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Dana Hills High School

VOLUME 38, NUMBER 1

THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

DHHSPAPER.COM

16 PAGES

CUSD Special Election Scheduled for June 2010 By Salil Dudani Staff Writer

photo by Emily Roulund

Sprinting towards the finish line at the 35th annual Dana Hills Invitational, which was strewn with Puma banners and flags, senior Sarah Smith brings flawless technique to fruition.

Cross Country and Track Receive Puma Sponsorship By Lexi Cotcamp Sports Editor

Despite successful seasons for both cross country and track last year, major state buget cuts threatened the teams’ funding for the 20092010 school year. In response to these financial problems, the combined booster club for the two teams met multiple times throughout the summer to discuss fundraising options. In late June 2009, the booster club secured a presti-

gious “strategic partnership” with Puma worth over $49,000. Puma’s part in backing the two teams marked the first time ever in the company’s history to enter such a partnership with a high school team. Booster club member Mark Gullickson commented, “It [the Puma partnership] has created an excitement amongst the families and kids. I think it demonstrates the quality of the school’s running program. It just enforces the fact that we are considered an elite school.” While Puma did not donate money, the athletics company readily agreed to provide much of the team’s athletic

wear and equipment. In terms of the Dana Hills Invitational (DHI), Puma donated 800 t-shirts. Racing bibs, course flags, banners, and markers were also provided by Puma for the DHI. Under the conditions that they would be the sole provider of all team apparel, Puma consented to discount team attire, uniforms, and shoes by 40% for the entire team, parents and staff included. “Over the course of the year, we’ll have Puma nights to offer additional discounts for friends of DHHS,” Gullickson continued. In exchange for the

aforementioned merchandise and benefits, the teams agreed to grant Puma full access to the DHI, making it the only footwear and clothing provider onsite. With a mutually beneficial partnership in place for the remainder of the school year, Gullickson confirmed, “They [Puma] were great people to work with. This is a test year for both sides, but we’re aiming for long term if all goes well.” Puma’s final condition? “If agreed upon, Dana Hills should consider themselves sponsored by Puma and by doing so will agree to represent the brand like rock stars.”

The Capistrano Unified School District Board Room was once again packed on Wed. Sept. 30 when citizens poured in to hear the Orange County Committee on School District Organization conclude the district-wide debate over voting method. Many spectators donned stickers that read “Local Control Now!” Major talking points supporting that sentiment were met with roaring applause, but opposing statements evoked equally blunt expressions of disgust. At the end of the hearing, the Orange County Committee ruled 8-1 that a special ballot in June will determine how the Nov. 2010 general election is to be conducted. The special election is a direct result of a petition submitted by concerned parents on July 1 that called for the immediate abandonment of the current from-trustee area system in favor of a by-trustee area system. Each of the seven Trustees on the Capistrano Unified School District Board of Education comes from one of

the seven areas into which the school district is divided, but they are elected at large nonetheless; that is, all voters from all the areas elect all the Trustees. With a by-trustee area method in place, each candidate would be chosen from his or her respective area alone. The proponents of bytrustee area voting say that the change is necessary for two reasons: campaigns to run for the Board in the current atmosphere are too expensive, and the constituency is too large to effectively interact with its Trustees. Although most people agree that the modification of the voting system should be put to a vote, opposition arises from the petitioners’ preferred timing. A chief complaint is the sheer cost of the June election, which is estimated to be as much as $496,000. CUSD—the chief opponent of the petition—also pointed to the areas’ boundaries as an issue. CUSD’s official statement of position sent to the Orange County Committee from District attorney Warren Kinsler stated that the current area boundaries will be illegal under a from-trustee system. The District contends

[See June Ballot, Page 2]

photo by Emily Roulund

Presenting their proposal, parents (from left to right) Kevin Kirwan, Erin Kutnick, and Marilyn Amato speak in favor of holding a special election in June.

Saam Alikhani Appointed District Student Advisor By Pia Bhathal Editor-in-Chief

Saam Alikhani

The Capistrano Unified School District trustee named senior Saam Alikhani as the Student Advisor for the CUSD Board of Trustees for the 20092010 school year. Alikhani is the first student in Dana Hills history to be chosen for this esteemed

Dana, How Do You Feel? Commisioners of Pep pump up pride in students and staff alike at the first pep rally of the year. Read News,

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position. His certification as a sitting member on the school board came after an interview at the district office last year. “I didn’t know what to expect from the interview,” commented Alikhani. He was interviewed regarding several topics, most importantly, his qualifications and how he could benefit the school board with his perspective of student body. Approximately eight other seniors from high schools

in the district also applied for the position. Alikhani’s responsibilities as the Student Advisor revolve around CUSD board meetings that take place about twice a month. He is accountable for attending each board meeting, recognizing the honorary student at each meeting, and ensuring that student body presidents are prepared to present their respective reports to the board.

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Alikhani sat with the school board for the first time on Tues., Sept. 15. Reflecting on the experience, he stated, “Everything went well. The board members were respectful and willing to let me speak.” During the meeting, Allikhani provided a statement regarding a master plan for the restructuring of several facilites for schools in the district, including Dana Hills. The plan proposes that

Dana Hills will receive a new gym floor, which will be up for bid to contractors soon, and a new performing arts center. Furthermore, the school’s swimming facilities will undergo modernization. However, due to recent budgetary concerns, “they may not all pan out in the near future,” said Alikhani. The position is open for application to any senior who is interested at the end of each year.

Football Secures Strong Start: With two wins under their belt, football shows determination to excel this season. Check Out Sports,

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PAGE 2 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

NEWS

THE PAPER DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

Committee Approves June Ballot Initiative [Continued from page I] that it will be impossible to redraw the boundaries properly in the time between June 2010 and the general election in Nov. 2010. The alternatives to adding the issue of voting method to the June 8 statewide primaries were to making it a part of the Nov. election and to making no alteration to the current system in the first place. Placing this vote on the Nov. 2010 ballot would have cost an estimated $8,500. If the electorate voted to change the system, it would be enacted for the Nov. 2012 general election. The Orange County Committee decided in favor of the petition after hearing the three chief petitioners and the District’s legal representation explain their positions. Speaking on behalf of the 30 constituents behind the petition, chief petitioners Erin Kutnick, Marilyn Amato, and Kevin Kirwan were the first to present their case. The petitioners said that the sheer scale of a campaign alienates many who would oth-

erwise be able to run. By considering all the common campaign costs such as ballot statements and yard signs, the petitioners estimated that a candidate must have $112,000 to even begin to reach out to the 220,095 voters in the district. They placed the cost of running in an area of approximately 30,000 voters at $18,000. “With our current atlarge voting system, we cannot attract candidates. If we cannot attract candidates we cannot vote for the best people. If we cannot vote for the best people, we will not have the best board. Without the best board, we don’t have the best education for our kids,” stated Kutnick. According to the petitioners, a total of $844,000 would be saved over the next five elections if a by-area system were adopted because only half of the Trustees are up for election in a given cycle—with the proposed method, only three to four areas would need to vote as opposed to the entire electorate. Next to speak was Kin-

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sler, saying on behalf of the District that the proposed June election is not feasible. He called it “an undue financial burden” and said that the adoption of a by-trustee area method would put the district in threat of lawsuit if because of the lack of proportionality among the seven areas. According to Kinsler’s numbers, there is a 37.60% deviation from a perfect balance among the areas’ populations, which he says is legally indefensible in that it violates the “one-person, one-vote” principle constitutionally required by the Equal Protection Clause. Kinsler stated that “there would be insufficient time to take all of the actions necessary to establish the new trustee areas following a June 2010 special election in time to elect from such areas in the Nov. 2010 general election” even if demographers set out to reconfigure the area boundaries immediately following the outcome of the June election. Kutnick responded with a reminder that the District’s numbers are based off of the 2000 census.

Data given to Kutnick by the Orange County Registrar of Voters in Aug. 2009 place the population deviation in the areas at 19.34%. 18 of the 24 citizens who chose to speak expressed support for reform and immediate implementation. Numerous allusions to the Founding Fathers’ intent for local democracy were made, and the credibility of Kinsler’s facts was questioned in many of these speeches. One of the speakers prepared a poem entitled “Reflect On the Way We Elect.” Trustees Ellen Addonizio, Anna Bryson, Ken Lopez-Maddox, Sue Palazzo, and Mike Winsten were in attendance. Student Advisor for the CUSD Board of Trustees Saam Alikhani opted to speak. “Our current system does not give those true community leaders a chance to run, those leaders whose best interest is in the people. This topic will continue to be an issue until it is resolved, so it is better to deal with it now than to let it exacerbate,” Alikhani stated. Among those who dis-

agreed with the June ballot was Rancho Santa Margarita Council Meamber Tony Beall. Beall supported the current from-trustee area methodology and said that the petition effort is anti-democratic, stating that “the teacher’s union is by far the largest special interest group in this district.” The Orange County Committee members voted after consulting with a commission from the Orange County Department of Education. With only one vote in opposition, the decision was to propose the byarea method to the electorate in June. Karin Freeman, the one dissident, did support the adoption of by-trustee area voting, but said that she would rather see it on the ballot for a lower cost in Nov. Committee President Shirley Carey pointed out that data-gathering for redrawing the boundaries could begin before the June election and placed the matter on the Committee’s Oct. agenda. The change in voting method could have been put into place for 2010 without an

election if a waiver were passed by the state. However, on Sept. 15, the CUSD Board of Trustees voted 5-2 to not request the state to grant the waiver. “It’s a shame that our district will have to pay approximately $500,000 from the budget when the cost could have been entirely avoided if the Board had cooperated with the waiver efforts,” commented Dana Hills Special Education teacher and CUEA representative Mike Weinell. Jack Brick and Palazzo voted in favor of the request to the state, but Larry Christensen, Addonizio, Bryson, Maddox, and Winsten opposed it. Those five Trustees explained their stance by stating that they felt the decision should be up to the voters and not in their hands alone. The Capistrano Unified Management Association (CUMA), the Capistrano Unified Education Association (CUEA), California School Employees Association (CSEA), and the Capistrano Unified Council of PTSAs all supported the waiver.

The school is in the top 2% of all schools as ranked by Newsweek, and in the top 5% nationally according to US News and World Report. Dana Hills also received a grade of “A” from the Orange County Register. Assistant Principal Tim Hornig believes that by “maintaining a conversation about the best practices for kids,” Dana has achieved all of these accolades. When asked how the school will continue to strive for such high distinction in the

future, Hornig stated, “We are looking at fine tuning it,” and reiterated that Dana will always continue to aim for excellence. In comparison to schools with similar demographics and populations, Hornig stressed that, “we are the best of the best.” Athletics Director Matt Reid stated the “Athletic success speaks to the level of commitment kids, coaches, and parents put into our program.” According to Hornig, the reason we have such great scores in academics and rank-

ings in athletics is because “our kids are doing their best,” and “we have really found our niche.” In its thirty-sixth year, it is clear that Dana Hills has hit its stride. Through practice and hard work Dana Hills continues to achieve excellence in sports and athletics. Nye concludes that success in both athletics and academics “shows that we offer a wide variety of things for all kids, and it makes us an even better place for kids to go to school.”

Sports and Academics Rank High in Nation By Gillian Slee Feature Editor

Dana Hills has reached incredible levels of academic and athletic prestige. Principal Dr. Rob Nye believes, “The fact that we do so well is a testament to teachers, students, and staff.” According to a recent ESPN assessment, Dana Hills’ athletic program was ranked ninth in the country.

