Page 1

M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

1

THE NAVIGARE 

1st QUARTER 2013 

www.M‐CAM.com  

Volume 3, Number 1 

FEATURE STORY:  

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 

M∙CAM ADVANCES ON THE PUBLIC POLICY FRONT 

M∙CAM Advances on the  Public Policy Front  

1‐2

Freedom to Operate Plat‐ form: Surpassing the  Joneses  

2‐3  

By Ken Dabkowski  

Not Just a Summer         

3  

Unfinished Business  

4

Innovation Economy: Not a  Cliché  

5  

The OECD Conference in  the City of Love 

6

What is Code, Really? 

7  

The Waves of Change and  the Tides of Innovation  

8

A Historical Treasure Trove:  M∙CAM to Launch Historical  Patent Database   

9

Spotlight on Amusement  Park Entertainment  

10

Featured Community Mem‐ ber of the Quarter  

11

Human creativity has no value.    At least, that is how the current financial system  accounts for it.   Government granted rights create “innovation  assets”, but these assets are not currently in‐ cluded in any construction of enterprise  value.  Assets like patents, copyrights, trade‐ marks, licenses do not count towards the value  of an enterprise.  In addition, executory con‐ tracts and off‐take agreements are rarely ac‐ counted for in collateral frameworks because  banks do not have a pathway to consistently and  reliably ascribe a value to these assets.   We think the system should be organized dif‐ ferently and aligned with human creativity.   Creativity is accessible by all human be‐ ings.  Innovation assets, the assets that allow us  to transact creativity, are the core value driver of  every enterprise because they allow enterprises  or individuals to control the marginal cash flows  associated with a business.  Therefore, innova‐ tion assets allow enterprises to control marginal  profitability in the markets they choose to pro‐ cure.   What are we doing to change this global         policy?  We engage the policy makers of  course!  Over the past several months we have 

reported on the great progress made educating  members and staff of the U.S. Senate and House  of Representatives.  Early 2013 has been no dif‐ ferent.  January started a very busy calendar on  Capitol Hill.  The Fiscal Cliff passed, a new Con‐ gress was sworn in, and a full scale government  spending “Sequester” has begun.  Through the  turmoil, we have continued to execute our over‐ sight awareness campaign on both banking com‐ mittees and continue to pursue a hearing on the  topic of bridging intangible (innovation) assets  into regulated financial markets.   Our responses to the Federal Reserve, Office of  the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), and the  Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)  Notices of Proposed Rulemaking on bank regula‐ tory capital (NPRs) last October have spread our  message within the bank regulator commu‐ nity.  We have our responses posted on  the Federal Reserve and OCC websites.  In Janu‐ ary we had a very productive follow up meeting  with the FDIC rule makers and plan to do the  same with the OCC shortly.   In addition to the FDIC and OCC, we have been  pursuing educational meetings with the Federal  Reserve Board.  In early March, we had the op‐ portunity to spend time with Dr. Carol Cor‐ rado.  Dr. Corrado is one of the foremost aca‐ demics in the area of intangible asset finance  

Continued on page 2 


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

2

M∙CAM ADVANCES ON THE PUBLIC POLICY FRONT (CONTINUED)  Continued from page 1   finance.  She has written extensively for the Federal Reserve Board  and served as the FRB’s Chief of Industrial Output.  Currently, Dr.  Corrado serves as a Senior Advisor and Research Director in Eco‐ nomics at The Conference Board.  Accompanying the Federal U.S. regulators, the White House has  taken an interest in the topic.  In late February we had the opportu‐ nity to present the concepts above to the White House Office of  Science and Technology – High Growth Entrepreneurship sec‐ tion.  In a very productive meeting, we offered up several pathways  to eliminate government waste, increase commercial and industrial  lending, and increase job growth by folding innovation assets di‐ rectly into our enterprises.  We will be following up in the coming  weeks.  Furthermore, we have been raising awareness about our programs  globally.  In mid‐February, we traveled back to the The Organization  for Economic Co‐operation and Development (OECD), in Paris.  The  OECD is the premiere global standard setting organization.  The  February conference focused on Growth, Innovation and Competi‐ tiveness – Maximising the Benefits of Knowledge‐Based Capi‐ tal.  M∙CAM’s Chairman, Dr. David Martin presented the Keynote 

speech at the event putting M∙CAM's advocacy for innovation‐ based capital reform on a global stage.   Lastly, we have also spent a great deal of time working on the issue  of intangible asset quality.  Intangible asset quality is critical for our  business.  We need to know when someone actually “owns” an  asset, and if it is held, where we can transfer it if we come to own  it.  Asset quality relates to our overall mission because as we de‐ velop a high quality intangible (innovation) asset class, the easier it  becomes to appropriately underwrite the assets .  When there is  less counterfeit innovation in the system, confidence around inno‐ vation adoption and finance increases.  An example of how we over  came this was issue was presenting at the January 11th United  States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) roundtable on ‘Real‐ Party In‐Interest.’  This roundtable aimed to obtain public input  from organizations and individuals on how the USPTO could change  its rules of practice to collect and provide such ownership informa‐ tion and make it publicly available.  Dr. David Martin spoke along  with several other panelists and his full  presentation can be  seen HERE.   Our relationship with the USPTO is continuing, as its  Chief Economist is scheduled to be in our offices in late March. 

