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Landscape Architecture Urban Planning Portfolio

Daniel Bursuck Cornell University 2015 Roanoke Drive Greensboro, NC 27408 dhb84@cornell.edu 919.448.7271


Table of Contents: (re)connect

increasing accessibility to repopulate the urban core

brooklyn bridge park

designing pier 5 to provide local residents passive and active recreation

infrastructure

solutions for mitigating a multitude of infrastructural systems in Montreal

amp

neighborhood development to establish community vitality and vibrancy

regenerative interface

adaptive and flexible ideas for a new arts neighborhood in San Diego


(re)connect is a study of the empire rail corridor and its potential for changing settlement patterns as we transition into a post-carbon society. While the current plan for High Speed Rail in Upstate New York is important, we believe its ability to be integrated with a fully functional local and regional rail system is paramount.

study area:

The high speed rail is very important for us to sucessfully transition the communities of Upstate New York into a post-carbon world. While we have focused on Buffalo for this analysis, its pricipals could be adapted to other, similar rust belt cities.

creation of a model:

adjusting the model:

Settlement patterns are likely to change as we ween ourselves off of fossil fuels. In order to determine where new settlement should occur or where conservation should occur, we have developed a model to determine the suitability of areas in the city for change.

To analyze the effectiveness of the model, we have chosen look at the analysis more intimately.

Canals

Prime Farmlands

Croplands

Buffalo

Buffalo

Syracuse Rails

Albany

conclusions: • Development model weighs heavy rail too much and is missing key potential internal rail connections. • Need to expand model into one for each residential / commercial, industrial, agricultural, and preservation. • Need for the development of a streetcar plan.

Floodplain

Place by population

Highway ROW

New York City

development of streetcar plan:

population analysis of the model:

Derived from the residential settlement zones we run population analyses of the Buffalo area. These include: • Calculate population of Erie County and calculate potential densities needed to relocate everyone to the zones generated by the model. • Compare to historical density information from 1920 prior to decentralization Erie County

We have developed a streetcar plan for the Buffalo area by using existing right-of-way on major thoroughfares. An emphasis has been put on connecting most existing residential communties and between the rail lines.

(re)connect:

• •

The streetcar plan was then incorporated into a new residential model to direct future change. Distances from a transit study by Sean O’Sullivan and John Morrall were used. Most preference was on areas closer to the line.

increasing accessibility to repopulate the urban core

Buffalo

Swan Street Downtown Buffalo, NY circa.

Erie County Pop. = 950,265 Erie County Area = 675,875

Erie County Population Density = 1.4 people / acre

Erie County Pop. = 950,265 Settlement Area = 43,004 acres

Proposed Population Density = 22.1 people / acre

1920 Buffalo Pop. = 580,608 1920 Buffalo City Area = 26,880 acres

1920 Buffalo Population Density = 21.6 people / acre

Spring 2011 Studio


interventions: HR

High Speed Rail (In Progress)

RR

Regional Rail (In Progress)

LR

Local Rail (In Progress)

HR

High Speed Rail (Completed)

RR

Regional Rail (Completed)

LR

Local Rail (Completed)

While driven by state and federal initiatives, high-speed rail is essential to connecting communities in Upstate New York and throughout North America.

Regional Rail systems will be used throughout to provide the communities a quicker more local connection than light-rail. To be devleoped in right-of-way of limited access hightways.

R

Streetcar rail systems developed in the existing street right-of-ways in order to connect new and existing residential neighborhoods to high-speed rail, regional rail, commercial areas and industry.

