutenant Mariana Valdez has felt this countless times. “I just like to perform,” Valdez said. “I love it.” Her passion for performance motivated Valdez to audition for the Tyler Junior College Apache Belles drill team, which is the same drill team that Denton High School drill team director Mrs. Kerri Burgess danced with while she attended college. Although Valdez knew about Burgess’ history with the Belles, it was not her reason for trying out. “I was not trying to follow in Mrs. Burgess’ footsteps, honestly,” Valdez said. “I wanted to continue because that is what felt best for me.” In pursuit of a spot on the nationally recognized drill team, Valdez and three of her friends packed up and

headed to Tyler, Texas for auditions during the spring. At the beginning of tryouts, thirty nine other girls were in the running for the first cut. “The first round focused on technique,” Valdez recalled. “We did a lot of floor combos, and because I was number four, I didn’t have time to practice beforehand. I was freaking out.” After the initial round, only twenty-one girls went through to the second part of the audition. “We had to perform a jazz dance, a kick dance, four floor combos, and tricks that showed off our strong points,” Valdez said. “That part was easier because we learned them the night before.” Hours later, the anticipation was over. Fourteen girls were admitted to the Apache Belles, and Valdez was one of them. “I was so honored to be picked,” Valdez said. “I’m taking it to the next level, and even though it’ll be more difficult, it’ll be exciting.” Apache Belles perform for two years before moving on to a different school to complete their junior and senior years. For Valdez, her dance career won’t stop there. “I might double minor with one of them in dance,” Val-

dez said. “It depends on whether or not I attend Texas A&M or the University of Texas in Austin.” As graduation nears, Valdez is growing more and more excited about her spot on the team. “I have been dancing so long that it would be weird to stop,” Valdez said. “This is what I love to do.”


FEATURES/NEWS

8

MAY 2013

Cancer can’t knock King down Freshman soccer player overcomes lymphoma with the help of friends, family of cancer that affects only 300 people nationwide. “Our first reacWhen we are young, the only thing that tion was shocked and concerns us is our scared because the inifuture. We mark the tial unofficial diagnoprogress we make sis had a low survival from day to day and rate,” Jordan’s mom we try to make life Kelly said. “After we worth living. But these were given the final things are hard to do diagnosis that it was when you’re faced with Burkitt’s Lymphoma an obstacle like bat- we were actually relieved because it was tling cancer. That obstacle is ex- curable.” Burkitt’s Lymphoactly what faced current freshman Jordan ma which is cancer King when he found in the nasal cavity is out he had a rare form one of the most curable forms there is today. Still that didn’t keep the Cancer at a glance shock waves from * There are more than 100 going through Jordifferent types of cancer dan’s body when he first found out * There are three ways cancer as well. can spread through the “I was in the body. car on my way _ through tissue to a Mavericks _ through the lymph system game with my _ through the blood parents and my mom got the call *7.6 million people die and I found out I world wide because of cancer had to go straight to the hospital,” King said. “It was

Evie Clark Staff Writer

News happenings around DHS Harden named scholar athlete of the week The Dale Hansen scholar award is given to North Texas senior student athletes that have displayed good qualities in and out of school and who try to make their community a better place. Denton High’s Josh Harden was given the award for

scary and definitely surprising. I really didn’t know what was happening or what was going to happen.” In Jordan’s case, this type of cancer if not treated could become life threatening. “The type of cancer I was diagnosed with was really fast growing, they had to treat it immediately,” King said. “I had paralysis when they brought me in, and they put me through eight or nine rounds of chemo.” King’s life was affected drastically because of his weak immune system during the [# of] weeks of chemo. “I stayed at home a lot because my immune system was weaker because of the chemo,” King said. “This was a really hard time for me because I wasn’t able to play the sport that I love, soccer.” The best advice Jordan could give someone in a similar situ-

his leadership on and off the field. Harden is in the varsity soccer team, the choir, eagle scouts and is going to do mission work in Brazil starting in the fall. It was a great experience for Harden who is getting ready to graduate. “It was really cool,” Harden said. “I went there while they were doing the weather forecasts; I put on a microphone and sat down. They told me to look into a camera and say my name where I was from and then Dale asked me about ev-

ation would be to tell them to listen to the doctor’s advice as well and give them strong words of encouragement. “You have to trust in God that he has a plan for you,” King said. “You have to follow his road, plan and trust in what the doctor tells you.” King’s friends supported him by starting fundraisers for him and bringing him things to help him feel a little better. “My friends created bracelets online that said, ‘King Is Kickin’ It,’ and sold them to friends and family and they told other people,” King said. “I was also a part of the Make-A-Wish Foundation and they granted me my wish of meeting and playing with David Beckham and Landon Donovan.” King got to know Beckham and Donovan very well while sitting in on their practices and even received

a pair of special cleats. “We watched their practices and even got to play some soccer together,” King said. “They were very nice to my brother and I, they gave me some jerseys and cleats, it was so awesome. It’s something I will never forget as long as I live.” King’s friends further came together and brought him a soccer ball that had encouraging words written on it from them, which really showed King that they cared. “They did a lot for me with the bracelets and got a soccer ball with the messages and encouraging words written on it,” King said. “My select team brought me a soccer gear from a professional team, it was really cool. It was extremely nice of all of them.” Jordan believes that people don’t really treat him differently

erything I did at DHS.” The entire process is done in the WFAA newsroom “It was really cool being in front of all the cameras and seeing everything being done,” Harden said.

Facing cancer never stopped freshman Jordan King, from playing the game he loved. King, who continued to play soccer throughout started on the junior varsity soccer team this season. That team lost just one game the entire season. (photo by Alex Meimers)

after his experience, but have a little more respect for him. “I think they have a little more respect for me but not much has changed,” King said.

team placed third overall led by Omar Akram who placed tenth individually with a score 92. Others on the team who competed were Ana Mitchell, Rebecca Fu, and Varada Salimath. The number sense team placed fifth, while George Roberson and Rebecca Fu placed seventh in News and Headline respectively.

“The doctors said there would be a slim chance of the cancer ever coming back. But if it ever does come back, I know this time I would be prepared.”

place in the Poetry Recitation Category (Poem by: Clayton Valli “Sit and Smile”), while Reginald Wright, grabbed third in the same category.

Senior pictures to be Students compete at held this summer UIL State Meet 2014 senior photos will Ten students competed at the be taken this summer on University Interscholastic State June 17-18 at the DHS Competition in Austin from ASL students win Cafeteria. For more inMay 20-22. William Root led the way by awards in Literature formation please contact placing sixth in Literary Criti- Competition Bluncks at 800-825-8625. cism. He also placed eighth in Morgan Rushing won first Makeups will be Aug. 7-8. computer science. The spelling


FEATURES

9

MAY 2013

Following in family tradition, Gray enrolls in Army Jordan Gill Assistant Editor College; it’s the next huge step in life after high school, the place where you lose your childhood dreams of becoming a princess and discover your true desire for the future. It’s a foreign place that can be so terrifying, but not for senior Emily Gray. Her dream is to become an Army ROTC Cadet and to get there, she will study nursing at the University of Arkansas. “I was so excited when I got my acceptance letter,” Emily said. “I’m looking forward to meeting new people and I’m really excited to make new friend circles and kind of start over.” Emily has been accepted into the University of Arkansas with a full four-year scholarship for the nursing ROTC program. She will study nursing to be an Army ROTC cadet. She sent in her application in August of 2012 and awaited her acceptance letter. “The application process is really tedious,” Emily said. “The process opened in February, but I started in June and I had to write three essays and get letters of recommendation. I also had to go do a physical therapy test where I had to run one mile. I had one minute to do as many push-ups as I could and another minute for sit ups. After that, I had to go do an hour long interview where I had to sit with the head of an ROTC unit and talked about why I wanted to do it and what I hoped to gain from it.” Emily started thinking about college during her sophomore year of high school. Like most students at that age, she had no plan. With both of her parents having served in the military, joining the service was always an option. “When I was starting to think about college, I went up to visit the University of Oklahoma,” Emily said. “I loved the campus and my dad said that we should talk to the ROTC unit. We went and talked to him. He explained how his kids get their room, board, food, and textbooks paid for while they’re in college and I thought, ‘free money! Yes!’ Then I learned about the commitment and I thought that sounded like my kind of thing; being fit and surrounding myself with other dedicated people.” Once interested in ROTC, Emily and her family took several trips to different ROTC departments to learn more about

Emily Gray will attend the University of Arkansas and follow in the footsteps of her family. Both of her parents, her grandads and one of her great grandads went into the service. (courtesy photo)

it. She found nursing to be a spot that she fit in well so she went to visit an actual army nurse. “I visited an army nurse in Oklahoma and that was really cool,” Emily said. “We visited her in Fort Sill; it’s close to Lawton, OK. I met with the director of nursing there, she was a colonel, and she just talked to me about military nursing. It was really cool to get to talk to someone high up there about my future, which was probably the turning point for me.” Emily will be a part of the bachelor’s program in nursing and will graduate with a bachelor’s degree. With the help of the military, Emily may return back to school and get her master’s degree or she may even get sent to med school. Her parents were huge supporters in helping her make the decision to go to college for ROTC nursing. “We talked about her going into the service since she was little and her dad and I were in the military,” Cindy, Emily’s mother, said. “We visited ROTC departments with Emily and visited an army nurse in Oklahoma to see if she was really interested.” Several of Emily’s family members were members of the army and they inspired Emily to take an interest.. Her parents were in the military and they were stationed in Germany at one point, that’s where Emily was born. “Her father and I, and her two grand-

fathers were a part of the military so that definitely encouraged Emily to want to be a part of the service,” Cindy said. Emily’s parents couldn’t be more proud. “We are very proud of her and it is very honorable to serve your country,” Cindy said. Emily will miss her family but she is excited to take this step in her life. “I’ll miss my family the most,” Emily said. “I have a few friends that I’ll miss but mostly my family. Denton High School has been great to me and Mr. Ford has been the best this year so I’ll miss that. I know I’m going where I’m supposed to be.” Once Emily graduates, she will go to an officer training school for four to five weeks. Then she will be assigned her commission. Being in the military, she will be given the opportunity to request the top five places that she would like to go. “I don’t know where I want to be commissioned yet, honestly I’d like to go to Hawaii or Alaska,” Emily said. “The beaches in Hawaii are a very cool attraction, but Alaska because I’m a very outdoorsy person and there’s camping and hiking.” No matter where she is assigned Emily will be ready for the challenge. “I’m not nervous to find out where I will be assigned,” Emily said. “I’m more excited. Another thing is that you can go to different schools while you’re still in college. There’s two in particular that i have an interest for, one’s called Jump School, where they go a teach you how to jump out of airplanes. The other school, which is a little bit harder, is called Air Assault School and they teach you how to fight

while you’re jumping out of an airplane. As you are jumping out of an airplane you would have a gun with you.” Emily isn’t planning to go into combat because as a nurse she will be on the back line which means she will never see the fight. “These schools are more about the patch,” Emily said. “You get a cool patch on your uniform, and they represent that you went to Flight School or Air Assault School. It’s for the experience.” She is expecting many great experiences to come from her life serving her country. “Right now my plan is to be a part of the military for the rest of my life,” Emily said. “Until my plan changes, we’ll see. My mom said that same thing and she thought she was going to make a career out of it but she got married and had kids so we’ll see what my plan is. In the end I would move back to Texas, I love it here.” With her family by her side, it won’t be hard for her to reach her goal. “I’m not scared to disappoint my parents or family because I set more expectations for myself than my parents do,” Emily said. “They never said, ‘you have to get all A’s’ I just pushed myself to do that. I have first child syndrome.” Emily can see the future that stands in front of her very clearly. “In 10 years I see myself as an established army officer and just making a difference in people’s lives by being a nurse,” Emily said. “Moving around and having fun and exciting adventures with whatever comes my way.”