FREEDOM TO OPERATE PLATFORM: SURPASSING THE JONESES  By Rod Jackson  

Patent Troll (n):   individuals or entities that file patent lawsuits to enforce patents  against one or more alleged infringers in a manner considered  predatory and opportunistic, with no intention to manufacture or  market the product covered by the patent in suit. 

patent trolls.  Businesses have been receiving assertion letters stat‐ ing they have been or are currently infringing upon the IP portfolios  of patent trolls.  In these situations, trolls provide businesses with  two undesirable options ‐‐ either go to court or take “a more favor‐ able route”, and pay a settlement fee.  The unfortunate part is, if  they decide to settle with the patent  trolls, they will have essentially posi‐ tioned their company to continue to  pay others in the future.  Ironically,  Anti‐Trust and Racketeering laws make  price fixing illegal.  Yet justice turns a  blind eye toward this business practice  which explicitly uses cost of litigation  as the "price" for protection.

When carefully observing the behav‐ ioral patterns of businesses today deal‐ ing with patent infringement litigation  brought on by patent trolls, the  phrase “Keeping up with the Joneses"  comes to mind.  I am not referring to  the great classic by Billy Paul "Me and  Mrs. Jones".  The Joneses, in this case,  are large corporations like Apple and Google, who have billions of  dollars to spend “resolving” patent litigation.  Small businesses have  Fueled by the proliferation of low quality patents and predatory  trolls, businesses across the country have been left to cope with the  adopted the same approach as the Joneses to managing patent and  messy aftermath and legal ramifications of lawsuits brought on by  IP litigation proceedings and are either losing their hard‐earned    Continued from page 3  


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

3

FREEDOM TO OPERATE PLATFORM:   SURPASSING THE JONESES (CONTINUED)   Continued from page 2  profits by paying court fees, losses that they can never recover, or  setting themselves up for failure by choosing to settle.    One of the alleged luxuries of being the Joneses is the availability of  relatively large amounts of disposable income to cope with these  legal situations as they arise.  Small businesses and start up organi‐ zations, on the other hand, do not have the disposable funds to  spend going to court with patent trolls.  Small businesses have ob‐ served the Joneses hiring lawyers and legal teams and spending big  bucks to solve these issues, and presume this must be the appro‐ priate and most effective way to deal with trolls’ accusations.   While the Joneses may have the monetary means to take the trolls  to court and really fight for their IP, what if I told you there is a  pathway to resolve these disputes without ever stepping foot in‐ side a courtroom?   As a result of M∙CAM’s unique involvement with banks specializing  in intangible assets as collateral, we have a distinctive perspective 

and approach to solving this quandary.   M∙CAM works with com‐ panies who are under attack by trolls to create a Freedom to Oper‐ ate (FTO) platform.  By supplying asserting parties extensive infor‐ mation that may undermine the validity of their patents, the cost  of case management starts to grow for the patent troll making the  low‐cost opportunistic behavior less and less desirable.  The FTO  platform is comprised of IP assets which are in the public domain  through expiration and abandonment.  At the client's option, we  even do the troll the "favor" of copying our enforcement review to  the USPTO so that everyone can benefit from the disclosure of va‐ lidity challenging information.    If you know of an individual or business that could benefit from our  FTO platform, please have them call 434‐979‐7240 and ask to speak  with me.  I welcome the opportunity to help companies and indi‐ viduals protect themselves from patent trolls through our FTO of‐ fering.   

NOT JUST A SUMMER INTERNSHIP    By Kimberly Schreiber, M∙CAM Intern (Summer 2011) 

I had the opportunity of  interning with M∙CAM dur‐ ing my last year at the Uni‐ versity of Virginia in 2011.   I spent every Friday at the  office and interned during  the summer as well.  It was  an incredible experience  that was indispensible to  my intellectual and profes‐ sional development.   I  worked on various projects  throughout the year includ‐ ing writing several Patently  Obvious reports, perform‐ ing an Integral Accounting  audit for a foundation in  Nepal, and analyzing intel‐ lectual property.   The M∙CAM team has become a second family to  me, and I’m so grateful for their ongoing support and advice.  During my internship, I was exposed to the world of intellectual  property and had the opportunity to learn from some of the  world’s leading experts in this field as I grappled with the extensive  reaches of IP law and its place in the world economy.  It was both  refreshing and enlightening to learn about M∙CAM’s concept of  Integral Accounting.  The ability to identify value beyond the con‐ fines of monetary figures while working in a financial setting is an  important skill I will carry with me forever.   