Regenerative Zone

E

These targeted areas of the city will be deconstructed and materials will be reused for new development throughout the rest of the city. (Policy only - this is a response to rail intervention)

Ecosystem Restoration

F

Programs developed to encourage increased ecological functions of the city. (Policy only - this is a response to rail intervention)

Farmland Zone

Farmland zones will be created to encourage the transition of periperial areas to farmland and to increase urban agricultural lands. (Policy only this is a response to rail intervention)

Present

dense urban core

medium density industrial

medium density commercial and residential

medium to high density residential

industrial canal port / low density residential

big box retail

medium density residential

limited access highway interchange

multi-family suburban residential

single-family suburban residential

gas prices reach $5/gallon local policy to create streetcar lines in existing right-of-way high speed rail construction begins gas prices double from 2011 to $8/gallon increases in tranportation costs lead to increase in local farms

HR

HR

competion of high speed rail line completion of first streetcar line

federal policy created to make moving to a more accessible area easier.

new infill development outpaces new develoment on periphery

E

E

LR

LR

E

F

HR

HR

LR

LR

LR

R

R

F

F

completion of first regional rail line

mass production of gas engine terminates

R

F 75% reduction of gas driven vehicles on the roads

completion of streetcar and regional rail systems to connect all transit zones in city

E

E

F

F

R

R

F

LR

LR

E

E

F

F

E

LR

E

E

HR

HR

LR

LR

LR

LR

LR

RR

R

R

F

F

R

R

R

E

E

F

F

F

F

F

E

F

F

LR

LR

E

E

E

E

E

LR

E

E

HR

HR

LR

LR

LR

LR

LR

RR

R

R

farms and agricultral uses begin to take back the periphery

90 percent of population on the periphery has relocated to the urban core

HR

High Speed Rail (In Progress)

RR

Regional Rail (In Progress)

LR

Regional Rail (In Progress)

HR

High Speed Rail (Completed)

RR

Regional Rail (Completed)

LR

Regional Rail (Completed)

M

Marketplace

R

Regenerative Zone

E

F

Ecosystem Restoration

R

Farmland Zone

(re)connect:

increasing accessibility to repopulate the urban core

Spring 2010 Studio


rolling lawn with clusters of trees

wave benches exposed warf pylons

grid of tree planters

lowland grasses and

with tables and chairs

wetland habitat

residential

45’ tall

/ bottom floor

150°

retail buildings

45’ tall

turf mound to provide views and passive recreation

95’ tall artificial turf soccer fields with semi-temporary lattice shelter

00

23

rolling lawn with clusters of trees

DBA Design Group

DBA Design Group

214 S. Geneva St. #1 Ithaca, NY 14850

214 S. Geneva St. #1 Ithaca, NY 14850

GRADING PLAN

PLANTING PLAN

ft

DBA Design Group

Amended Soil Mixture Existing Piles from Warf to Remain Typ Sandy Loam Wetlands Soil

Concrete Greenway See Detail L501 - 5

214 S. Geneva St. #1 Ithaca, NY 14850 Approx Mean High Tide

DETAILS

Reinforced Conc. Deck Slab to Remain Existing Rip-Rap and Miscellaneous Fill

Mudline

1

10'

Wetlands and Stormwater Treatment Area Along Water SCALE: 1/4" = 1'

15'

6" 4000 PSI Concrete w/ No 4 Rebar Both Ways 12" O.C.

BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK PIER 5 IMPROVEMENTS

BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK PIER 5 IMPROVEMENTS

1" = 40'

BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK PIER 5 IMPROVEMENTS

Timber Pile Backwall to Remain

35'

1 21" Thick Asphalt Surface Course Sandy Loam Amended Soil Mix

Compacted No 2 Crushed Stone Compacted Subgrade

1 2"

Thick Binder Course

9" Thick Asphalt Base Course 12" dia perforated pipe

Compacted No 2 Crushed Stone

8" 1'

NOTES: 1. INSTALLATION TO BE COMPLETED IN ACCORDANCE WITH MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS. 2. DO NOT SCALE DRAWINGS. 3. CONTRACTORS NOTE: FOR PRODUCT AND COMPANY INFORMATION VISIT www.CADdetails.com/info REFERENCE NUMBER 433-103.

