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DANIEL HEMMENDINGER Portfolio


TABLE OF CONTENTS VIRGINIA TECH

Thesis

03

Urban Lab and Observatory (ULO)

05

Timbre of the City

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(2012-2013 ACSA Competition)

Fire Station and Dwelling

(VSAIA Weekend Competition)

Lookout 9/11 Memorial

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(Weekend Competition)

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Watershed Observatory

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Modular Research Laboratory

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Research Laboratory Chair

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Site Intervention

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Light

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Toy

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(2010 Naef Toy Design Competition)

front cover - thesis drawing, model, and scan conspire to create a spatial reading unattainable by each medium individually

overlapping plan and elevation - thesis a study in constructing architectural experience through the design of a cinema 01


INDEPENDENT WORK

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Concrete Array I

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Concrete Array II / Lecture Poster

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Faculty Lecture Series Announcements

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NEW YORK/ PARIS PROGRAM

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An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris

Display/ Delay

Species of Space/ Materials in Motion

Sightlines/ Sitelines

Fabrication and Function

All Fashionable Paris

[Citations]

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Thesis (in progress) The thesis wrestles with the complexity of dwelling and existing in today’s world, in particular as it relates to the agency of film and a resultant cinematic perception of reality. Contemporary living is increasingly defined by the interrelation of perceived dualities: physical and virtual; persona and avatar; and reality and fantasy. The project uses a notion stipulated by James Turrell about “seeing yourself see” as a point of departure, and examines architecture’s ability to influence perception as one moves through space. The architecture attempts to foreground the observer and control their relationship to a perceived background by asserting itself in the middleground.

zoetrope the zoetrope is a device that, as it rotates, produces the illusion of motion from a sequence of still images; the device is a tool for systematically testing constructed experience and allows designs to be judged more precisely with respect to the intent of the thesis

section model - cinema the model constructs a false vanishing point within the realm of reality that becomes the projection point for the fictive virtual world of the film below, converging two parallel phenomena in order to distinctly separate the experiences of them

oblique projection - cinema interior spaces are experienced in sequence and allude to each other; details along the procession highlight a departure from reality as one descends 03


site model - house

arrival II - house

constructed experience is studied through the design of a house in the Hollywood Hills, on a site in which the landscape collapses in front of the house and the background recedes to the horizon

the architecture occupies the space between the picture plane and the perceiver and compresses space inward rather than extending it, shedding the notion of the ‘picture window’ in favor of cinematic spectation

arrival - house

descent - house

movement through three consecutive rooms activates the opening of a view cinematically, giving the observer a heightened self-awareness of being in the foreground

the agency of the wall dictates the dweller’s experience; the positioning of a wall fragment within the space creates two rooms and forces a choice about how one proceeds through

04


[01]

Urban Lab and Observatory (ULO) Cincinnati, OH 01/2012-05/2012

The ULO is a fictive organization comprised of researchers, artists, policy makers, and innocent bystanders of Cincinnati, concerning itself with the exploration and tracking of the extended city and its emergence. The building is a material-space construct of its organization’s mission and an engagement with the trajectory of city building in Cincinnati, both a base of operations and a critique of architectural best practices in the urban context. The intent of the project is to foster a relationship between the public and the researcher-artists who live and work in the building. Entrance into the structure is organized as a spatial sequence that simultaneously divides living from working and creates an intersection point for public dialogue. Inside the ULO are gallery spaces, a mediatheque, and multiple lookout points that encourage an understanding of the city, its history, and its future. site findings a visit to Cincinnati yields traces of the city’s history, spoken through brick

aerial the city exists as a record of the disparate hydrological, infrastructural, and architectural forces that have featured in its history

[02]

05


Cincinnati’s growth and expansion is inextricably tied to innovations in transportation. Its founding as an outpost for steamboat shipments spurred its initial development while the creation of a beltway around the city in 1962 greatly expanded its metropolitan area. Today, two-thirds of the American population live within a one day drive of Cincinnati. 1819, POPULATION: 9,642 1907, POPULATION: 363,591

