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Dalai Lama receives Congressional Gold Medal Page1 Declaration of Tibet’s Independence Page

2 InterviewPage 3 Tibetan sites closed Page 4 World news Page 5 Miss Tibet 2007 Page 6

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Back of the Gold Medal

Front of the Gold Medal

Vol. 01, Issue 01, 01 November, 2007 T P I S h o r t s Ta k e s

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H. H. The Dalai Lama receives Congressional Gold Medal

AP: Tuesday, 30 October 2007, Ottawa: Prime Minister Stephen Harper met His Holiness the Dalai Lama at his Ottawa office, despite strong objections by China in hosting the Tibet’s spiritual leader. Mr Harper became the first Canadian prime minister to meet His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Mr Harper said, he will not back down on speaking about human rights in China for the “almighty dollar.” China has warned that the meeting will gravely undermine the relationship between China and Canada, echoing similar ubiquitous criticism against countries hosting His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

Dharaamsala

The H.H The Dalai Lama being presented with the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor.

Tibetans celebrate at the Dharamsala on Oct. 17 after the Dalai Lama was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor by the U.S. Congress.

Rs.5

Runggye Adak’s relatives taken into custody

WASHINGTON, D.C. (October 17, 2007) – His Holiness The Dalai Lama received the Congressional Gold Medal at the United State Capitol on Wednesday, in a ceremony that included President George W. Bush, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and members of the House and Senate. His Holiness received the hone with Eliezer Wiesel, a Romanian-French Jewish novelist whose memoir, “Night”, describes his experiences as a Holocaust survivor and about life and death in several concentration camps. The celebration began with pre-ceremony Tibetan cultural performances on the West Lawn stage and Special Envoy Lodi Gyari offered opening remarks before the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony from the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. The cultural program continued afterward with a public address by His Holiness, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and ICT Board Chair Richard Gere. The program will conclude with an excerpt performance of a Tibetan opera. The Dalai Lama, 72, is the exiled Tibetan leader and Nobel laureate, who has worked for nearly half a century to reunite the Tibetan people in some sort of meaningful autonomy for the Tibetan people within the People’s Republic of China. “It is a great honor for me to receive the Congressional Gold Medal,” His Holiness said. “This recognition will bring tremendous joy and encouragement to the Tibetan people, for whom I have a special responsibility. Their welfare is my constant motivation and I always consider myself as their free spokesperson. I believe that this award also sends a powerful message to those many individuals who are dedicated to promoting peace, understanding and harmony.” continued on page 4

Miss Tibet 2007

T i b e t

Dharamsala, October 14: Firecrackers were repeatedly shot into the air making spectacular patterns and hundreds of crowd made a roaring applause as the grand finale night of the Miss Tibet 2007 unveiled its stage. Photo: By Yeshe Choesang more details see page 6

World Myanmar releases 87 prisoners, prepares for Pinheiro visit

Tibetans celebrate at the Barkhor in Lhasa on Oct. 17 after the Dalai Lama was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor by the U.S. Congress. photographed by an eyewitness.

AP: 30 October 2007 Myanmar’s military junta has announced the release New image confirm dispersal of Tibetans by armed police after Lithang protest International Campaign for Tibet, August 24th, 2007

New eyewitness accounts and images of the aftermath of local nomad Runggye Adak’s protest during Lithang horse festival on August 1 confirm that armed police and soldiers dispersed a peaceful gathering of Tibetans with shock grenades, tear gas, and beatings. Runggye Adak’s nephew, a 45-year old monk called Lupoe, has been detained after calling for the release of Runggye Adak, who is still in custody in Lithang Tear gas canisters and shock grenades col- after speaking about the importance of the Dalai lected from the site of the encampment after Lama’s return to Tibet to a sympathetic Tibetan riot troops dispersed the Tibetans in Lithang, crowd of several thousand gathered for the horsephotographed by an eyewitness. racing festival earlier this month.

Lupoe, who handed himself into police in the last few days, is also now in custody and is reportedly being singled out by local officials as being a ‘splittist’ force behind Runggye Adak’s protest. According to one report, official posters describing Lupoe as a ‘splittist’ element have been posted in Lithang. Two more of Runggye Adak’s nephews, Gyatso and Nyima, were detained from his home village, Yonru Kharshul village in Lithang, Kardze (Chinese: Ganzi) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, and held in temporary custody locally. According to two reports, Gyatso and Nyima have now been released. continued on page 4

of 87 people held in the wake of the government’s crackdown against protesters and political dissidents which began in August. The released prisoners include more than 50 members of the National League for Democracy, the pro-democracy political party led by Aung San Suu Kyi [BBC profile; JURIST news archive]. The announcement follows reports [JURIST report] this week that UN special rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar Paulo Sergio Pinheiro [official profile] has been given permission to visit the country in November to investigate alleged human rights abuses.


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01 November, 2007 Dharamsala

THE EDITE PAGE

Tibet Post World Should Demand Response for Nangpala Border Shooting The malevolence video spectacle that was the Chinese Nangpala pass shooting has provoked outrage throughout the world and just lighted on icon free speech of Tibetan people. The so called taunts of the land of control guards, China’s Nangpala shooting ripostes and the very videotaping of the event-ending in the sequels to the dropping of the trapdoor-removed, at least in Western media’s eyes, any dignity to the proceedings and opened questions about its legality. Even the architects of humble Tibetan’s downfall, many of world leaders have expressed displeasure with how things unfolded. It is clear that China and its officials wanted the escaping Tibetans to be shot and killed to capital penalty for a variety of brutality. Cutting goat’s neck for sheep afraid of, said in Tibetan ancient words. It is also clear that Chinese officials underestimated the purpose of exile Tibetans to avenge Nangpala Tibetan dead women and children. Chinese determination was due more to reputation and political motivations rather than emotive reasons: The Chinese implementation order to Nangpala border guards and (most importantly), their immediate follow-up in face of several pressures to delay or commute on the shooting the Tibetan children and women, confirmed brutality as a serious player in their self guarding. There were, after all, these children women who did escape for free-speech-they killed them, the humble Tibetans without a single weapon. For the pushing and shoving red scene in Snow Mountains that passed as witnesses at the killings, revenge was just a corner of red wing. With the exception of one red corner’s threat-ness, the killers, so called border guards, Chinese government officials, and everyone else in the snowline were Tibetan victims of Dalai Lama reign. To be in the snowline at their deaths were to recognize the sacrifice of their dead kin by exile Tibetans, especially Tibetan youths. These were no wanton victims in snowline where they lost their souls in ice of snow, but symbols of brave resistance to Chinese rule. To be present at murder videos meant that a participant’s exile family member (The Tibetan children or Tibetan brothers and sisters who killed by Chinese) had paid the ultimate sacrifice for their political opposition during Chinese illegal control over Tibet. All Tibetans paid their praise and remembered their solidarities. Among those martyrs was Tibetan Youth congress, Tibetan women’s Association, Tibetan Guchusum movement and Friends of Tibet etc, the much-revered other exile Tibetans to speak out for their pure souls were milted in the whit e snowline with red bleeding and pulled the only responses for blood for blood and souls for souls. For those who were present at the brutality and more so for those who spoke, Nangpala pass shooting was an earth-shattering murder act. Their stature in the Tibetan’s mind is established, and their hopes and kin reaffirmed. For their part, they comported themselves with courage at the end, remaining calm and defiant in the face of taunts and death. That saved their struggles in the eyes of their Tibetan brothers and sisters, particularly their closer once, and reaffirmed their strength as a struggle for Tibet and it�€™s people at a time when thousands of Tibetans costly representing the majority of Tibetans who have no a little freedom in Tibet. At the end, they were reminder of history of Tibet, a completed Tibet nation and resolve in the face of insurmountable odds-something not lost on Tibetan leaders. Thus, whatever their rhetorical outrage, Tibetans know that even in deaths of Tibetans will continue to spread a long shadow over Tibetan issues. For the China, the Tibet problem was the apparent haste and thirst for revenge that fueled the drive to easier implementation. Chinese foreign speaker at the press brief, who created the trial not reality that tried shooting Tibetans and Chinese lieutenants, expected years of appeals as self-guard from escaping rats added and a verdict on the infamous gassing of border militaries at Tibet and Nepal borders to occur before the Tibetans was killed to the scaffold. Members of border guard Forces responsible for high value detainees such as other Tibetans expected that at a minimum the murdering acting would take place after the any of Tibetan at land control broken. The Chinese now bans the Tibetans most respected religious festival (Gaden Ngachoe) marking the 25th of every 10th month of Tibetan calendar, Chinese has been taken the actions at end of 2006 the pilgrimage to all over Tibet. Tibetan’s supporters around the world assumed that some form of pardon or reduction in the Nangpala brutality might be possible in order to quell sectarian violence in future in Tibet. None of these views took into account Tibetan youths’ motivations or the absolute need of younger Tibetan leaders to see that Tibet freedom will be lighted sooner rather than late r in order to bolster their political positions in an around the new Tibet government. Thus, the drive to killings of Tibetans at Nangpala was the “known unknown” (to use one of secretary of Tibet Autonomous Region’s best phrases) in the equation that Chinese policy-makers did not foresee and could not prevent.