The Horseshoe 1007 Fulton Denton, TX 76201 940-369-2150 Editor-in-Chief: George Robeson Assistant Editor: Taylor Brown Jordan Gill Sports Editor: Chandler Elsbecker Online Editor: Ryan Carr Entertainment Editor: William Crouch Staff Writers: Dimitrios Aerts, Isaac Bowen, Mwape Chintankwa, Evie Clark, Amber Cowles, Dylan Curtis, Johnny Fletcher, CJ Mauricio, Floribel Núñez, Tanneth Oxford, Brandon Shields, Jackie Wostrel Photographers: Alex Meimers, Austin Pugh Graphic Design: Cynthia Pantaleon, Alex Plese Adviser: Mr. Greg Bogomol Principal: Mr. Dan Ford

The student newspaper of Denton High School is published by the publications staff. The ideas expressed in this publication and on the Opinion page are solely those of the individuals providing them, and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the entire staff, adviser, faculty, administration, or the Denton ISD Board. DHS is a member of the Interscholastic League Press Conference, National Scholastic Press Conference, and Columbia Scholastic Press Conference. Find us online at www.dhshorseshoe.com, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. A version of this issue formatted specifically for the Internet can be accessed at issuu.com/ dhshorseshoe.


10 FEATURE Art student expresses emotions through painting MAY 2013

Taylor Brown Assistant Editor Junior Davida Rios’ father is mad at her. She isn’t pregnant, she isn’t doing drugs; she’s doing art. Her bedroom carpet is soiled with the colors of the rainbow after many late nights of putting her emotions on the canvas. Rios has developed skills in many forms of art ranging from pottery to screenprinting; however, she feels that painting best expresses her emotions. “I feel like I can express myself best through painting,” Rios said. “It’s easy to manipulate and very easy to convey my message.” Her interest in art started when she was only in fourth grade after Rios found inspiration in anime. “I actually started drawing because I wanted to make my own anime comic book,” Rios said. “After I started going through my mom’s art books, I began like art more and more and it just became my passion from there.” Rios cites her mother, Heidi Ross, as a big influence in part of encouraging her to draw and to get her feelings on paper, even as early as elementary school. “I took Davida to the pottery studio that I worked at and encouraged her to draw at a very young age,” Ross said. “Whenever I made art, I included Davida in the process as much as possible.” In fact, Rios’ mother has a BFA

I paint,” Rios said. “I get my inspiration from a number of things, whether it’s life events or dreams.” That inspiration can strike Rios at any time, even if it’s at 1 a.m. in the morning. “I get a lot of my inspiration in the middle of the night at around 1 a.m. in the morning,” Rios said. “I wake up in the middle of the night sometimes and paint what I was dreaming.” What Rios takes from those dreams depends on whatever is happening in her regular life while she’s awake. “I was extremely depressed over the first semester,” Rios said. “The product of that depression was my grey emotional painting; it’s a monochrome painting of this woman with black jetting from her eyes. You can’t see her eyes. When the eyes are blocked out like that, it usually means I’m enraged with something.” The blocked out eyes Rios is referring to is something that has become something of a signature in her pieces. “I always do something with the eyes in my pieces,” Rios said. “It’s supposed to

“I don’t paint for anyone really, I paint to paint,” Junior Davida Rios said. “Over that period of depression, art was the only thing that got me through.” (Bachelor of Fine Arts) with a specialization in Ceramics, meaning art literally runs through her blood. “I still remember her first ‘scribble scrabble,’” Ross said. “It showed enthusiasm for her creative endeavor.” Over the years, Rios’ ‘scribble scrabble’ as a child turned into full blown paintings on mega-sized canvases that convey a much deeper meaning. “I wear my heart on my sleeve when

Junior Davida Rios shows off a pair of her art pieces made with acrylics and water colors. These were just two of the many paintings she created during the year. She had one of her other pieces she painted during \the year auctioned off at the Good Karma Circus. (photo by Austin Pugh)

m e a n somet h i n g like you can’t see the light at the end of the tun-

nel.” IB Art Instructor James Rosin has taught Rios for two years, and has been amazed at her talent ever since her freshman year. “I knew Davida when she had Mr. Illy in her freshman year,” Rosin said. “I saw her work and knew she had something for sure.” That something Rios displayed in her work has wowed Rosin ever since

she became a student of his. “Her work almost scares me at first sight, I’ve never had a student that could convey such dark and intense messages,” Rosin said. “It’s brutally honest, there’s angst in her pieces. She’s the real deal.” Rosin further compliments Rios’ art by saying that he sees her having her own solo art show in the near future. “Her art opens up a dialogue, she doesn’t hold anything back,” Rosin said. “I can totally see her having her own solo show one day; she’s got a massive amount of work ethic. It’s not a question of ‘if,’ but ‘when.’” And Rios has already proven that her art can attract attention. On May 4 at the Good Karma Circus festival in Fort Worth, Rios auctioned one of her original pieces for $110 benefiting the

honored charity at the festival. However, money isn’t what Rios hopes to garner from her art. “I hope to be able to build my own art studio one day,” Rios said. “But my biggest dream is to have my own solo show of just my art.” Rios will continue to express herself through

art whether she’s successful or not, because at the end of the day she paints for nobody but herself. “I don’t paint for anyone really, I paint to paint,” Rios said. “Over that period of depression, art was the only thing that got me through.”


ENTERTAINMENT

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Gatsby adaptation solid hit The Man of Iron is back for more Taylor Brown Assistant Editor When I first heard that ‘Gatsby’ was being adapted onto the big screen for a 2013 release, I couldn’t contain my excitement. Shortly thereafter, I found out that the film was going to be directed by Baz Luhrmann. I was skeptical as to how Luhrmann was going to approach ‘Gatsby’ as he is known for his boisterous art direction, but it turns out I had nothing to worry about. Luhrmann’s outlandish art direction was paired with huge names such as Leonardo DiCaprio (Jay Gatsby), Tobey Maguire (Nick Carraway), and Carey Mulligan (Daisy Buchanan); they all came together and delivered one great movie. The cinematography was unlike anything I have ever seen before in a film and the saturated colors used throughout the movie exudes the feel of the Roaring 20’s. Though I have to say, the best part about this movie was most definitely DiCaprio’s outstanding performance as the ambitious, yet very lonely Jay Gatsby. He embodied everything Gatsby is, a well-liked individual, but childlike when it comes to love.

The film was nearly identical to the novel, but it did come with a few mishaps here and there. The first thing I didn’t quite like about the film was Tobey Maguire’s narration skills. Don’t get me wrong, Maguire played Carraway pretty faithfully, but as the words came out of his mouth, I just didn’t believe it. Another thing that put me off was that Luhrmann had Carraway residing in a sanitarium. There’s really no explanation as to why Nick is living in an asylum, only a little chart that shows his ‘symptoms,’ but the sanitarium situation was made up for throughout the film with good use of the doctor questioning Carraway about his past. Beside those couple of things, the film was beautifully made and it would absolutely shock me if I didn’t see the name ‘Gatsby’ as a contender for an Oscar next March.

William Crouch Entertainment Editor

Imagine what you were doing thirteen years ago and you’d probably remember what you did as a toddler. What if you wronged someone and now they were coming back for revenge. That’s the case with Tony Stark in Iron Man 3. The film is narrated by Stark and shows how his demons come back to bite him. It opens in 1999 at a convention in Switzerland where Stark blows off a meeting with a prospective scientist. Now, 14 years later the film opens with Stark having anxiety attacks from his near-death experience in New York, in the Avengers. Tony continually builds new suits to deal with his anxiety which

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blows up his suits to better commit to Pepper. The film is a great improvement over Iron Man

2 and is intelligently written. It shows something that very few sequels show; what heroes experience after a traumatic event. It realistically shows post-traumatic stress and gives Stark and Potts a conflict that doesn’t feel forced. The film doesn’t have the AC-DC background music that made Stark so cool in the first two films, but the film’s sound track is still pretty good. Plot-wise the majority of the story makes sense, but the Mandarin’s motive is a little difficult to discern because the film has so many subplots going on at once. Other than that Iron Man 3 is the same excellence that I’ve come to expect from Robert Downey Jr. and Marvel. It’s a great film to start the next series of films after the Avengers.

Theatre puts on Arsenic and Old Lace

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alienates his girlfriend, Pepper Potts. Stark challenges a terrorist, the Mandarin, and his house is bombed while the Mandarin kidnaps Pepper. Then Stark goes to kill the Mandarin, who it turns out is the scientist that Stark blew off 14 years ago. Stark defeats the Mandarin, rescues Potts and

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Name: The Horseshoe Location: Denton, Texas Web: www.dhshorseshoe.com Bio: The student news site of Denton High School.

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As the year draws to a close, the DHS Theatre Department is still in full swing, as they put on their annual Student Directed Production. This well-known classic, Arsenic and Old Lace, encompasses two old murderous women (KJ Cox and Morgan Van Aken) and three distinctly dissimilar nephews: Mortimer (Brand Richter), Jonathon (Seth Cope) and Teddy (Jordan Brown) The show was directed by Jackson Strecher and William Tarte. KJ Cox and Morgan Van Aken were both excited to be cast as inseparable old women. “We were born to play old ladies,” Van Aken said. “It was really fun because we were able to feed off of each other’s energy

and there were people actually laughing at our jokes.” The whole cast became anxious as opening night drew closer and closer. “The apprehension leading up to opening night was stressful for all of us” Richter said. “We all pulled through and were able to make this show one of our best.” Despite the small cramped atmosphere of the Black Box, audiences were thoroughly captivated, creeped out, and amused by the wittily comedic show. “Seeing this show was different from others because it was in the Black Box,” junior Sarah Fremder said. “It made you feel like you were a part of it all.” Overall the Denton High School student directed production of Arsenic and Old Lace was a huge success and had several sold-out performances.


12

FEATURE MAY 2013

Underage hookah run Taylor Brown Assistant Editor

Part I: The Zombie Lounge

Its 7:13 in the evening and the special tonight is Watermelon Infection at the Denton Hookah Zombie Lounge. The mood is set by a light fog accented by blue neon lights. My sixteen year-old friend and I sit at the booth of our liking and take in the apocalypse-themed ambiance. We start to get nervous as the owner comes by to take our order, but it turns out we had nothing to worry about. He didn’t card us and he didn’t ask us if we were of legal age; he just asked us what we wanted. We ordered the special that was advertised, Watermelon Infection. We wait about ten minutes for our hookah to be ready. We take advantage of the offered checkers table, and play a couple games. A college kid brings our hookah out, lights the coals, and places them on our hookah. He tells us to have a good time, and we smoke away.

Part II: We card, sort of

My sixteen year-old friend and I continue our hookah escapade to Jasmine’s on Sunset St. We seat ourselves and the waitress asks us for our drink orders. “We’ll just have water,” I tell her. As she gets our water, I pick out the hookah of my liking; Melon House Tobacco. To my surprise, she asks for our ID’s. I take mine out while my friend explains to the waitress that she left hers at home. She acknowledges the fact that she doesn’t have an ID and tells us that she can only bring one mouthpiece. “That’s fine!” I reply. After a few minutes pass, she brings out the hookah, hands me the hose and walks away. As the waitress tends to the other patrons, I stick the mouthpiece on the hose, but I don’t smoke. Instead I hand it to my friend

who takes multiple hits off of it in clear sight of the waitress. From that point on, the waitress didn’t acknowledge the illegal activity going on in front of her face, instead she brought the bill, and we paid and moved on.

