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PORTFOLIO2012

DYLANGARRIDOFISCHER

TABLE OF CONTENTS //

01 02 03 04 05

SPORT

COMPETITION

ACADEMIC

PROFESSIONAL

PERSONAL

01

TULANE STADIUM

TULANE STADIUM // on-campus stadium proposal

Tulane University possesses a long standing football tradition and has experienced success in the sport throughout its history. However, since the 1974 season, the program has played all of its home games at the Louisiana Superdome in downtown New Orleans. In recent years, support for the program has declined and the school has proposed that a stadium be built on-campus to reestablish the program’s former success and to reenergize fans and alumni. This proposal seeks to create a cutting-edge facility while simultaneously respecting the character and culture of the campus, university, and surrounding neighborhood. Because the site is located near short shotgun homes, a key design goal was to limit the height of the stadium to that of the surrounding academic buildings. Additionally, the main traffic coming from the university accesses the site from the southeast corner. To accommodate this inflow, a gathering plaza was created to allow for pre- and post-game celebrations and other community gatherings on non-game days. The site previously featured an athletic building and a tennis complex. This proposal rebuilds these facilities in an attempt to improve the experience of the student-athletes, coaches and staff, and spectators.

Glass PV canopy

Aluminum screen

Secondary structure

Primary structure

Bowl + athletic facility

0’

25’

75’

175’

For smartphones

02

SHOTGUN // HoR+W

SHOTGUN // usgbc natural talent competition 2010

SHOTGUN reinterprets the existing New Orleans shotgun typology of residential construction by creating spaces that encourage both social and environmental interaction. The form is separated into two main living spaces: public and private. The mass that defines the public spaces is a living element in itself — a green wall that demonstrates the act of sustainable living to both residents and the surrounding community. The perforated metal skin defining the private spaces reduces solar gain by diffusing direct sunlight, and, in combination with numerous light wells in the ceiling, creates a tranquil environment throughout the house. The redistribution of spaces and elements found within traditional shotgun homes provides homeowners with opportunities for efficiency. Operable windows on all sides of the home create an effective passive ventilation system that reduces residents’ need for air-conditioning. Similarly, the utilization of solar water heating, combined with a radiant floor system and thermal mass, alleviates dependency on an HVAC system. Through the careful consideration of building systems, building construction, and materials, SHOTGUN will serve as an educational tool for the community and will help minimize structural devastation in future disasters. Completed in collaboration with Brian Vesely

Guest bedroom

Master bedroom

Bathroom

Water closet + utility

Kitchen

Dining + sitting [outdoor + indoor]

Living room

Entry + patio 0’

5’

10’

25’

Site-fabricated light wells to provide ambient solar radiation throughout the day [integrated LED lights for night illumination], shaded by green roof native wild grass plants // Folded seam metal vent stack, high radiant absorptivity, in conjunction with rain screen fresh air recirculation //

7 Ÿ� sole and top plates with 2x4 stud framing with thermal break, or offset 2x4 stud framing; cavity filled with two layers of R-19 un-faced fiberglass batt insulation // 12x12x4 green wall panels, with recessed plant cups with drip irrigation system and 2x2 vertical rain screen with fresh air recirculation fan to interior volume //

4x8 stamped and folded recycled corrugated steel panels, secured to 2x2 rain screen //

S

N

E

W

LEED PLATINUM < $100,000

LEED for Homes Simplified Project Checklist for Homes

Builder Name: Project Team Leader (if different): Home Address (Street/City/State):

Project Description:

Adjusted Certification Thresholds

Building type: Single detached

Project type:

Certified: 45.0

Gold: 75.0

Floor area:

Silver: 60.0

Platinum: 90.0

Two

# of bedrooms:

Project Point Total

Final Credit Category Total Points

Prelim: 111.5 + 2 maybe pts

ID: 10

SS: 20.5

EA: 26

EQ:

21

LL: 7

WE:10

MR: 16

AE:

3

Final: 114

Certification Level

Prelim: Platinum

Final: Platinum

Max Points

date last updated : last updated by :

Innovation and Design Process (ID)

1. Integrated Project Planning

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

2. Durability Management Process 3.Innovative or Regional Design

2.1 2.2 2.3 3.1

   