I had more to learn at M∙CAM as I concluded my fourth year at  UVA.  However, I had post graduation plans to travel around the  U.S. on a six month rock climbing expedition.   Before I left on my  road trip, I worked on a two‐month contract with M∙CAM as a Fi‐ nancial Analyst.  I conducted an extensive review on the Indian  Cement Industry to assess the feasibility of implementing our cli‐ ent’s technology in the Indian market.   This Global Technology  Assessment was a wonderful learning experience and tested the  skills I had developed as an intern.    During the middle of my climbing trip while living in Yosemite, I  attended M∙CAM Chairman David Martin’s TEDx talk in Sacra‐ mento, California.  David introduced me to his friend and colleague  Cory Johnson at Bloomberg TV West who indicated he was looking  for some help with the show.  Following our introduction, Cory  offered me a position as a Financial Analyst to assist him with his  work on Bloomberg as well as his radio broadcast and written arti‐ cles.    Before I moved out to San Francisco to start my position at  Bloomberg, I was invited to work at the foundation in Nepal for  which I had performed the Integral Accounting  audit while intern‐ ing at M∙CAM.   It was a dream come true to spend a month work‐ ing in person with Kevin Rohan Memorial Eco Foundation.    I feel very fortunate to have been a part of the M∙CAM team and  my experience there has had a great impact on my future.   Both  the skills and the relationships I developed while interning and  working at M∙CAM are invaluable.     


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

4

UNFINISHED BUSINESS    By Dr. David Martin  

Three years ago, M∙CAM was introduced  to the world of marketing and advertising  by our colleague Adam Tepper.  Within the  context of socializing his then‐new posi‐ tion at the company (far removed from  Los Angeles and his network of friends) he  kept having conversations about the inca‐ pacity of the advertising world to quantify  the effect of their work.  This created a  situation in which agencies continued to  struggle with, and on behalf of, corporate  Chief Marketing Officers to justify the im‐ portance of their collective work.  Add to  this struggle the austerity‐imposed com‐ pressing budgets in many organizations  and the tension appeared intractable.   After many of his conversations, he’d re‐ turn to Charlottesville convinced that  there must be some mechanism for a firm  like M∙CAM to address this problem.  There was.  Working together with a team  at Omnicom’s TBWA\Chiat\Day in Los An‐ geles, we collaborated on evolving a plat‐ form that we’d piloted years earlier with  Niko Canner (then Managing Partner at  management consulting firm Katzenbach  Partners) for work at MasterCard and  Pfizer.  Using M∙CAM’s unique conver‐ gence of unstructured data assessment  and intangible market value metrics, we  created a commercial offering that would  precisely measure the consequence of  advertising campaigns and marketing mes‐ sages.  By understanding this consequence  – in some instances even modeling the  likely consequence prior to their launch ‐  marketing resources could be more accu‐ rately aligned to business objectives.   Modeling the signal propagation of previ‐ ous campaigns by firms and their unlikely  cohorts, we could accurately tune mes‐ sages to achieve desired responses while  avoiding identifiable missteps.  After  months of collaboration, Epiphany™ ‐ a  comprehensive data analytic service plat‐ form – was born.  Finally agencies could  quantify their effect and work to change  their business model to more readily  measure the economic impact of their  deliverables.  All that was needed was a  complete alteration in how the industry  interacted with client firms – including   

changing the point of sale, involving more  constituents within client organizations,  and completely altering pricing and incen‐ tives.  Five major brand prospective campaigns  later, the obstacles to the rapid assimila‐ tion of Epiphany™ became evident.  And,  as is often the case in the advertising busi‐ ness, several members of the team moved  on to other ventures or to form entirely  new agencies.  The brilliance of the im‐ pulse that led to our initial platform, like  the impulse with Katzenbach and subse‐ quently Booz & Co (who had acquired  Katzenbach), flickered and nearly went  out.  Another piece of M∙CAM’s unfinished  business.  But, the merits of Epiphany™ were too  good to abandon.  The component of the  business associated with identifying the  convergence of message and technology  was taken up by Jimmy Smith in his new  venture, Amusement Park Entertainment.   Realizing that marketing, advertising and  media have become synonymous with the  technology through which they are deliv‐ ered, Jimmy’s team sat down with M∙CAM  and formed AP∙Q.  Most of you will recall  “Q” from the James Bond 007 movies.  Q is  the technology geek who equips James  Bond with his secret weapon or device  that invariably is vital in completing Bond’s  mission.  In AP∙Q, M∙CAM identifies and  creates the pathway to have ownership of,  or freedom‐to‐operate around, the tech‐ nologies for the media developed by  Amusement Park Entertainment.   