Claims of the Dalai Lama’s nepotistic behaviour wrong By Dr Lobsang Sangay The Age, June 07, 2007 Dr Lobsang Sangay was selected as one of Asia’s 200 outstanding young leaders to attend the “Asia 21 Young Leaders Summit”, held in Seoul from 17-19 November 2006/File photo

In his recent column (“Behind Dalai Lama’s holy cloak”, 23/5), Michael Backman chastised journalists for not challenging the Dalai Lama. In doing so, he resorted to questionable journalistic standards by accusing the Dalai Lama of nepotistic and non-democratic behaviour based on “hard facts” that are either manipulated to sensationalise his case or are downright wrong.Backman alleges that the Dalai Lama advocates greater autonomy for millions of people who are now “Chinese citizens, presumably with him as head of their government”. The fact is

Whatever the future may bring, in Tibetan eyes exiled Tibetan leaders actions are relatively dignified and just. From 1990s, Tibet issues are running in corner direction, which never ever seen in world history, it also draws to an end a chapter in Tibet history that in retrospect may seem relatively stable given the uncertainties and chaos of the present. For the moment, contrary to what was promised in future, the future for Tibet is uncertain and delicately balanced as a direct consequence of the Chinese-crucial invasion and occupation. Such are the perils of the forced imposition of democracy, or ether communist, something that nations with similar pretensions may wish to take into account as they pursue their every individual’s future life. Tibetans never enjoyed a free speech since Chinese occupation on Tibet.

just the opposite.In July 1981, then Chinese Communist Party General Secretary Hu Yaobang announced “China’s Five-point Policy towards the Dalai Lama”, urging the Dalai Lama to return so he “will enjoy the same political status and living conditions as he had before 1959”. The Dalai Lama rejected the offer and stated that the issue was not his own position in Tibet, but the welfare of 6 million Tibetans.In 1992, the Dalai Lama categorically declared that he would not hold any official position in the government of future Tibet. Rather, he would hand over his traditional authority to an elected leader of Tibet and “serve the people as an individual outside the government”.It is a fact that the traditional government of Tibet was unegalitarian and inefficient. However, when the Dalai Lama was enthroned to be the leader in 1950, he was merely 15 years old, and faced the daunting task of handling the invasion and occupation of Tibet by Communist China. In exile, as part of an anti-Communist campaign, it is true that the American Government supported the Khampa guerilla resistance force till early 1970s.However, it is not true that the Dalai Lama was “personally” paid $US15,000 a month by the CIA. As it is the case today, he was kindly hosted by the Indian Government as an “honoured guest”. The fund was not even part of the budget of the Tibetan government in exile. In actuality, the main source was not the CIA, but fulfilment of a pledge made by US ambassador to India Loy Henderson in 1951.On the advocacy of non-violence, the fact is that the Dalai Lama sent an emotional appeal on audio tape to the Tibetan guerillas in early 1970s, telling them to disarm. This message demoralised many of the fighters, and a few even committed suicide. Soon after that message from the Dalai Lama, the camp disbanded.The budget of the Tibetan government in exile totals ap-

proximately $US20 million ($A24 million). It is openly debated in yearly Tibetan parliament budgetary sessions for two weeks, and allocated transparently. Compared with other refugee groups, the Tibetan government in exile is arguably the most efficient and effective in providing service to 130,000 Tibetan refugees with such limited budget. Still, the general impression is that the Dalai Lama must be raising millions of dollars.On the contrary, strict rules apply to the Dalai Lama’s visits abroad that these cannot be used for fund-raising purposes. During his trip to Australia, as is true everywhere, his organisers are instructed to charge fees only to cover the actual expenses of the event. More impressively, the Dalai Lama does not charge even a penny for speaking fees. He speaks for free so that he will be accessible to as many people as possible.Perhaps the most irresponsible reporting in the column is the accusation that the Dalai Lama “has been remarkably nepotistic, appointing members of his family to many positions of prominence”, like many Asian politicians.The facts are as follows: as per his specific instruction, a provision was introduced in the Tibetan constitution of 1963 and the Charter of 1991 that the Dalai Lama can be impeached by the parliament.From 1960 to 1990, the Dalai Lama had the sole constitutional power to appoint exiled Tibet’s cabinet ministers, heads of departments, and members of parliament.He never appointed anyone from his family as ministers, parliamentarians or heads of departments. Only his brother-in-law served as the head of the Security Department and his elder brother headed a fledgling start-up (the Tibetan Medicine Institute). As a matter of fact, from 1978 to 1986, the Gayong Mimang Tsokcheng, the highest decision-making body, discussed and consistently recomcontinued on page 4

Declaration of Tibet’s Independence Phayul, July 06, 2007 By Jamyang Norbu(At the conclusion of “March for Tibet’s Independence” at the Independence Hall, Philadelphia earlier on July 4 2007)(Philadelphia, PA), July 4: When we fight for Tibetan freedom we are, in a real sense, fighting for the freedom of oppressed

In 1950s, in the end, Dalai Lama met Chinese leader Mao Tse Tung, made in a very Tibetan way. It may have looked cruel and barbaric to Chinese, and it may have been based on disputed legal grounds, but Chinese committed him as to tried and convicted for nation separation crimes, criticized, and pulled out unacceptable conditions in what for Tibet was an part of China, as same as Taiwan. It is must accepted efficient and relatively transparent process by Dalai Lama, one that was far better than the “justice” carried out during the ruling by Chinese leaders. To be sure, the Tibet issues are more political than criminal, but that was exactly the point: political crimes are the most sacred of crimes in China, particularly in Tibet, and Nangpala shooting was the best at committing them. That many Tibetan writers and media person were detained on the same gallows as their brothers and sisters and provided a sense of poetic, and political justice. Nangpala pass shooting holds important lessons for those who seek to impose communist in countries where it has never existed. Holding human rights record is useful as a procedure for selecting government incumbents, and running open trials in which defendants can speak and have legal representation is clearly a step towards more transparency in the administration of justice. But neither of these can overcome decades of political hatred superimposed on centuries of religious and ethnic conflict, which is the case in Tibet. The banned, detained, sentenced and censorship’s samara exposed the delusions of Chinese President Hu Jintao’s administration officials who championed the forced imposition of “Communist” in Tibet, as well as the naivete of Chinese officials on the very corner and every ground when dealing with the political realities motivating Tibet approaches to Tibetan issues. It also proved to be a remarkable way of reaffirming both red Chinese and particularly HanChinese pride and determination as well as Tibet control, which may or may not pave the ground for some form of post-some Tibetan small minded leaders, post-Chinese-occupation political compromise (especially if the Han-Chinese can act as intermediaries and power brokers, given their history and treatment under the Tibet democrat nation).

