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dylan christopher hayn clemson university m.arch I portfolio 2012


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mod car

kinetic movement

29 turns

atlanta library

digital construction


gasp logo

highline museum

atlanta park

wave to opie

nyc library drawing


mod car : clemson university fall 2011 charette professor unseen

reclaiming urban space through interactive systems

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Cell phones link people to the system and allow scheduling or immediate requests for a Modcar.

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We propose to reappropriate space once dedicated to the car, back to the human being, the city dweller. An intelligent system of automated Modcars will revolutionize urban transit by eliminating the private vehicle. Street parking will give way to pedestrian walkways and community space. Traffic problems will dissolve as a result of a collective system where each Modcar is tracked and routed accordingly. In utilizing real time population data as part of an automated transportation system transportation will be available on demand. parked cars + parallel spots create urban clutter.

they are replaced with trees, greenspace, benches and vendors

 

The global positioning system allows each Modcar to be tracked and routed accordingly.

The streetscape reacts to the traffic demands by allocating unused lanes back to the public.



Electric Modcars keep minimized energy consumption and pollution while providing efficent transport.

Real time population data allows the system to react and anticipate transportation needs.

$'$37,9( 675((76&$3( Quality of life for city populations increases as community space is more abundant.


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The Modcar system is based on a sensory reactive process that responds to the urban population and its need for transportation. Similiar to how a taxi cab responds to itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patrons, Modcars increase when the need for mobility increases. By running on a need based system, Modcars return to their charging points when not in use, thus eliminating parked cars and encouraging alternate forms of transportation. In addition to decreasing the amount of traffic in city centers, the technical running of Modcars will only occur along arterial routes which will decrease the need for secondary streets and provide alternative opportunities for the use of these spaces.

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clemson university fall 2011 studio I professor montilla

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graduate architecture student partnership

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y graduate school of architectur partnership

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF URE R ARCHITECTURE PARTNERSHIP P

GRADUATE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT PARTNERSHIP CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

GRADUATE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT PARTNERSHIP CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE PARTNERSHIP


walktheline an interactive art gallery

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clemson university spring 2012 studio II professor mills


mechanical elevator escalator - typ. stairwell outdoor exhibition highline


interior view


29turns:

an exploration of Libeskind’s 2008 serpentine pavillion installation +

ARCH 841 MARCH I STUDIO I FALL 2011

18 TURNS

‘Para-architectural Formations and [de]Formations Iteration 3 - Spaces of [de]construction and [de] Mystification Midterm Review Po-Kai Chen Dylan Christopher Hayn

Project History Daniel Libeskind’s 2001 installation at the Serpentine Pavilion Gallery was only the second, following Zaha Hadid’s installation the previous year. The project’s concept lies in the study model which is a single piece of folded paper. The engineering services

Armando Montilla Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, Daniel Libeskind 2001 London, Engalnd

of Arup were instrumental in the success of the project. Libeskind commented on his work: “18 Turns is a special place of discovery, intimacy, and gathering. The space is seen as part of an infinitely accessible horizon between the Gallery and the landscape. Though the structure will disappear with the onset of autumn, it will leave a sharp afterimage and the ineffable resonance of a unique space.”

A.5

ROOF PLAN Upon being disassembled in the fall of 2001

1/4” = 1’-0”

18 Turns was purchased by an undisclosed buyer. In 2005 18 Turns resurfaced in Cork, Ireland, on loan to the Fota House where it could be visited free of charge. Daniel Libeskind was present and gave a lecture at the opening. Since it’s departure from the Fota House 18 Turns been removed from the public eye.

A.4

SECTION A 1/4” = 1’-0”

B

A.2

A

FOLDING DIAGRAM N . T. S .

A.8

A.1

SITE PLAN N . T. S .

A.3

PLAN 1/4” = 1’-0”

B

A.6

E L E VAT I O N E A S T 1/4” = 1’-0”

SECTION B 1/4” = 1’-0”

A.9

A.7

E L E VAT I O N W E S T 1/4” = 1’-0”

E L E VAT I O N N O R T H 1/4” = 1’-0”


reinterpretation as an an olympic dive tower

PROCESS

Project Narrative

29 TURNS

The project selected is Daniel Libeskind’s 2001 installation at the Serpentine Pavilion, 18 Turns. In the process of [de]mystification and [de]construction the Architect’s motives, design process

foldtwistoragami voidquadrillateral intersection angleaggressive planebendspiral punctuatevolume harmonyinward

and built design have been extensively explored. Once a scale model of the installation had