keting research firm DB5 and carried  M∙CAM’s unstructured signal intelligence  capabilities into a suite of new product  offerings sold to clients who are seeking to  expand the range of market insight they  can acquire.  Working with M∙CAM’s  mathematical and programming team,  DB5 is at the forefront of making sense out  of a myriad of signal generators ranging  from social media to what’s becoming  generally known as “Big Data”.    And, to be clear, the TBWA\Chiat\Day rela‐ tionship has been actively maintained by  Nick Drake, recently promoted to Manag‐ ing Director.  In February, Nick joined  David Martin at the Organization for Eco‐ nomic Cooperation and Development  (OECD) Knowledge Based Capital confer‐ ence in Paris where he spoke of the evolv‐ ing econometric understanding of brands  and their importance in the economy.   Nick’s involvement at the OECD repre‐ sented a major step forward in the organi‐ zation’s understanding of the effect of  branding and advertising – a topic largely  ignored in previous policy inquiries.  This intrepid team continues to collabo‐ rate on a number of big ideas.  Along the  way, what started as unfinished business  has become a Hydra of opportunities.  Our  Odyssey is well underway and together,  we’ll figure out how to thread the arrow  through the axe heads.        

Niki Weber, one of the co‐creators of the  Epiphany™ framework, has integrated  M∙CAM’s strategic advisory capabilities  into work for several start‐up firms in the  greater Los Angeles region.  Recognizing  the absence of market intelligence around  technology and intellectual property‐ heavy entrepreneurial ventures, she’s  linked M∙CAM into numerous opportuni‐ ties and continues to provide valuable  industry expertise to M∙CAM’s brand and  marketing related activities.  Dan Goldstein became a partner at mar‐

 

Continued on page 3 


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

5

INNOVATION ECONOMY: NOT A CLICHÉ    By Alex Stott  

There are many economic metrics one may use to gauge the  health of the underlying economy. To get a good idea of this  health, one would ideally take a group of the metrics together, or  a rational ensemble variable to get a modestly accurate assess‐ ment.  The one that has come to dominate the minds of the pub‐ lic and the pundit alike is the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA).   Since the 19th century, this Index has been a conventional stan‐ dard for describing a proxy for the economy's performance.  But  this formula‐derived shortcut is woefully lacking in its assumed  understanding of what really drives growth.  Everyone agrees that intangible assets have some effect on value.   On the other hand, almost no one knows what that value is.  This  is why the General Intangibles Lien exists in nearly every loan  agreement, but borrowers do not get any collateral credit for  their intangibles even as they are liened.  To understand what  that value is, let's take a look at the hallowed DJIA.  The thirty  component members taken as an aggregate are supposedly an  accurate barometer of the economy as a whole.  But this is based  on the assumption that industrials drive the economy.  Leaving  aside the debate as to whether this assumption was ever true, we  present the hypothesis that it is innovation which is the driver of  economic growth. To test this, we constructed another index  based on the Dow, which we will call the Global Innovation 30,  and then compare the performances of the respective indices.   To begin, we have taken each of the members of the Dow Jones,  and defined an "innovation cohort," the Dow component firm and  a short list of companies holding Innovation assets which cover 

the same innovation space.  Then, based on the priority and origi‐ nality of the IP of each of the cohort members, we assigned an IP  fitness score to each company. The company within each cohort  with the highest IP fitness earned membership in the Global Inno‐ vation 30. Sometimes, that meant that the original Dow company  stayed. If the Dow component was the sub‐par asset holder it was  replaced. We chart the performances of the two indices below  with each cohort given the same weight as in the Dow, and nor‐ malized to the same starting price.  The difference is obvious and striking, with the Global Innovation  30 more than doubling the returns of the DJIA, without any in‐ crease in volatility. This shouldn't be surprising. Intuitively, we  would expect that, in general, companies that are on the cutting  edge of technology would be the first to market or deliver better  products and reap the respective rewards. Intuitively, we would  expect that those with the intellectual property that most clearly  controls an innovation space would benefit from it monetarily.  Intuitively, we would expect to be able to measure this, and, in‐ deed, we see this borne out in our simple comparison.  After all,  innovation assets are supposed to assist firms in controlling mar‐ ginal cost and protecting pricing power in the face of commoditi‐ zation pressures.  This is a powerful new piece of data confirming the idea that we  exist in an "innovation economy" in more than just a vacuous,  superficial way. Innovation, as measured by intangible assets,  leads to very real, tangible economic advantages. It's long past  time for us to treat it as such. 