The Tibet Post

people and nations all over the world. The real battles for freedom are fought in local and mostly desperate struggles, by people prepared to give up not just respectability and careers but even their lives. Freedom Struggles are by their very nature disruptive. There is an unsettling quality to even the mildest of them that finds echo in the old legal exhortation: fiat iustitia, et pereat mundi - Let justice be done though the world perish. Yet, however disruptive, however much a source of economic loss and human suffering, the

indomitable struggles of Aung San Suu Kyi and Nelson Mandela inspire freedom-loving people all over the world.Each victory of freedom over tyranny is a tremendous boost to other causes. Tibetans remember how genuinely thrilled they were when Bangladesh became independent, and even more encouraged and proud when they learned that Tibetan paratroopers had made an important contribution to the victory. After India gained her independence, a whole succession of African and Asian nations also became free from their European colonial masters. In the 1990s, with the fall of the Berlin wall, another series of countries gained their freedom, this time from the Soviet yoke. Tibetan independence could well precipitate, or at least herald, a new era of freedom not only for neighboring countries such as Burma, East Turkistan, and Inner Mongolia but even for the people of China itself.It is vital that we do not give up the struggle for Rangzen. We must instead completely rethink and revitalize the struggle. The Tibetan Freedom Struggle must constantly seek effective ways to challenge Chinese tyranny both inside Tibet itself and all over the world, even if that entails facing Chinese reprisals or retaliations. The struggle for Rangzen is a revolutionary cause. It must be a cause for those with courage, dedication, and a willingness to make sacrifices. It is only with moral commitment that we will be able to bring about a restoration of

Tibetan independence and establishment of a genuinely democratic system of government based on the rule of law and the primacy of individual freedom. Of course, there is no guarantee that independence will happen soon, or even in our lifetimes though many Tibetans are somehow convinced it will. Yet, it goes without saying that maintaining the goal of Rangzen is vital to its eventual achievement. The hope of independence is vital for people inside Tibet. Keeping alive the Freedom Struggle in exile gives people inside Tibet hope, and in spite of the terrible sufferings they undergo, gives them some assurance that their world has not disappeared entirely. In order for Tibetans to preserve their identity, culture, and religion, the hope of a free Tibet must always be preserved. We individuals and our organizations assembled here today are firmly behind all the Tibetans who are standing up and demanding independence, and we mutually pledge to fully support those inside who risk everything, including their lives, in the quest for a free and democratic homeland. We call upon individual nations of the world and the United Nations Organization to support the inalienable right of Tibetans to an independent homeland. We appeal to the United States of America, the first liberal democratic nation in the world, to give due recognition to the rightful cause of the Tibetan people and aid them in their noble quest for independence, freedom, and democracy.


TPI DALAI LAMA 3 Spiritual Leader Stresses InAn Interview With His Holiness ner Peace, Nurturing The Tibet Post

their families and take to heart lessons gleaned from family life. “The seed of compassion, from birth, we already have. very nature, we come from our mother — our entire life depends on others’ care,” he said, adding that his own affection for all people comes not from Buddhism, but from his own mother. “My mother was very warmhearted. Never angry,” he said. “My compassion, I learned from her.” And this instruction, he said, should also take place in classrooms. “I raise question whether modern education system effective,” he said. “Adequate at brain development, not adequate at developing warm-heartedness. “Please give your children maximum affection, maximum care,” he advised the audience, adding, playfully, “Of course, I am monk so I have no responsibility.” Gretchen Greminger from Brunswick, Ga., arrived at the venue four hours before the Dalai Lama took the stage. “It was perfect,” she said after the

U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) paid his respects to the Dalai Lama at Centennial Olympic Park. speech. “Seeing him was number four on my top 20 things to do in life.” Peter Wang, a Taiwan native now living in Atlanta, heard the speech on the grass, sitting over a blue baseball cap next to his young daughter. “He is a real religious leader,” he said. “He teaches us how to live together peacefully and use our wisdom to approach peace amongst the conflict around us today.” Wang hesitated to call himself a Buddhist, until his daughter nudged him and smiled. University President James W. Wagner, Board of Trustees Chair Ben Johnson and U.S. Rep. John Lewis took turns presenting the Dalai Lama and welcoming him to Atlanta and the sprawling park at the heart of downtown. “As a man of peace, nonviolence and love, we welcome you,” Lewis said. “We welcome your wisdom and your teachings.” The Dalai Lama, speaking to a crowd of about 7,000 people, also stressed the need for universal respect, regardless of individual beliefs. “As much as you love to God, you must love to fellow human being,” he said, adding that even if individuals have “no need to be religious minded, [there] is no point to neglect inner values and compassion.” He also called for religious tolerance, urging people from different backgrounds to practice respect disregarding personal beliefs.. Later, in response to a previously submitted question about reconciling his teachings with Christianity, he described the similarities between many of the world’s religions and his affinity for other religious practices. “I’m Buddhist. I may argue with Jesus Christ, but in practice I fully agree with his [teaching],” he said. “All religious belief, same practice,” he said. In southern France, he said nuns and monks at a Christian monastery shared a remarkably similar daily routine and way of life as Buddhist monks. “Why? Perhaps same source,” he said, slowly waving his hand toward the sky.

Conference Highlights Meditation Research

The Dalai Lama met with scientists and Buddhist scholars to discuss new research on the effects of meditation on mental disorders.

By Marissa Krimsky Contributing Writer While scientists are searching for a cure-all pill for mental disorders, new research shows that the cure may not be in a bottle, but could rather be found in Tibetan meditation. Hundreds gathered in the Woodruff Physical Education Center to hear discussions on this pioneering research on meditation and mental disorders. This research was presented in an dialogue in the 15th Mind and Life conference: Mindfulness, Compassion, and the Treatment of Depression. Mind and Life was organized by a scientist and an entrepreneur in 1987 to establish a dialogue between Buddhist Philosophers and scientists.

01 November, 2007 Dharamsala

An Interview With Emory’s Newest Professor, the Dalai Lama The Dalai Lama has been touring all over the United States this past month. His last stop was Washington, D.C., where he received the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian award Congress can bestow. The award enraged China, which views the Dalai Lama as a dangerous separatist because of his support for greater Tibetan autonomy. On Friday, the Dalai Lama arrived in Atlanta, beginning a three-day visit celebrating his acceptance of a professorship at Emory. His visit to the University generated excitement all over campus and the city, with thousands of people gathering to hear him speak. In addition to his highly promoted public appearances, the Tibetan spiritual leader sat down for an interview with members of the media, including Wheel Editor in Chief Chris Megerian and News Editor Susan McMillan. During the 20-minute discussion, the Dalai Lama talked about the political nature of his role, the importance of nonviolence and the happiest moment of his life. The Dalai Lama: Let’s start! Chris Megerian: Your role as Dalai Lama has been very unique from all previous Dalai Lamas in your political nature. I was wondering how you saw the role of the Dalai Lama evolving in future generations. DL: Future generations? Nobody knows.*laughs*