Part III: The Truth

A hookah is a water pipe, sometimes with multiple hoses, that allows patrons to smoke shisha (flavored tobacco) out of. Normally, people go to hookah lounges in groups for recreation. One of the reasons many people under the age of eighteen seek out hookah is that it is often thought as better for you than cigarettes. They believe that because the smoke passes through water, it filters out “the bad things,” such as harsh chemicals, however this misconception is far off from the truth. The facts point toward that smoking hookah is just as bad for you, if not worse, than smoking ordinary cigarettes. People can smoke on a hookah for over an hour, and usually patrons inhale more smoke through a hookah pipe than from a cigarette.

Many studies conducted by sources such as the Center for Disease Control, the World Health Organization, and the Mayo Clinic, prove that hookah smokers have similar effects to that of deep inhalation cigarette smokers and that smoking hookah is NOT a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes. Not to mention that smoke from a hookah pipe can contain cancer-causing chemicals, fifteen times the amount of carbon monoxide as a cigarette, and quite a bit of tar. Smoking on a hookah for about an hour is the equivalent of smoking a full pack of cigarettes. If you’re going to smoke hookah, you may as well smoke old fashioned cigarettes.

Part IV: Interview

Nite Davis is the owner of the Denton Hookah Zombie Lounge. The same lounge where we weren’t asked to see any form of ID. However, when asked if Davis ID’s everyone, he replies with a straightforward “Yes.” And then goes on to explain how everyone in his lounge is carded before they are even seated. Davis even informed us that anyone under the age of 18 cannot even come into the lounge. So naturally, he found it hard to believe that we got in without being card-


FEATURE

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MAY 2013

ns rampant in Denton ed. “Are you sure it was my lounge?” Davis said. “I find that hard to believe. I guess it’s possible, you could’ve come in when it was crowded, and we missed carding somebody.” But it wasn’t crowded. In fact, the two of us made up half of the entire amount of patrons. They had next to no business at the time we came, so there’s no excuse as to why we were not carded.

Part V: Our findings

Though two hookah lounges refrained from carding us, my investigation leads me to believe that not every lounge is guilty of this practice. Bagheri’s doubles as a restaurant and a hookah lounge. Upon our arrival, my underage friend and I were both carded. We were told that she could stay, but could not smoke whatsoever. As the waitress again brought our hookah out, I encouraged my friend to smoke it blatantly in front of the waitress. She did, and to our surprise the waitress came over and put a stop to the illegal activity. She then went on to explain that if she was to see my friend smoking again, she would have to ask us to leave immediately. From then on, my friend respected her wishes to not smoke, and we left. The Bagheri’s situation came as quite a shock to

“It doesn’t surprise me that these lounges are letting in minors,” Kathy Van Hoose, mother of junior April Van Hoose said. “When I worked at a convenience store the owner would sell alcohol to underage kids. When those kids tried to buy alcohol from me while I was working, they’d get mad because I refused to sell it to them.” me. From what I understand, it’s one of the hotspots for underage people to smoke at. We talked to a DHS senior, who we’ll call “Jim Smith.” He has been to Bagheri’s and Jasmine’s on multiple occasions and even tells us that he’s brought people under the age of eighteen countless times. “I would say I go to a hookah lounge like three times a week,” Smith who started going to the lounges himself well before he was 18 said. “It’s cool to go there to hang out with friends and have a good time.” Smith and his sometimes underage friends frequent Jasmine’s more than the other hookah lounges around Denton.

“I always bring like 1-2 friends under eighteen every time, we usually go to Jasmine’s and they never card,” Smith said. “I know a lot of people who go to hookah lounges under the age of eighteen.” Smith’s theory on why the lounges like Jasmine’s don’t normally card is because they double as a restaurant. “I don’t think they card because at Jasmine’s it more of a restaurant rather than just a hookah lounge,” Smith said. “Or they just really need the business.” Regardless of whether the lounge is partially a restaurant or not, serving hookah to minors is illegal and can come with consequences. If an employee is caught selling hookah to someone underage, it is classified as a Class C

Misdemeanor. This means that the employee may not face jail time, but would face a hefty fine. However, these hookah lounges are seemingly covering their tracks well. City Councilman Jim Engelbrecht has not heard about the illegal activity going on around town. “I did not know about the activity going on in these lounges,” Engelbrecht said. “I am not in favor of necessarily any smoking and certainly no underage smoking.” Engelbrecht also could not provide further knowledge of any sting operations that may or may not have occurred at the lounges. “I know they run sting operations on alcohol sales to minors, but I don’t know how often they do them on tobacco sales,” Engelbrecht said. However, if Engelbrecht himself saw the illegal act in progress, he would make certain to put a stop to it. “I would confront the owner or manager of the lounge as a citizen,” Engelbrecht said. “I certainly do not want to see that activity going on around town.” Though Engelbrecht sounded surprised to hear the activity going on in certain hookah lounges around Denton, it didn’t come as a shock to parent Kathy Van Hoose. “It doesn’t surprise me that these lounges are letting in minors,” Van Hoose said. “When I worked at a convenience store the owner would sell alcohol to underage kids. When those kids tried to buy alcohol from me while I was working, they’d get mad because I refused to sell it to them.” The mother of junior April Van Hoose says it also doesn’t surprise her that kids are still trying to get into places they shouldn’t be. She went on to explain that she would be disappointed to see her own daughter visiting one of these lounges. “I would be disappointed if I saw my daughter go into a place like that because she knows she’s not supposed to go in there being underage,” Van Hoose said. “Hopefully she knows the difference between right and wrong.” Overall, the act of serving hookah to minors is illegal. Yet many people under the age of eighteen still seek out hookah and we know of at least three businesses around Denton who have trouble carding everyone that walks through the door. These businesses may face consequences if caught, but most will not. Hookah may just become another mainstay tobacco product like cigarettes, but for now we have to recognize the illegal activity for what it is.


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SENIORS MAY 2013

TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL Lindsey Heal

Ryan Duggan

Kallie Smith

Tyler Proffitt

Stephanie Mobley

Sport/School: Golf/ Oklahoma Wesleyan University in Bartlesville, OK

Sport/School: Football and Baseball/ McPherson College in McPherson, KS

Sport/School: Volleyball/ Arlington Baptist College , in Arlington, TX

Sport/School: Soccer/ Oklahoma Wesleyan University, in Bartlesville, OK

Sport/School: Golf/LeTourneau University, in Longview, TX

How much does your scholarship pay for? About $10,000

How much does your scholarship pay for? About $6,500

How much does your scholarship pay for? Since it’s a private school they don’t offer athletic scholarships.

How much does your scholarship pay for? About $10,000

How much does your scholarship pay for? $16,000

What are your goals for golf as a college athlete? Move up higher on the roster.

What position do you plan on playing? Linebacker for football and outfield for baseball.

What do you plan to major in? Physical Therapy

What are your goals as a college athlete? Being the star on both teams.

What do you plan to do after college? Own my own physical therapy business, be married, and have a family.

What do you plan to major in? Automotive Restoration What do you plan to do after college? I haven’t thought that far ahead yet.

What are your goals for volleyball as a college athlete? Being able to manage my time and priorities, as well as getting playing time. What do you plan to major in? Special Education, but Arlington Baptist doesn’t have that major, so I’m just going to get my basic teaching then transfer. What do you plan on doing after college? Working at a school.

What position do you plan on playing? Left or right defender What are your goals for soccer as a college athlete? Get a starting position, become a captain, be part of going to a championship, and get recognized by professional teams. What do you plan to major in? Undecided, but possiblities include medical degree, exercise science, or sports ministry.

What are your goals for golf as a college athlete? To be on the starting golf team, which means being one of the top five. After that I want to work my way up to number one. What do you plan to major in? Pre-Med or Nursing What do you plan on doing after college? Med School to be a doctor or a nurse

Alex Clerihew Sport/School: Tennis at Seminole State College in Seminole, Oklahoma How much does your scholarship pay for? Everything except for room and board. What position do you plan on playing? singles and doubles What are your goals for tennis as a college athlete? To help my team compete for the National Junior College Championship. And to become the best player I can be so that after my first two years in Junior College I can transfer into a really good Division I or Division II tennis school. What do you plan to major in? Business.


SENIORS

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MAY 2013

SENIOR PROFILES

OMAR ALI My advice to lower classmen? Try not to get ‘senioritis’ until at least March of your senior year. What/who will you miss the most? I will miss the people and the atmosphere of high school. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Diversity is good and keeps things interesting. My future plans? I want to study International Studies at UNT and become a diplomat or work in intelligence. The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Mrs. Seeley because she really prepared me for college English. The most influential person in my life is... Dr. Combs for guiding and shaping me throughout high school. KAIRHI ALLEN My advice to underclassmen? Stay on top of your class work The hardest part of high school? Keeping my grades up Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Is to have style upon yourself and walk with pride My favorite memory? Being introduced into the band program My future plans? To be an auto mechanic Where do you see yourself in ten years? Living big and having my own car shop SAMI BARUWAL What are you involved in? Track 1,4 Cross Country 2, Interact Club 1,2,3,4 NHS 3,4 HOSA, 4, Class officer, 4 My advice to underclassmen? Take it one day at a time The hardest part of high school? Keeping up with school work What/who will you miss the most? My friends because we are going to different colleges Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Get involved and contribute My future plans? Attend University of North Texas to major in Biology The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Ms. Parks because she is always there for me when I need something Where do you see yourself in 10 years? I will be doing my residency to become a surgeon The most influential person in my life is... My mom because she is always pushing me to do my best to reach goals and dream. KATHRYN BAUSWELL What are you involved in? Choir 1,2,3,4 Student Council 1,2,3,4 Tennis 1,2 My advice to underclassmen? Get involved because it could get you somewhere and gives you the opportunity to meet great people What/Who will you miss the most? Mr. Ford Mrs. Koontz Mrs. Stratton and all of my closes friends and all of the wonderful teachers who have helped me Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Is about finding yourself and who you want to surround yourself with and where you want to be in life My future plans? Attend film school and move to Austin The one person on campus I would like to thank is? I can’t pick one Mr. Ford and Mrs. Koontz work so hard to make school a good environment The most influential person in my life is? My Grandmommie she is the sweetest and stron-

gest person I have ever met. ROSALEE BAYER My advice be to lower classmen? Do well in your first years so the last ones will not be a struggle to bring your GPA up. What was the hardest part of high school? Managing my time wisely. What/who will you miss the most? I will miss swimming and the people in swimming the most. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? To not be afraid to try new things and meet new people. My favorite memory? When I made the varsity swim team and my senior prom. My future plans? I plan to go to the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor and major in Sociology. The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Coach Hay. She saw potential in me and believed I had what it took to be on varsity swimming. The most influential person in my life is... My family. They teach me lessons everyday about how to be a better, stronger person. SARAH BEN-EZRA What are you involved in? Soccer 1,2, Theatre Arts 1,2,3, STUCO 3,4, PALS 4, NHS 3,4, DHS Jazz Band 3,4. What would be your advice to underclassmen? Believe in your capabilities and talents. Keep up with all assignments and try not to procrastinate. What was the hardest part of high school? Trying to keep up with all of my AP classes What/Who will you miss the most? I will miss seeing my friends and watching all of my friends change and grow to become incredible people. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? To not procrastinate and do your very best because that is all you can do. What’s your favorite memory? I have a lot of fond memories but my favorites would either be participating in Jekyll and Hyde, getting a 1 at state Solo and Ensemble or Junior Prom My future plans? I will be going to UNT for Anthropology with a minor in Music. I would like to be a museum curator or a national park ranger. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mr. Woolery because he has provided me with the growth of my guitar skills and the assistance I need for my minor. Where do you see yourself in ten years? I want to be a museum curator and married The most influential person in my life is… My mother because she has helped me survive through my stressful moments in high school and gives me advice. LaTESHA BRADLEY What are you involved in? Cheerleading 1,2,3,4 Choir 1,2,3,4 HOSA 1,2,3,4, Interact 1,2 Golf 1,2 My advice to lower classmen? Don’t get behind in school Biggest thing I leaned at DHS? Not to slack off till the last minute My favorite memory? Cheering at the football games My future plans? Attend NCTC then continuing through TWU to get my degree in nursing. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? As a certified nurse working as a neonatal nurse and married