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

6

THE OECD CONFERENCE IN THE CITY OF LOVE   By Colleen Martin 

Dr. David Martin had the exclusive honor of being the only keynote  speaker at the “Growth, Innovation and Competitiveness – Maximiz‐ ing the Benefits of Knowledge‐Based Capital” OECD Conference in    Paris, France this February.  His presentation entitled “Bank Lending  and the Crisis:  Unlocking the Collateral Value of Knowledge Capital”  highlighted some of the work he and M∙CAM have been doing over  the last 17 years.  In attendance were Finance Ministers, policymak‐ ers, and analysts from various OECD member countries.  David’s par‐ ticipation and our  commitment to maintaining transparent and  genuine relationships continues to place M∙CAM in globally strategic  and influential world changing positions.   The conference was the completion of a 2 year program of work     examining the effects that knowledge‐based capital (KBC) has on    investment and growth in the economies of OECD member coun‐ tries.  The goal of the gathering was to inform future OECD policy  recommendations and analysis by reviewing the “state‐of‐the‐art”  research and policy experiments and spotlight gaps in the develop‐ ment of policy.  David Martin’s presentation was the solitary voice in  presenting an actual regulated capital markets solution to the ques‐ tions presented.  

Above: Long‐time friends and partners, Dr. David Martin and  Nick Drake of TBWA\Chiat\Day discussed the ever growing  relevance of Knowledge Based Capital in today’s global      economy at the OECD conference in Paris, France.   

In listening to the moderators and panelists throughout the confer‐   ence, it became abundantly clear the global “state‐of‐the‐art” stan‐ dards are lagging behind M∙CAM’s data, analytics, approach, and  solution.  The OECD was interested in looking at three types of KBC:  computerized information or “big data”, innovative property, and  economic competencies including such areas as brand equity and  organizational know‐how that increases enterprise efficiency.   M∙CAM’s capabilities address and provides answers to all of these  areas.  Possibilities for data and research collaboration as a result of  our conference contribution include the United States Council of  Economic Advisors, the United States Conference Board as well as  numerous global Finance Ministers and policymakers.  Several of  these parties have entered into subsequent communication for more  in‐depth conversations with M∙CAM to access data and gain insight  to M∙CAM’s solutions to the knowledge‐based capital issues.  I was honored to personally participate in this monumental event.   Being a part of this journey from the beginning and seeing David on  stage in this venue was and continues to be a deeply profound ex‐ perience.  The impact we are making in this world has ramifications  that are foundational, long‐lasting and forward‐looking.  There is no  issue that is truly unsolvable!  David Martin’s message continues as he was asked to submit the  policy briefing for the May 2013 OECD Ministerial Council Meeting.   David’s full speech can be viewed HERE.     M∙CAM’s partner Nick Drake, Worldwide Managing Director at  TBWA\Chiat\Day also presented at the event in regards to brand  management and his speech can be viewed HERE.  

 

Above: While the purpose of the trip to Paris was to participate  and attend the OECD Conference, David and Colleen still man‐ aged to squeeze in some fun!  They walked around the beauti‐ ful city of Paris and visited some of the historical landmarks  including the Eiffel Tower. 


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

7

WHAT IS IT TO CODE, REALLY?    By Sharadha Ramakrishnan, M∙CAM Intern (Summer 2010) 

Sometimes I have an over‐ powering urge to come up  with something new.  It  took me a while to under‐ stand “new” exists primarily  in terms of incremental‐ ism and innovation, not in  terms of invention.  Then  again, it depends on  whether you think of the  wheel as an incremental  improvement on a round  log or as the child of neces‐ sity.   It’s hard being a program‐ mer in 2013 because in order to make a mark, you need to be  really darn good.  Graduating from PSG Tech with a Masters de‐ gree, I was pretty proud of myself.  I started my career as a pro‐ grammer by starting my own company.  Actually, I incorporated  my own company.   I was a naive, confident, rebellious, Indian girl who thought too  much about herself.  Two years ago, I didn’t understand what  programming was.  Five years of school and a postgraduate de‐ gree later, I didn’t know what it meant to write code.  And  maybe I still don’t fully understand, but I do have a better idea.   I’m still naive, rebellious and very much Indian, but I would like  to think it’s for the right reasons.   To code is to love understanding how things work ‐ together.   Last summer I was accepted into a program called Hacker  School.  The very first day, my whole world came crashing down.   Here I was thinking I can whip up IRC servers in Java when some‐ one asks me how a socket works.  My mind reaches back to my  networks class and I’m thinking hard, but I turn up with nothing  but:  ServerSocket s = new ServerSocket(); These “moments”  started repeating and they had a pattern.  Over and over again, I  was asked a question and I didn’t have the answer.  That’s when  I started to realize how wrong I had gotten my college education.  Good thing that it’s never too late to start asking what, how and  why.  I resolved never to take anything for granted again.  