2

5

STORMWATER TREATMENT AREA ALONG FURMAN AVE

TYPICAL GREENWAY IN GROUND LIGHTING UNIT

SCALE: 6" = 1'

SCALE: 1/4" = 1'

Existing Pier Deck Expansion Joint to Existing Wall Amended Soil with Turf

1" = 40'

4" 1'-5" 5"

Solite mixture amended with 5% compost

6" 4000 PSI Concrete w/ No. 4 Rebar both ways 12" O.C.

Solite Mixture Amended With 5% Compost

1' Compacted No. 2 Crushed Stone 2x2 Brick Pavers Set in 21" Sand Base

Geofoam Lightweight fill, Placed in 4" Lifts Over Existing High Level Platform Existing Bulkhead

CONCRETE POURED WITH DARK PIGMENT TO DELINEATE BIKE PATH CONCRETE POURED WITH LIGHT PIGMENT TO DELINEATE WALKING PATH

Compacted No 2 Crushed Stone

2"

Geofoam Lightweight Fill, Placed in 4" Lifts Over Existing High Level Platform

921"

2'

6'

14'

4000 PSI CONCRETE W/ No 4 REBAR BOTH WAYS 12" OC COMPACTED No. 2 CRUSHED STONE

6" 1'

Existing Pier Deck

2'

GEOTEXTILE

1'

COMPACTED SUBGRADE

3

40 Scale

L301

brooklyn bridge park:

GREENWAY CONNECTION TO PIER DECK

SCALE: 1/8" = 1'

4

TYPICAL TREE PIT IN PLAZA DETAIL

SCALE: 1/4" = 1'

6

GREENWAY CONCRETE PAVMENT DETAIL

SCALE: 1/8" = 1'

40 Scale

L401

designing pier 5 to provide local residents passive and active recreation

L501

Fall 2011 Studio


brooklyn bridge park:

designing pier 5 to provide local residents passive and active recreation

Fall 2011 Studio


The following analysis drawings are examples of the process undertook to examine how we interact with the many layers urban infrastructures.

infrastructure:

solutions for mitigating a multitude of infrastructural systems in Montreal

Fall 2010 Studio


As the project evolved, it became clear that simply capping the sunken freeway was ignoring problems caused by automobile traffic. By incorporating portions of the freeway into the design it created an experience that would be informed by the park user and the freeway driver.

section 1 section 3

section 2

section 1

section 2

section 3

infrastructure:

solutions for mitigating a multitude of infrastructural systems in Montreal

Fall 2010 Studio


Located at Seattle’s international crossroads, AMP aims to:

• empower vibrant local businesses • activate open spaces & ecological systems • energize neighborhood vitality THE AMPLIFIER: CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP

+

= • • • • • •

SMALL BUSINESS SUPPORT TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CO-WORKING OFFICE SPACE COMMERCIAL KITCHEN AFFORDABLE RETAIL COTTAGE INDUSTRY WORKSHOP

Amplifier Center for Entrepreneurship & Food Cart Pod

A NEIGHBORHOOD’S IDEAS...

a

A NEIGHBORHOOD EMPOWERED

THE WAVE: LANDSCAPE PROMENADE

=

+ • • • • •

GREEN NETWORK CONNECTION STORMWATER TREATMENT HABITAT LINKAGE OPEN SPACE URBAN AGRICULTURE

A NEIGHBORHOOD’S ECOLOGIES...

안녕하세요

Xin chào

THE TRANSCEIVER: MULTILINGUAL MEDIA ARTS CENTER

Sveiki Halo

NATURAL SYSTEMS ACTIVATED

你好

Прывітанне

The Wave Landscape Promenade

b

Përshëndetje Hola

Bonjour

Hello

+ Ahoj こんにちは

Tere Pozdravljeni Hallo

= • • • • • •

MULTILINGUAL LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER RECORDING STUDIOS PERFORMANCE SPACE COMMUNITY RADIO STATION FILM PRODUCTION STUDIOS

A NEIGHBORHOOD’S VOICES...