Senior Social Draws Crowd By Ben Lim Centerspread Editor

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At 6:30 on Tuesday the 29 of September, the mall exploded with seniority as the Seniors of 2010 congregated for their Senior Social. Key attractions such as ping pong, pizza, ice cream, a raffle, and a game of musical chairs made this night memorable for seniors across the campus.Sadly, the game of musical chairs ended abruptly; no winner was announced, and no explanation was given. Sara Shepherd exclaimed, “I can’t wait to bond with my senior class and commence my senior year on a good note!” Lauren Shepherd added that she would rather begin on an, “excellent note!”

The raffle proved fruitful. Winners received prepaid orders for senior shirts, candy, gift cards to Starbucks, and the grand prize was a free homecoming bid. The general population expressed their content with the event. Henry Camarillo exclaimed, “Five dollars on a ice cream and pizza was a night well spent!” On the other end of the spectrum, some were displeased. David Gonzalez commented, “I see everyone that I see at school everyday.” Mary Claire Roman seconded the notion, “Senior Social, the time to hang out with the friends you already have.” ASU dedicated loads of time to this event, and this year’s senior class is glad they attended.

photo by Emily Roulund

Dancing to MGMT, the class of 2010 kicks off their senior year in the mall at the Senior Social.


THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

NEWS

PAGE 3 DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

Constitution Week Brings Spirit, Dancing, and Remembrance of 9/11 By Annie Bubinski Entertainment Editor The first dance of the school year, Patriotic Palooza, was held in commemoration of Sept. 11. ASU covered the gym with red, white, and blue lights and decorations. Principal Dr. Rob Nye even wore an Uncle Sam hat. Many students attended in similar attire. Senior Beau Rodgers

dressed up in a patriotic outfit, which included American flag shorts. Rodgers explained, “It was a good way to kick off my senior year with my friends. This dance was especially exciting; the music was very upbeat.” Rodgers added, “I didn’t even feel like I was at school. It felt like being at Club Stars or something.” Many students attended the dance, including incoming freshmen, who have begun to

show their school spirit. Following the dance, a patriotic pep rally brought the school together to celebrate the upcoming football game against Edison. The hosts, seniors Aly Trachtman and Seena Foroutan, entertained the crowd with their always-comical quips. Foroutan threw in a few jokes concerning Kanye West’s interruption of Taylor Swift at the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards and did impersonations of Michael Jackson.

photo by Emily Cullen

ASU’s newest additions, Freshman President Alyssa McKown and Freshman Secretary/Treasurer Sarah Martino, will lead the freshman class in making the “Boats” Homecoming float.

Reading Class Streamlines By Claudia Varney Staff Writer

The reading class program has been modified this year to fulfill the needs of the students. Principal Dr. Rob Nye described the changes, stating, “We just streamlined our course offerings. In the past, we had different levels.” The two classes previously offered, Reading Development and Reading Improvement, weren’t cut, but instead moved down to the middle school level. The remaining class, Content Reading, utilizes

the program “Read 180” to improve students’ reading skills. There is literature supporting the effectiveness of the hybrid program, which is computer based. “Students take diagnostic tests over the year which show their growth,” said Nye. The two teachers involved in teaching the program are Maryanne Irwin and Jen Wood. Irwin, who exuded enthusiasm, saying, “There are a variety of activities to keep readers motivated. I believe that it is customized to each students’ reading [level] and therefore it is accommodating to their needs.”

photo by Emily Roulund

ASU officers Allie Gersten and Amy Nilmeier laugh as seniors David Gonzalez, Nick Kaspar, Laura Wilke, and Kyle Norman and juniors Kristi Nishihira and Shellsy Ashen attempt to eat powdered donuts off strings during the Patriotic Palooza pep rally on Sept. 17.

The pep rally began with an impressive performance by senior Shea Gomez singing “Proud to be an American” and continued with routines from Pep Squad, Cheer, SOCSA Dance, and the Dance Team. ASU included video clips of recent sports competitions on a big screen before calling up the sports teams. Toward the end of the rally, ASU presented a challenge for the representative sport team members. Participants had to eat a donut off a string while blindfolded and without using their hands. This was quite comical, and few accomplished the difficult feat. The second week of school, which featured the pep rally, was also named Constitution Week by ASU. ASU honored the occasion by posting facts about the Constitution. The details of how, when, and who wrote the Constitution were displayed throughout the school. The pep rally occurred on the actual Constitution Day, Sept. 17. During lunch, ASU gave out cake to students who could answer trivia questions about the Constitution. This was a new twist on the old tradition of simply giving out free cake; however, many students could not answer the trivia questions correctly. Senior Molly Churlonis of ASU commented, “It worked out better than last year. More people came to celebrate after lunch, because it was right after the pep rally.”


PAGE 4 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

FEATURE

Survey: If you could change the school mascot what would you change it to and why?

“A dolphin with a laser beam attached to its head. The real question is, why not? ” - Lily Rhodes, 12

“Pikachu because it’s the best pokemon known to man and could probably beat up all the other animals.” - Ryan Young, 10

THE PAPER DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

Joy to the World: Teachers’ Babies are Born By Elizabeth Chaddock News Editor

F

or many, summertime is often a time of change and new beginnings. For some teachers, this summer brought a whole new person in to their lives: a baby! English teacher Molly Coghill spent the summer enjoying time with her newborn baby girl, Isabelle. Born on May 9 at 6:48 a.m., she weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces and measured 20 inches. Now, at four and a half months, Isabelle can hold her head up and laugh, and she is “super curious,” as her mother observed. However, her most distinctive quality is her alertness, for which she is advanced for her age. Coghill fondly remarked, “She is one the of the best things that ever happened to me!” About a month after Isabelle was born, special education teacher David Georgia’s son, Ryan Mantle Georgia, was born on June 11, weighing 5 pounds, 12 ounces and measuring 18 inches tall.

Although he was born seven weeks early and stayed in the Neo-natal Intensive Care Unit for 15 days, his father remarked that “he is doing awesome.” His older brothers, Jake, five years old, and Kaden, three years old, are helpful in caring for him. Special education teacher Chad Wanders also had a baby, Dylan, on July 14, weighing 8 pounds, 12 ounces. Wanders commented that he now suffers from a lack of sleep and is tired every day, no doubt owing to the fact that Dylan wakes up once during the night. Wanders also commented that sometimes “it feels like a circus” with Dylan and a twoyear-old in the house. Despite this, Dylan is very easy going, eats a lot, and is “a breeze compared to [his] first child,” who was a loud crier. Band teacher Steve Wade also welcomed a baby girl, Penelope, to his family on Aug. 27. She weighed 6 pounds, 11 ounces and measured 18.5 inches. She is his first child, and Wade feels “a lot more fulfilled” with her in his life, and commented that, “she’s pretty awesome.”

photo courtesy of Molly Coghill

Smiling brightly and playing with her stuffed animal, newborn baby Isabelle, who is “super curious” and advanced for her age “is one of the best things that ever happened” to English teacher Molly Coghill.

Roberts Leaves a Hole in HMO By Salil Dudani Staff Writer

“Unicorn...enough said.” - Kelsey Werner, 11

O “Dinosaurs because they are awesome and Dana is awesome. It’s like a win-win situation. ” - Katherine Rudzki, 11

ver the summer, the Health and Medical Occupations (HMO) Academy lost a parent and gained a step-parent. Since the birth of HMO, Vicki Roberts was the Coordinator of the academy directed by Tammie Wingen. This summer, however, she moved to Sacramento after her wedding on June 27. Roberts taught at Dana Hills since 1995, a total of 14 years. She met Wingen the day she first set up her classroom. They have been close friends ever since. In 1997, Wingen told Roberts about her aspirations to start a medical academy and invited her on board.

Roberts taught in an academy previously and had always had a serious interest in medicine, thus she accepted without hesitation. Beginning what Roberts considers “a program not matched anywhere in the state.” Both she and Wingen expected to continue running the academy until their retirement, but Arnie Orton walked into Roberts life. Roberts met Orton via an online dating service, and approximately a year ago they began a long-distance relationship. Orton lived in Sacramento and Roberts lived in San Diego. They would fly to see each other every other weekend. Six months after meeting, they were engaged. Orton could not find work in Southern California, nor could Roberts in

Sacramento. The question of who would move was an excruciating one that caused Roberts to “lose much sleep and shed many tears.” In the end, Roberts decided that her husband should be her priority. They were wed in Sacramento on June 27th at the same place Orton proposed. She says she is “blissfully happy” with her marriage and does not regret the decision she made. “Probably the biggest impact is the loss of a motherly figure in the academy’s leadership,” said Wingen. “Students found her very easy to talk to and she got emotionally involved with each of them.” Indeed, the analogy was made that Roberts was the students’ mother and Wingen their

father. They worked well together well, but each had her own well-defined role. Roberts taught the younger students, preparing them for Wingen’s domain. A world of IV lines, lab results, and legal contracts that demands maturity and professionalism with little room for coddling. “Ms. Roberts loved what she did, and this passion passed on to me and motivated me to do my best,” explained junior academy student Katie Halloran. “She left a hole in HMO that will be hard to fill,” Halloran added. Filing Roberts formet position is Jerry Garcia. Garcia has taught Biology and Coordinated Science for sixteen years. Garcia earned her undergraduate degree in Human Biology from Stanford University.

Beware of Swine Flu Epidemic

“Toasters because we pop up and we’re ready to learn.” - Dylan Castagno, 10

By Annie Bubinski Entertainment Editor

A “Lumberjacks for the sake of pancake breakfasts.” - Rachel Albright, 11

photos by Emily Roulund and Emily Cullen

ccording to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, the H1N1 virus could infect 30-50 % of Americans this fall and winter. There have already been several cases of the H1N1 virus, commonly known as swine flu, in students around the school and many more are likely to surface. Junior Teresa Chappell caught a case of the swine flu this past summer while at a medical camp at UCLA. At the camp participants visited hospitals and the virus spread to multiple students in the program. Chappell showed symp-

toms for about a week. After she passed out, for the first time, her mom took her to the doctor. After a series of tests, including blood samples, the doctor informed Chappell that she had caught swine flu. Chappell’s symptoms were similar to those of the common flu and left her feeling aches and pains and much weaker than normal. She experienced a cough and sneezed often. After rest and keeping hydrated, Chappell began to feel an improvement, but unfortunately later passed the virus on to her father. Another student who was recently infected with swine flu was senior Mary Claire Roman. Roman, who caught the virus from her previously in-

fected dad, became sick with the swine flu in early Sept. Roman missed a week of school and suffered from many of the same symptoms as Chappell. After describing her symptoms to the doctor over the telephone, Roman’s pediatrician informed her that it was probably a mild strain of the swine flu that has been going around. Neither patient recieved antibiotics for the epidemic, which are only being used for individuals with extreme symptoms. Dana’s Health Assistant, Gail Martin, has seen only a slight increase in the number of students with the flu. Martin wants students to know, “If you’re sick, stay home, because in the first days of your sickness you are most

contagious.” Martin added to make sure to take precautions to, such as washing your hands and not touching your eyes because this and other viruses are roaming throughout the school. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, students with H1N1 who are suffering from a fever should not return to school until 24 hours after it has subsided. The CDC also states that in California, the virus is not widespread rather it is regional throughout the state. Although the H1N1 virus created quite a scare when it began to spread, Dr. Sanjay Gupta of CNN, explained, “The vast majority of children who develop flu-like symptoms this fall will have a few miserable days, and nothing more.”


THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

FEATURE

PAGE 5 DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

Random Kid Spotlight:

Alyssa Smith: Nationally Ranked Tennis Player By Gina Scott Feature Editor

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or the past six years, freshman Alyssa Smith has been playing tennis. “I am ranked number five in the 14 and under category and in the top 50 for 16 and under,” Smith stated. She is one of the few freshmen on Dana’s competitive Varsity team. In fact, she is already one of the team’s best players. Smith stays in top tennis shape by practicing everyday. She even travels to Carson, California, three days a week to work on her tenns skills. “It has taken a lot of hard work to get to where I am, but

some of it comes naturally to me,” she said modestly. Smith’s entire family plays tennis. Her sister Joanna Smith is also on the Varsity team at Dana, while her two other siblings are away at college. Both of Smith’s parents played tennis in their youth. Most of her time is spent playing tennis matches, practicing tennis, doing athletic conditioning, and thinking about tennis. Basically, her life is tennis. Smith is constantly traveling for tournaments and has visited Florida, Georgia, and Arizona to compete. Although she often travels many places for tennis, she usually doesn’t get to enjoy her time there and relax. “I haven’t gone on a vacation in forever. I go a lot of places, but it’s not for pure en-

joyment, it’s for tennis,” Alyssa reflected. “I love the fact that tennis is an individual sport. It all depends on you and no one else,” she explained. By next year, Smith hopes to be competing in the Junior US Open. When she turns 18, she wants to become a professional tennis player, even though this may make her ineligible to be awarded a college tennis scholarship. However, by becoming a pro, she can make money by doing what she loves: playing tennis. It’s not uncommon for young people to become professional atheletes. Many players who compete in major tournaments are younger than 18. If she can’t play pro tennis, she wants to work in the

sports field, such as being a trainer, coach, or sports medicine doctor. As far as colleges go, she thinks she wants to attend college in Florida or Georgia if she does not choose a California school like her siblings did. Besides being a nationally ranked tennis player, she is also just a normal high school kid. Her favorite school subject is math, but she’s excited for all of her classes. “It’s really crowded, but otherwise it’s been great so far. Being a freshman kind of sucks, but it will get better eventually,” Smith commented on the start of her freshman year. Smith enjoys hanging out with her friends, going to the beach, and running in her very rare spare time.

photo by Emily Roulund

Nationally ranked tennis player at fourteen, Alyssa Smith, enjoys playing for the Varsity team here at Dana.

UC Student Fees Rising 30 Percent in 2010 By Stephanie Wright Sports Editor

U

niversity of California officials recently met to discuss a 30% increase in student fees starting in the middle of the 2010-2011 school year. Half of the increase will be effected mid-year, and the

other half will be implemented the following fall. The increases will limit the number of applicants, as many middle and lower income students will not be able to afford the elevated fees. UC officials expect that an increase in available financial aid in the form of student loans and government grants will cover the increase. Senior Allison Riiska

said, “[my] dad graduated from college over twenty years ago, and he���s still paying off student loans he took out back then,” “If he is still paying now for a loan that covered lower college costs, we will be forced to keep paying for our educations thirty or forty years from now,” she added. Even more than just a student fee hike, the increase is set to raise the cost of room,

board, and books. The overall increase will place the average undergraduate student’s costs at $25,000 (if he or she lives in the dorms). These hikes will bring the UC system to the number three ranked most expensive state school system in the country, just $2,000 behind Illinois and Michigan, according to the Los Angeles Times. That means that for the

first time in history, it costs more to go to a California state school than a state school in New York. Lucero Chavez, President of the Statewide UC Student Association, commented that lower and middle-income students may not even bother to apply for UC financial aid. Many fear that they will not be able to afford it even with the assistance that schools

and governments offer free of charge, which is now more limited due to the current state of the economy. Another measure, already approved by the state Senate, is that UC and Cal State executives will not recieve a pay raise in the years where state funding of the universities does not increase. The bill now sits on Governor Schwarzenegger’s desk.


PAGE 6 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

FEATURE

THE PAPER DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

President Obama Speaks to Students By Pia Bhathal Editor-in-Chief On Tues. Sept. 8, President Barack Obama delivered a national address to students regarding his expectations for the current school year. In several states, the speech sparked controversy, which has allegedly been rooted in partisan politics. Principal Dr. Rob Nye recieved numerous phone calls throughout the morning regarding the speech. He stated, “Many parents called to know if the program was going to be aired school-wide or not.” He continued, “I got calls both ways. Parents who supported the idea as well as those who oppossed it called.” The administration left the issue of airing the speech up to the teachers themselves. If teachers could integrate the broadcast into their curriculum, they could choose to show it to their students.

Although Martha McIntosh’s AP Government and Politics class did not watch the address, they discussed the political aspect of the speech and why it caused dispute. Prior to the broadcast of the address, numerous parents around the nation were enraged that school districts were permitting their children to be exposed to what they believed was Obama’s socialist ideology. Despite widespread opposition, Obama delivered his address as was planned. Speaking from Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia, Obama began his motivational speech by stressing that education will prove unsuccessful unless teachers, parents, the government, and most importantly the students themselves fulfill their respective responsibilities. Throughout his address, he challenged the future leaders of America to develop their talents so that several key issues can be fought and overcome in

the future. Obama stated, “Every single one of you has something to offer. And you have a responsibility to yourself to discover what that is.” In order to make the point that education is absolutely essential, Obama asserted that, contrary to what the media portrays, success will not come as easy as starring in your own reality television show. He stated that everyone will be faced with obstacles and challenges throughout the course of their life and that “some of the most successful people in the world are the ones who’ve had the most failures.” A majority of Obama’s speech centered around his view that students need to take responsibility for their future and work hard to “write [their] own destiny.” However, in accordance with previous addresses, he reiterated that the government will have a vital role in ensuring that public education is effective.

the hearts of Dana Hills’ dolphins. On Sunday, Oct. 11, 2009, join the friends and family of Myers for the third annual 5K run and walk in her memory. The run will begin at 11

a.m. on campus. All proceeds will go the non-profit Megan Myers Memorial Fund, which supports safety and education for local kids. Myers passed away on Sept. 26, 2007 during a cross country meet against Capistrano Valley at Laguna

photo courtesy of Google Images

President Barack Obama addresses students across the nation about personal educational responsibility. He hopes to improve the at-present weakened system through various means.

For example, setting high standards for schools around the nation, supporting

teachers and administrators, and helping struggling schools recuperate financially.

Niguel Recreational Park due to heart failure. Each year the Myers Fund organizes a run in her memory. The 5K course used for the memorial run and walk is the same course used for the Dana Hills Cross Country In-

vitational. The course starts on the softball fields and proceeds across the baseball fields. The course is completed on the track. Myers’ friends and former cross country team members continue to wear “Run for

Megan” t-shirts in her memory. If you are unable to attend the run, donations can be sent to the Megan Myers Memorial Fund, 32545B Golden Lantern #123, Dana Point CA, 92629 or go to http://missmeganmyers.blogspot.com/.

Upcoming 5k Celebrates Megan Myers By Aralyn Beaumont Opinion Editor Just two years after Megan Myers’ tragic death, her spirit continues to run through


THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

PAGE 7 DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

FEATURE

Teachers Satisfied by Supply Drive By Elizabeth Chaddock News Editor

W photo courtesy of Google Images

The Wedge, pumping from this summer’s epic swell, beckoned surfers to grab their boards and hit the beach in hopes of catching waves.

Insane Summer Swell By Aly Vander Hayden Sports Editor

W

hile a South Pacific storm almost destroyed parts of Baja California over the summer, it brought an insane swell to Southern California’s coast with waves reaching 20 feet at various beaches. Many braved the huge surf, while even more people gathered on the beach to watch the numerous surf competitions at the Wedge in Newport Beach. Dana Hills’ body boarders and surfers were among the fearless souls who took on the thrashing waves at Salt Creek.

Surf team members senior Beau Rodgers and junior Sebastian “Sea Bass” Perez went out and caught some “really tubular waves.” “When we got to the water’s edge, we looked at each other hesitantly with butterflies in our stomachs,” stated Rodgers dramatically. The boys, however, became immediately hopeful and knew that they had to enter the water upon seeing “Dan Johnson and the rest of the Rusty team riders killin’ it with their claw,” Rodgers continued. “I noticed Sea Bass on the inside taking some real whompers,” said Rodgers. When Rodgers and Perez paddled out into the eight to ten foot waves they were

instantly pummled by the constant pounding of set after set. Despite this, the boys managed to catch some “epic” waves, even though it was “such small surf” for them. At the end of the day, it was an incredible session for Rodgers, Perez, and the rest of the Creek pack with a only a few barrels, but Sammy Orozco inevitably stated, “Nah, it sucks out there.” Junior body boarder Nick Kouatli dared to take on the 20 foot waves at the Wedge this summer. At the location where a 50 year-old body boarder died, Kouatli was “scared” by the large surf but was able to paddle out into the swell and catch many “awesome” waves. Math teacher and surf

team coach Marc Degen also went down to surf the ten foot waves at Salt Creek. “The beauty of a big day is that a lot of people paddle out, but none of them really surf it,” Degen said. “I just take off.” Degen opted to take on the smaller waves at Salt Creek over the Wedge beacause there is more water under a surfer, which creates a “bigger buffer” with less chance of injuries. “I have fun falling off of big waves,” Degen commented. This storm surge brought some of the largest waves Southern California had seen in five years, and hundreds of people took advantage of this rare Californian occurrence.

ith budget cuts plaguing the school district, little money is left for purchasing school supplies for teachers and students. To present a creative solution to this problem, ASU spearheaded a “Supply Drive” the week of Sept. 14. Students were encouraged to donate school supplies to their fourth period classes. The winning class, Mr. Speidel’s fourth period AP Calculus BC class, earned a pizza party. The class brought in an entire box of copy paper and twelve boxes of tissues, just to name a few items. Speidel said of his class’s victory, “I didn’t think we actually brought enough to win,” adding, “I find it kind of

sad that we have to beg parents and students to bring in supplies. It’s a sign that the public schools are underfunded, which they are.” The drive was started by ASU officer Jillian Burns, who commented, “Our goal with the drive is to help all the teachers at the school get the supplies they need.” The drive did not generate as many supplies as had been hoped for. Junior Kara Ferrari commented, “I don’t think anyone brought anything in my class. Especially in this economy, if people can’t afford their own school supplies, they’re not going to buy some for the school.” Despite this, the PTSA Back to School Night Drive was very successful, and with the combined proceeds of the ASU and PTSA drives, many teachers and students have felt the benefit.

photo by Emily Roulund

Supplies donated by students show an understanding of economic difficulties for the entire school.


CENTERSPR EA D

THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

CENTERSPR EA D

Turn On Tu n e In 10/2/09

From Elizabeth Chaddock, The Paper

This article is not actually an entry on Wikipedia. For other uses, see Internet (disambiguation).