1950, POPULATION: 1,249,738

2012, POPULATION: 2,130,151

06


The ULO resists the normative architectural practices typical of Cincinnati in order to provide a precedent for future urban experimentation. The building does not abut its lot limits along the main public thoroughfares, instead offering a public plaza to the west and a garden for residents to the east. Likewise, the gabled roof enclosure hints at the residential uses within and distinguishes the structure from the flat roofs that surround it. The various programs of the ULO are constructed around a public spatial sequence that isolates sensory experiences of the city, an intent based on the notion that separating sensations allows for a heightened individual awareness of them.

studio suite

public interface // surface [1] plaza :: extension of civic life [2] forum :: aural perception [3] exhibition hall :: sensory removal [4] mediatheque :: visual acuity

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dwellings

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steel frame model on schematic plan drawing the act of drawing generates the architecture

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^ [1] plaza [2] forum [3] exhibition hall [4] mediatheque [5] lookout

[6] gallery space [7] studio [8] pinup space [9] resident apartment [0] garden

gallery atrium and entry model the visual continuity of the entry stair between inside and outside attempts to architecturally manifest the ULO’s public-private relationship

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Wall Section 6F - Glass Brick Wall with Structural Interlayer 7F

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3/4” = 1’-0”

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Cast glass bricks comprise the northern facade and respond to the pervasive use of brick around the site. Passersby see obscured movements within through the cast glass; inside, the illuminated wall serves as a wayfinding device for patrons in the galleries. wall section cast glass bricks are assembled within a custom armature and supported by a structural steel interlayer

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year 0

year 1

year 5

year 25

year 50

copper cladding

exploded isometric, dwelling exterior wall understanding the wall assembly as a threedimensional construct fosters its design within the formal and material logic of the project 11


Cincinnati’s development over time is manifest in the copper cladding of the living and working spaces. As the copper weathers, the observatory’s physical presence and relationship to its immediate context will change. Distinctions in the treatment of the copper cladding highlight the work-live relationship of the observatory’s residents. Dwelling units, located below the public surface, are clad in solid copper sheet, while workspaces above are shrouded in perforated, corrugated copper. This affords the living spaces a domestic character, while studio spaces allow the artist-researchers to see, but not be seen.

experiential section lookout onto the city through perforated copper screen

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Timbre of the City 2012-2013 ACSA Urban Habitat Competition Red Hook, Brooklyn, New York 02/2013 - 05/2013

timbre /n/ the quality of tone distinctive of a particular voice or instrument The competition calls for 180,000 square feet of program, including a bicycle shop, wood production space, a digital fabrication lab, and 175 residential units, to be constructed from structural timber. The building is an offering to the various groups and communities collected around the project site, from the burgeoning culture of Red Hook, to the transient public of the Ikea, to the building’s own residents and workers. This intent manifests architecturally by carving out common spaces between the disparate programs and between layers of the facade that correspond to unique views and unique qualities of light. These places have a distinct quality of being “in-between� and encourage dialogue and familiarity among neighbors. The project is composed of two primary moves: a large horizontal volume containing commercial and manufacturing space, and a segmented upper volume supporting the residential program. Enshrouding these elements are two overlapping skins--one slate brick, the other wood--that serve as enclosure, light filter, and occupiable interstitial space.


slate brick rainscreen slate bricks create a fabric-like reading of the facade; aperatures for doors and windows are designed to support this impression as well as indicate the various unit types from the exterior

glued laminated timber assembly wood structural members meet and are joined at a custom steel plate; deeper beams are required along the exterior of the residential blocks to support the weight of the slate skin

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A

bicycle shop level 1

wood production level 1

On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit Red Hook, washing out a community-run garden adjacent to the site. The project proposes a new elevated greenhouse to reintroduce this asset to the community, serve as an acoustic barrier from the wood production space below, and focus residential and work life at the building around sustainable living. The greenhouse, along with expanded stair lobbies and large balconies, encourages residents to lay claim to communal spaces, establishing a greater sense of trust and familiarity between neighbors. study models

greenhouse level 2

a gabled wood roof with glazed infill is explored as a continuation of the wooden skin and as a means of scaling down the expanse of the greenhouse