hack and work around the problem.  Sometimes that’s enough,    but sometimes, it’s not.     To code is to understand limitations and optimize for maximum    results.  Understanding and scoping out a problem is one of the most  important parts of coding.  What good is your 1000 LOC if it  needs more CPU bandwidth than you can afford?  This is where  the desire arises to write beautiful code.  Sculpting and molding  it to fit requirements and constraints is an art by itself.   To code is to want to share and collaborate.  When you’re writing code, you’re writing an instruction manual.   The whole point of an instruction manual is for the benefit of  other people.  For some reason, it is called “code” meaning it can  be read only by those people who understand how to read it.   The least we can do is make sure it is easy for fellow program‐ mers to read our code and build on it. The want to own beautiful  code is well and good, but the maturity of understanding con‐ stant evolution of technology and accepting a better solution is  part of being a great programmer.   To code is to make programming part of life.   As a software developer, you are a day job holder.  As a pro‐ grammer, you are an artist.  What we fail to understand is the  fact that once you know what programming is about, it helps  you apply all those principles in real life.  Suddenly, I was curious  about how the plumbing in my house works and why my fan  made that awful noise.  Programming is a lifestyle that doesn’t end with a computer.  It  is who you are.  It is who I am.  I like spelling out instructions, I  like fixing broken things, I like to break things, and I like to get a  whole bunch of minds involved in breaking and then fixing them.    I like the challenge of working under impossible conditions.  It’s  who I am; it’s not what my education made me. 

That’s why I don’t take frameworks and libraries at face value.  If  I don’t know how they are structured, what they look like, and  how I can change them to maximize utilization, I have a physical  itch.  It was then that I started understanding what it is really like  to code.  I started understanding the power of knowing.  I  started connecting the disconnected.   To code is to want to understand why things don’t work.  “Have you ever tried turning off the system and switching it back  on?” Debugging is one of the most important parts of coding and  it takes a lot of technique to be a good one; a pre‐requisite being    an inquisitive mind.  It doesn’t take two seconds to introduce a 

Above: Shar (pictured far right) was part of the 2011 Heritable  Innovation Trust internship team that went to Papua New  Guinea. 


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

8

THE WAVES OF CHANGE AND THE TIDES OF INNOVATION  By Dylan Korelich  When waiting for a ship to arrive with your good fortune, what are  the risks you would have to account for as the ship travels across  the ocean to reach its destination safely?  What is the information  you would need to know and how do you measure it?  More im‐ portantly, how do you make sense of it?  As a person deeply curi‐ ous about signals, waves, and communication technologies, I pon‐ der the analogies I can draw between how M∙CAM interprets data  and information and a ship at sea carrying its good fortune.  This  analogy helps me unveil the complexity of what we learn and how  to convey M•CAM's unique approach to interacting in the world.    Many of the forces that present risks for businesses are observed  in the capital markets.  In this first analogy, the capital markets are  the weather and the indicators for what is to come are the price of  equities and bonds.  These indicators (price of equities and bonds)  are ephemeral, changing every day with major quarterly shifts and  minor daily announcements, much like the weather.  Despite this,  much of the capital market indicators are driven by the confidence  of investors looking at data that is easily available and generally  well correlated.  Businesses that perform well are rewarded and  their stock goes up.  The connection could be drawn that investors  are assessing the risks of business much like a captain of a ship  would assess the weather.    As an M•CAM analyst we look at a variety of data points including  data that’s not obvious to the average investor who, even if they  had manageable access would have no understanding of how to go  about assessing the value and risks with regards to their invest‐ ments.  In this analogy, innovation ‐ represented by patents and  intangible assets ‐ are much like the tidal forces in the oceans that  businesses must travel across.  These market controls are like large 

waves that cycle slowly and have immense impact on directional  flow.  The USPTO's current estimation of patent pendency is 31  months which to a business is six reporting periods.  The ability to  fully understanding the strength and harmonics of how these  forces work is one of the unique skills of an M•CAM analyst.  The  effects of a tidal force is much more profound than simply predict‐ ing amplitude and frequency of a tide through calculating the align‐ ment of the earth, moon and sun and projecting those calculations  out into time.  This is because the apparent relevance of the tide to  a ship is less consequential when it is out at sea.  To understand  the tides of innovation, M∙CAM assesses the subtle effects on the  enterprise (the ship at sea) and on the competitive environment  (the whole ocean).    A term we use often when talking about the data we study is  “velocity”.  When analyzing data, it is the direction and speed at  which the subjects, forces, and objects in the ecosystem are mov‐ ing towards or away from one other that is important for us to  observe.  The ability to understand the changes in relationships  and what impact those changes will have help us to determine the  possibility and significance of an event.   Now in this analogy, we  have a ship sailing (a business) and tidal forces (the market con‐ trols and patents) acting upon it resulting in an object.     Without tidal charts for ports, shipping is a fruitless exercise.   Con‐ sider the contours of depth as commercial pathways for the cap‐ tain and his ship (the business) to navigate successfully and its shal‐ lowness as a way to discern and avoid obsolete pathways.   When  we couple the curvature of the bathymetry with the tide's (the  patents) amplitude or strength represented by the combined vec‐ tor of height and direction, it then becomes very important what  time the captain and his  ship have arrived to enter  the port.   This is because  it will determine the ease  in which the ship will  safely reach the port de‐ livering good fortune or  the velocity at which the  ship and its captain will be  beached in obsolescence.    To the left is a chart of  Apple Inc. U.S. patent  portfolio from 2000 to  2012.   It represents the  size and the commercial  fitness of Apple's portfo‐ lio.  It reveals a minor  increase of Apple's com‐ mercially fit patents when  compared to the increase  of its lesser quality pat‐ ents.  On June 29, 2007 