Imagine life without the Internet. It’s a scary thought. No Facebook, no YouTube videos, no MyLifeIsAverage, no more iChats, no Wikipedia (you would actually have to visit the library to do research!). However, just 19 years ago this was the case. According to Wikipedia, the World Wide Web was created during the 1990s in Switzerland as a way for businesses to connect their computers to share information, especially between business partners overseas. AP Computer Science teacher Glenn Forster was the first student to ever use a computer at Dana Hills back in 1982. He commented, “In 1995, the Internet as we know it took off. That’s the year that many of this year’s freshmen were born.” Thus, they are the true “Internet generation.” Considering that mankind has existed for upwards of 30,000 years, it is remarkable that we have become so dependent on the Internet in such a small span of time and that it has developed at such an exponential rate. Special Education teacher Mike Weinell remembers writing his thesis in 1981, when he paid $600 to have automatic whiteout to use on his typewriter, exclaiming, “That was huge; it was a big breakthrough!” Since then, the Internet has increasingly come to mean so much more to people who depend on it every day for basic communication and social functions. We have email, Facebook, eBay, and a plethora of information and entertainment at our fingertips. With all these resources, what we can learn is virtually limitless! In the future, Internet speed and bandwidth will increase (computer capabilities double every two years). According to www. thelivinginternet.com, it is also possible that higher quality three-dimensional graphics and even virtual reality applications will become more widely available to Internet users. The cost of Internet connection is expected to drop with time as well, and easier access to portable wireless Internet is expected. While the Internet has done great things, it has also introduced a new dimension of danger into our lives. People can stalk others online and transmit viruses to others’ computers. There is also Internet fraud and illegal music piracy, which has led to a major collapse of parts of the music industry. The government of North Korea takes these dangers very seriously: they block the Internet entirely, according to The New York Times. We should appreciate that we have access to the Internet and exercise responsibility when using it, especially as its capabilities increase.

Gina Scott

Remember the first cell phones, or car phones as we used to call them? They were bulky and inconvenient. But over the years, phones have progressively improved. Cell phones have become thinner, and some snazzy features have been added. I can recall the excitement I felt when I was presented with my first camera phone so many years ago. Back in the day, a Motorola Razr was the phone that only the coolest kids had. In the few short years since the Razr craze, phones have probably developed the most that they have since their initial conception in the ’70s (although they weren’t mass marketed until 1984). Now we have text messaging, mobile Internet, games, music storing capabilities, voice recognition, and more. But possibly the most significant innovation has been the touch screen. Most phones now have touch screens and anything else we could ever possibly want plus much more, the most notable of these phones being the iPhone. The iPhone has new applications available practically every day and is continually being improved. A new model is coming out in the near future. Despite this, there are parts of the world with even more advanced cell phone technology. For example, according to Chris Nickson of Digital Trends, the Japanese, have developed a wrist videophone that looks like it came out of a “Spy Kids” movie. There are so many possibilities for cell phones that no one quite knows what the next great innovation will be.

Cars of Tomorrow:

Which social networking site do you use?!

Annie Li 11

Drop Out Most students cannot get through a single class without texting their friends, playing games on the latest iPhone applications, checking their Facebook statuses, or taking embarrassing photos of their teachers, but what if our entire world were to become completely… Unplugged? “A life without technology? Well that’s simply not a life at all!” stated senior Alex Bradley.      Some of us would be saved from the slightly scandalous Facebook photo uploads weekend escapades. The rest of us would plagerize without the infamous turnitin.com our 75% similarity rating. Other than that, and chaos would erupt from the student body.

from our be able to reporting on complete madness

“Sometimes I leave myself voicemails so that I can listen to them in crowded places and pretend like I have friends. My cell phone is my BFF,” stated senior Taylor Morosco.      Even if we do not realize it, we are completely “plugged-in” to technology throughout the entire day. With our Internet-accessed cell phones with cameras, high tech cars with GPS, HD TVs, and our everything computers, we constantly use these technologies to make our daily life easier and more entertaining.      Without navigators or GPS, how would we know when to arrive at our destination on the left in 157 feet? And without TV how would we be amused for hours on end by pointless yet addictive shows?      “Without TV I wouldn’t get to watch my husband, Chuck Bass, on ‘Gossip Girl’ every Monday night,” commented senior Anais Ziae-Mohseni. A world without the tantalizing Chuck Bass? We truly would have reached the apocalypse.      We are reliant on technology for everything, especially quick and easy communication. Though the print newspaper industry would immediately bounce back, we would feel the crippling effects of an unplugged world. We would have no simple way to contact our friends, get news, or write papers quickly. While many people immensely appretiate how technology has sped up our way of life, most fail to realize how deeply rooted it is in our daily routines.      As senior Carla Reyes simply stated, “Without blogging, I wouldn’t be as influential as I am today… or spread propaganda half as fast.” -Aly Vander Hayden

Hybrid and electric cars are becoming increasingly popular in the Dana Hills parking lot as fuel prices inevitably rise, but as long as they require the burning of gasoline, they don’t function as a progressive piece of technology. The electricity that powers a Toyota Prius, for example, has to be generated in a power plant that runs on oil. Therefore, driving a Prius contradicts the purpose of saving the environment. Distancing oneself from the gas consumption does not eliminate it. That is where the Honda Clarity proves astonishing. The Clarity is a revolutionary car because instead of using electricity made from fossil fuels, it creates its own electricity on board through the use of a hydrogen cell. You fill it up just like any car, except instead of using petrol, you fill it up with eco-friendly hydrogen. Since hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, we will never run out. The hydrogen fuels an electric generator that powers the front wheels, and the only emission is water vapor. The best part about the Clarity is that drivers don’t need to change their habits to drive it. There is no recharging the battery. As James May of the show Top Gear puts it, the Honda Clarity “is the car of tomorrow because it’s just like the car of today.” -Matt McCreadie

Facebook, because I love stalking my friends

PAGE 8-9

Social networking sites have become extremely prevalent in the modern world. The average user spends four and a half hours on Facebook per day. In June alone, Facebook users logged in over one billion hours, making it the number one-visited website in the world. As for Twitter, it has grown exponentially in the past years, with major news corporations and celebrities “tweeting” to reach their viewers. 3 seconds ago clear

I prefer networking by mail. It is good for the economy and good for America

Neil Gandhi 12

I do not social network Eric Cho 12

I <3 Facebook! It makes my world go round Chris Thompson 11


CENTERSPR EA D

THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

CENTERSPR EA D

Turn On Tu n e In 10/2/09

From Elizabeth Chaddock, The Paper

This article is not actually an entry on Wikipedia. For other uses, see Internet (disambiguation).

Imagine life without the Internet. It’s a scary thought. No Facebook, no YouTube videos, no MyLifeIsAverage, no more iChats, no Wikipedia (you would actually have to visit the library to do research!). However, just 19 years ago this was the case. According to Wikipedia, the World Wide Web was created during the 1990s in Switzerland as a way for businesses to connect their computers to share information, especially between business partners overseas. AP Computer Science teacher Glenn Forster was the first student to ever use a computer at Dana Hills back in 1982. He commented, “In 1995, the Internet as we know it took off. That’s the year that many of this year’s freshmen were born.” Thus, they are the true “Internet generation.” Considering that mankind has existed for upwards of 30,000 years, it is remarkable that we have become so dependent on the Internet in such a small span of time and that it has developed at such an exponential rate. Special Education teacher Mike Weinell remembers writing his thesis in 1981, when he paid $600 to have automatic whiteout to use on his typewriter, exclaiming, “That was huge; it was a big breakthrough!” Since then, the Internet has increasingly come to mean so much more to people who depend on it every day for basic communication and social functions. We have email, Facebook, eBay, and a plethora of information and entertainment at our fingertips. With all these resources, what we can learn is virtually limitless! In the future, Internet speed and bandwidth will increase (computer capabilities double every two years). According to www. thelivinginternet.com, it is also possible that higher quality three-dimensional graphics and even virtual reality applications will become more widely available to Internet users. The cost of Internet connection is expected to drop with time as well, and easier access to portable wireless Internet is expected. While the Internet has done great things, it has also introduced a new dimension of danger into our lives. People can stalk others online and transmit viruses to others’ computers. There is also Internet fraud and illegal music piracy, which has led to a major collapse of parts of the music industry. The government of North Korea takes these dangers very seriously: they block the Internet entirely, according to The New York Times. We should appreciate that we have access to the Internet and exercise responsibility when using it, especially as its capabilities increase.

Gina Scott

Remember the first cell phones, or car phones as we used to call them? They were bulky and inconvenient. But over the years, phones have progressively improved. Cell phones have become thinner, and some snazzy features have been added. I can recall the excitement I felt when I was presented with my first camera phone so many years ago. Back in the day, a Motorola Razr was the phone that only the coolest kids had. In the few short years since the Razr craze, phones have probably developed the most that they have since their initial conception in the ’70s (although they weren’t mass marketed until 1984). Now we have text messaging, mobile Internet, games, music storing capabilities, voice recognition, and more. But possibly the most significant innovation has been the touch screen. Most phones now have touch screens and anything else we could ever possibly want plus much more, the most notable of these phones being the iPhone. The iPhone has new applications available practically every day and is continually being improved. A new model is coming out in the near future. Despite this, there are parts of the world with even more advanced cell phone technology. For example, according to Chris Nickson of Digital Trends, the Japanese, have developed a wrist videophone that looks like it came out of a “Spy Kids” movie. There are so many possibilities for cell phones that no one quite knows what the next great innovation will be.

Cars of Tomorrow:

Which social networking site do you use?!

Annie Li 11

Drop Out Most students cannot get through a single class without texting their friends, playing games on the latest iPhone applications, checking their Facebook statuses, or taking embarrassing photos of their teachers, but what if our entire world were to become completely… Unplugged? “A life without technology? Well that’s simply not a life at all!” stated senior Alex Bradley.      Some of us would be saved from the slightly scandalous Facebook photo uploads weekend escapades. The rest of us would plagerize without the infamous turnitin.com our 75% similarity rating. Other than that, and chaos would erupt from the student body.

from our be able to reporting on complete madness

“Sometimes I leave myself voicemails so that I can listen to them in crowded places and pretend like I have friends. My cell phone is my BFF,” stated senior Taylor Morosco.      Even if we do not realize it, we are completely “plugged-in” to technology throughout the entire day. With our Internet-accessed cell phones with cameras, high tech cars with GPS, HD TVs, and our everything computers, we constantly use these technologies to make our daily life easier and more entertaining.      Without navigators or GPS, how would we know when to arrive at our destination on the left in 157 feet? And without TV how would we be amused for hours on end by pointless yet addictive shows?      “Without TV I wouldn’t get to watch my husband, Chuck Bass, on ‘Gossip Girl’ every Monday night,” commented senior Anais Ziae-Mohseni. A world without the tantalizing Chuck Bass? We truly would have reached the apocalypse.      We are reliant on technology for everything, especially quick and easy communication. Though the print newspaper industry would immediately bounce back, we would feel the crippling effects of an unplugged world. We would have no simple way to contact our friends, get news, or write papers quickly. While many people immensely appretiate how technology has sped up our way of life, most fail to realize how deeply rooted it is in our daily routines.      As senior Carla Reyes simply stated, “Without blogging, I wouldn’t be as influential as I am today… or spread propaganda half as fast.” -Aly Vander Hayden