A COMMUNITY ENERGIZED

Development Funding Sources The Food Cart Business Start-Up Model CDF Development Fund 600

Seattle Housing Levy Fund

500

City of Seattle Public Use

400

Land Contribution Cash Equity

300

FOOD CART PODS Operate on: •Low overhead & startup costs •A shared sense of community Provide: •Inexpensive & unique menus •A draw for office, residents & nightlife

‘ULTRA-AFFORDABLE’ RETAIL & CO-WORKING OFFICE SPACE ensure economic diversity & opportunity for a multitude of community businesses

Commercial Bank Debt

200 100 Dollars in Millions

amp:

The Transceiver Multilingual Media Arts Center & Independent Cinema

new neighborhood development while maintaining community vitality and vibrancy

c

Spring 2011 ULI competition entry


Phasing

Land Use

Building Section

Massing

amp:

new neighborhood development while maintaining community vitality and vibrancy

Spring 2011 ULI competition entry


Social service centers are distributed within East Village to provide services to those in need. Public/private organizations provide funding and continuous guidance and support to help different social and cultural groups with various needs.

Compact streetscapes encourage people to walk and shop in local in-town businesses. The “Fault Street� is a new major commercial street consisting of retail and mixed-use shop homes that will attract the locals as well as tourists. Market-rate and affordable housing (20%) units allow mixed-income families to live harmoniously in the same neighborhood. Some of these can be constructed with seismic retrofitted prefabricated housing units which can be modified to suit individual needs.

Locally-owned cafes, restaurants and retail near urban park support local spending and sprout other economic activities.

Some of the former warehouses are refurbished and reused to create an Art Alley, consisting of art studios and gallery spaces.

10-story Green Art Hotel located in the heart of the new commercial/retail district will bring in tourists and stimulate local economy.

The Village Green Park provides spaces for social gatherings, local festivals, and special events to foster interactions of a diverse population. The park also educates people about the geological history of the site, giving the park and the neighborhood a unique identity.

Multi-story medical facility provides new jobs and stable tenant occupancy. Car-share program in a neighborhood can take as many as 10 cars off the road, which can potentially free up 30 parking spaces on a regional basis. To accommodate parking needs, we are replacing surface parking with multi-level underground parking. Park bridges on Broadway and Market St. establish friendly connections between East Village and the neighborhoods east of I-5, such as the Golden Hill and Logan Heights communities.

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2184 adaptive and flexible ideas for a new arts neighborhood in San Diego

Spring 2010 ULI competition entry


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Ve r Un tical S it ca s: P tack nc eo p ing h un its oos le fro Stru e c ac m co va ture rdin rio wit us hM g to ba the ck ultip g in on ir ne type roun le & e ec s ds om d an of mu d nit y; ve ry

to fle geth multi xib er ple le ad ap tive

Prefabricated Homes

-- often referred to as prefab homes, are dwellings manufactured off-site in advance, usually in standard sections that can be easily shipped and assembled.

Go Green-- building a prefab home is earth friendly. Prefabrication techniques reduce waste, offer

energy-saving designs and improve manufacturing and construction efficiencies. More green thoughts; reduce your carbon footprint, recycle waste, and car donation. The primary goal of building a green home is to reduce its environmental impact while also creating a healthy environment for occupants. Architects and builders do this by emphasizing energy efficiency, reducing fresh water use, selecting materials that are healthy and sustainable, and choosing sites that minimize environmental disturbance.

live

Various & Flexible & Adaptive & Regenrative The prefab units are suitable for: - Office - Conference rooms - Warehouse - School building - Accommodation units - Canteen facilities - Kitchen facilities - Laundry facilities - Shops

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2184 adaptive and flexible ideas for a new arts neighborhood in San Diego

Spring 2010 ULI competition entry


Daniel Bursuck Portfolio  

A collection of works done for my MLA I at Cornell University.

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