Continued on page 10 


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

9

A HISTORICAL TREASURE TROVE:   M∙CAM TO LAUNCH HISTORICAL PATENT DATABASE  By Denise Holman  On the morning of  December 15, 1836, the United States Patent  Office was destroyed by a massive fire resulting in the loss of  approximately 7,000 models and 9,000 drawings of pending and  patented inventions.  Most importantly, lost in the rubble were  literally thousands of valuable patents and pending applications  that without supporting documentation were to be deemed in‐ valid.  In the 46 years prior to the fire, the United States had is‐ sued approximately 10,000 patents.  Following the fire, con‐ gresses acted to restore the records, but were only able to re‐ cover a limited amount.   

This spring, M∙CAM will launch a database that includes many of  the “forever lost” patents dating back to July 31, 1790.   

M∙CAM’s historical patent database is truly a one‐of‐a‐kind.  The  patents in M∙CAM's proprietary collection date from July 31,  1790—to July 2, 1836 and have been carefully transcribed from  original patents and patent applications.   It has never before  been easier to read these significant historical documents and to  gain insight from them.   This historical groundbreaking database has been a long term  project that has taken many years to reach completion.   These  patents cannot be transcribed through Optical Character Recog‐ nition (OCR), a mechanical or electronic conversion of scanned  images of handwritten, typewritten, or printed text into            machine‐encoded text.    They have all been carefully hand‐entered and then quality con‐ trol checked by M∙CAM staff.  Each transcription has been tran‐ scribed into parce‐able raw XML data and entered into an easily  searchable database and are available in a legible PDF docu‐ ment.  The database will be launched later this Spring.   Stay  tuned via our website and Facebook for the announcement of  the official launch date.                      Above: The United States Patent Office (1936), Washington, D.C.    burns to the ground losing all patents filed from 1790—1836.  

       

        Above: A screen shot of the Historical Patent Database demon‐ strating its searchability and easy to read interface.   

THE WAVES OF CHANGE AND  THE TIDES OF INNOVATION  (CONTINUED )  Continued from page 8  

Apple launched the iPhone ‐ the year their U.S. patent holdings  peaked.  Since then, Apple's commercial patent holdings have de‐ clined with current numbers below what they held in 2000 and their  poor quality holdings almost double.  What this graph indicates is  that the tide has been moving Apple towards shallow sea and its  velocity is increasing.  With the current headwinds of tough compe‐ tition, the stock has significantly declined (note that the white line,  representing Apple's market cap, benefited from Apple's powerful  market brand despite a declining quality of innovation assets).   However, Apple is still operationally fit.   It will be interesting if their  new captain and crew will be able to steer Apple away from the  shoals of obsolescence unlike the great ship Kodak.  In our endeavor to find opportunity and reduce risks, as an M•CAM  analyst, we observe and study the interrelationship of the direction  and speed that businesses, market controls, and ecosystems move.   We collect data and find different ways to measure it and make  sense of it.  For me, it is these great journeys inspired by our data  and our approach that inspires me to wonder what will happen  next.   


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

10

SPOTLIGHT ON AMUSEMENT PARK ENTERTAINMENT    By Denise Holman  

New to The Navigare is a segment highlighting Companies and ini‐ tiatives M∙CAM sees as leaving a positive footprint in our world.  We  want to enlighten as many individuals as we can about these pivotal  business models and innovative, creative solutions to conducting  business in today’s economy.  Our newsletter is an excellent net‐ working tool for global relationships and connections to be created.   If you are interested in featuring your business or nominating some‐ one you know, please contact Denise Holman at dlh@m‐cam.com.  

“Gatorade Replay.”  All of these were highly successful and critically  acclaimed.  “Gatorade Replay” was even nominated for an EMMY.  Amusement Park recently won our first ever industry award for  “Discovered” ‐‐ Not bad for a company that is only a year and half  old!  “Discovered” is a Microsoft Kinect video game we created for  Intel’s Ultrabook.  Check it out HERE.  Our latest work is an app for Mondelez.  It’s called Oreo Skies.  Us‐ ing augmented reality technology, the app allows you to leave mes‐ sages in the stars for your friends and family.  Check that out HERE.  I met David Martin, Chairman and Founder of M∙CAM, through a  mutual friend, Nick Drake.  Nick is the Worldwide Managing Direc‐ tor of TBWA\CHIAT\DAY.  David and I discussed the chasm between  branded entertainment and technology, especially in regards to  Intellectual Property (IP).    Traditional ad agencies do not understand IP.  Many agencies are  like raging bulls in china shops when it comes to understanding and  managing their IP.  They unknowingly trample on the IP rights of  others and set themselves up for lawsuits.  In general, most tech  firms, particularly the engineers, don’t understand how to create  content and marketing opportunities for their IP. David and I saw  this as a huge opportunity for our two companies.   