Hybrid and electric cars are becoming increasingly popular in the Dana Hills parking lot as fuel prices inevitably rise, but as long as they require the burning of gasoline, they don’t function as a progressive piece of technology. The electricity that powers a Toyota Prius, for example, has to be generated in a power plant that runs on oil. Therefore, driving a Prius contradicts the purpose of saving the environment. Distancing oneself from the gas consumption does not eliminate it. That is where the Honda Clarity proves astonishing. The Clarity is a revolutionary car because instead of using electricity made from fossil fuels, it creates its own electricity on board through the use of a hydrogen cell. You fill it up just like any car, except instead of using petrol, you fill it up with eco-friendly hydrogen. Since hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, we will never run out. The hydrogen fuels an electric generator that powers the front wheels, and the only emission is water vapor. The best part about the Clarity is that drivers don’t need to change their habits to drive it. There is no recharging the battery. As James May of the show Top Gear puts it, the Honda Clarity “is the car of tomorrow because it’s just like the car of today.” -Matt McCreadie

Facebook, because I love stalking my friends

PAGE 8-9

Social networking sites have become extremely prevalent in the modern world. The average user spends four and a half hours on Facebook per day. In June alone, Facebook users logged in over one billion hours, making it the number one-visited website in the world. As for Twitter, it has grown exponentially in the past years, with major news corporations and celebrities “tweeting” to reach their viewers. 3 seconds ago clear

I prefer networking by mail. It is good for the economy and good for America

Neil Gandhi 12

I do not social network Eric Cho 12

I <3 Facebook! It makes my world go round Chris Thompson 11


PAGE 10 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE PAPER DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

OPINION

The Poisonous Health Care Debate n Clearly health care reform is necessary in the United States, and president Obama’s proposals are more feasible than they seem. By Salil Dudani Staff Writer The United States spends more money on health care than any other developed nation, yet its system alienates more citizens than any other. An estimated 50 million Americans are currently in need of insurance. As President Obama stated in his most recent address to Congress, 14,000 insured people lose their coverage every day. The pervasive misinformation surrounding the issue would be humorous were it not effective—as Fox News reminds us, Americans are outraged. The Democrats’ socialism is unacceptable and un-American, it is said. Obama’s policies have been likened to those of Nazi Germany, and a segment of the opposition honestly believes that “death panels,” to judge the value of senior citizens’ lives, are part of the bill. It is clear which side has won the war of lies. But the President’s proposals should not be so difficult to understand. The essence of his plan is to make health insurance mandatory for all citizens. With this mandate would come research for improving our grossly wasteful medicinal system, regulations to end some of the more unethical practices of insurance companies, and a public option comparable to Medicare for those who need it now. The idea that anything government-run is innately ineffective and inefficient does not stand up to any serious inspection. For example, Medicare and Medicaid have proven themselves more than sufficient. Perhaps the most legitimate argument offered by the opposition is concern over the costs such ambitious reform would require, which various sources predict to be between $750,000 and a trillion dollars over the next 10 years. This number needs to be put into perspective to really be understood. Our annual Gross Domestic Product is over $14 trillion; if military expenditures merit such a large piece of that pie, so should our citizens’ health. Students here at Dana should not be so apathetic; we depend on our parents for our coverage, and an improvement in their health care means an improvement in ours. This debate has been clouded by bitter partisanship. People seem trapped in the paradigm of conservative vs. liberal, Republican vs. Democrat, “small government” vs. “big government.” But when all these political games are cast aside, an ugly truth continues to stare us in the face: until something is done for the millions of Americans who are denied the fundamental right to their health, we cannot call ourselves a just society.

Pro

n Despite the necessity for health care reform in America, President Obama’s plan cannot be successfully carried out without dire financial consequences. By Stephanie Wright Sports Editor The governmental and public conflict over health care has been a long and difficult one. Division along party lines, formerly very pronounced, has begun to blur as Congressmen of a leftist persuasion break from their fellow Democrats to err on the side of Conservatives. And although it is not done as a result of ideological differences, it does give power to the right side of the aisle, which has banded together to block the public option. It is that aspect of the bill that today is the most controversial clause. That’s not to say that the bill being proposed is completely useless. In fact, there are many parts of the bill being discussed that both political parties can agree on. The idea that insurance companies cannot drop policy holders who become sick, for example, is generally applauded by members of both parties. The public option, however, is an idea that should not even be considered. Not only is the idea so far left as to be labeled socialist, but it would put our already struggling economy on the brink of total collapse. We don’t need another Great Depression. But now, since the economy has begun to make small improvements, the progress we are seeing cannot be delayed or reversed for the sake of the general welfare of the average low-income American. Any suggestion of this nature should be put aside until the economy is stronger and capable of taking such a hit. At this point, the health insurance industry is one of a select few in the country that is not facing extreme financial difficulty or the possibility of collapse. This is one circumstance that is helping to keep our heads above water. In addition to supplying millions of Americans with health care, insurance companies also supply thousands more with jobs, which, with current unemployment rates, is absolutely essential. These benefits would be forfeited if the public option is passed. Private insurance companies cannot compete with free, government-sponsored health insurance, and neither should they have to. Private companies would lose revenue as a result of holders switching providers. The lack of revenue would not be the only negative consequence economically. It would also force the companies to downsize, laying off workers and eliminating muchneeded positions. This could easily affect many of the students right here at Dana. Students are, for the most part, insured under their parents’ health coverage. It’s this simple: if they lose coverage, we lose coverage.

Con

Another Way to Waste the Day By Alexa Cotcamp Sports Editor It all started with a moo. Just when you thought the wonderful world of social networking could not become any more ridiculous…It did. Call it an epidemic, an addiction, an ideal way to waste your life staring at a computer screen. Or, in the case of over 45,000,000 people, call it Farmville. The concept is simple: Facebook users everywhere are able to start a plot of land where they can grow virtual crops, tend to plants, and raise livestock. When I first heard about Farmville a few months ago, I’ll admit, I was amused. Truth be told, who doesn’t love a corny video game every now and then? Unfortunately, it seems safe to say that Farmville has become an unhealthy obsession. When comments such as, “Does anybody have an iPhone I could borrow

to replant my crops before break ends?” or “Dude, I just earned my red ribbon” can be heard on a daily basis, we have nothing short of a rampant plague on our hands. Honestly, I know Old McDonald and his legendary farm are a force to be reckoned with, but I doubt even he would endorse dedicating numerous hours to nurturing overly-peppy cows and pigs. If four-legged mooers just happen to be your thing, try considering the fact that California has the top five agricultural counties in the country. I see no reason why you can’t be one with your cow brethren there. Cultural phenomenon?! I’ve heard the election of Obama described as a cultural phenomenon, but an online hick town simulator? As if that weren’t absurd enough, Farmville’s popularity soared due to the newest update which introduces the use of “Farm Cash.” The irony? Farm Cash is obtained by paying real cash. Real cash? Yup. Real Life? Nope. Real stupid? Most definitely.

Payroll Cutback Unfair It is the opinion of The Paper that... Capistrano Unified School District has recovered from the $25 million deficit that threatened over 500 jobs and numerous programs last year. With a balanced budget for this year, no further cutbacks are necessary to maintain a healthy checkbook. However, CUSD is still pushing the Capistrano Unified Education Association to accept an unreasonable proposal that would financially strain teachers district-wide. CUSD’s proposal includes provisions that would cut teacher’s paychecks by 10%, reduce the school year by five days, and require them to purchase health insurance through alternative insurance providers beginning in 2010. The severity of these extreme provisions begs the question: why enact additional cutbacks when CUSD already has a balanced budget? Bringing payroll levels down to approximately the 2005-2006 level is irrational. Teachers already work long, tiring hours for insufficient pay and do not deserve to have their contracts violated by CUSD, especially when none of the aforementioned proposals are required for this year. If salaries are reduced, CUSD will stand second to last place in Orange County in terms of base salary. How does CUSD expect to recruit new teachers if compensation is so low? Furthermore, forcing employees to purchase coverage from private companies in addition to pay cuts is extreme. Singling out one particular group of employees without prior notice is “creating a bigger divide between management and the employees they supervise,” as CUEA President, Vicki Soderburg, correctly stated. Therefore CUSD- work with our teachers, rather than against them. Negotiate a reasonable and responsible settlement during impasse mediation before this negative climate creates a dispute that endangers the quality of our education.

THE PAPER

33333 Golden Lantern, Dana Point CA 92629 Rm. 708 (949) 240-9497 E-mail: dhhspaper@gmail.com Website: www.dhhspaper.com Editor-in-Chief News Editors Feature Editors

Opinion Editors Centerspread Editor Entertainment Editors Sports Editors Copy Editor Photo Editors Advertising Sales Subscriptions Computer Technician Website Manager Adviser

Pia Bhathal Jake Rosen Elizabeth Chaddock Gina Scott Marilyn La Jeunesse Sara Gold Gillian Slee Devin Valenciano Aralyn Beaumont Ben Lim Andrew English Tyler Hartung Annie Bubinski Alexa Cotcamp Aly Vander Hayden Stephanie Wright Sara Gold Emily Roulund Emily Cullen Alexa Cotcamp Jake Rosen Tyler Hartung Ben Lim Alan Reeve Ben Lim Paige Gilbert

Writers: Aralyn Beaumont, Pia Bhathal, Annie Bubinski, Elizabeth Chaddock, Stephanie Cheng, Lexi Cotcamp, Emily Cullen, Salil Dudani, Andrew English, Sara Gold, Tyler Hartung, Marilyn La Jeunesse, Ben Lim, Matt McCreadie, Jake Rosen, Gina Scott, Gillian Slee, Devin Valenciano, Aly Vander Hayden, Claudia Varney, Stephanie Wright Photographers: Emily Roulund, Emily Cullen Distribution: Mrs. Prescott-Gilbert’s 4th Period Lifesavers: Thomas Carney, Jesse Sharps, Anais ZiaeMohseni The Paper is published monthly throughout the year by Dana Hills High School newspaper students. Comments and editorial opinions expressed in The Paper are those of the staff and do not represent the position of Dana Hills High School, its administration, student government, or that of the Capistrano Unified School District.


THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

PAGE 11 DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

OPINION

To Tweet or Not to Tweet, That ‘Tis the Question By Matt McCreadie Staff Writer

Online social networking has become a key part of life. It seems like everyone has some way of posting their life on the Internet, but where did Twitter come from? And, frankly, what is the point? First of all, it is surprising to see a new competitor in the social networking scene, since MySpace and Facebook already have many loyal users. Somehow, though, Twitter has crept its way onto our computer screens. It seems like few can say when it became relevant, yet celebrities of all sorts tweet about upcoming appearances, and many organizations spread word of their causes via Twitter. But still, I am

unable to see the attraction. Most people who use Twitter are normal people with ordinary lives. Therefore, it is hard to imagine why these people feel they must announce details of their personal lives in characterrestricted messages, especially when there is no specific recipient in mind. And couldn’t they post it just as easily, and perhaps more clearly, on either MySpace or Facebook? Twitter is a rather exhibitionist means of virtual interaction. There is no real conversation between Tweeters, just people briefly stating their actions or emotions. If you think about it, the status section alone on MySpace is essentially the entire Twitter website. Maybe the attraction has to do with a trend towards minimalism. With today’s world being as complicated as it is, why use a social website that is just as complex? Or maybe the attraction is power. Not allowing others to

reply to what you say gives you the confidence to say whatever you want, consequence free. Twitter did have a shining moment of purpose this summer, though. Had it not been for Twitter, we may not have received the detailed accounts of the level of violence going on in post-election Iran. Tweets from Iranians gave us the minute-to-minute reports on the story, but I can’t help but think that if Twitter hadn’t existed, the information would have still spread through some other electronic highway. During this year’s VMA Awards pre-show, hosts were hyping the number of Tweets posted about Lady Gaga as she walked on stage for the first time. Is this critical information? Is it exciting to watch a number go up on a screen that tells how many people can repeat each other? Is this kind of information exclusive to Twitter? It is difficult to see the draw of Twitter when it already exists but with more functions. Twice.