The most influential person in my life? My mother because she inspired me to follow my dream and always work hard for what I want. KIAH BROOKS What would be your advice to lower classmen? Don’t procrastinate or antagonize your English teachers. My future plans? Attend McNally Smith College of Music and graduate with a B.A. in production and sound board engineering. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Coach Matous because he kept giving me challenges throughout the year in and out of the classroom. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? In a studio as a music producer. The most influential person in my life is… My mother because she affects everything I do. TAYLOR BROWN What are you involved in? Yearbook 2,3,4, Newspaper 3,4, Band 2, Choir 3, Beta Club 1,2, Interact Club 3, PAC 4. My advice to lower classmen? Don’t procrastinate. Deadlines are close than they appear. The hardest part of high school? Growing up and taking responsibility for everything. What/who will you miss the most? Of course I’ll miss all of my close friends, but I will definitely miss coming into Newspaper and Yearbook everyday and feeling good about my work. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? No fear is too big to handle. My favorite memory? Going to New York City with Journalism! My future plans? Going to UNT and majoring in Journalism. The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Mr. Bogomol. If it weren’t for his class and his motivation, I wouldn’t have a slight clue of what I want to do with my life. Where do you see yourself in 10 years in ten years? Living out my dreams. I know whatever I do, it’ll be great. It’s a journey. The most influential person in my life is... My mother. In the toughest of times she’s always persevered and has always made sure that our family has the best no matter what. She’s a saint. NICO CORTES My advice to lower classmen? Spend a lot of time outside of class studying for AP and SAT tests. The hardest part of high school? Managing time; having enough free time to stay sane, and be prepared for long nights. Who will you miss the most? Mrs. Seeley and Mr. Mueller they are the people who kept me going this year. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Is to get along with everyone and be open about things. My favorite memory? Sitting in Ms. Kramer’s class just listening to her speak. She made me love English. My future plans? Attend UT and then grad school somewhere. The most influential person in my life is? My mom; she taught me to treat everyone as an equal, to love life, and question my beliefs. MWAPE CHINTANKWA What are you involved in? Cross Country 4, Track 4, UIL Academics 3,4, FCA 4 My advice to lower classmen? Don’t feel intimidated by upper classmen The hardest part of high school? Being myself Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Is that a real champion doesn’t just win trophies they find wins even in their loses My favorite memory? The day I won first place at

the UIL Academics My future plans? Go to TCC, then transfer to a big college and write for a newspaper The one person on campus I would like to thank is...Coach Dellelo if I came to her troubled or fine I left her laughing Where do you see yourself in 10 years? With college degrees, being a news writer while trying to publish a book The most influential person in my life is? My mom. She is so strong physically and mentally and makes me feel like I can do anything. JEANEVA CLARK What are you involved in- Choir 1,2,3,4 Journalism 3, 4 My advice for lower classmen? Focus on class work and make sure you pay attention because your grades reflect on you and college The hardest part of high school? Moving my junior year to Denton. It’s really hard to be the new student and not knowing anyone Biggest thing I learned at DHS?- Not take things for granted and study hard My future plans? Attend Collin County to get my basics then transfer to A&M Commerce to study veterinary medicine The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Shelby Gillum, because when I moved to Denton. She was one of the first people I met and she really helped me out Where do you see yourself in 10 years in ten years? Working in a vet’s office doing what I love The most influential person in my life is? My dad and grandpa because they were always there for me and were always supportive of everything I did. Even though they won’t be at my graduation because they’re in a better place I want them to know that I did it not only for myself, but for them. SAM COADY What/Who will you miss the most? Mrs. Phillips. My future plans? Drexel University The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mrs. Phillips because she has done so much for me. She has motivated to try harder and always been there when I needed to talk. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Trying to start a business. The most influential person in my life is… My mom, she has taught me how to be compassionate and patient. WADE COPE What are you involved in? Tennis 1,2,3,4 Math Club 1,2,3,4 NHS 3,4 My future plans? Attend UT Austin The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Coach Blanco because he is a motivational person, and a funny guy. EMILY CURRAN What are you involved in? Volleyball 1, 2, NHS 3, 4, Student Council 3, 4 My advice to lower classmen? Persevere- be wise with your decisions The hardest part of high school? Planning time for school, extracurricular activities, social time What/ who will you miss the most? Being able to recognize and say hi to many people. I’ll miss the personalities of Seeley, and Curtis. My future plans? Attend UNT to study speech pathology The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Seeley- for being a consistently committed and knowledgeable teacher. She treats her students like adults. Where do you see yourself in ten years? Maybe, married, possibly working with special needs


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SENIORS MAY 2013

Going out on top ....... The following students are the top 12 seniors of the class of 2013 Nico Cortes

Sarah Ben-Ezra

Elena Souris

Peter Hansen

School Attending: University of Texas at Austin Major/ Minor: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science double major. How has your work paid off? Absolutely I’ve maintained my GPA without sacrificing my social life. Who is your favorite teacher and why? Mr. Mueller his teaching style is tantamount to that of a college professor What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Be proactive and study for tests and exams. Also join an extracurricular activity you intend to get very involved in What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? DHS is a place where you will be accepted for you really are. What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? I will never forget the experience of growing up scholastically and physically as a whole.

School Attending: University of North Texas Major/ Minor : Anthropology/ Music How has your hard work paid off? It allowed me to achieve my goals and dreams through my dedication to academics and music Who is your favorite teacher and why? Mr. Woolery because through the jazz program he has helped me become more versatile in music What is your advice to new students and freshman? Do not procrastinate, it will haunt you and catch up to you later What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? Very culturally diverse school and there’s lots of opportunity to make a difference to make a difference in the Denton community and the school. What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? The friends that I’ve made and the education.

School Attending: Trinity University Major/ Minor: Communications and Sociology/ German How has your work paid off? I’ve gotten good scholarships at the schools I’ve applied to, so I’m just glad I won’t have to pay the full tuition Who is your favorite teacher and why? It’s really hard to pick, but Ms. Phillips and Mr. Rosin are my favorites because they’ve taught me a lot and are always fun to be around What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Figure out what matters to you and what you think is important, but don’t forget to get sleep and spend time with your friends and family What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? I’ll never forget how much fun I’ve had with all the incredible friends I made here.

School Attending: University of Texas Major/ Minor: Electrical Engineering How has your work paid off? It’s allowed me entrance to and the ability to afford one of the top engineering schools in the U.S. Who is your favorite teacher and why? Ms. Nicewarner, she really gave me an appreciation both for math and education in general. What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Don’t overestimate your abilities, and over prepare for every test What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? It’s a very diverse school with helpful accommodating staff What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? The people that helped me get to where I am today.

children, or traveling wherever. RYAN DANIELS What would be your advice to lower classmen? Have school pride, take advantage of opportunities, handle business, and have fun. What was the hardest part of high school? Having ‘senioritis’ all throughout high school What/Who will you miss the most? Basketball season Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Playing around a lot will cause people to not take you seriously when you are serious. What’s your favorite memory? Beating the number one team in district, at home in front of a big crowd. What are your future plans? Go to college, play basketball, graduate, and take my talents as far as possible. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Coach Thomas and Officer Black because they’ve showed me that being a successful Af-

rican American male can be hard at times, but it can be done. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Either playing professional basketball or working as a pharmacist. The most influential person in my life is… My older brother and my mother because they have a lot of passion for what they do and they work hard so that inspires me. JARED DAVIS What would be your advice to lower classmen? Work hard and don’t do drugs What was the hardest part of high school? Applications and scholarship apparitions in conjunction with school What/Who will you miss the most? School lunches. My future plans? To graduate from college. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… There are many people that I am grateful to

have met. The most influential person in my life is… My father because he raised me on his own. ALEXI DOLLAR What are you involved in? Band 1,2,3,4, Jazz Band 4, Tennis 1. What would be your advice to lower classmen? Read a book. What are your future plans? Major in music education and performance. And then to teach music at college level The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mr. Brannock the Director of Percussion because he guided me and helped me become the musician I can be. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? A musician in Boston working on a PHD in music performance at the Berklee Music Conservatory. BRITTANY DURAN

Emily Curran School Attending: University of North Texas Major/ Minor: Speech/ Language pathology How has your work paid off? I’ve gotten a $26,000 scholarship from the University of North Texas. Who is your favorite teacher and why? Mrs. Julie Seeley because she’s extremely knowledgeable and a little goofy at times. What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Don’t be stupid What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? Don’t be scared, you’ll get through it. What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? Student Council, especially with the bajillion t-shirts I’ve gotten over the years.

My advice to lower classmen? Make good grades, don’t skip, keep good attendance and be the best you can. The hardest part of high school? TAKS, but I accomplished it. What/who will you miss the most? I will miss my ROTC classmates, Sergeant Ashcraft, and Colonel West. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Leadership, good citizen skills, how to work well with the others, and great learning skills. My future plans? Go to NCTC, then to Texas Tech The one person on campus I would like to thank is… All of my teachers who taught me what I know now. Where do you see yourself in ten years? Having a good house, good career, and a good family. KENDELL EDDINGTON My advice to lower classmen? Try your best in school. If not, you’ll regret it when you’re a senior and your GPA is really low.


SENIORS

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MAY 2013

....... Class of 2013 Wade Cope

Kiah Brooks

Kendall Wagner

Allison Beltrone

Kyla Petrie

School Attending: University of Texas at Austin Major/ Minor: Computer Science/ None How has y o u r w o r k paid off? Au t o matic admission to UT Who is your favorite teacher a n d why? Mr. Grindle because he was passionate and enjoyed his job. What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Don’t procrastinate unless you can handle it. What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? Do clubs, they’re fun. What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? The people.

School Attending: McNally Smith College of Music Major/ Minor: Music Production and Sound Engineering How has your work paid off? Get a lot of benefits and scholarships Who is your favorite teacher and why? Coach Matous because he inspires us to work harder What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Even though the work is hard it’s still worth it What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? Good school if you want diversity What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? The students because they’re crazy.

School Attending: University of Texas at Dallas Major/ Minor: Speech and Language Pathology How has your work paid off? Absolutely, I got all mandatory fees paid off and I know that it will be stress taken from my parents Who is your favorite teacher and why? A tie between Mr. Rosin and Mr. Place What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Practice good study and work habits early so that by the time you’re a senior you’re an expert at it What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? I am full of pride for my school and I know that people here truly care about being Broncos What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? Tradition and strive for success

School Attending: University of Texas at Dallas Major/ Minor: Mathematics How has your work paid off? I have received many academic awards as well as a full ride scholarship to UT Dallas Who is your favorite teacher and why? Mr. Woolery because he always makes class fun and he tells hilarious jokes. What is your advice to new students and freshmen? If you’re looking for a room in the 300’s its on the third floor What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? Enjoy every moment in high school. Participate in a bunch of different activities and clubs, do well in all of your classes, and have fun. What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? All of the wonderful experiences I had

School Attending: We l l e s l e y College Major/ Minor: undecided How has your work paid off? It has paid off because I’m valedictorian Who is your favorite teacher and why? Ms. Nicewarner because her teaching style is amazing and she’s a fun person in general What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Work hard, complete all assignments, and get involved in lots of activities What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? There is a large variety of cultures here, everyone can fit in some way What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? All of the friendships I have formed and experiences I had.