Above:  Jimmy Smith, CEO and Chief Creative Officer of Amuse‐ ment Park Entertainment poses for a feature in Forbes   Amusement Park Entertainment is a transmedia, branded content  studio.  What’s that mean?  It means we create, develop, and pro‐ duce branded messages across multiple media platforms.  What’s  that mean?  It means the advertising we create looks nothing like a  30 second TV spot, magazine ad, or billboard.  Our ads are gaming  apps, video games, TV shows, events, and even tech products;  hence the name of our company, Amusement Park … ENTERTAIN‐ MENT.  You see, generally speaking, people don’t like advertising,  but people do like to be entertained.  They’ll interact with enter‐ tainment, but they’d rather get up and go to the bathroom than  watch advertising.  Our philosophy is if you want to get your product and/or brand  message across in a way that produces results, it better be enter‐ taining.  Entertaining to the point where a consumer wants to en‐ gage with your piece of entertainment over and over and over,  again. 

Amusement Park Q (AP∙Q) is a revolutionary partnership between  two unlikely businesses that represent opposite realms of reality:  The “what ifs” and the means to make them happen.    Inspired by Ian Fleming’s James Bond, and his technology con‐ sigliere Q, AP∙Q leverages unprecedented creativity and mind‐ bending analytics by:    Using best‐in‐class analytics to map out the ecosystem, threats,  and opportunities, around the impulses of innovation.   Identifying and developing new IP‐based product offerings to  provide unique opportunities to our partners. Structuring a “freedom to operate” for brands at the intersection of  creative content and technology. If the Lord is willing and the creek don’t rise, 2013 will see the first  fruits of our joint partnership!   To learn more about Amusement Park Entertainment, check out  their website: http:// amusementparkent.com/#page1  and “like” them on Facebook:  http://www.facebook.com/ AmusementParkEnt 

I co‐founded Amusement Park because a lot of the work I was cre‐ ating in the traditional world of advertising often became some‐ thing non‐traditional.  For example, my traditional ad work for Nike    and Gatorade often found its way into non‐traditional media and/or  entertainment products, like the coffee table book “Soul of the    Game,” EA Sports’ video games, “NBA Street 2 and 3,” MTV’s “Nike    Battlegrounds” TV series, and the Fox Sports Network series ‐   


M∙CAM NEWSLETTER  

FOURTH QUARTER 2012 

11

M·CAM COMMUNITY MEMBER OF THE QUARTER  Name:  Bill Hess  Age:  45 (I don’t feel it)  Hometown:  Baltimore, MD  Education:    B.A., Engineering and Art, Dartmouth College B.E., Mechanical Engineering, Dartmouth College  M.S. Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University Favorite memory at M∙CAM so far:  The 2010 trip to Mongo‐ lia to build a green house  What occupies your spare time? (Hobbies/activities): hiking,  skiing, playing, dancing with my wife, Wendy and our chil‐ dren Solomon and Althea     Three random facts about yourself:    

I am an accomplished glass artist having taught, pub‐ lished, and shown my work internationally.   



I was captain of my high school swim team 



I have created (among other things) a children’s game  about reducing waste and conserving energy.  

Above: Bill enjoys hiking with his  family and friends on the week‐ ends.  Luckily, the Charlottesville  area is home to many of Bill’s  favorite hiking locations.   

Favorite thing about M∙CAM: Seeing someone’s eyes widen  as I discuss the many facets of M∙CAM and the numerous  pathways for collaboration.  

Above: Bill fixed a broken water  pipe in Mongolia.  Before joining  the M∙CAM team in 2010, Bill was  the Owner/Principal of Ideas on  Legs where he consulted and  created original glass and metal  products and sculptures.   

GET IN TOUCH WITH US! 

TEDX (MAY 3, 2013)  DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA  Dr. David Martin will be participating in his 2nd TED talk this Spring  in DelRay Beach Florida.    This TED event will focus on “The Human Experience” and will  unite the world’s most creative minds and forward thinking indi‐ viduals.  Dr. Martin’s speech for the event is titled “Flowers in the  Barrel of a Gun” and he will address the economics of abundance  to an “unsolvable” world conflict.     For more information regarding the event or how you can pur‐ chase tickets, please visit the website:  http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/6420 

M∙CAM, Inc  210 Ridge McIntire Rd, Suite 300   Charlottesville, VA 22903   Phone: 434‐979‐7240  Fax: 434‐979‐7528  Like us on Facebook  + Follow us on Twitter    http://www.m‐cam.com  http://www.heritableinnovationtrust.org  http://www.globalinnovationcommons.org  http://invertedalchemy.blogspot.com 

The Navigare_2013  

Be sure to check it out to find out what we've been up to in 2013. Inside this exciting volume, readers will hear about progress made on th...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you