CM: Do you think it will remains as political a role as it has been recently? DL: No, no, no. As early as 1969, I publicly made statement to whether the very institution of the Dalai Lama should ontinue or not for the Tibetan people. Some people, you see, get the impression that the Dalai Lama institution is so important for Tibetan nation or Tibetan Buddhism. It’s wrong. Some occasions the Dalai Lama institution very strong. Some occasions, the Dalai Lama institution, it has ceased. But Tibetan spirituality, Buddhism, Tibetan nation will remain. So for my own case, ’til my death, I am fully committed to promotion of human value and promotion of religious harmony. After me, after my death, my responsibility now finished. So as a Buddhist, I believe, you see, the next sort of rebirth. I don’t know where rebirth omes, whether this planet, or some other planet more peaceful. More happier. *laughs* Susan McMillan: At some point during the struggle for Tibetan independence, Tibetans have used violence to try to attain their political goals. Looking back on that portion, how do you view that portion of the struggle and the use of violence? DL: Now, violence brings more suffering. More destruction... In 1956, until

early 1960s, crushed by Chinese forces in Tibet. So, one Chinese military person, we received a Chinese paper, in it, it stated between March 1959 and September 1960, the number of people who were killed through military action, in surrounding area, 87,000. So, the open clash with Chinese forces started early 1956. And it remained until 1962, 1963. In some places, more dense populations. So we roughly estimate, a half million Tibetans killed. And more than half million death through starvation. And that took place during 1958, 1959. So, all together, we believe, more than one million Tibetans perished. So, no use using violence. Also, you see, we are not seeking independence. We want general autonomy within People’s Republic of China. That is also to our advantage. Tibet is a very poor country. Spiritually very advanced, but advanced spirituality will not fill our stomachs. Entire Tibet cannot live in cave. So we need some good shelter, we need material facility, and easier communication. For this, certainly, we want to

modernize Tibet. For these reasons, to live in People’s Republic China, we get greater benefit for material aspect. Meantime, we should have meaningful autonomy, so that our unique cultural heritage and rich Buddhist tradition and also delicate environment can project effectively. So, Tibetan culture remains alive. Tibetan Buddhism remains alive. CM: In your life, what single moment has brought you the greatest happiness? DL: Greatest happiness? Many occasions. One I remember, the next day of my escape from Tibet... I left, disguised as a soldier with a rifle. So, the more I walked, that rifle became heavier, heavier, heavier. *laughs* So, that night, really, full of fear. Because on the road, the other side of the river, just over there, was a Chinese military garrison. So although it was completely dark, we were not using flashlights, still the hooves, the horses still made noise. So, if they notice, very easily, we would be shot. So next morning, next day, when we passed one hill, one mountain, we felt safe. Real liberation!

Will vet all reincarnations, says China, Lamas say no way The Indian Express October 23, 2007 By NEERAJ SANTOSHIJAMMU - Lamas in the trans-Himalayan Ladakh region are up in arms against the Chinese authorities for having issued a regulation that requires all reincarnations, including that of Dalai Lama, to be approved by the Chinese Government.Asserting that this amounts to interference in the religious matters of the Buddhists and a ploy to undermine Tibetan Buddhism and the very institution of Dalai Lama, the Buddhists in Ladakh, also called Little Tibet, have urged the Prime Minister of India and international bodies to take up the issue with the Chinese authorities.All Ladakh Gompa Association (LGA) leader Lama Lobzang Angchuk and Ladakh Buddhist Association (LBA) leader Sonam Dawa have expressed deep concern over the Chinese directives, adding that in no way will the same be acceptable to the Buddhists globally, who revere Dalai Lama as a living Buddha.Lama Lobzang Angchuk, who is representative of nearly 5000 Lamas across Ladakh’s nearly 700 monasteries, said it was ridiculous that China should issue a directive on the very spiritual process of reincarnation of the Dalai Lama, who is central to the very ethos of Tibetan Buddhism.He stressed that given the fact that the holy land of India is the birthland of Buddhism, India has the moral responsibility to speak out for the Buddhists and take up the issue with the Chinese authorities.Angchuk said the Tibetan Administration in exile had already rejected the Chinese directive intended to choose Tibetan spiritual leaders. He said the so-

called order no. 5, containing 14 articles on Management Measures for the Reincarnation of ‘Living Buddhas’ in Tibetan Buddhism by China’s State Administration of Religious Affairs is against the very concept of religious freedom, universally accepted, which lays special stress on the fact that there should be no political interference in the religious affairs.”Though China claims that it is an atheist state, at the same time it has also included freedom of religious belief among the fundamental rights in its constitution,” he added.Buddhists in Ladakh worship Dalai Lama as a living manifestation of Buddha. It may be noted that in August this year, Dalai Lama was in Ladakh for a fortnight where he conferred Avalokiteshvera initiation, a special religious ceremony seeking buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings.Angchuk said Dalai Lamas were manifestations of Avalokiteshvara, the Bodhisattva of Compassion and patron saint of Tibet. He said that Avalokiteshvara was the earthly manifestation of the self born, eternal Buddha, Amitabha and is said to be guarding this world in the interval between the historical Sakyamuni Buddha, and the next Buddha of the Future Maitreya.Bodhisattvas are enlightened beings who have postponed their own nirvana and chosen to take rebirth in order to serve humanity.Thousands of Tibetans led by the Dalai Lama fled to India in 1959, nine years after China’s Communist army overtook Tibet. The Dalai Lama also won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 for advocating a non-violent campaign for genuine autonomy to preserve Tibetan language and culture.


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01 November, 2007 Dharamsala

TPI TIBET

The Tibet Post

China closes Tibetan sites Claims of the Dalai Lama’s nepoto silence US award to tistic behaviour wrong Dalai Lama from page 2

TPI. Dharamsala, October 23: China has stepped up curbs in Tibet, closing down websites and blogs after it failed to stop US President George W. Bush from meeting Tibetan leader the Dalai Lama and awarding of the US Congressional Gold Medal to him according to a media report. The report stated that at least five Tibetans were arrested in Tibet’s Amdo province for celebrating after the Dalai Lama received the US Congress’ highest civilian honour while a website and two bogs were closed down. The report, however, did not cite on what specific grounds the site and the blogs were closed down. On October 16, a day before the Dalai Lama was due to be honoured with the Congressional Gold Medal, www.tibettl.com/blog was closed down and soon after www.tibetcm.com and blogwww.tibetcm.com/blog were also reportedly closed. The closure of the websites comes in the wake of international media freedom watchdog Reporters Without Borders issuing a report, saying how repressive governments were turning their sights on websites and blogs in a bid to undermine media freedom the IANS report stated. China has begun a massive public relations exercise in its southern neighbour Nepal, inviting groups of Nepali journalists to Tibet so that they can write about the region’s development and prosperity under Beijing’s control, IANS report stated.

H. H. The Dalai Lama receives Congressional Gold Medal from front page President Bush remarked that the Gold Medal has many times been awarded to great figures after their accomplishments or victories have been achieved. He said that by awarding the medal to the Dalai Lama, whose difficult work and uncertain outcome continues, “America raises its voice in the call for religious liberty and basic human rights.” “These values forged our Republic. They sustained us through many trials. And they draw us by conviction and conscience to the people of Tibet and the man we honor today,” he said. Bush described the Dalai Lama as a man of faith, sincerity and peace who has won the respect and affection of the American people – a people that have earned his respect and affection, as well. He reflected on the tragedy of a stubborn endurance of religious repression during a time of unprecedented freedom. “Americans cannot look to the plight of the religiously oppressed and close our eyes or turn away. And that is why I will continue to urge the leaders of China to welcome the Dalai Lama to China,” he added. “They will find this good man to be a man of peace and reconciliation.” The Dalai Lama reflected on the journey his life has taken, to explain just how much he, a humble Buddhist monk, is deeply touched with this great honor that has gone to such people as Pope John Paul II and Mother Theresa. The 14th reincarnation of the Buddha of Compassion, The Dalai Lama was born Lhamo Dhondrub to a peasant family on July 6, 1935, in a small village called Taktser in the remote Amdo region of northeastern Tibet. He was recognized at the age of two, in accordance with Tibetan tradition, an incarnation Avalokitesvara, the Buddha of Compassion. The enthronement ceremony took place on February 22, 1940 in Lhasa, the capital of Tibet. His Holiness spoke of learning what it means to be “kind, honest, and caring” from the loving care of his mother, who he called a truly compassionate woman. He spoke of moving to Lhasa at the age of four, where his teachers and housekeepers continued with his care and teaching, until he was old enough for formal Buddhist education. The he learned concepts of interdependence and the human potential for infinite compassion. “It is these that gave me a profound recognition of the importance of universal responsibility,