Dispute over the Legitimacy of Standardized Testing By Stephanie Cheng Staff Writer

A numbers game has plagued students, teachers, and administrations of schools nationwide. Be it the CST, the SAT, or the ACT, standardized testing has become an integral part of education. Unfortunately, standardized testing has been erroneously placed on a shining pedestal; however it does not accurately measure achievement. After all, a test score is but a number, and intelligence and aptitude simply cannot be quantified. Everyone understands—or pretends to understand—the great significance of “high” scores.

Students and educators alike are led to believe that there is a magic number which, once attained, miraculously opens doors to opportunity. Students are placed under more stress, believing that they will never be successful lest they earn these magical scores. Schools focus more on the flat numbers than on their students’ actual education and achievement. California’s API, the so-called “cornerstone” of the Public Schools Accountability Act of 1999, has put pressure on administrations to push for greater improvement and higher achievement. These programs, meant to produce “better” students, spend taxpayers’ money to create scantronbubbling, multiple-choice-answer-eliminating robots. Pushing students to perform well on these tests teaches them nothing of substantial value. Standardized testing essentially involves considerable knowledge of test

strategies and patterns and little curriculum-based knowledge. Someone who may not be well-versed in the subject matter but is adept with test strategies could score better than a more knowledgeable student. Furthermore, test results are heavily impacted by non-academic factors such as quality of life at home and financial situation. Those families that can afford to pay for preparation classes and materials for these tests undoubtedly help to boost their students’ scores, whereas students who are facing financial hardship may not score as high, even if they are more academically gifted. The truth is that a test score, whether a 2400 on the SAT or the ACT’s 36, only measures a student’s ability to take multiple-choice tests. There are students that are academically gifted but are simply not good at taking tests, students whose scores do them no good.

his/her parents for not getting an “A” on a test. Many parents blame the student for not studying or trying hard enough, but students perform better without the constant fear of consequences in their heads. Students should be rewarded for achieving high grades, not scared into them by their parents. Parental pressure isn’t the only cause of a student’s poor academic performance. Students are simply not getting enough sleep. With the effect of pressure to score well on tests combined with distractions of cell phones, computers, social networking, etc., many students simply cannot find time to sleep. Most students only get about six to seven hours of sleep at night, some even less, but research proves that students perform better when they get at least ten

hours of sleep. Sleep isn’t the only necessity that students are lacking. Students need more down time, time to relax. Students taking AP, accelerated, and honors courses at school find that homework is overwhelming and requires them to work until they fall asleep. High schoolers need more time to do whatever they want, hang out with friends, or express their creativity. Students cannot grow and mature if they cannot find time to have fun. Most students understand the importance of succeeding in school, but the combined effects of pressure, lack of sleep, and lack of free time are causing some students to fall down the school’s rankings. These detrimental influences need to change, so that students can succeed in high school and have a better chance of entering college.

What is Draining Students of Academic Potential? By Andrew English Centerspread Editor

With the budget crisis in California and the increasing competitiveness of getting into college, who is to blame for a student’s declining grades? More and more students are finding it harder to achieve satisfactory grades in school. But what is the cause? The overall pressure to succeed from parents, a lack of sleep, and not enough time to relax in a calm environment are all contributing factors to this ongoing issue. Every student knows how it feels to be scolded by

Letters to the Editor n Homecoming Theme Disappoints This year’s homecoming theme is disappointing to say the least. The themes of the past three years (super heroes, board games, and famous couples) were not only imaginative, but tasteful. I am ashamed at the lack of imagination involved in coming up with this year’s theme, especially after Pixar Perfect was turned down. Modes of transportation, especially the seniors’ motorcycles, is easily just another excuse for students to wear revealing clothing and show off their inappropriate dance moves. The audience at the homecoming game consists not only of students, but also families who need to be taken into consideration. It’s embarrassing to be represented by your classmates in the half time show when you can hear

the disgusted remarks of the parents sitting next to you. Although some students may consider rude language and tasteless behavior acceptable in certain social situations, they need to clean up their act for a family oriented audience that is present at football games among other public events that the school hosts. Aside from only the theme itself, what is also extremely insulting is the way in which it was chosen. While the Senior Director of Activities is left in charge of dance themes every year, the opinions of other members of ASU and the student body as a whole are usually taken into consideration. I propose that students vote on the multiple options (offered by ASU) for dance themes. That way, whether it’s appropriate or not, at least everyone’s voice is represented fairly. - Stephanie Smith

n No Soap in the Bathrooms During the first week of school I was surprised to find seat covers, toilet paper, and soap (suds, really) in the bathrooms. Most of last year, the rest rooms boasted none of these amenities. However, I was disappointed to find that the soap has quickly disappeared. While I am still proud of Dana Hills for, at least momentarily, offering toilet paper, not providing soap is not only inconvenient, but also unsanitary. Ironically, papers are posted between the sinks in the large downstairs bathroom encouraging students to thoroughly wash their hands with soap. I assume that these posters were put up as a response to the growing threat that swine flu poses to school campuses. Although not having the resources to wash your hands in the bathroom is disgusting anytime, in light of the H1N1

and its prevalence on high school and college campuses, not supplying soap is negligent to student and faculty health. Even though our state and district face financial and personnel issues, preventing the spread of germs by making soap available should be of greater importance. - Meagan Vigus n Academic Ninja Seeks Deeper Answers In our school, there are those who take an active part in their high school experience. These are the team captains, the club presidents, the editors-in-chief. They participate in various clubs and sports. They are in the top of their class. These people are the ones who are at school longer than at home. They are SOCSA’s stars, athletics’ champions, and academic’s brightest minds. We all know who they are, and we question how they

have so much time. However, the question that we all ask is, “Why?” To them I ask, for what do they spend the extra time and energy? Is it for pride? Is it for colleges? I ask them to answer. And no, I don’t want to hear the prefabricated, college interview answers. No. Truly, what drives you? Do you simply join a multitude of clubs, hold several offices, practice and rehearse for hours upon end, take countless classes so you can put it on your college application, or do you truly have a vested interest in those activities that drive you to go above and beyond what is required of you, not for your own sake, but for the wellbeing and growth of what you are a part of? Do you have that spark of passion that gives you pride in your work and in what you accomplish? Ask yourself these things and tell me: Why? - Eric Cho

n Hall Crowds Continue to Frustrate This school is absolutely insanely crowded. I must say it sucks. I personally think it is ridiculous that I can’t walk from the mall to the outside portables without walking into someone! I think that most students would definitely agree with me on this one. I think that we need to have some solution to the annoying and crazy crowded halls. Did our school gain an epic amount of students this year? I don’t know how to solve this personally but it needs to happen soon. - Sean Jackson LETTERS POLICY

Please submit legibly written, signed letters to room 708 during second, fourth, and fifth period to Mrs. Gilbert’s mailbox in the office, or to dhhspaper@gmail.com. The staff reserves the right to delete or condense letters to meet space requirements. Unsigned letters will not be accepted.


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THE PAPER DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

ENTERTAINMENT

Blink-182 Back Together and Better than Ever By Tyler Hartung Entertainment Editor

When it was reported that alternative-rock band Blink-182 was reuniting this year after four years apart, the resounding question asked by nearly everyone was “Do Mark, Tom, and Travis still have it?” And by “it,” the public means the ability to use their music to make fun of themselves and everyone around them, as well as mix in the mature side they showed on their last album. The answer, without a doubt, is yes. From the moment the curtain descended on the

stage and the band ripped into “Dumpweed,”, Sept. 17 was a night to remember. The trio, based out of San Diego, pulled almost the entire setlist from its Greatest Hits album, ranging from the group’s beginnings in 1994 all the way to 2003. However, the band members also blended in a few lesser-known tunes, such as “Stockholm Syndrome,” and the anti-authority rant entitled “Anthem Part 2.” Blink was able to relentlessly bring the energy throughout the show. It appeared that they were all having a great time on stage as they played most of their fan favorites, including “All the Small Things” and “I Miss You.” Along with their great

stage presence, the dudes also have had the ability over the years to keep their crowds laughing hysterically with their foul-mouthed jokes. They proved that this had not disappeared at all, as guitarist/singer Tom DeLonge and bassist/singer Mark Hoppus fired off sex jokes and “your mom” cracks at each other. Although these two are the stars, it is clear that the two of them would be nothing without their third member, drummer Travis Barker. Barker relentlessly pounded his drum kit from start to finish; making it clear that his drumming prowess is unmatched by anyone else in his generation. In fact, the highlight of the night took place after the

photo courtesy of KROQ

Playing for thousands of fans, bassist/singer Mark Hoppus of Blink-182 rocks out. set was over. Barker came out by himself and performed the most mind-blowing drum solo

ever witnessed. After Barker did his thing, DeLonge and Hoppus

rejoined him on stage. Blink-182 fans around the world rejoice: they’re back.

The Masters Remastered: Revisting the Birth of Modern Music By Devin Valenciano Opinion Editor

On the eighth day of Creation, the Lord of Rock looked at the world and saw that man was good. He wanted to reward His subjects, but He could not conjure a gift which He found sufficient. In a sudden stroke of ge-

nius, the Lord had a revelation. Focusing His legendary powers onto the task, the Lord sent to His humble followers His magnum opus – now walking upon the earth were four British men of unspeakable musical prowess. Beatlemania had begun. Over forty years ago, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr began a music career of unprecedented proportions, taking the world by storm and

transforming the industry forever. An endless stream of defining hits, a tributary from the ocean of their genius, flowed strong for almost ten years. But perfection is a fickle phenomenon, ephemeral in nature and impossible to capture and enjoy for too long. Before the world was ready, the Beatles left us forever; today, however, their legacy is far from forgotten. It is difficult to find a person who

has not been graced by one of the timeless classics that made their career so signature. For the last four years, some of the music industry’s top sound technicians have been fine-tuning the entire Beatles collection, allowing every Beatles song to be played in stereo instead of mono. Perfection was reborn on Sept. 9 when “Beatles Remastered” finally became available to the public, a dream for any enam-

ored fan of the band. I’ve heard the music thousands of times, and now I’ve listened to the Beatles in stereo; to be honest, the experience has not changed. The fact of the matter is, the Beatles were excellent before and the same can be said now. The magnificence emanating from every Beatles song is not the result of the volume or sound quality, but instead is some irreplaceable element that

will keep each track running through your mind for hours. For people horribly deprived of the Beatles, this is an excellent opportunity to reverse the damage that has been done to you – go and buy an album and prepare to have your musical outlook altered forever. The rest of you normal people, listen to the albums you already have. The Beatles are the Beatles no matter how well you can hear them.


THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

Arctic Monkeys Stun the Crowd By Jake Rosen News Editor Although their physical appearances have changed, British sensation the Arctic Monkeys have not. Their unique blend of catchy hooks, British pop, and American alternative has stayed constant. Their performance at the Hollywood Palladium on September 15 was only the second US date of the Humbug tour. The night opened on a slower note with “Dance Little Liar”. The crowd, many displaying personalized signs and Union Jacks, went into a frenzy when the group took the stage. Fans escalated into utter pandemonium when the band

proceeded into the next song, “Brianstorm.” Sweat-covered fans sang along with the lyrics while violently pushing into each other. Despite Humbug being more slow and steady than previous albums, the crowd was pleased with the set. The Monkeys played several old stand-bys, including “I Bet You Look Good on the Dance Floor,” “A View From the Afternoon,” and “Still Take You Home” from Whatever People Say, That’s What I’m Not. These songs pleased new and old fans alike. They also added “Fluorescent Adolescent,” and “If You Were There Beware” from Favourite Worst Nightmare. Throughout the night, singer Alex Turner commented

Crowds and Critics in Disbelief After

“The Informant!” By Devin Valenciano Opinion Editor

photo couresy of Google Images

Performing at the Hollywood Palladium, The Arctic Monkeys make fans go bananas over their live show. on the crowd and their city, saying, “I love saying the name Los Angeles and you will find me saying it many times tonight.” The Monkeys ended the set with “Do Me A Favour,” a somber yet upbeat tune about an old girlfriend. The band left the stage with the crowd pleading for more. It only took about

three minutes for the band to return with “Secret Door,” sending the crowd into a hypnotic trance of wonder. The Arctic Monkeys finally ended the night with “505,” one of the slowest songs in their arsenal. Towards the end, each member walked off individually, leaving their fans in amazement.

“Fame” Reinvents Attitude of Original By Marilyn La Jeunesse Feature Editor The highly anticipated film, “Fame”, arrived in theaters Friday, September 25, complete with a contemporary twist on Alan Parker’s 1980s original. The new version of “Fame” modernizes the personality of the characters and adds current music to the sound track. However, after remaking the movie, the new version

of “Fame” was watered down to the point that all the classic scenes of the original were missing. In order to fill the gaps where the more memorable scenes of “Fame” were supposed to be, the screenwriters had to adjust the story line. As a result they focused more on the performing arts aspect of the movie, rather than on the hardships that the characters underwent in order to gain acceptance into the prestigious school. Compared to the original characters, who were realis-

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tic and more relatable, the new characters were flat and were the typical twenty first century cliché. The advertisements for “Fame” make the viewer believe the new movie is all about singing and dancing. The movie shows the progression of the individual students throughout their four years of high school, which eventually leads to the muchanticipated final performances. These performances, which showcased new songs and new choreography, were a clear positive improvement to

the original film. Unfortunately, it seems as though the screenwriters were solely trying to make an entirely new movie while adding snippets of the original in order to use the well-known title “Fame” to entice moviegoers. If you are seeing “Fame” for the first time, you will be quite satisfied with the movie’s story line. However if you have seen the original, you will be spending the whole time comparing the two movies instead of enjoying the film.

Unbelievable. That is the single word that covers each “Informant!” movie poster, overwhelming everything with its massive font. Somewhere behind the neat white lettering is an image of Matt Damon dressed as the character he portrays, a young business man named Mark Whitacre. Damon has his mouth slightly ajar with the tinge of a smirk - that coupled with a pair of eyes that scream incredulity suggests that he simply cannot believe what is happening. By the end of “The Informant!”, your face should look astoundingly similar. The movie, based on a true story, is centered around Whitacre and his crushing fall from a comfortable position near the rafters of the business pyramid. Whitacre is an executive for a company called ADM that manufactures lysine, an enzyme that makes trans fats. When the lysine is attacked by a virus, supposedly planted by a Japanese competitor attempting to destroy competition, an FBI agent is sent in to investigate. The FBI ends up uncovering a much larger situation – ADM has been fixing prices with foreign competitors for years.

To amend his illegal acts, Whitacre agrees to be a government informant. He attends illegal meetings and makes incriminating tapes for the FBI. The dialogue is invigorating, but the best commentary is the product of Whitacre’s wandering mind. Randomly sprinkled throughout the film are short lines of great range detailing whatever may be the subject of Whitacre’s thoughts. Anything from polar bears to government schemes. Damon’s performance is truly winning, but he was certainly fortunate to have such a fantastically original character to work with. Whitacre seems to be so innocent, but the viewer soon discovers his true identity. By the end of the movie, the plot transforms into the pathetic workings of a pathological liar. This proves a sharp contrast to what seemed to be a complex corporate scheme. “The Informant!” is not a comedy along the lines of Superbad and Forgetting Sarah Marshall in that it has an undeniable subtlety – the viewer is not instantly entertained, or offended, by obscene language and idiotic scenarios. The movie is, however, a very enjoyable experience for those who can sit back and enjoy Damon’s excellent performance, waiting patiently for a satisfying ending.


PAGE 14 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE PAPER DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

SPORTS

Cross Country Lays Foundation for Success By Lexi Cotcamp Sports Editor Amidst triple digit temperatures and cloudless blue skies, it’s hard for anyone to imagine running a minimum of three miles per day. Would the average student dare to attempt such a task? Probably not. Did the cross country teams do so with eagerness and absolute dedication? You bet. Starting practices a mere two weeks after the end of the 2008-2009 school year, both the girls’ and the boys’ team began building their stamina for the grueling season to come. Girls Outfitted in a variety of neon sports bras and colorful spandex, the girls began practicing on July 1, 2009 under the direction of the varsity captains until coach Rex Hall joined them one month later. After only two weeks of training, the girls ran in a preliminary time trial on Aug. 22. Required to run a time of 23:30 or better, the varsity girls also competed for one of the 20 prestigious spots in the Big Bear Training Camp. Though the summer camp is typically held in Jalama, a twist of fate led to the re-

location of the camp. “Big Bear is our new home,” Hall commented, “The girls have started calling it ‘Oso Grande.’” Although he readily admits the effects of losing three of his top five runners last year, Hall remained positive, “We’re looking to win league, win Orange County Champs, win California Interscholastic Federation, and repeat state champs,” commented Hall. For their first meet of the season, the girls competed in the Laguna Hills Invitational on Sept. 12, where they were crowned combined champions, or majority winners. The sophomore and junior teams won their respective levels. On the path to victory, the girls dominated the Iolani XC Invitational on Sept. 19 in Hawaii. At the end of the day, the girls were declared the winners of every level at the meet. Meanwhile, the girls who did not race in Hawaii competed in the Mt. Carmel Invitational also on Sept. 19. While the results were not as dynamic for the seniors, Hall declared, “It was really a learning process for the younger girls to see what it was like to get on a bus and compete somewhere else.” After returning from Hawaii and San Diego, the girls prepare for a race on their own turf: the Dana Hills Invi-

photo by Emily Roulund

Calmly powering to the finish, Senior Damai Vergara-Heigi impresses at the 35th annual Dana Hills Invitational. tational. With a time of 17:03, sophomore Danica Wyson of Aliso Niguel High School was declared the top overall finisher. Junior dolphin Alaina Alvarez placed second overall and won the junior race with a time of 17:10, while her sophomore teammate Sheridan Gomez, clocking in at 17:39, was second to Wyson in the sophomore race and third overall.

Boys With beads of sweat flying off their brows and a look of fierce determination, the boys’ team worked equally as hard as the girls throughout the summer in order to repeat their success from the prior year. The boys’ goals, which included winning South Coast League Finals, winning OC Champs, and making it to the

state meet, were met with hard practices beginning practice on June 28. Coach Tim Butler acknowledged that a majority of the boys started slow, huffing and puffing at first but gradually improved with time. “Well, they’re still huffing and puffing now, just faster!” Butler joked. To determine which boys would go to training at the Jalama Summer Camp, the first time trial of the season was held on Sept. 16. Senior Blake Ahrold commented, “Jalama was really important for us. It was tough but good base training and probably one of the hardest weeks of the season. We had two-a-days, meaning we had one workout in both the morning and the evening.” Only two weeks after the first time trial, the boys ran in their second time trial on Sept. 30 in order to determine which runners would receive the opportunity to race in Hawaii. In a seemingly easy fashion, the boys snatched the 1 through 6 spots in the Kaaawa Valley Invitiational. Senior Jesus Molina took first place, followed by senior Derrick Lloyd in second place and junior Connor Kaddatz in third place. Following the LHI and Kaaawa Valley Invitationals, the boys competed in the Mt. Carmel Invitational.

Varsity runners Ahrold, Molina, and Kaddatz laughed, “Let’s put it this way…We had a minor setback at Mt. Carmel.” Butler also commented, ”Our biggest challenge will be to overcome our inexperience on varsity. [On Varsity] we only have two boys in the top eight who have run on varsitybefore.” Moving past the less than spectacular showing in the invitational, the boys prepared for the 35th annual Dana Hills Invitational (DHI). In an exciting finish, senior Jacob Wood of Mt. Carmel barely edged Ahrold out of first place, running a time of 14:42. Wood won the senior race and took first place on the day. Ahrold, however, exceeded his goal of 14:45 with a time of 14:44 and placed second in both the senior race and overall. After exhausting practices and trying races, the boys’ and girls’ teams could agree on one thing. “We’re looking forward to the Dunn’s [Craig Dunn and Julie Dunn] baby. The girls are hoping for a girl, so the baby can be their mascot,” said Hall with a smile. Ahrold, Molina, and Kaddatz jokingly responded, “We’re looking forward to having Danger Dunn be our newest coach!”

Girls Tennis Starts Season Strong By Sara Gold Copy Editor Dana Hills’s Girls’ Varsity Tennis team played its opening match of the season against Laguna Beach High School in a home game on Tues. Sept. 15. The starting line-up consisted of singles players freshman Alyssa Smith, junior Joanna Smith, and senior Victoria Wing. Doubles teams were freshmen Cassidy Spearman and Jessica Perez, junior Rebecca Winkle and senior Laura Wilke, and sophomore Kasey Mathis and senior Katina Zampis. The aforementioned

girls, in addition to substitute players who competed, achieved a triumphant win over Laguna Beach, 16-2. “Some factors that contributed to our team’s success are that everyone is really motivated; none of our players are holding us back,” said Wilke (“Wilkyway”), a team captain. “Everyone plays an important role,” Wilke added. The Varsity team’s new players this year are freshmen Alyssa Smith, Jessica Perez, Cassidy Spearman, Rebecca Gold, and Sabine Ludwig; sophomores Shelby Butcher and Jacqueline Stewart; and seniors Kristi Culp and Janis Chou. Wilke stated that one of

the team’s principal goals this season is to win CIF, a feat that the Varsity team has achieved the past two years. “In order for the team to win CIF, our freshmen are going to have to step up right away and perform at the highest level,” said Coach Mark Spearman. Even though the team lost two key seniors last year, Brynn Boren and Kristina Smith, the team’s potential to succeed has not been compromised. “We have the capability to win; we just have to put it together in the end,” M. Spearman affirmed. Concerning the Laguna Beach match, C. Spearman (“Cassidink”) recalled, “My

photo by Emily Cullen

Preparing to return the ball to her opponent, junior Joanna Smith plays in her single match against Capistrano Valley High School.

doubles partner, Jessie [Perez], was really positive and encouraging. We were able to push each other to our highest, allowing us to play well against our opponents.” C. Spearman and Perez won two sets, 6-1. The Varsity team competed against Peninsula High School at the Laguna Niguel Racquet Club on Tues. Sept. 22 and won 11-7. The starting singles players were Perez, J. Smith, and Wing; A. Smith and Spearman, Winkle and Wilke, and Mathis and Zampis competed in doubles. Explained Winkle (“Twinkle”), “Laura and I played a difficult set against two solid players from Peninsula. Our opponents had solid serves and ground strokes that gave us trouble.” However, the two doubles teams were eventually tied at 6-6 games, calling for a tiebreaker. Both teams were tied in the tiebreaker 6-6 points, but then Winkle and Wilke finally won the set, 8-6 points. “To mentally prepare ourselves to win, we had to calm ourselves down, focus on one point at a time, and not think about winning or losing but just play our best game,” Winkle reflected. The Varsity girls dominated over San Clemente High School on Tues. Sept. 29, earning a final score of 14-4. The following day, Wed. Sept. 30, 11 Varsity players traveled to Van Nuys, California, to compete against a challenging competitor- Campbell Hall High School. Dana Hills fought for a close win, 10-8. Yesterday, Thurs. Oct. 1, the team played an away game against Capistrano Valley High School and won 13-5.

photo by Emily Cullen

Deep in concentration, senior Christine Caley starts her swing.