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site section

A

digital fabrication level 1

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Studio Apartment x101 units

dwelling

One Bedroom x35 units

apartment floor plans residents of the building live on the upper six stories; dwelling units are accessed from an entry in which mail and laundry facilities are also located

section model openings in the slate brick skin respond to the various programs and simultaneously create a draped quality to the facade

Two Bedroom x25 units

Three Bedroom x15 units 17


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Fire Station and Dwelling VSAIA Weekend Competition, Finalist Beauregard, Alexandria, VA 02/2013

[01]

The entry proposes that firefighters, serving as farmers during inactive shifts, operate and maintain a large greenhouse, growing flowers, vegetables, and other produce. The proposal reorganizes the mandated fire and housing programs around a new typology of public-private agricultural living. This for-profit operation offsets the fire department’s expenses and redefines the Beauregard community with sustainable practices and healthy eating. Architecturally, the proposal studies the ability of the gabled roof to adapt to various programs through scalar and material changes. The glass greenhouse permits passive heat gain to the surrounding spaces and daylighting to residences through operable screens. The firehouse and residences are clad in panelized tombasil, a white bronze alloy used to make fire hose nozzles.

isometric section, looking northwest 19

Haji Abboud is a rece is a rent-stabilized u greenhouse, Haji pay


Jared Ashland is a firefighter who monitors the water distribution system in the greenhouse. He lives in Unit M with the company’s two dalmations. Jared never went to college, but enjoyed biology in high school and takes pride in his new job and lifestyle.

ent immigrant working in D.C. She lives in Apartment F, which unit. Because she contributes her Saturdays to working in the ys less rent each month and receives fresh produce weekly.

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Kaz Watanabe lives in Apartment R. Mr. Watanabe convinced the greenhouse foreman to begin growing ginger and watercress after he and his friends lamented their rarity in nearby markets. Both are easy to grow in any climate, and Mr. Watanabe will receive a share of both since he works in the greenhouse during his Sundays off.


[01]

Lookout Watchtower Ruin, Appalachian Mountains 01/2013

The project calls for a lookout and resting point for hikers sited within the ruin of a Civil War-era watchtower. The structure occupies the void within the ruin and treats its boundaries as a physical constraint. Due to the remote nature of the site, the structure is comprised of uniformly dimensioned lumber that is hand-carried to the site. The lookout fosters an awareness of its site by focusing the space within the ruin and incorporating circulation that encourages an appreciation of the entire surrounding landscape. model open stacked wood construction serves as a counterpoint to the weight of the ruin

exploded isometric circulation up to the lookout point generates a panoramic experience of the landscape

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[01]

9/11 Memorial

beam h-0159

Weekend Competition, Finalist With Husain Almousawi Marion, VA 04/2012

length: 12 feet weight: 4000 lb a fragment of a fallen tower, a survivor of an attack, an instrument of prolonged mourning

The memorial is a passageway, dedicated to the victims of September 11th, and a sanctuary for a remnant of the former Towers. Taking advantage of two existing site elements--a narrow path and a public clearing--the memorial creates a room for intimate reflection and a walled passage to comprehend the magnitude of the lives lost. The 48-footlong passageway is illuminated by 2977 etched glass rods, each representing a victim of the terrorist attacks. The narrowness of the passageway puts visitors in close proximity to the glowing rods and forces an acknowledgement of each life.