The hardest part of high school? Mr. Spaulding’s English class. He was so strict, and expected so much The biggest thing I learned at DHS? Hard work pays off in the future My favorite memory- Sophomore cheer camp, when Deandra slipped and fell in the shower My future plans? To be a counselor and open up my own kennel The one person on campus I would like to thank is…. Mrs. Mize because she helped me through a rough time and is always there when you need someone JAMES ELIMAN What would be your advice to lower classmen? Stay focused, do your work, and keep working hard. Start looking for scholarships early because scholarships are hard to come by What was the hardest part of high school? My senior English class. Also waiting to graduate. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? I learned about responsibility and hard work. I learned high school is terrible and I can’t wait for college

What’s your favorite memory? I don’t have any at this school What are your future plans? I want to be a news anchor for a major news corporation. I plan on going to college and pursuing and Journalism degree. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… I would like to thank Mr. Curtis because he was an amazing teacher. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? I will be pursuing a career as a news anchor AUSENCIO FLORES What would be your advice to lower classmen? Find honest people and deal with the truth. What/Who will you miss the most? The few friendly faces and teachers that I’ve met will stay in my memory. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mrs. Seeley because she introduced us to literary classics JULIE FLORES My advice to lower classmen? Enjoy high school while you can it all ends very quick The hardest part of high school? Second semester of senior year

What/who will miss the most? My soccer team and friends My favorite memory? Football and soccer games and team dinners My future plans? Go to college and become a therapist The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Coach Khoury because no matter how bad this season was he still believed COURTNEY FOSTER My advice to lower classmen? Get good grades sophomore and junior year so you don’t have to worry about them senior year The hardest part of high school? Juggling homework with outside life. My future plans? Going to Texas Tech to become an English major. Where do you see yourself in ten years? As an English Teacher BAILEE GANDY My advice for lower classmen? Don’t mess around with your grades and enjoy your time here The hardest part of high school? Focusing on school work

My favorite memory? Student training, everything about it was awesome My future plans? To go to college and get my RN The one person on campus I would like to thank is? Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. Gabriel because Mrs. T was always there for me and Mrs. G is the reason I love math on campus I would like to thank Where do you see yourself in ten years?- Working in the NICU, being married and having kids The most influential person in my life? My mom, because she has been through so much and she doesn’t let it bring her down ALEXIS GEORGE What would be your advice to lower classmen? Try to graduate early What was the hardest part of high school? Moving away from my friends near senior year and having to start over. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? AP English is hard What’s your favorite memory? Military Ball in March. Greatest thing ever. What are your future plans? Join the Air Force The one person on campus I would like to thank


18

SENIORS MAY 2013

Austin McGregor

Sidney Durmick

School Attending: University of North Texas Major/ Minor: Undecided How has your hard work paid off? It has made me determined, a better writer, a better team player, and just a hard worker in general. Who is your favorite teacher and why? It is a tie between Ms. Seeley and Mr. Wagner. Ms. Seeley because of her instruction, it made my writing better,. She is also the most solid teacher I have ever had. Mr. Wagner because his process of self-teaching and the fact that he works with everyone made my computer programming better. What is your advice to new students and freshman? Definitely read the books you are assigned. Do not procrastinate! Prioritize and manage your time. Be dedicated to your studies and make the best of your time at high school. What would you tell someone who has no idea about DHS? DHS offers a lot of higher level classes that not a lot of schools offer so take advantage of them. We also have wide variety of sports and organizations. And we have a wonderful fine arts department. What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? My IB Friends, the IB retreat, performances at football, and going to Chess super nationals with the Chess team.

School Attending: University of Vermont Major/ Minor: Environmental Science wtih a concentration in ecological design How has your work paid off? Sure Who is your favorite teacher and why? Mr. Rosin, because he taught me how to use my artistic abilities What is your advice to new students and freshmen? Play the game. What would you tell someone who has no idea about Denton High School? It’s alright What is one thing you will never forget about DHS? My art classes.

The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Coach D, she’s the best and most understanding. SHELBY GILLUM What would be your advice to lower classmen? Being invisible is best. What/Who will you miss the most? Becca Jewett and Dipali Dave. What are your future plans? College to be a vet. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Evie Clark because she’s my rock. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Being a vet and married. ELLEN GOETZ What would be your advice to lower classmen?

Take your classes seriously because you will want to have good grades when you apply for college or you won’t get in. What’s your favorite memory? When Kyle and I would make bird noises in our English class and got our teacher to believe there was a real bird in our classroom. What are your future plans?I plan to attend Texas A&M. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mrs. Gabriel for helping me pass my dual credit exams and making precal a little less boring. The most influential person in my life is… My two sisters because they have consistently helped me through every struggle in my life. CHRIS GOLD What would be your advice to lower classmen? Don’t procrastinate. Do your work when it’s assigned. What was the hardest part of high school? Freshman and Junior year when you have to transition What/Who will you miss the most? I will miss the Bronco Band the most. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? How to survive massive amounts of stress and sleep deprivation. What are your future plans? I plan on becoming a vet at Texas

SENIOR PROFILES Cont. A&M and opening my own practice in Seattle. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mr. Wilson because he gave me my band family Where do you see yourself in ten years? Working with the ASPCA in New York City VIRGINIA GRESHAM What/who will miss the most? All my teachers What are your future plans? Attend UNT and get a psychology degree. Where do you see yourself in ten years? Married, finishing school or opening a practice. The most influential person in my life is… My mom, she taught me strength. JOSH HARDEN What are you involved in? Football 4, Varsity soccer: 1,2,3,4 Choir: 1,2,3,4 Theater 1,2,3,4 What would be your advice to lower classmen? do everything you can and do it to the best of your ability What is the hardest part of high school? Staying committed and never giving up on assignments What/who will miss the most? I will miss friends, coaches, and teachers who gave me advice and prepared me for college. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Anything is possible through hard work. You can achieve what you let yourself achieve. My favorite memory? Making playoffs for varsity soccer senior year. My future plans? Go on a mission for church and go to college. I want to go to Hollywood and become a well respected and honorable professional singer. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mr. Ford. He came into this school and brought with him the attitude and ambition this school needs. The most influential person in my life is…My mom because she has raised me to be the person I am now. She has given me all of my opportunities and I will not disappoint her. GAUGE HOADLEY What are you involved in? FCA 1,2,3,4 Football 1,2,3,4 What would be your advice to lower classmen? Keep grades up and find a way to get rid of stress What is your favorite memory? football practices My future plans? Go to school for paramedic program then go to fire school to become a fire fighter The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Coaches for teaching me stuff in life like; coach ability, use my brain, common sense, communication, integrity, etc Where do you see yourself in ten

years? Fire fighter hopefully as the fire engine driver The most influential person in my life is…My grandparents for being the strongest people I know GENNIFER HOLBERG What are you involved in? Volleyball 1,2,3,4, HOSA 3, Stuco 3,4, PAC 4. What would be your advice to lower classmen? Learn to do all your work efficiently. What was the hardest part of high school? Getting though junior and senior year. What/Who will you miss the most? Volleyball and Stuco. What’s your favorite memory? Winning Bi-district senior year for volleyball. What are you future plans? UNT then medical school. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? In medical school doing research. MICHAEL HOLLIS What would be your advice to lower classmen? To keep your head down and stay in the books because you don’t want to just do enough to get by and prove to the teachers and upperclassmen. What/ who will you miss the most? The football team because that was family to me Biggest thing I learned at DHS? That life is too short to be playing with it so make smart choices What’s your favorite memory? When I had a 40 yard interception My future plans? To own my own clothing stores The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Officer Black because he was like a dad to me. I could go talk to him about anything and he would listen and give me advice The most influential person in my life is... My mom because she’s by my side no matter what I say or do. LaNEISHA HUDSPETH What are you involved in? Volleyball 1, FCA 3, Track 1,2,3, Cross Country 1,2,3,4, Basketball 1,2,3,4, Orchestra 1,2, NHS 4. What was the hardest part of high school? Managing my time effectively What/Who will you miss the most? Friends, lunch, and basketball What’s your favorite memory? Coming back home from a basketball game in Wichita Falls and Coach singing loudly for everyone to hear. What are your future plans? Attend OBU and major in Secondary Mathematics Education then minor in Spanish. The one person on campus I would like to thank is...

Mrs. Seeley because she helped me with writing, there’s so much that I have learned in her class. The most influential person in my life is… My grandmother because she has been through so much it just inspires me when I see how far she has come. MARLON JOHNSON What would be your advice to lower classmen? To not give up, and always fight for what you want My favorite memory? football season My future plans? Graduate and go to college to help people The most influential person in my life is... My mom because she was always there for me MATT JORGENSEN Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Pace yourself What is your favorite memory? Playing with grammy nominated guest artist in lab band 1 My future plans? Becoming a music educator The one person on campus I would like to thank is Mr. Woolery, because he challenged me and gave me a purpose COURTNEY KELLEY. What would be your advice to lower classmen? Do not be lazy and do your work! What was the hardest part of high school? Mrs. Seeley’s English class Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Don’t fall behind My favorite memory? Mr. Ford singing My future plans? Become a nurse The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Coach Silva for being such a great math teacher. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Working for a good hospital The most influential person in my life is? Ms. Kratch she showed me how to keep moving forward instead of living in the past. JOE KLIMPEL What would be your advice to lower classmen? Don’t skip class What’s your favorite memory? Freshmen year chemistry and sophomore year biology My future plans? Go to NCTC then go work and have a family Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Playing sports or having my own talk show The most influential person in my life is? My girlfriend she has always been there for me and has helped me out this whole year. DESTINI LEE Advice for lower classmen- Don’t slack in any of your classes. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Responsibility and gong or getting things done on your own. My future plans? Move to Arizona and


SENIORS

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MAY 2013 then go to college and make a life out there for me The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Ms. Nancy because she helped me with all of my college and senior stuff my senior year. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Starting my first job as an Anesthesiologist TERRENCE LUCAS What was the hardest part of high school? Staying focused. What/Who will you miss the most? Baseball and the playing of the game at the high school level. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? People talk, and run their mouths. What are your future plans? Work and go to school. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Tyler Pena because he always helped me keep a good head. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Working, raising my kids, and married. Just living the everyday life as an American adult. The most influential person in my life is… My dad because he didn’t give up. CLARIBEL MARTINEZ What are you involved in? Student Council, LULAC, and Interact. What would be your advice to lower classmen? Do not slack off! Turn everything in on time and pay attention! What was the hardest part of high school? Turning things in on time and passing classes. What/who will you miss the most? Definitely some of the teachers I got along with well. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Always get along with everyone! What’s your favorite memory? Getting away with so many things. What are your future plans? Attend NCTC then UNT. Study Criminal Justice and become a probation officer. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mrs. Hay, because she’s always been there and Mr. Redding for his advice and understanding. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Hopefully I’ll have a family and my career set. The most influential person in my life is… My mother for sure, because she has raised me and has made me who I am. She is everything to me. CJ MAURICIO My advice to lower classmen? Don’t be afraid of anything, try everything once and then you’ll know all the things you want. What was the hardest part of high school? The hardest part of high school is finding the group of people that suits you the best. What/Who will you miss the most? I’ll miss walking around the hallways between classes while talking to my friends.

Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Not everyone is who they seem to be, don’t judge before you get to know people. What’s your favorite memory? My favorite memory was when we went on a field trip to the aquarium in Dallas. CHRISTOPHER McGEE What would your advice be to lower classmen? Take care of all your classes before it’s too late. What was the hardest part of high school? Staying focused on what really mattered. What/who will you miss the most? Football. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? To get something you never had, you have to do something you’ve never done. What are your future plans? Going to college to play football and to become very successful. The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Mr. Tackett because he helped me and pushed me throughout my senior year. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Out of college and becoming a cop. The most influential person in my life is... My grandmother. ESPY MENDEZ What would be your advice to lower classmen? Join clubs! It keeps you out of trouble and it gets you connected My favorite memory? Team dinners with the softball team My future plans? UNT, Military, Marriage, Kids The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Coach Bradley and Coach Ramos because they taught me about character and passion for something bigger than myself Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Sitting in an office finishing up an evaluation on a veteran about to call my husband telling him I’m going scuba diving for a few hours so he needs to pick up the boys from soccer. HEATHER MENDOZA What are you involved in? Drill Team 2,4, ROTC 1,2 Key Club 2 Theatre 2,3,4 and Basketball 1 What would be your advice to lower classmen? Take it day by day. High school can be fun, but only if you make it that way. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? That some people do care, and when you find those people, keep them. My future plans? Go to college to get my degrees in Business and Dance, so I can open a dance studio. The one person on campus I would like to thank is…Coach Paramore, he was always there for me and he always had something funny to say. The most influential person in my life is... Ms. Burgess, she’s like my mom. She always pushes me to do my best, and I love her for it. JACKIE MENDOZA What/Who will you miss the most? I’ll miss my best friends.

My favorite memory? Winning Powder Puff junior year. My future plans? Becoming a police officer and studying computer science. The one person on campus I would like to thank is…Coach Silva, for helping me with school and personal problems. Where do you see yourself in ten years? Being a Dallas police officer. The most influential person in my life is...My dad, showed me to be strong and independent. ANTHONY MILBITZ My advice to lower classmen? Don’t waste your time in high school. Start taking at least one AP class and exam sophomore year or earlier. AP exams are a lot of college credit. Study on your own, teachers won’t teach everything. It’s your responsibility to learn. What was the hardest part of high school? Balancing school with extracurricular activities. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? I learned to balance my schedule. Don’t spread yourself to thin or you can’t do anything well. What’s your favorite memory? First day on swim team. My future plans? College, civil engineering degree. ALEC MITCHELL My advice to lower classmen? Get papers in before the dead lines, The one person on campus I would like to thank is…Mrs. Seeley because she taught me to be a better writer, and an overall better student SAWYER NEILSON My advice to lower classmen? Make friends with you teachers. They’re much more interesting than you think. What was the hardest part of high school? Losing friends over time. Also IB classes. What/Who will you miss the most? I will probably miss my teachers the most. I may not have enjoyed their teaching style or subject, but they’re all incredible people. What are your future plans? Go on to study English education at UNT. Do whatever I can to be happy. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Julie Seeley for renewing my passion for literature. Where do you see yourself in ten years? Probably living in Texas working as an English teacher and writing in my free time. The most influential person in my life is…My mother simply because she is my mother and I love her. BOSE ODUNAIYA What are you involved in? PALS 4, Track 4 My advice to lower classmen? Don’t give up when things get hard. What was the hardest part of high school? Keeping yourself motivated Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Keep

your head even when everyone is trying to bring you down My favorite memory? Homecoming carnival My future plans? Go to college to be a pediatric nurse The one person on campus I would like to thank is…Mr. Sanchez because since my first day at DHS he has had an impact on my life Where do you see yourself in ten years? Almost out of college, starting a family The most influential person in my life is…My dad because he has shown me what it’s like to be strong even when everything goes wrong. VIVIAN OLABAMIJL What would be your advice to lower classmen? Take as many advanced classes as you can the effort is worth the reward Biggest thing I learned at DHS? DHS gave me a greater appreciation for my friends My favorite memory? Going to the HOSA trip to San Antonio My future plans? To become a doctor The one person on campus I would like to thank is…Ms. Parks because she helped me become a more determined person Where do you see yourself in 10 years? As doctor/ as surgeon The most influential person in my life is...My mother because she helped me become who I am today. TORI OLSON What would be your advice to lower classmen? Stay golden, Ponyboy What was the hardest part of high school? English 4 with Mrs. Seeley. What/who will you miss the most? Marching season with Band. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Don’t procrastinate. What’s your favorite memory? Time with friends, because they’re awesome. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mr. Curtis, he has set the example of being awesome. Where do you see yourself in ten years? Being awesome. The most influential person in my life is… My grandma, because she’s awesome. KYLA PETRIE What are you involved in? Soccer 1,2,3,4 Student Council 3 Spanish Honor Society 3, NHS, 4 My advice for under classmen-Work hard and maintain good grades, because that is extremely important when applying to colleges What was the hardest part of high school? AP classes but there really not that hard if you keep up with your work The biggest thing I learned at DHS? Is that sometimes things don’t always go your way, but you still. Try to make the best of them and go home My future plans? Go to Wellesley College where I will play soccer and

complete my undergraduate education The one person on campus I would like to thank is...Mrs. Seely because she pushed me to become a better writer Where do you see yourself in 10 years? I see myself getting out of graduate school and entering the professional workforce and beginning my career The most influential person in my life is... my dad because he has really taught me the meaning of working hard in order to achieve my grade ISAIAS PORTILLO My advice to lower classmen? Keep you head on track and don’t slack What was the hardest part of high school? Nothing if you actually try and ask questions. My favorite memory? All the great math classes I had The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Mrs. Gabriel because we made it happen and it was fun. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? To have my own car shop KATELIN PEGG What would be your advice to lower classmen? Take AP/Pre-AP classes or dual credit especially over the summer so you can get them out of the way for high school and college. What was the hardest part of high school? Getting ready for college and keeping everything organized What/who will you miss most? JROTC and the freshman; getting to lead them and show them how to be a leader. My favorite memory? JROTC Summer Camp because that’s when I learned how to lead and I learned my limits My future plans? Going to UNT major in applied behavioral analysis work for a federal agency or police department. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Msgt. Ashcraft he pushed me to always be excellent in everything I do and challenged me to be a leader through JROTC. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Working for a federal agency or police department. TAYLOR PEREZ What would be your advice to lower classmen? Persevere. Things may get harder, but greater challenges yield greater rewards. What was the hardest part of high school? Freshman year, no doubt about it. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Principles of life. What’s your favorite memory? Working as an office aide. What are your future plans? UNT. Then the FBI in the Behavior Analysis Unit. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Jeffrey Arrington, because he always makes things easy to understand. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Field Agent for FBI BAU.


20

SENIORS

SENIOR PROFILES Cont. The most influential person in my life is… Jeffrey Arrington, because he is everything I hope to become. KARA PIPHER My advice for under classmen? To just make sure that you do what you’re supposed to and always remember that you can do whatever you want in life Biggest thing I learned at DHS? No matter what, you are always able to go after your dream. My favorite memory? When two boys I know and love were playing with a ball and it hit Mr. Bush in the head. My future plans? Tp graduate high school and go to performing arts school to become an actress. The one person on campus that I’d like to thank is... Ms. Lane because I learned so much from her and she’s such a wonderful and amazing person. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? I see myself being a famous a rich actress and of course married with kids. The most influential person in my life is... My mom, because she always told me no matter what, you can do anything. EMMA RUIZ What would be your advice to lower classmen? Push through, go to tutorials if you need to, do anything you can to pass, and work hard to graduate. What was the hardest part of high school? The hardest part of high school was passing every TAKS test and semester finals. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? To never give up and keep moving forward My favorite memory? Helping out special ed kids with art work My future plans? I plan to become a professional body piercer and modification artist The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Coach Silva, because she took the time of day to help me out through my struggle as a math student and I can’t thank her enough The most influential person in my life is... Mrs. McEuin because she helped me out a lot when I transferred to DHS. Without her help and encouragement, I wouldn’t be where I am. MORGAN RUSHING What are you involved in? Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, NHS 4, Class Officers 2, Choir 1. My advice to lower classmen? You have to go through all four years, so you might as well suck it up and do your best. My future plans? Attend college, get a job that allows me to travel the world. The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Ms. Covey because she is a wonderful human being and is the best teacher I’ve had.

Where do you see yourself in 10 years? In another country, hopefully. The most influential person in my life is... My club coach, Hugh Bradford because he has pushed me to become a better person on and off the soccer field. SANDRA SAN MIGUEL The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Mrs. Burgess. She has always been there for me. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Hopefully married and happy with a family. The most influential person in my life is... My brother. He has showed me that if you work hard for what you want, it’ll all pay off in the end. SHARDAI SCOTT My advice to lower classmen? Keep your grades up and don’t let anyone distract you from reaching your goals What is the hardest part of high school? Staying focused and not letting the personal things in your life affect your school work What/who will miss the most? I will miss the chance I had to do my best with my school work What is your favorite memory? Dancing for the school My future plans? Going to a college The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mrs. Ware for guiding me through all of my hard times with advice as well as Mrs. Mize The most influential person in my life is… Mrs. Puga the DHS social worker. ADAN SHAH What would be your advice to lower classmen? Get involved and spread your wings. Experience new things and discover what you love What was the hardest part of high school? Keep up grades and handling everything. Time management! What/ who will you miss the most? My teachers who have helped guide me to a good path Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Staying focused! And that you can be who you choose to be My future plans? To go to college and become a lawyer The one person on campus that I’d like to thank is...Mr. Place because he really made me feel part of the class when I transferred to this school. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? A successful lawyer The most influential person in my life is... My mom who always made sure to keep going on after the toughest battles BRYAN SAMUELS What are you involved in? ROTC 1,2,3 Yearbook 1,2,3,4 Commercial photography, 4 My advice to lower classmen? To never quit your goals and you will always succeed The hardest part of high school? Al-

ways dealing with Mrs. Weldons warm ups and test What/ Who will you miss the most? I will miss Purple Out, The homecoming festival, and funny janitors My favorite memory? When my photos from the rebound festival were published in the Denton Record Chronicle My future plans? To go to NCTC to get my basics and then to UNT to study geology/astronomy The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Mrs. Hudspeth because she was always there for me when I had an issue and help me get through it Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Becoming an astro-geologist or a professional photographer for national geographic The most influential person in my life is... my brother and sister is without their motivation I wouldn’t be where I am now. MIKAYLA SOWARD What/who will you miss the most? Everyone I’ve seen almost everyday for the past four years. The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Mr. Illy. He is such a cool cat and made me appreciate and get into art. JAVAN STALLS My advice to underclassmen? Get involved with as much as you can. You will be amazed if you try to push your mind to the limit. What/who will you miss the most? Mr. Jesse Woolery, Mrs. Patti Freeman and Mr. Dan Ford because they have been the best teachers in my life. Biggest thing you learned at DHS? Never say that you can’t do anything. Always strive to do as much as you can. My future plans? Attend Trinity University and major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Then attend grad school to become a Neurologist. The one person on campus I would like to thank is…Mr. Ford because he has been such an amazing person Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Doing a medical mission in areas of severe poverty. The most influential person in my life is...my dad because he has shown me that anything is possible and he has brought me closer to my family, friends and god. PEDRO SUBIAS What would be your advice to lower classmen? Try hard because it’s not as easy as it looks. What was the hardest part of high school? Senior year is pretty hard, because we are all ready to get school over with and are tired. What/who will you miss the most? I will just miss seeing all the people I get to see only in school.