nonviolence, and inter-religious understanding,” he said. “Today, it is a conviction in these values that gives me the powerful motivation to promote basic human values. Even in my own struggle for the rights and greater freedom of the Tibetan people, these values continue to guide my commitment to pursuing a nonviolent path.” The Dalai Lama reflected his joyous welcome in both his 1991 and 2007 Congressional visits, and noted the familiar faces still here, and those who have moved on or passed. “Our American friends have stood with us in the most critical of times and under most intense pressure,” he said. “Mr. President, thank you for your strong support, and for the warm friendship that Mrs. Bush and you have extended to me personally. I am deeply grateful to you for your sympathy and support for Tibet, and your firm stand on religious freedom and the cause of democracy.” He also thanked House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for her “unwavering support to the just cause of the Tibetan people.” “You have also worked hard to promote the cause of democracy, freedom and the respect for human rights in other parts of the world,” he said. “For this, I would like to offer my special thanks.” The Dalai Lama said he regrets that the consistency of American support for Tibet has caused some tension in the US-China relations, but said this path would hopefully create a future of Tibet and China “that will move beyond mistrust to a relationship based on mutual respect, trust and recognition of common interests.” He said both China and India are welldeserving of the tremendous advances in economic liberalization that has led to wealth, modernization and power and leadership. “In order to fulfill this role, I believe it is vital for China to have transparency, rule of law and freedom of information,” he said. “Much of the world is waiting to see how China’s concepts of ‘harmonious society’ and ‘peaceful rise’ would unfold. Today’s China, being a state of many nationalities, a key factor here would be how it ensures the harmony and unity of its various peoples. For this, the equality and the rights of these nationalities to maintain their distinct identities are crucial.” The Tibetans are watching events with concern, and he said with each year, the Chinese population of Tibet grows and will soon surpass the six million Tibetans in Tibet. He is also concerned for the environmental impact in a land that is the source of rivers that are vital arteries all over Asia.

mended that the Dalai Lama appoint his elder brother Gyalo Thondup as the Prime Minister. Each time, the Dalai Lama declined.In 1991, as part of democratic reforms, the Dalai Lama delegated the power to appoint the cabinet to the parliament, which since 1960 has been directly elected by the people.Ironically, the parliament began to elect members of his family, and the most high-profile was his elder brother Gyalo as the Prime Minister.The elder brother played a key role in seeking US Government support in 1950s-60s, and paradoxically he was also instrumental in opening a dialogue with the Chinese Government in the early 1980s.Nonetheless, he is controversial partly because of his autocratic personality.Not surprisingly, Gyalo was eased out without completing his term as the Prime Minister, partly because of his incapability to cope with a democratic-environment-in-exile polity.In 2000, another reform was instituted by the Dalai Lama, requiring exile Tibetans to directly elect

their Prime Minister with full administrative power except in dealing with China.Tibetans in 27 countries voted on a single day, with more than 80 per cent electing Professor Samdhong Rinpoche as the first Prime Minister. He didn’t appoint any member of the Dalai Lama’s family to his cabinet. In the parliament, only a nephew was elected as an ordinary member among 46 parliamentarians and he faced disciplinary action for violating parliamentary rules and regulations.Clearly, the experience of the Dalai Lama’s family in the nascent Tibetan democratic system reflects that they don’t necessarily get a free ride.More importantly, the Dalai Lama never appointed his family members to positions of influence, even when he was permitted to do so (1960-90) and those who did were elected by the parliament.The truth, then, is far removed from Backman’s claim that the Dalai Lama “appointed” his family members to positions of prominence.Finally, Backman’s suggestion that had the Dalai Lama “stayed quiet”, possibly “fewer Tibetans might have

been tortured, killed and generally suppressed by China” sounds comically naive and hypocritical.Firstly, between 1960 and 1972, when the Dalai Lama was “quiet” and never ventured outside of India, Tibet went through brutal suppression under China, when thousands of people perished.From 1973 to 1986, the Dalai Lama made limited trips abroad, but suppression continued.From 1987 to 2007, when the Dalai Lama made the most trips abroad and finally put Tibet in the international map, Backman suggests he keep quiet.It is hypocritical to suggest the Dalai Lama refrain from speaking out for the welfare of 6 million Tibetans when Backman himself speaks out and writes columns and books to pay his rent and put food on his table. Last time I checked, free speech is universal. It is noble to speak for millions of suffering people, and especially to speak out against authoritarian regimes.It is certainly not just the privilege of the few to make a living by criticising others. Dr Lobsang Sangay is a scholar on Tibet at the law school of Harvard University.Sangay@law.harvard.edu

Runggye Adak’s relatives taken into custody continued from front page

In the week following the protest on August 1, local television ran reports on the incident, stating that 53-year old Runggye Adak had not admitted to the ‘serious crimes’ he had committed. Following Runggye Adak’s detention, approximately 200 Tibetans gathered in the courtyard of Lithang police station to appeal for his release while several Tibetans went inside to talk to police and Kardze officials. An unusual official statement on Runggye Adak’s case, issued just two days after his detention, confirmed the gathering of around 200 Tibetans, saying that they were “unaware of the facts” (Xinhua, August 3). The new images, seen below, show armed soldiers marching towards the Tibetans gathered together away from the horse festival grounds, south of the town, a week after Runggye Adak’s detention, and other security personnel with black uniforms gathered on the streets of Lithang (Chinese: Litang) after the event. An eyewitness, who has now left Tibet, told ICT that dispersing the Tibetan crowd who were gathered was a coordinated action by police and army. “First they blocked all the roads leading to the area where the Tibetans were gathered,” said the visitor to Lithang, a tourist who arrived in the town on August 7, and witnessed the incident the next day. “The army was in the meanwhile doing some kind of battleformations; I could see them swinging their riot-shields and marching up and down. Later all the police cars drove down to the tents. Then the army started to fire tear-gas and hurl shock grenades at the crowd. It also seemed from my position that they were shooting towards the crowd, but it could have been that they were firing into the air, and I didn’t hear later if anyone had been hurt. Closer to where I saw standing, I saw them beating up a Tibetan guy with metal prods. It seemed that they also took him in the police car, but because a huge crowd of Tibetans gathered around him, I was not sure if he was actually taken in the car or not.” Later four policemen grabbed the tourist and seized his camera, but he managed to keep his film through showing the police some separate images that were not of the crackdown. He was later

followed by a policeman in a black balaclava (ski-mask), who intimidated him and warned him to leave the area. The tourist source said that it was not clear on the ground why the police had launched the crackdown to disperse this particular gathering of Tibetans but it is likely to be related to the concern that has been expressed in the local area for Runggye Adak’s welfare, which included a gathering of Tibetans from his home area after his detention. A Tibetan who is now in exile and who is connected to events in the area said: “Runggye Adak expressed what every Tibetan feels, but cannot say. You can see that from the reaction of the crowd when he talked about the Dalai Lama’s return.” The two nephews of Runggye Adak who were reportedly detained earlier this week have now been released after their brother handed himself into police custody, according to reports from the area. Their detention involved more than a hundred police and Public Security Bureau officials arriving in Runggye Adak’s home village. According to a report by the Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy, police had said that they were looking for another nephew, Lopoe, a monk from Lithang monastery, who had apparently been involved in requesting Runggye Adak’s release (TCHRD report, August 22, 2007). When Lopoe heard that they were looking for him, he reportedly handed himself in at a local police station. Further images on ICT’s website depict the official ceremony which was the venue for Runggye Adak’s protest, and show a Chinese military official watching dances at the ceremony. A second eyewitness, who observed Runggye Adak making his protest, told ICT: “It all happened so fast Runggye Adak just came onstage and started speaking. Although his voice did not carry very far, because it could have been that they switched the microphone off, I could see Tibetans nodding their heads about what he was saying about the Dalai Lama and freedom. Quite a few people were cheering him. Then a few men came up onto the stage, and it seemed to me that they could have been Tibetans trying to help him, trying to get him offstage so he wouldn’t be in more trouble. But