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plan

[04]

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[01]

[05]

Watershed Observatory Bryson City, NC 08/2011-12/2011

The Watershed Observatory is a fictive organization arising in response to the issues surrounding the debate of water in the Blue Ridge region. The Observatory alters one’s relationship to water in terms of proximity and means of engagement in order to foster an awareness of water issues. The goal of the project is to form a relationship between researcher and public by maximizing inclusive space and establishing an open and transparent environment. An understanding of the relationship between site and context allows for a more appropriate and meaningful artifact within the landscape. The importance of water in shaping the local region is evident from the image at left. site findings the site yields evidence of both natural life and man’s imposition of order over it; as the project develops, its becomes clear that this reading is applicable to all facets of the site

model the roof monolith experientially situates the public between mountain and river

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DN

Due to a dam constructed downstream, water levels rise 23 feet annually, creating a dynamic and unique site condition. The building situates itself just above the high water line and sectionally within its drainage basin, allowing researchers and the public to track the rising of the water from any point in the structure. As an observatory, the building acts as a lens to help understand its underlying context; as an architectural experience, the building is perceived as a mediation between mountain and river--water and land--and makes its role within the community explicit.

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Ground Level Plan

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UP

The observatory is 150 ft long and 36 ft wide, and is bent along its length in order to conform to the contours of the site. The building is broken into three levels: a ground floor containing the main public space; an intermediate level supporting researcher live and work rooms; and a lower level comprised of outdoor spaces and a library.

UP

-1 Level Plan

site model chronologically layered newspaper emphasizes the physical and contextual forces that accumulate over time to form the site

UP

UP

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section studies beginning with a vernacular barn structure, each consecutive model attempts to respond to the slope of the site

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-2 Level Plan

UP


[01]

Modular Research Laboratory Rubondo Island, Tanzania 01/2011-05/2011

[06]

Rubondo Island National Park is a small group of protected islands located in northwest Tanzania in the waters of Lake Victoria. The park attracts a small number of visitors annually, and its undisturbed wildlife and environment make it an ideal research location. The laboratory is a mobile, modular construction that supports the living and working activities of two or three researchers. The laboratory is built from a prefabricated kit-of-parts, shipped from the United States and assembled on location. The project’s mission arises from the conflicting politics of the island. The park rightfully prosecutes local poachers who fish illegally, but allows tourists who financially support the island to fish at their leisure. While this allows the park to continue its existence, it is inconsistent with the park’s values and damaging to its resources. Altering the relationship between researchers and the public in the interest of preservation benefits Rubondo Island. By providing a place for education of both tourists and the local populace, a greater respect for the island’s cultural significance is possible. map of tanzania the two face of rubondo island national park

material studies molded pulp drink caddies satisfy many of the ambitions of the project and reject the convention of the insulated wall panel

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[07]

The final form of the laboratory is a central 9 foot cube with 3 foot deep wings on all sides. Wall panels mounted to these extensions swing out to aid in ventilation, create indoor-outdoor spaces, or open for public education. The laboratory can be easily deconstructed and moved to accommodate the transient nature of the island research. photocollage the laboratory is an alien in the landscape, but its modular construction allows it to respond to specific situations

structural frame model the greek cross plan allows for a simplified kit-of-parts to be developed

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[08]

The Shipping Container Capacity: 2247.23 cubic feet Payload: 59417 lb

Translucent Polycarbonate Wall Panels x24 Volume: 16 cubic feet Weight: 890.94 lb

High Density Polyethylene Footings x12 Volume: 4.5 cubic feet Weight: 143.72 lb

Molded Pulp Wall Infill x840 Volume: 9.94 cubic feet Weight: 46.3 lb

Wood Roof Pergola x10 Volume: 5 cubic feet Weight: 230 lb

Stainless Steel Structural Frame x84 Volume: 19.414 cubic feet Weight: 1550.14 lb

Floor and Ceiling Infill Panels x57 Volume: 35.625 cubic feet Weight: 477.75 lb

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An understanding of the lab’s transportation is critical to the project. The constraints it establishes necessitate notions of packing density, material weight, and usability of parts. Questions of module, nesting, and other means of volume reduction are decisive factors in re-evaluating the basic components that comprise the structure. By actively engaging this question, a typical shipping container is capable of carrying 17 deconstructed laboratories. section adjustable footings allow the laboratory to maintain its modular parti in spite of a variable ground plane


Research Laboratory Chair Rubondo Island, Tanzania 06/2011

In order to facilitate the educational goals and task work of the mobile laboratory, chairs emphasizing low cost and material efficiency were designed. The chair is made by lasercutting three layers of plywood and then inserting metal rods during assembly, allowing the pieces to swing freely. Each chair can be built for approximately $20 in material cost. Cut-outs allow the chair to lock into an open position, while two elastic bands around the top and bottom hold it closed and prevent damage during shipping.