MAY 2013 Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Work hard to finish good. My future plans? To be a welder or to go to a technical school for welding. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Married, maybe have a baby, a house, and a good paying job. MAKENZIE STALLO What would be your advice to lower classmen? Do not procrastinate! What was the hardest part of high school? IB What/who will you miss the most? My friends because I’m going away. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? How to work hard. My favorite memory? Senior homecoming Where do you see yourself in 10 years? As a journalist ZACH TORRES What are you involved in? Football, 1, FFA, 1, Baseball, 4, and Cross Country, 4. What would be your advice to lower classmen? Be smart with your decisions, follow your dreams, and make your life worthwhile. What was the hardest part of high school? Keeping up with the homework, for sure. What/who will you miss the most? I’ll miss stepping on the baseball field and playing ball. My favorite memory? Coming to baseball every day and seeing my teammates. My future plans? Go to UTA to get my degree in blood casting and to become a future MLB star. The one person on campus I would like to thank is...Mr. West for teaching me what it means to be a successful adult. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? A successful starting pitcher for an MLB teams and making cash money. KYA TOWRY What was the hardest part of high school? Trying to fit in, then I realized its okay to walk alone and be unique. What’s your favorite memory? Letting go of people that are no good for you and knowing you’ll be okay. My future plans? To be a wonderful kindergarten teacher. The one person on campus I would like to thank is... Mrs. Love because she is one of the greatest women I’ve ever known. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Successful and married to a millionaire The most influential person in my life is... My mom, she‘s taught me everything I know. JASON VAN HORN What would be your advice to lower classmen? Do not procrastinate on class work and scholarship application. Start college applications early. What was the hardest part of high school? AP Biology

What/who will you miss the most? I will miss the easy going atmosphere. Biggest thing I learned at DHS? Staying organized is worth the effort. My favorite memory? Hanging out with my friends. My future plans? I plan to go to the UT and major in Computer Science. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mr. Brian Wilson because he genuinely cares about his students including teaching them life lessons. The most influential person in my life is… My grandfather because he taught me how to live an upright life. JUAN VARGAS What are you involved in? Cross County 1,2,3,4 Soccer 1,2,3,4 My advice to lower classmen? Have as much fun as you can but also stay on top of your work What is the hardest part of high school? Managing all your time What/who will miss the most? The sports and the activities Biggest thing I learned at DHS? People are willing to give you more than a couple chances, you just got to take advantage and show you care My favorite memory? When we made the soccer playoffs after years My future plans? Going to ITT tech and being a computer technician Where do you see yourself in 10 years? Living in a nice city maybe in a different state, having mostly everything I could imagine TYLER VINEGAS My future plans? Become an ESPN sportscaster The one person on campus I would like to thank is…Terrence Lucas because he taught me how to be myself and forget what other people say Where do you see yourself in 10 years? On ESPN talking about sports JUSTIN WALDEN My future plans? Go to law school and become a lawyer and be a college football coach Where do you see yourself in 10 years? UCLA head football coach. “finishing up law school” TRACE WILCOX My advice to lower classmen? Turn in your work on time What was the hardest part of high school? Taking the TAKS test. What/who will you miss the most? I will miss hanging out with people after school Biggest thing I learned at DHS? I learned how to make friends. My favorite memory? Playing football all four years. My future plans? Get a job then go to college. The one person on campus I would like to thank is… Mr. Fritz because I liked when he helped us out during school The most influential person in my life is... My dad because he helped me with my work and got me to school on time.


21

OPINION

MAY 2013

Bouncing back from adversity

Four years later, I’ve conquered my fears

Taylor Brown Assistant Editor

Dimitrios Aerts Staff Writer

Taylor’s Final Take On April 27, 2011, my world was changed. I was physically assaulted by a junior who didn’t agree with my sexuality. He sent shockwaves through my family and my close-knit circle of friends. He took away everything; my confidence, my drive, but most of all, my voice. I felt like I didn’t belong at school any longer because I couldn’t be myself without my voice. Though the assault happened three days after my birthday, I refused to let him bring me down. I kept calm and collected, and carried on. And really, what else could I have done? Mope around and pity myself? No, I promised myself not to shed one tear over it and I didn’t. When you’re bullied, you feel like the smallest person on the planet. Whether it’s physical or mental abuse, nobody should ever feel like that. But I couldn’t be more grateful that I was assaulted. In a way, you could say he gave me the best gift anyone could ever give, and that was the gift of finding myself. In my junior year, I started over fresh and new at Denton High. Upon my arrival at this new school, I was anxious until I found my niche; journalism. The journalism department set me free and helped me become a better person than I originally was. No matter what you’re bullied for, ven-

geance is not something that you should seek. In the end, I promise you’ll be the winner; you’ll be the one on a world stage while the bully is serving up something fried at a dead end job. Two years later, I’m proud to say I have it all figured out. I know what college I will be attending in the fall, I know I will be majoring in Journalism, and I know what I will be doing for the rest of my life. Bullying is never okay, but I guess you could say I was assaulted for a reason. Had he not hit me, I would’ve never gone to DHS and never found journalism. I would’ve never figured out my future like I have. Sometimes the most outrageous, dreadful things can produce amazing outcomes. I don’t want sympathy; I want you to understand that life is really just a game of balance and fairness, and we’re all going along for the ride. Not every tragedy is tragic, and not every ‘miracle’ is life-changing, you just ride.

Denton High School, just like any other school, can be a huge pain in the butt. The children can act stupid, the teachers at times are annoying, the work is tedious, and the weekends are just too short. These are the downs that come with the ups of fun, achievement, reward, and the general wonderful experience of DHS. I could not have wished for a better

four years. Beyond the teenage drama stories about finding yourself in this dog-eatdog world, having loved and lost, discovering new opportunities and losing others, the disappearance of friendships and the kindling of new ones, and the obnoxious sense of invincibility in this timely world of ours that is eventually shattered, I have learned a

wealth of knowledge “more valuable than all the gold in Erabor” (The Hobbit). I have struggled through the years, seemingly with a cloud looming over my head some days, yet somehow I manage to act a crazy fool on others, and in between these days I find myself writing poetry and symphonies in my head. Each of these days I see myself surrounded by friends, but I often question their friendship for the dumbest reasons. I have no cause for grief even though I feel the need to grieve for something. From my years at DHS I have grown from a frightened little fish to the man I am today (or some form of male human organism). From the knowledge I’ve gained here, I have unchained the shackles of adolescents and escaped the prison of my own fears and concerns. The world is open to me, and to all of us, and I plan to take the storm head on until I’ve reached the eye. If I had been anywhere else for the last four years, I don’t think, no I wouldn’t be the same person I am. Now in some cases that might not be the worst thing, but I wouldn’t exchange my high school life for any other.

Parking spots a welcomed addition to campus life When you pull up to most schools for a sporting event, a choir or band concert or any other activity, you don’t notice graffiti on the ground. Instead your eye is drawn to the spot you have parked in, decorated by those that attend. You don’t see that at Denton High, or at least not yet. This is hopefully going to change next year as Principal Dan Ford and his administration team need to approve

the decoration of se- amount of diversity nior parking spots for at our school will fithe 2013-2014 school nally be seen by people passyear. i n g D e n t o n Staff Editorial b y, High would finally be getting the privilege that most staff, and fellow stuother schools already dents. It’ll be nice to see have. This decision will color brought to the liven up the otherwise concrete maze we bland parking lots of call a parking lot. The our school, and will change of scenery will continue help students express definitely themselves through to improve the atmosphere of the school. own creative art. Another positive The immense

would be it would allow the senior class to earn some more money by charging an additional amount for those premium spots. Though art is subjective, I’m sure there will be a list of what is acceptable and what isn’t prior to being able to decorate your space. These guidelines may limit some students idea of art, however guidelines are a must when it comes to any kind of student activity.

The only thing that could be considered troublesome would be the fact that seniors decorating parking spots also means that they get to reserve that spot. This could be a problem if seniors are in the same lot as underclassmen. If seniors reserve all of the good spots, what does that leave sophomores and juniors with? That entire concept doesn’t seem fair at all, but the problem could be

easily remedied by, if possible, giving the seniors their own lot. Overall, the concept of decorating the parking lot sounds like a fantastic idea and should add to the positive culture that has arisen at DHS. It will be another chance for the studentsto show off their talents and let those from other schools see. Giving more freedom to the seniors is great, and the fact that

the school is granting this freedom means we, as a campus, are moving forward in the right direction. While the underclassman might complain now about the situation, they too in time will have their turn to express their freedom and isn’t that all we’ve ever wanted. So it would be in the best interest of the school and those who attend to approve the decorating of parking spaces.


SPORTS

22 MAY 2013

Football takes Behning on life’s journey Chandler Elsbecker Sports Editor When a young man picks up a sport for the first time, he hardly begins to dream of going anywhere past even the high school level as anything but that – a dream. Mark Behning, however, made that dream a reality. Behning was a two-sport athlete at Denton High playing both football and competing in track and field. Playing right tackle, he won first team honors for All-District, All-Area, All-Greater Dallas, and All-State in football his senior year before moving on to major college football and eventually, the NFL. Behning arrived on Denton

[pounds]. It’s awkward being that big when you’re a kid too, so as I went through, I continued to grow. When I was in tenth grade, I was 6’5”, 240. And by the time I graduated I was 6’6”, 260. So back then I was a pretty goodsized kid.” While he appreciated the compliments, Behning never became overconfident. The goal was always the same: get better. “It was comforting that they had that confidence in me,” Behning said. “I never thought I was good enough. I wanted to be good. I worked my ass off when I was in high school. I went out of my way to do things that nobody else would do. I would go train on weekends and Friday

“I had people telling me from an early age, ‘I’m going to see you in the NFL,” Behning said. High’s campus the fall of 1977 from Chester O. Strickland Middle School, a little over a mile and a half away. The University of North Texas had an impact on student life at Denton High, especially influencing the music scene. “It was the rock and roll era,” Behning said. “It was pretty cool. Not everybody, but there were a lot of guys at Denton High that were in bands. There were a couple of rock bands at school. And the guys that were in them – they looked like the classic seventies rock band. They all looked like Fleetwood Mac. The girls were really hippy-looking, and the guys were all long hair, real druggylooking guys, and they played kick-ass rock and roll.” Some who knew Behning as he grew up saw his impressive frame as prodigious. “I had people telling me from an early age, ‘I’m going to see you in the NFL,’” Behning said. “I was always big. Tall. I was like six-foot-one by the time I was in sixth grade, and maybe 220

nights. A buddy of mine, a guy who played next to me on the O-Line in high school, his nextdoor neighbor was the offensive line coach at UNT, so he gave us access to use their weight room. So we went to the weight room on Friday nights and we worked out because we knew our friends were out partying, or cruising on the strip, or whatever. We made a point of doing something for us during that time. You always hear stories about people and the dedication that they have, and outworking their opponents, investing more, working harder than the other guy. That was my classic story: I was going to outwork them. If it was a matter of hard work, I was your guy.” During and after his senior year of football, Behning began to attract a lot of attention from colleges. “I got recruited by everybody,” Behning said. “I’ve got file boxes. Just hundreds and hundreds of recruiting letters; personal letters from famous alumni. Then I had coaches who would come to

school and coincidentally ‘bump into you.’ And I’d have two or three college coaches in town three or four days a week. It was very flattering. People knew when the University of Texas was in town, because they’d have their burnt orange coaching regalia on; and then the Oklahoma Sooners would come to town; and then Norte Dame would be here – it was just pretty cool that all of these schools were coming here to see me.” Eventually though, Behning would sign with the University of Nebraska in Lincoln to play with the Cornhuskers, a traditional football power in the Big Eight. “It was all business. I was there to play football,” ,” Behning said. “They gave me a scholarship to go to school for free, but when you get an athletic scholarship you’re there to play sports. It was real clear that football was occupying six to eight hours of the day. “Usually football practice started one o’clock in the afternoon with meetings; on the football field at three; practice from four-thirty or five; in the weight room till six or six-thirty; eat dinner about seven; study hall till eight-thirty or nine; get up and do it all over again the next day. It was a well-planned-out football place. It was about football.” Playing in a conference up to its ears in tradition like the Big Eight was an incredible experience for Behning, who enjoyed the rivalry with Oklahoma the most. In Behning’s four years, Nebraska was in 3-1 games versus the Sooners. “It was awesome,” Behning said. “Back then, it was Nebraska and Oklahoma. They were the only two teams that were year-in and year-out really good. It was great playing Oklahoma every year, it was a great regional rivalry, and I was sad to see it end when they got put in the Big XII and were separated into different divisions.” Going into the 1983 season, Nebraska had lofty expectations after going 12-1 and winning the