then uniformed officers arrived and I could see them moving through the crowd quickly towards the stage. Many Tibetans tried to block their way to prevent him reaching Runggye Adak, but they had no chance. Quite a lot of people followed him when they took him away, and other people around me were saying how scared they were about his fate.” The same source also said that a Chinese flag that had been displayed on the first day of the horse festival was apparently removed by some Tibetans. Most of the Tibetan nomads and local people from Runggye Adak’s home area who had been gathered outside the county authorities’ office have apparently dispersed, particularly following the crackdown with tear gas and shock grenades on August 8, although some have said they will return if Runggye Adak, a father of 11 children and a respected figure in his nomadic community, is treated unfairly. The official Chinese statement, dated August 3, reported that Runggye Adak had been detained “for inciting separation of nationalities”, saying: “The villager named Runggye Adak went to a platform at about 10:00 am Wednesday before the opening ceremony in Litang county, and shouted out words of “Tibetan independence” and stopped vehicles to disrupt public order, according to the sources. The villager was detained by police for being suspected of breaching the law.... The police sources said they would handle the case of Runggye Adak, whose words and deeds were meant to separate the country and harm national unity and has disrupted public order, according to law.” (Xinhua, August 3, 2007) According to information received by ICT, several weeks earlier, the Chinese authorities had circulated a petition at Lithang monastery for monks to sign saying that they did not want the Dalai Lama to return to Tibet, which provoked tension in the area, and resentment towards monks who signed. Images of the crackdown and the horse festival after the protest are available from ICT - contact press@savetibet.org. All images were provided courtesy of two eyewitnesses and one other tourist in the area at that time.


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The Tibet Post

A Lesson from Our Burmese Brothers and Sisters

Flanked by civilians, thousands of monks march against Burma’s military government. Around 100,000 protestors have taken to the streets in Burma demanding democracy and an end to the military junta (Photo: AFP — Getty Images)

By Ketsun Lobsang Dondup ”I extend my support and solidarity with the recent peaceful movement for democracy in Burma. I fully support their call for freedom and democracy and take this opportunity to appeal to freedomloving people all over the world to support such non-violent movements,” - (Statement by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, September 24, 2007) As one commentator noted, Tibet and Burma are linked in many ways. Our peoples and languages are related, and we share a deep faith in

Buddhism and the misfortune of brutal dictatorship. Our revered leaders have both won Nobel Peace Prizes, but are exiled or imprisoned. Our countries also both saw widespread protests in the late 1980s, which our respective regimes cr ushed violently. With all these connections, it is clear that when something huge is happening in one country, the people of the other country should watch carefully. Right now, the massive protests in Burma hold a lesson for the people of Tibet – if we choose to listen.

Concern at Tibet monk ‘arrests’ BBC, October 23, 2007

By Chris Xia Human rights groups have expressed concerns about reports of clashes in Tibet last week between Chinese police and Buddhist monks.Thousands of police were deployed at monasteries in Lhasa, and scores of monks are said to have been arrested.They were celebrating the award of a US congressional medal to the Dalai Lama.China regards him as the leader of a separatist movement. Beijing was furious at the US decision to give him the medal - one of the highest honours.Tight security measures had already been put into place in the capital Lhasa.Police intervened when the monks in Drepung began decorating the quarters tra-

ditionally reserved for the Dalai Lama, the most important figure in Tibetan Buddhism.Security forces sealed off the monastery and another nearby, and there are reports that the unrest there carried on for several days.Human rights monitors in the Indian city of Dharamsala, where the Tibetan government in exile is based, said they were still trying to collate reports about exactly how many monks were taken away, and where to.The incident shows how revered the Dalai Lama still is among Tibetan Buddhists, almost 50 years after he fled into exile into India.It is a mark of how nervous the Chinese authorities are about his enduring influence that even possession of his photograph is banned.

Argentine first lady claims victory in presidential elections

Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner

BBC. October 29, 2007 Argentina’s glamorous first lady, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, claimed victory Sunday in her bid

to succeed her husband and become the first woman in her country’s history to be elected president. “We have won by a large margin,” the 54-year-old senator told cheering supporters in a speech broadcast live on television hours after polls closed. A partial count showed her with 43 percent of the vote, double that of her nearest rival, according to a tally of 12 percent of ballots on the official electoral agency website. If maintained, that score will make her the outright victor of the election without the need for a runoff in November.

01 November, 2007 Dharamsala

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His Holiness the Dalai Lama addresses the audience during the Congressional Gold Medal Awards Ceremony President Bush, Speaker Pelosi, Senator Byrd, my fellow Laureate Elie Wiesel, Honorable Members of Congress, Brothers and Sisters. It is a great honor for me to receive the Congressional Gold Medal. This recognition will bring tremendous joy and encouragement to the Tibetan people, for whom I have a special responsibility. Their welfare is my constant motivation and I always consider myself as their free spokesperson. I believe that this award also sends a powerful message to those many individuals who are dedicated to promoting peace, understanding and harmony. On a personal note, I am deeply touched that this great honor has been given to me, a Buddhist monk born of a simple family from the remote Amdo region of Tibet. As a child I grew up under the loving care of my mother, a truly compassionate woman. And after my arrival in Lhasa at the age of four, all the people around me, my teachers and even the housekeepers, taught me what it means to be kind, honest, and caring. It is in such an environment that I grew up. Later my formal education in Buddhist thought exposed me to concepts such as interdependence and the human potential for infinite compassion. It is these that gave me a profound recognition of the importance of universal responsibility, nonviolence, and inter-religious understanding. Today, it is a conviction in these values that gives me the powerful motivation to promote basic human values. Even in my own struggle for the rights and greater freedom of the Tibetan people, these values continue to guide my commitment to pursuing a nonviolent path. I have had the honor to be in this hall once before when I visited your country in 1991. Many of the faces that welcomed me then, I can see today, which gives me great joy. Many have retired and some are sadly no longer with us. However, I would like to take this opportunity to recognize their kindness and contribution. Our American friends have stood with us in the most critical of times and under most intense pressure. Mr. President, thank you for your strong support, and for the warm friendship that Mrs. Bush and you have extended to me personally. I am deeply grateful to you for your sympathy and support for Tibet, and your firm stand on religious freedom and the cause of democracy. Madam Speaker, you have not only extended an unwavering support to me and the just cause of the Tibetan people, you have also worked hard to promote the cause of democracy, freedom and the respect for human rights in other parts of the world. For this, I would like to offer my special thanks. The consistency of American support for Tibet has not gone unnoticed in China. Where this has caused some tension in the US-China relations, I feel a sense of regret. Today, I wish to share with you all my sincere hope that the future of Tibet and China will move beyond mistrust to a relationship based on mutual respect, trust and recognition of common interests. Today we watch China as it rapidly moves forward. Economic liberalization has led to wealth, modernization and great power. I believe that today’s economic success of both India and China, the two most populated nations with long history of rich culture, is most deserving. With their new-found status, both of these two countries are poised to play important leading role on the world stage. In order to fulfill this role, I believe it is vital for China to have transparency, rule of law and freedom of information. Much of the world is waiting to see how China’s concepts of “harmonious society” and “peaceful rise” would unfold. Today’s China, being a state of many nationalities, a key factor here would be how it ensures the harmony and unity of its various peoples. For this, the equality and the rights of these nationalities to maintain their distinct identities are crucial. With respect to my own homeland Tibet, today many people, both from inside and outside, feel deeply concerned about the consequences of the rapid changes taking place. Every year, the Chinese population