Girls Golf Tees Off By Matt McCreadie Staff Writer

Golf, more specifically girls’ golf, is often overlooked in the sporting world. For most macho sports junkies, it is too slow; too soft. But there’s nothing dainty about the varsity girls golf team this year. If you are remembering last season as more of a blunder than a success, you would be correct. “But this year,” senior Christine Caley says, “will be better. Last year was a building year for us.” With two preseason wins under its belt, the team is off to a strong start. They beat El Toro two weeks ago by a colossal 60 strokes and have kept up their spirits since. “We all have a really good attitude and get along well. We didn’t need to have an attitude intervention like the San Clemente team,” says Caley. This positive attitude has helped the team dynamic and has served them well in some of their less out-

standing performances. In season play, the girls are 0-2, losing only by a few strokes to some of the best teams in the league. “San Clemente and Mission are the teams to beat this year, especially Mission. We always come ready to win when we play them.” Despite their league record so far, and despite losing a few senior players this year, they feel that they have the talent to compete. “Avery French (freshman) has really performed well for us,” says Caley. As the only freshman on varsity, she carries the weight of all the younger players to prove their rising talent as well as her own. Samantha Sullivan (senior) is a transfer student from Arroyo Grande High School who has also been kicking it up a notch. Her ability on the course has helped the team achieve success. The team as a whole feels like they are much more able this year. They expect to make it to CIF and end up in the top three in the league.


THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

PAGE 15 DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

SPORTS

Surfing Prepares for Fall Season

Girls Volleyball Comes Back After Rocky Start By Emily Cullen Staff Writer The ladies began their season with a record of two wins and six loses. Up against immense talent in pre-league competition. With the graduation of star players Morgan Kavanaugh and Felicia Ariola, the 2009 team is adjusting. On Tues. Sept. 8, the girls began their season with an intense five-game battle against El Toro. They went back and forth in a lose, win, lose, win pattern, but girls unfortunately fell short again, losing to the Chargers in the fifth game, 15-8. The following day, the first home game of the year was held on Sept. 9 against San Juan Hills. The girls made their fans proud, playing a solid match and dominating over the

Stallions in just three games. On Thurs. Sept. 10, the girls traveled to Trabuco for their third match that week. The team took a while to find its stride, losing 25-21 and 2518 in the first two games. After the two-game run by Trabuco, the ladies fought out a close third game and came out with the win, 25-23. However, the girls were unable to carry the momentum into the fourth game and lost 25-20. The girls fought hard to push points in tournamentplay against tough competition Fullerton, St. Margaret’s, and Notre Dame Academy. Though they lost to Fullerton and St. Margaret’s, the girls were able to overcome Notre Dame Academy with a score of 25-22 in the first game and 25-19 in the second. The Dolphins showed promise early in their first

By Andrew English Centerspread Editor

photo by Emily Cullen

Leaping in the air, Erin Baxter and Shellsy Ashen strive to block the opponent’s set. match against Beckman High School, winning 25-22. However, they lost their glimmer in the next two games, suffering defeat at the hands of Beckman 25-17 and 25-16. They fought back during the vigorous fourth game but were unable to pull through, relinquishing the win to Beck-

photo by Emily Cullen

With the ball flying overhead, the lady dolphins attempt to maintain control over the game.

Water Polo Begins Strong By Claudia Varney Staff Writer The boys’ water polo team kicked off its season the first week of school. On Sept. 10, the Varsity team dominated Brea Olinda with a final score of 19-8 overtime. Senior David Gonzalez scored five goals, senior Stephen Krieger scored four goals, and junior Larson Pfeil scored six overall. Tanner Yould was filled with enthusiasm after the game, saying, “We’re definitely going to win league.” That same week, the team competed at the Conejo Classic Tournament in Thousand Oaks, and their success there qualified them to play at Cal Lutheran University on the following Saturday. They ranked fourth overall in the competition, finishing with three wins and two losses. The team had a narrow win 8-7 against Edison at a home game on Sept. 16. They were helped along in part by junior Jonathan Amato, who scored two goals in the third quarter, making three goals overall. On Sept. 17, the boys lost to El Modena High School at a home game, ending at 7-11. Junior Kevin Guck made 13 impressive saves, effectively helping to repel El Modena’s offense. The boys proved their prowess over Canyon on Sept. 22 when they fought and won a close game against Canyon with a final score of 11-10 overtime. From Sept. 24-26 the

boys competed in the South Coast Tourney, losing four games and winning one. “Our defense kept us in the game. This past weekend our defense owned Mission,” explained senior Stephen Krieger. On Sept. 30, the boys played against Laguna Hills, winning with a close 9-8. Junior Larson Pfeil commented, “We didn’t play our best game, but we still won so its alright.” Matt Rosa, head coach,

explained, “[The team’s progress was] good considering our circumstances. We get hurt and sick alot.” Beginning yesterday, the team is competing in the Villa Park Tournament until Saturday. Sophomore Trevor Scott concluded, “We could execute our plays better, but with our record so far we are still getting the job done.” Their next home game is Sept. 6, this coming Tuesday, against Laguna Beach.

photo by Emily Roulund

Shooting for the goal, junior Larson Pfeil helps lead his team to victory.

man, 25-22. The girls went up against the robust powerhouse team, Mater Dei on Sept. 24. Despite Mater Dei’s impressive rankings 9th in the country last year, the Dolphins challenged their opponents to play up to their reputation. After losing the first game of the match 25-17, Dana played a captivating second game and showed Mater Dei worthy competition. The battle ended in the Dolphins losing with a close outcome of 25-23. Mater Dei defended its title in the third game, taking victory over Dana 25-21. Though Dolphin volleyball seems to be off to a rocky start, Coach Lael Fresenius and her team of experienced players aim to win more matches as the season goes on. For now, their scores might be down, but their confidence is still high. “We hope to win league” says senior right-side hitter Katy Swartzbaugh. “We have a strong team with a lot of heart.”

“With a bit of work, I think we can bring them some heat,” stated surf team member Beau Rodgers. Even with the loss of three key seniors, Andrew Hines, Jessie Johnson, and Parker Wright, the surfers have high expectations for the upcoming season. Last year, the surf team placed third, behind rival schools Newport Beach, Huntington Beach, and San Clemente. “This year’s team is looking good,” stated head coach Marc Degen. A strong line-up, including incoming surfer Scott Weinhart, a Hurley-sponsored rider, and Sam Orozco, who received the Most

Valuable Player award last year, gives the surf team much potential for the upcoming season. The team is ambitious in their quest for first place. “I feel we have a much stronger women’s team as well,” mentioned Degen. With outstanding rider junior Tara Franz and a new addition to the team, freshman Lulu Erkeneff, the girls are well prepared for the season. They aspire to place well in the upcoming competitions. As well as new surfers, Tim Sampson has been selected as assistant coach. “It’s great having him here, he’s a very positive addition,” Degen commented. Both coaches are looking forward to going to state competitions this year, and going head to head against southern California’s best.

photo courtesy of Lulu Erkeneff

Getting ready for the season, Lulu Erkeneff shows off her skills.


THE PAPER FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

SPORTS

PAGE 16 DANA HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

Football Starts Season Strong By Stephanie Wright Sports Editor The Dolphins are starting off the 2009-2010 season with a record of 2-1. Game one, played on Sept. 4, ended in a 34-19 victory against Santa Margarita Catholic High School. The win was not unexpected but not necessarily guaranteed. “It was good for us to start off the season right against a team like Santa Margarita, since they have a tough reputation,” commented second-year head coach Brent Melbon. On Sept. 10 the Dolphins defeated El Toro High School with a score of 34-20. Despite the boys’ confidence, they were not able to win against the fearsome Edison Chargers. The game was highly anticipated by coaches, players, and fans because of Edison’s winning reputation.

Date

The boys warmed up before the game to songs such as “Welcome to the Jungle” by Guns ‘N Roses and “TNT” by AC/DC to get pumped up. Just moments before kickoff, an anxious Melbon hastily commented, “It’s going to be a good game.” Principal Dr. Rob Nye added that the build up was good for school morale and added to the anticipation for the game. “It’s great to see the excitement around campus about Dolphin football,” enthused Nye. Present at the game were several alumni that had formerly been dressed in uniform on the same field. One such alumnus was Todd Crowley, whose younger brother, senior Tanner Crowley, is a prominent Dolphin linebacker. “I’m happy to see this program coming along so well,” he commented after observing Dolphin football for

Opponent

Dana Hills Sept.4 Santa Margarita

Score

l l a b t o o F 34-19

Sept.10 El Toro

34-20

Sept.17 Edison

17-34

Oct.2

Newport Harbor TBD

the last several seasons. And about his little brother he said, “I’m definitely proud of him. Legacy...” From kickoff until the clock ran to the last seconds of the first half, it was anyone’s game. Although Edison was the first team to put points on the scoreboard, it was only three points earned by a 51 yard field goal. The first touchdown was scored by junior widereceiver Chris Kearney from a pass by senior quarterback Josh Dean. The touchdown pumped up the attending crowd, which was made up mostly of parents and students. From then on, every call in favor of Edison provoked a profane chant from the cheering senior section. Just before the end of the second quarter, after a stopping Edison touchdown, the crowd was screaming once more for Kearney. With less than two minutes left in the half, he returned the kickoff with a 94-yard touchdown, twisting and jumping out of the grips of Edison’s defenders and leaving the score at 17-13 in Dana’s favor. Catching his breath on the sidelines after the play, Kearney confessed to Crowley “I wasn’t going to make it; I’m so tired.” Kearney’s efforts, which included the two touchdowns and several long returns, went unsupported by the defensive line in the second half. The last 24 minutes were not nearly as productive as the

photo courtesy of xpsphoto.com

On his way to a 94-yard touchdown, junior Chris Kearney dodges a Charger defender at the 30 yard line, which earned points that brought the score to 17-13 with Dana leading just before the end of the first half. first. The Dolphins were not able to score any more points to match Edison’s three touchdowns, and the game ended with a final score of 17-34. The team had a bye last week but looks forward to student support tonight at the home game against Newport Harbor.

Newport, a fairly small public school, is known for having a well-rounded football program. Dolphin coaches and players, however, remain undaunted and project another win that will hopefully bring their record to 3-1. “I’m proud of the boys.

They practice hard, they play really hard, and they’ve put a lot into my program. We should do really well this week,” Melbon commented, smiling. The team is excited for many more victories in the future that will finally bring Dana Hills to the top of CIF competition.


The Paper