Big Eight the previous year. “It was that year that we were chosen to play in the very first Kickoff Classic,” Behning said. “It was something that they decided to start doing to kick off the college football season. They would typically pick the national champion from the previous year and some valid, viable opponent, and those teams would play each other. “Well, they picked us to play Penn State. Penn State had won the national championship the year before, and Nebraska had actually played them in Lincoln, Nebraska. Basically, Nebraska got screwed on a couple of close calls. If it weren’t for those two plays, we would’ve beat Penn State, and we probably won the national championship. The following year, we went out to the Meadowlands in New York, and we just kicked the dogsnot out of them.” After the 44-6 vic- Looking to the Future: Behning watches tory over the Nittany early morning freshman practice. (photo by Lions, Nebraska went Mwape Chintankwa) 12-0 for the rest of the regular season, winning cessful.” a third consecutive Big Eight Head coach Tom Osborne along the way. The Cornhuskers opted for a rollout pass to the earned a berth in the Orange right. The pass went into double Bowl. coverage and fell to the ground, “Nebraska was ranked num- incomplete. Miami 31, Nebraska ber one the entire year,” Behning 30. The Hurricanes would be votsaid. “We played for the national ed the national champions by the championship against the Miami Associated Press soon after. Hurricanes, and we had scored a “It was just – it was horrible,” touchdown to put us within one Behning said. “It was just horripoint with just seconds left in ble to lose that game. It sucked.” the game, and we decided to go The 1984 season, Nebraska for two. We could’ve kicked the went 10-2, earning a berth in the extra point and won the national Sugar Bowl, where they would championship, but the coach defeat LSU by a score of 28-10. didn’t want to have a tie on the “We beat LSU and I signed record since we had been so sucCONTINUED ON PG. 23


23 BEHNING CONTINUED FROM PG. 22 papers with my agent in New Orleans at the Superdome after that football game,” Behning said. “I packed a bag and flew from New Orleans to Mobile, Alabama to play the Senior Bowl, which was an invite kind-of-thing for the top seniors to play in. It was the first step in the 1985 Draft, because NFL coaches coached the teams in the Senior Bowl.” Behning, after a successful Senior Bowl for the North team, then made a decision that would impact the rest of his life. “My wife was at the game,” Behning said. “We decided that I had an opportunity. It was then that the NFL Draft started really shaping up, it started being, ‘Hey, this is real. This is really going to happen.’ “I told Nebraska that I would not be a student-athlete for them anymore. I went back to Lincoln after the Senior Bowl, and I didn’t take any classes. I just trained for the draft every day. Six, seven hours a day: running, lifting.” On April 30, 1985, the NFL

SPORTS Draft arrived. Behning, at his home in Lincoln with his family, was told to expect his name called within the first two rounds. “I think the teams had fifteen minutes per pick, and everybody used every second that was allotted to them,” Behning said. “So the first round took four hours to get through. That was just painful to go through. I finally got drafted in the second round by the Steelers. I just felt relief.” --After he was taken with the 47th pick in the draft, Behning reported to Steelers training camp. However, an unhealed college injury returned to haunt him. “My rookie season was horrible,” Behning said. “Turns out that I cracked my arm sometime during my senior year of college, and it never healed. I could still do things. At the NFL Combine they had a thing where you could bench press 225 pounds, and I did forty-three reps. That’s probably top three, all-time in the history of the NFL Draft. Not many people do that many reps. I was still strong. It just hurt like hell.” In a preseason game during

Leading the way: Behning, 73 for Nebraska, blocks for his running back in a game versus Colorado. (courtesy photo)

Behning’s rookie year, the Steelers played a game versus the Washington Redskins. “I was getting beat on an inside pass rush,” Behning said. “I grabbed the guy, and I just fell down with him – that’s just one of the things you do when you’re getting beat. And when we fell down, his arm was between my arm and his body, and it just snapped my arm in half. I ran off the field after that.” The following year, Behning would start one game, but for most of the season he was as a bench player for Pittsburgh. “I look at my NFL career as a failure,” Behning said. “And when I tell people that, they’re like, ‘Are you crazy? You did what very few have done – the elite, of the elite, of the elite.’ But when your livelihood is based on competition, it’s got to end sometime. “And the only way it’s going to end is by you not being good enough someday. That’s the hand you’re dealt, unless you’re like Barry Sanders, and you get out at the pinnacle of your career. He had the ability to get out at the top of his game. Most people, they’ve got to have it pried out of their hands and be told that it’s over. That’s what happened to me.” At summer training camp in 1988, the Steelers cut Behning, and the Chargers would pick him up. However, Behning was dismissed from Chargers camp soon afterwards. He would never play again. “I wanted to keep playing,” Behning said. “I had visions of playing ten or twelve years – and ten or twelve years back then was a damn good NFL career. I wanted to have that. And I got cut my fourth year, and it was over.” Behning’s career stats included 16 NFL games, one started. “It hurt because that’s all I’d ever been: a football player,” Behning said. “I was a lot of other things because it came with it, like I was a student-athlete. But in college, you were an athletestudent. It was football first. If it wasn’t for football, you wouldn’t be a student. You were an athlete first. And you go your whole life doing that, especially in football.

Working Man: Mark Behning, # 66 for the Steelers gets in position to block an opposing player during one if his 16 NFL games he played in. (courtesy photo) “I was hurt, I was empty when it was over. I ended as a failure. That’s the way I think about it. I know I shouldn’t think that way, and everybody I talk to says, ‘No, it’s this way,’ but when it gets right down to it, how you feel is what things are.” --“I was broke,” Behning said. “I had a saw and a hammer, and I had a 1979 Camaro that I was driving. You didn’t need a key to start it, and the doors wouldn’t lock. I was literally living checkto-check. My wife was working, and I had two kids. I still was thinking about having this great comeback, so I was still training, still trying to train three, four, five hours a week.” During this training, Behning would arrive at Torrey Pines High School in northern San Diego. “I was in the head coach’s office, talking to him,” Behning said. “There was this big poster on the wall, and it just had a picture of this woman who happened to be the academic counselor at Nebraska. It was just like one of those Uncle Sam posters, with Uncle Sam pointing at you, saying ‘I want you.’” The rest of the poster asked for former college athletes who were no longer able to pay for school, but were just short of

enough credits to get their degree and graduate. “I was like, ‘They’re talking to me,’” Behning said. “So I picked up the phone, and I called this lady. She was working in Kansas somewhere. She said, ‘Write me a letter, tell me what you need, we’ll go to the board, and see what we can do.’ So I wrote a letter. I got a response back a couple weeks later that they had reinstated my scholarship.” Behning graduated in 1990 after completing two semesters’ worth of classes, making the dean’s list both semesters. After briefly working for a construction company, Behning coached a year of football at McMath Middle School before returning to his alma mater. “People always ask me what I remember about football,” Behning said. “I don’t remember the games. I remember the locker room, and the guys I was with. I talk to people about that now, and even the guys I coach with, they all played high school football, and most of them played college football, and every one of them: they talk about the experiences they had with their teammates. They don’t remember the games, or the details about the games, they remember the guys they lived with.”


SPORTS

24 MAY 2013

Senior places sixth in triple jump at state meet Chandler Elsbecker Sports Editor Senior Victoria Amadi arrives at Mack A. Myers Stadium in Austin, and is met with an incredible sight. Over ???? people have filed into the stands by 9 a.m. “I didn’t realize how big the UT Stadium was,” Amadi said. “I was there kind of early – the field events were earlier in the day than the running events – but by the time I was done and the running events had started, there were so many people there.” Amadi walks by the runners as she makes her way around the facility. “The relay teams there – they’re more like machines,” Amadi said. “They’re not even

runners anymore.” Amadi and the “machines” are participating in the Texas High School State Track Meet, held May 11-12 in the state’s capital. “Of course it’s a lot more official,” Amadi said. “They made me come over with everything I was wearing so they could ‘inspect’ me and make sure everything was up to UIL rules. Aside from that, it was nice to see so many people who were really dedicated. At state, it’s more the people who are really dedicated to what they do, so it’s like a different caliber of competition. They were so driven and focused on doing really well. It was an honor to be surrounded by that.” Amadi, the first female to represent Denton at a state track meet in over two decades, fin-

State of Euphoria: Senior Victoria Amadi stands on the podium after qualifying for the state meet. Amadi finished sixth at the state meet in the triple jump.

ished sixth in the triple jump. “When we were there, I was actually competing with a pulled tendon or something, so I didn’t even jump as well as I did at regionals,” Amadi said. “It was kind of disappointing, but I was happy to be there.” Amadi’s siblings also participated in track, her brother Johnson making state for Denton in ??. “I guess I was taking examples from them,” Amadi said. “But I did track in middle school. I’ve played basketball and volleyball, so track has always been the thing that’s easiest to me. You just run, run faster, jump further. You can only depend on yourself. You can’t say, like, ‘Oh, I couldn’t win because of everyone else.’ You’re the one who’s run-

ning and jumping, so I like that I am responsible for how well I do or how poorly I do.” While she has a passion for the sport, Amadi says she doesn’t know if it will be in her future. “I had originally planned not to do track in college,” she said. “I’ve done athletics and sports since I was like ten, so I kind of want to see what it’s like to just be a normal student, and I plan on doing Pre-Med, and I know those are harder classes to take. So I just wanted to focus on that, living, because it’s not like I want to go to the Olympics or anything.” However, her time in Austin is something Amadi won’t forget. “It was an awesome experience,” Amadi said. “I’m really glad I got to do it before I graduated.”

Team looks to find answers during spring game Chandler Elsbecker Sports Editor After a two-win improvement in 2012, the Broncos are set for their annual spring game Thursday night at Bronco Field. Following a tough winter of offseason workouts, head coach Kevin Atkinson likes seeing the leaps his players have taken. “The thing that’s impressed us the most is, I wouldn’t say it’s not just one individual; it’s our overall team chemistry,” Atkinson said. “I’m a big

believer in vision, because when you’ve got a vision you’ve got to chase it every day. When vision and sacrifice meet one another, something amazing happens. We’re trying to worry about not just ourselves, but also our teammates, and to help them improve.” This spring, Atkinson’s approach has been a simple one of back to the basics. “We want to be fundamentally sound,” Atkinson said.

5.5 Yards per carry for sophomore running back Tre’Von Jackson

“We can always work on fundamentals. We need to be able to run the ball with the types of running backs that we have.” “Defensively, we’ve got to be able to control the line of scrimmage better than we did last year with our defensive linemen, and then we’ve got new kids to figure into the secondary and in the linebacker corps. The people in there don’t have a lot of experience, so that’s going to be important for us.” This spring the

2012-13 in sports: By the Numbers

Broncos have adopted a motto of “Sacrifice ‘Me’ for ‘We,’ and Atkinson says there’s been a definite change in culture in the offseason. “We didn’t have a vision last year,” Atkinson said. “Our vision is to build a playoff team on the field and in the classroom, and right now, the camaraderie, the way we’re getting along, the way we’re being attentive – it’s 180-degrees different from what it was this point last year.”

4 Broncos that made thee District 5-4A Tennis Tournaournament

Turning the corner: Sophomore running back Tre’Von Jackson hurries for the edge in fall practice. After a 1-9 2011, under new head coach Kevin Atkinson the Broncos improved their record by two wins in 2012. (photo by Chandler Elsbecker)

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Points scored by the Bronco basketball team m during a five-game me winning streak in January

Goals scored by the Broncos soccer team in their finale versus Lake Dallas


May 2013 - Volume 106 Issue 7