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[01]

Site Intervention Blacksburg, VA 08/2010-12/2010

As the primary entertainment venue in the town of Blacksburg, College Avenue has significant value to the university and local populace that use it. The site intervention transforms the physical condition of the street from a barrier to an interface between these two parties. Automotive traffic is removed from the street and two occupiable volumes are constructed to encourage the site’s renewed use. Each volume is 120 feet long, 30 feet wide, and rises to a height of 12 feet. The volumes enclose two 6 foot depressions in the street that allow the interior to be occupied. Above, the structures serve as seating, attracting pedestrians from the nearby shops and park. section model the simple structural system allows light to pour into the voids below

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site

focus

intent

plan

isometric assembly diagram uniformly dimensioned wood members are joined by countersunk bolts, creating a boundary that is performative structurally and aesthetically

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Light 10/2010 - 12/2010

The light design began as an investigation of the formal relationship between a hexagon and an isometric wire cube. Their unique sameness despite existing in different dimensions drove the project and enriched the process. The final form of the light folds up from a single flat piece of paper and encloses a lightbulb, reintroducing the play between two- and three-dimensions. folding diagram the lamp’s ability to be constructed from a single unbroken piece of paper revealed itself as the project progressed; tones represent independent cubic volumes

isometric superimpositions sketches completed during an uninteresting lecture serve as an entry point into studies between two- and three-dimensionality


Toy Naef Toy Design Competition 02/2010 - 03/2010 With Jacob Harvey

As part of a competition hosted at Virginia Tech by international toy company Naef, students were challenged to create an object demonstrating unexpected geometric relationships, a high level of craftsmanship, and multifunctional pieces. The toy is a 6� wood cube, subdivided into twelve pieces. Fabricated using an efficient seven cut process on a single wood block, three distinct piecetypes are created. The four exterior pieces are joined with fabric hinges, creating a container for the interior objects and serving as a dynamic object on its own.

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[01]

Concrete Array I Blacksburg, VA 10/2010 With Jacob Harvey, James Heard, and Chelsea Kilburn

A 12 by 12 grid of compression test fragments occupies the space between the Schools of Building Construction and Architecture. The concrete fragments were discovered in a concrete recycling dumpster and were reappropriated to serve as a challenge for greater artistic sensibility in the building professions.

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Concrete Array II/ Lecture Poster Blacksburg, VA 10/2013 Installation with James Heard and Chelsea Kilburn

A 6 by 14 grid of compression test fragments occupies the lobby of the School of Architecture. Aligned with the coffering of the exposed slab above, the array creates a more visceral experience of the floor surface and the planar dimension of the space while announcing an upcoming lecture. The lecture poster adopts the grid of the floor as its organizing element.

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Faculty Lecture Series Posters 09/2013-10/2013 With Ashton Hamm, James Heard, Chelsea Kilburn, and Matthew Ridgeway

Architecture is Derived from Architecture A lecture by Markus Breitschmid September 19, 2013 photograph on bristol paper

MARKUS

BREITSCHMID

2:00 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 — HANCOCK

The Thin Green Line A lecture by Elizabeth Grant September 26, 2013 tape installation and tape on bristol paper

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Architecture in the Making A lecture by Keith and Marie Zawistowski October 03, 2013 photograph on bristol paper

Influential Experiences A lecture by Jim Jones October 10, 2013 photographs inside of constructed matteboard boxes

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The Majesty and Mystery of Machu Picchu A lecture by Humberto Rodriguez-Camilloni October 24, 2013 photographs on folded bristol paper