inside Tibet is increasing at an alarming rate. And, if we are to judge by the example of the population of Lhasa, there is a real danger that the Tibetans will be reduced to an insignificant minority in their own homeland. This rapid increase in population is also posing serious threat to Tibet’s fragile environment. Being the source of many of Asia’s great rivers, any substantial disturbance in Tibet’s ecology will impact the lives of hundreds of millions. Furthermore, being situated between India and China, the peaceful resolution of the Tibet problem also has important implications for lasting peace and friendly relation between these two great neighbors. On the future of Tibet, let me take this opportunity to restate categorically that I am not seeking independence. I am seeking a meaningful autonomy for the Tibetan people within the People’s Republic of China. If the real concern of the Chinese leadership is the unity and stability of PRC, I have fully addressed their concerns. I have chosen to adopt this position because I believe, given the obvious benefits especially in economic development, this would be in the best interest of the Tibetan people. Furthermore, I have no intention of using any agreement on autonomy as a stepping stone for Tibet’s independence. I have conveyed these thoughts to successive Chinese leaders. In particular, following the renewal of direct contact with the Chinese government in 2002, I have explained these in detail through my envoys. Despite all this, Beijing continues to allege that my “hidden agenda” is separation and restoration of Tibet?s old socio-political system. Such a notion is unfounded and untrue. Even in my youth, when I was compelled to take on the full responsibility of governance, I began to initiate fundamental changes in Tibet. Unfortunately, these were interrupted because of the political upheavals that took place. Nevertheless, following our arrival in India as refugees, we have democratized our political system and adopted a democratic charter that sets guidelines for our exile administration. Even our political leadership is now directly chosen by the people on a five-year term basis. Moreover, we have been able to preserve and practice most of the important aspects of our culture and spirituality in exile. This is due largely to the kindness of India and its people. Another major concern of the Chinese government is its lack of legitimacy in Tibet. While I cannot rewrite the past, a mutually agreeable solution could bring legitimacy, and I am certainly prepared to use my position and influence among the Tibetan people to bring consensus on this question. So I would also like to restate here that I have no hidden agenda. My decision not to accept any political office in a future Tibet is final. The Chinese authorities assert that I harbor hostility towards China and that I actively seek to undermine China’s welfare. This is totally untrue. I have always encouraged world leaders to engage with China; I have supported China’s entry into WTO and the awarding of summer Olympics to Beijing. I chose to do so with the hope that China would become a more open, tolerant and responsible country. A major obstacle in our ongoing dialogue has been the conflicting perspectives on the

current situation inside Tibet. So in order to have a common understanding of the real situation, my envoys in their sixth meeting with their Chinese counterparts suggested that we be given an opportunity to send study groups to look at the actual reality on the ground, in the spirit of “seeking truth from facts.” This could help both sides to move beyond each other’s contentions. The time has come for our dialogue with the Chinese leadership to progress towards the successful implementation of a meaningful autonomy for Tibet, as guaranteed in the Chinese constitution and detailed in the Chinese State Council “White Paper on Regional Ethnic Autonomy of Tibet.” Let me take this opportunity to once again appeal to the Chinese leadership to recognize the grave problems in Tibet, the genuine grievances and deep resentments of the Tibetan people inside Tibet, and to have the courage and wisdom to address these problems realistically in the spirit of reconciliation. To you, my American friends, I appeal to you to make every effort to seek ways to help convince the Chinese leadership of my sincerity and help make our dialogue process move forward. Since you have recognized my efforts to promote peace, understanding and nonviolence, I would like to respectfully share a few related thoughts. I believe this is precisely the time that the United States must increase its support to those efforts that help bring greater peace, understanding and harmony between peoples and cultures. As a champion of democracy and freedom, you must continue to ensure the success of those endeavors aimed at safeguarding basic human rights in the world. Another area where we need US leadership is environment. As we all know, today our earth is definitely warming up and many scientists tell us that our own action is to a large part responsible. So each one of us must, in whatever way we can, use our talents and resources to make a difference so that we can pass on to our future generations a planet that is at least safe to live on. Many of world’s problems are ultimately rooted in inequality and injustice, whether economic, political or social. Ultimately, this is a question of the wellbeing of all of us. Whether it is the suffering of poverty in one part of the world, or whether it is the denial of freedom and basic human rights in another part, we should never perceive these events in total isolation. Eventually their repercussions will be felt everywhere. I would like to appeal to you to take a leadership role in an effective international action in addressing these problems, including the huge economic imbalance. I believe the time has now come to address all these global issues from the perspective of the oneness of humanity, and from a profound understanding of the deeply interconnected nature of our today’s world. In conclusion, on behalf of six million Tibetan people, I wish to take this opportunity to recognize from the depth of my heart the support extended to us by the American people and their government. Your continued support is critical. I thank you once again for the high honor that you have bestowed on me today. T hank you. The Dalai Lama being presented with the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor.

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TPI VARIETY

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Miss Tibet 2007 vidual but, have a bigger responsibility for myself and for the larger cause of Tibet” Miss Dolma said after winning the title. She intends to use the title to promote Tibet issue. She will participate in the forthcoming Miss Earth contest.My parents and my family members are my inspiration and they thought it was the right thing to do”, she said when asked what inspired her to take part in the beauty pageant.Miss Dolma longs to visit Tibet someday and raise voice for Tibet to be free. She, however, says she supports and stands by “His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s Middle way approach” to resolve the issue of Tibet. Tsering Yangzom, a 20-year-old from Karnataka was declared the first runnerup and also won the Miss Photogenic Phayul. 21-year-old Tenzin Dolma from McLeod Ganj, Dharamsala crowned Miss Tibet 2007 (Photo by Tenzin Choejor) Dharamsala, October 14: Firecrackers were repeatedly shot into the air making spectacular patterns and hundreds of crowd made a roaring applause as the grand finale night of the Miss Tibet 2007 unveiled its stage. Director producer of the Tibetan beauty pageant Mr Lobsang Wangyal thanked the crowd for their overwhelming support. “I am happy to see such a huge crowd and it is a sign of growing acceptance in Tibetan society,” he said. “Miss Tibet also enjoys international fans” Mr Lobsang added, referring to foreign Medias and visiting tourists present in large number for the show.After going through seven rounds of competition in three days, 21-yearold Tenzin Dolma from Dharamsala, the seat of the Tibetan Government-inExile, was crowned Miss Tibet 2007 here this evening.Miss Dolma is the first contestant from Dharamsala since the first

01 November, 2007 Dharamsala

We will not negotiate with bullies, Taipei official says Taipei Times[Wednesday, October 24, 2007 By Ko Shu-ling STAFF REPORTER Taipei, October 16: Taiwan will not negotiate with a regime that kills its own people and supports Myanmar’s military junta, the Executive Yuan said yesterday in response to Chinese President Hu Jintao’s (ŒÓ‹ÑŸ·) call for an end to cross-strait enmity and for Taiwan to accept its “one China” policy.”Human rights and democracy are the foundation of the country,” Government Information Office Minister Shieh Jhy-wey (•Ó•uˆÌ) said.”That is why Taiwan can connect with the world. If the Beijing administration really wants to pin its hopes on the people of Taiwan, it should listen to them and think about the people killed, imprisoned and arrested during the 38 years of martial law and 50 years of oneparty rule. It should realize what price the Taiwanese have paid for human rights and democracy,” he said.While the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) might rule China, it does not represent all Chinese, Shieh said.”The Taiwanese and Chinese can stand together for democracy and human rights, but we will never discuss peace, unification or any other