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been constructed it was then decided to design an Olympic diving tower in the spirit of 18 Turns. 18 Turns is a compilation of quadrilateral and triangular planes which intersect in a seemingly random series. The structure is constructed of a steel framework that is sheathed in oblong aluminum panels. The brilliant aluminum skin is in stark contrast to the lush green lawn and leads one to believe that the structure is more sculpture than shelter. 18 Turns Adjacent planes meet at varied angles while often planar surfaces violently cross paths and delve into one another. The strong geometric shapes produce an enclosure that is alive with the voids left where planes have not met fully. Light is allowed to seep through these crevices to the pavilion space below. Guests of the pavilion are allowed to explore the interior and follow their own paths in and out of the building. Libeskind has clearly advanced beyond Alberti’s classical theory: … the house is a good house only insofar as it is constituted analogically to the body... [VIDLER, Anthony: The Architectural Uncanny: Essays in the Modern: Unhomely. Cambridge MA: MIT Press,1994 P 69 “Architecture Dismembered”

B

and embraced the deconstructivist ideals of fragmented spaces for which he has become well known. In deconstructing 18 Turns the Architect’s design process become visible. Libeskind was exploring the idea of folded paper; the practice of origami. A study model of the structure shows a piece of paper folded in a spiraling formation to create the mold the structures massing. The powerful aluminum clad panels of 18 Turns seem to bend and fold, paying homage to the folding of the paper model. Though the aluminum skin is a visceral design element, it is the concept of folded intersecting planes which embody the project. The program is seemingly secondary to the spirit of the project in that the concept can be applied to limitless architectural applications, not solely the 2001 installation at The Serpentine Pavilion. 18 Turns is Libeskind’s interpretation of a folded piece of paper into a horizontal form. It was decided that a vertical application of Libeskind’s concept would be an appropriate adaptation.

B.1

ROOF PLAN 1/4” = 1’-0”

B.2

SECTION A 1/4” = 1’-0”

B.3

SECTION B 1/4” = 1’-0”

B.4

SECTION C 1/4” = 1’-0”

An Olympic diving tower provides a fitting avenue toward that end. The specific nature of the tower’s program would provide design challenges, namely the constraints of the diving platforms and discovering how to integrate vertical circulation. Following Libeskind, paper was folded and a series of test models were produced to explore massing, circulation, layout and style. Quadrilateral and triangular forms were first cut and then connected, then revised as necessary to advance the model. The tower should be tall, lighter toward the apex and contained within. The diving platforms would be in different locations along the y-axis to eliminate diver folly but conclude in the same plane of the x-axis for consistency. Rather than assemble the planes of the structure and then add the diving platforms it was decided that the diving platforms would be integrated into the design. Each platform would be a singular plane, functioning as both a structural element and fulfilling the programmatic requirements. The required dimensions of the diving platforms set the proportion and scale for all the other planes and promoted the use of oblong forms and linear elements. The initial design attempt was to produce a spiraling form which linked each platform

A

together though a continuous stair along inclined planar surfaces. This approach produced a disproportionately scaled result which relied too heavily on the needs of the stair rather than the design being driven by the intersection and interaction of the planes. A stair that interacts and reacts to the planes became a solution. The stair weaves within the planar structure, separate from the structure but integrated and content to coexist. The stair assembly was minimized in stature to ensure that, though an integral design element, it did not contend but rather support the spirit of the project; intersecting planes. The intersecting planes are envisioned to be of concrete tinted to near black. Ideally the concrete would be poured to produce smooth intersections and promote the idea of folded edges, though prefabricated concrete panels might be a more economical alternative. The stair system is to be of stainless steel to separate it visually from the structure and display it as a utility. The completed adaptive project is aptly named 29 Turns as a nod to the original. The number of planes, the number of folds and even the materials of 18 Turns only alluded to the project’s most core design concept; folding, intersecting planes which create a volume. 29 Turns embodies the spirit of the original while ignoring the superficial. Where Alberti surmised: ... the building is in its entirety like a body composed of its parts. [VIDLER, Anthony: The Architectural Uncanny: Essays in the Modern: Unhomely. Cambridge MA: MIT Press,1994 P 69 “Architecture Dismembered”]

B.5

E L E VAT I O N X Z 1 1/4” = 1’-0”

B.6

E L E VAT I O N X Z 2 1/4” = 1’-0”

B.7

E L E VAT I O N X Y 1 1/4” = 1’-0”

B.8

E L E VAT I O N X Y 2 1/4” = 1’-0”

29 Turns presumes to be an adaptive emulation to the soul of 18 Turns.


clemson university fall 2011 studio I professor montilla


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clemson university spring 2012 studio II professor mills


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clemson university fall 2011 studio I professor montilla


digitalconstruction an exploration of digital modeling and fabrication

heat formed acrylic spray painted acrylic laser cut matt board layered plywood


clemson university spring 2012 visualization II professor hecker


nyc public lic library :

a study of Carrère and Hastings 1910 neoclassical landmark


clemson university spring 2012 march I history/theory II professor bruhns


portfolio