Architectural Structures, Research, and Teaching A lecture by Mehdi Setareh October 31, 2013 photograph on bristol paper

M E H D I _ S ETA R E H 2:00 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31 — HANCOCK

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Design Beyond Architecture A lecture by Carl D’Silva October 04, 2013 image on bristol paper

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contextual map of paris

the urban fabric becomes a texture superimposed on a memory of the city

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NEW YORK/ PARIS From the Lower East Side, the origin of the city’s garment manufacturing, to the Lincoln Center, the latest home of Fashion Week, the New York garment industry has moved across the city in response to a multiplicity of economic and civic forces. Each project presented is sited within a significant location in the city’s fashion history and cultivates a richer understanding of its site at different scales. Observed and documented phenomena translate into specific programs that increase in scale with each new project. Each engages its given site through specific publicprivate and foreground-background relationships in order to establish and clarify its position toward its surrounding context. The intention is to generate an awareness of the site’s history not simply through alike programs, but through relational encounters with it.


1.1 An Attempt at Exhausting a Place in Paris Prosthetic Device Lower East Side, Manhattan 08/31 - 09/14

The prosthetic device merges the attributes of two observed pedestrians--the young tourist: curious, vital, and exploratory; and the elderly local: slow and with no regard for conventional traffic patterns--into an ultimate experiential tool for Orchard Street.

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1.2 Display/ Delay Display Screen Flatiron District, Manhattan 09/14 - 09/25

The screen frames clothing through varying aperature sizes in order to promote a greater understanding of the garment at a range of scales, from texture to stitching to its engagement with the city beyond.


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1.3 Species of Space/ Materials in Motion Changing Rooms Garment District, Manhattan 09/25 - 10/05

Two changing rooms for two studied modes of carrying; an exploration of the information contained in a line through drawing and material investigation.

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1.4 Sightlines/ Sitelines Seating Bryant Park, Manhattan 10/05 - 10/12

The bleacher seating links common scales of human interaction on the Pompidou Centre facade and the plan of Bryant Park while simultaneously serving as an extension of the existing Fashion Week tents below.

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1.5 Fabrication and Function // Final 1 Fashion Atelier Lincoln Center, Manhattan 10/12 - 10/26

The atelier translates the observed tension between vertical and horizontal readings present at various scales at the Lincoln Center into a definition of the spatial character of specific programs.

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1.6 All Fashionable Paris // Final 2 Fashion Atelier Palais Garnier, Paris, France 10/26 - 11/20

The atelier frames its host building, the Garnier Opera House, in specific ways, fostering an appreciation for its performance at various scales within a narrow intervention that activates the surrounding space.

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CITATIONS [1] Aerial photography © Google Maps [2] Aerial image of Cincinnati: Carroll, Tracy Lee. Hello Cincinnati and Covington! 2005. Photograph. ‹http://www.flickr.com/photos/tracylee/39720778/›. [3] Cast glass brick image: “The Material.” Neuesstadttor Isny. ‹http://www.neuesstadttorisny.de/?page_id=517›. [4] Newspaper article below plan: Libeskind, Daniel. “Learning from the World Trade Center Wrangles.” Wall Street Journal, Eastern Edition [New York] 12 Nov. 2013: A15. [5] Satellite image: National Aeronautics and Space Administration “Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission ID #2128141237” [satellite photograph]. 11 Feb. 2000. ‹http://srtm.usgs.gov/index.php›. [6] ‘Two faces of Rubondo Island’ photographs: Flickr user idogu. 1994 Rubondo Island. 1994. Photograph. ‹http://www.flickr.com/photos/idogu/819773708/›. [7] Background image: Adelman, Matthew. IMG_0597. 2011. Photograph. ‹http://www.flickr.com/photos/mattadelman/5551012729/›. [8] Shipping container image: Woods, Lebbeus, and Christoph a. Kumpusch. Tale from the Tectonic Forest. 2011. ‹http://lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com/2011/04/16/tale-from-the-tectonic-forest/›.


Portfolio // 2014