issues with a regime that bullies and suppresses Tibet, kills its own people and backs the military junta in Myanmar,” he said.Shieh made the remarks at an event promoting Taiwan’s UN membership campaign at the Executive Yuan yesterday afternoon.Lai Ichung (œ}’‰), director of the Democratic Progressive Party’s (DPP) Department of International Affairs, said that Hu’s remarks were nothing new and were detached from reality.”Hu does not seem to understand that `one China,’ `one country, two systems,’ and `peaceful unification’ do not have any market in Taiwan. They are only popular among a few groups,” he said. “The public opinion is that Taiwan is an independent sovereignty and Taiwan and China are two different countries. Any change to the `status quo’ must obtain the consent of the Taiwanese public.”Although Hu proposed an end to cross-strait enmity, Lai said that Taiwan has never been hostile to China, while Beijing has 1,000 missiles targeted at Taiwan and seeks to limit Taiwan’s diplomatic space and economic power.”The crux of the problem does not lie in enmity but in China’s unwill-

ingness to reconcile with Taiwan,” he said. “Both sides can only reconcile if China stopped its military intimidation and diplomatic oppression and recognized Taiwan’s existence.”The Mainland Affairs Council issued a statement yesterday afternoon criticizing China’s “one China” policy as the “biggest obstacle” in cross-strait relations, emphasizing that Taiwan’s sovereignty belonged to the 23 million people of Taiwan who have the final say on the nation’s future.”China’s one-party rule and bogus democracy cannot bring sustainable development to China or bring real peace to the Taiwan Strait,” the statement said. “Democracy is the foundation of peaceful development across the Taiwan Strait. We are calling on the Chinese authority to abandon its rigid thinking and adopt a practical approach to face the reality that neither side is subordinate to the other.”DPP vice presidential candidate Su Tseng-chang (‘h’啹) said that Beijing had to refrain from trying to force the Taiwanese public to accept its terms, and should instead respect the will of the Taiwanese to decide their future.

Will vet all reincarnations, says China, Lamas say no way

award receiving 1170 votes of the 3156 votes cast online by public. Photo by Tenzin Chojor”20-year-old Deeki Dolma from Gangtok, Sikkim was declared the second runner up and won a scholarship cheque of Rupees 25 000.Students for a Free Tibet (SFT) was

The Indian Express, October 23, 2007 By NEERAJ SANTOSHIJAMMU - Lamas in the trans-Himalayan Ladakh region are up in arms against the Chinese authorities for having issued a regulation that requires all reincarnations, including that of Dalai Lama, to be approved by the Chinese Government.Asserting that this amounts to interference in the religious matters of the Buddhists and a ploy to undermine Tibetan Buddhism and the very institution of Dalai Lama, the Buddhists in Ladakh, also called Little Tibet, have urged the Prime Minister of India and international bodies to take up the issue with the Chinese authorities.All Ladakh Gompa Association (LGA) leader Lama Lobzang Angchuk and Ladakh Buddhist Association (LBA) leader Sonam Dawa have expressed deep concern over the Chinese directives, adding that in no way will the same be acceptable to the Buddhists globally, who revere Dalai Lama as a living Buddha.Lama Lobzang Angchuk, who is representative of nearly 5000 Lamas across Ladakh’s nearly 700 monasteries, said it was ridicu-

lous that China should issue a directive on the very spiritual process of reincarnation of the Dalai Lama, who is central to the very ethos of Tibetan Buddhism.He stressed that given the fact that the holy land of India is the birthland of Buddhism, India has the moral responsibility to speak out for the Buddhists and take up the issue with the Chinese authorities.Angchuk said the Tibetan Administration in exile had already rejected the Chinese directive intended to choose Tibetan spiritual leaders. He said the socalled order no. 5, containing 14 articles on Management Measures for the Reincarnation of ‘Living Buddhas’ in Tibetan Buddhism by China’s State Administration of Religious Affairs is against the very concept of religious freedom, universally accepted, which lays special stress on the fact that there should be no political interference in the religious affairs.”Though China claims that it is an atheist state, at the same time it has also included freedom of religious belief among the fundamental rights in its constitution,” he added.Buddhists in Ladakh

worship Dalai Lama as a living manifestation of Buddha. It may be noted that in August this year, Dalai Lama was in Ladakh for a fortnight where he conferred Avalokiteshvera initiation, a special religious ceremony seeking buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings.Angchuk said Dalai Lamas were manifestations of Avalokiteshvara, the Bodhisattva of Compassion and patron saint of Tibet. He said that Avalokiteshvara was the earthly manifestation of the self born, eternal Buddha, Amitabha and is said to be guarding this world in the interval between the historical Sakyamuni Buddha, and the next Buddha of the Future Maitreya.Bodhisattvas are enlightened beings who have postponed their own nirvana and chosen to take rebirth in order to serve humanity.Thousands of Tibetans led by the Dalai Lama fled to India in 1959, nine years after China’s Communist army overtook Tibet. The Dalai Lama also won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 for advocating a non-violent campaign for genuine autonomy to preserve Tibetan language and culture.

India, China not in race: Sonia- Congress president and army chief look forward to stronger Sino-Indian ties

edition of the Tibetan beauty pageant was launched in 2002.A part-time model and a call centre executive based in Delhi, Miss Dolma had to resign from the latter one to participate in the beauty pageant. Tenzin Dolma reacts after she was announced winner of Miss Tibet 2007 (Photo by Tenzin Choejor)Miss Tibet 2006 Tsering Chungdak crowned Tenzin Dolma and was presented a scholarship cheque of Rupees 100 000 by Mr Wangyal.”I am now no longer an indi-

awarded Miss Tibet’s “Free Spirit Award 2007” for their active role for the cause of Tibet.Tenzin Choeying, SFT’s National Coordinator for India on receiving the award appealed Tibetans and Tibet supporters to be ready to act during the Beijing Olympic Games, which will start on August 8 next year.Five contestants vied for Miss Tibet 2007. Tenzin Pema, 19, from Clement Town, Dehradun and Tenzing Dolma, 25, from Gangtok, Sikkim are the other contestants.

accompanied by son Rahul, referred fleetingly to the border dispute and made no mention of strategic competition or the race for energy reserves. Her focus was on how India and China have to “work and prosper together”. “There is no race or competition between our two countries. On the contrary, there are numerous opportunities to pool Sonia Gandhi with China’s leaderHu Jintao in Beijing. our resources for dealing effectively with common problems New Delhi, Oct. 27: Sonia Gandhi today and challenges,” she said. praised Beijing’s economic reforms and hoped In her overseas visits so far, Sonia has never that pragmatism and mutual self-interest expounded her views on bilateral relations except in Russia in June 2004. She had then would boost India-China ties. China had shown the world that “it is pos- described the Indo-Russian relationship as one sible in a relatively short time to substan- of “unusual resilience, stability and continutially eradicate poverty, to inculcate dyna- ity despite great changes in the international mism and to unleash the forces of social and and domestic environments”. Her later trips economic creativity”, she told students at have had more to do with health, culture and the Gandhian legacy. Beijing’s Tsinghua University. “This is the China that we respect, this is the Without getting nostalgic about the millenniaold India-China relationship, the Congress China we wish to partner in the future.” The Congress media cell released copies of president outlined her vision of a partnership between the neighbours in the 21st century. Sonia’s speech. On her first visit to China as the power be- “How can we build on our long traditions of hind the Indian government, Sonia, who is peaceful contacts and exchange a catalytic

partnership that is relevant for the 21st century? This is today’s imperative,” she said. “Pragmatism and mutual self-interest offer a sound basis for the future development of our relationship. We may well have different views and different perspectives on both bilateral and global issues. That is only natural. I have no doubt, however, that there is no problem that cannot be sorted out through free and frank dialogue and discussion.” She was effusive about the growth projections for both countries but also spoke of how India was “not blind to the fact that as we develop, within our society, we need to address age-old problems of economic and social inequality”. Without labouring the point, she mentioned how India did this “within our own democratic framework in which people’s participation is paramount and every citizen, especially the most deprived and disadvantaged, has a voice”. Among the areas of collaboration Sonia spoke of were bilateral trade and investments, coordination in the World Trade Organisation, climate change, education, culture and “youth connectivity”. “It is you, the youth, who will give us the reason, the hope and the energy to find new solutions to old problems,” she said.

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