3.2 3.3 3.4

(No Minimum Points Required)

Max

Preliminary Rating Integrated Project Team Professional Credentialed with Respect to LEED for Homes Design Charrette Building Orientation for Solar Design

Prereq

Durability Planning Durability Management Third-Party Durability Management Verification

Prereq

Innovation #1 Innovation #2 Innovation #3 Innovation #4

1. LEED ND

3. Preferred Locations

(No Minimum Points Required) LEED for Neighborhood Development

2

Site Selection

3.3

Edge Development Infill Previously Developed

4

Existing Infrastructure

3.1 3.2

4. Infrastructure 5. Community Resources/ Transit

5.1

6. Access to Open Space

6

5.2 5.3

1. Site Stewardship 2. Landscaping

1.1 1.2 2.1

    

2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

Maybe

No

0 0 0 0

Y/Pts

1 1 1 0

LL 5.2, 5.3 LL 5.3

(Minimum of 5 SS Points Required) Erosion Controls During Construction Minimize Disturbed Area of Site No Invasive Plants Basic Landscape Design Limit Conventional Turf Drought Tolerant Plants Reduce Overall Irrigation Demand by at Least 20%

3

0

3

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0

1 1 1 1

10

Max

LL 3.2

Basic Community Resources / Transit Extensive Community Resources / Transit Outstanding Community Resources / Transit Access to Open Space

3

11

OR LL2-6

Y/Pts

OR

0 Maybe

10 No

Y/Pts

10

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

1 2 1

0 2 1

0 0 0

0 2 1

1

1

0

1

1 2 3 1

0 2 0

0 0 0

0 2 0

1

0

10

Sub-Total for LL Category:

Sustainable Sites (SS)

1 1 1 0

Prereq

Living/Garden Wall Solar Water Heating System Stack Effect 1 1/2" Concrete Thermal Mass

1

Y/Pts

1 1 1 1

Sub-Total for ID Category:

Location and Linkages (LL)

2. Site Selection

112 2 114 Project Points Preliminary Final

7

Max

1

0

Y/Pts

Maybe

7 No

Y/Pts

Prereq

1

1

0

1

2 3 2 6

2 3 2 0

0 0 0 0

2 3 2 0 1

Prereq

SS 2.5 SS 2.5 SS 2.5

3. Local Heat Island Effects

3

Reduce Local Heat Island Effects

1

1

0

4. Surface Water Management

4.1

Permeable Lot Permanent Erosion Controls Management of Run-off from Roof Pest Control Alternatives Moderate Density High Density Very High Density

4 1 2 2 2 3 4

4 1 0

0 0 2

4 1 2

1.5 0 3 0

0 0 0 0

1.5 0 3 0

22

18.5

2

20.5

4.2 4.3

5. Nontoxic Pest Control 6. Compact Development

5 6.1 6.2 6.3

SS 6.2, 6.3 SS 6.3 Sub-Total for SS Category:

LEED for Homes Simplified Project Checklist (continued) Max Points

Water Efficiency (WE)

1. Water Reuse

1.1 1.2 1.3

2. Irrigation System

2.1

2.2 2.3

 3. Indoor Water Use

3.1 3.2

U.S. Green Building Council

Energy and Atmosphere (EA)

1. Optimize Energy Performance 7. Water Heating

1.1 1.2 7.1

7.2

11. Residential Refrigerant Management

11.1 11.2

OR WE 1.3 WE 1.3

Max

4 1 3

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

High Efficiency Irrigation System Third Party Inspection Reduce Overall Irrigation Demand by at Least 45%

WE 2.3 WE 2.3

3 1 4

3 1 0

0 0 0

3 1 0

3 6

0 6 10

0 0 0

High-Efficiency Fixtures and Fittings Very High Efficiency Fixtures and Fittings Sub-Total for WE Category: Page 1 of 3 (Minimum of 0 EA Points Required) OR Performance of ENERGY STAR for Homes Exceptional Energy Performance

(MR)

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

2. Environmentally Preferable Products

2.1

 

2.2

3. Waste Management

3.1 3.2

1

2. Combustion Venting

2.1 2.2

3. Moisture Control 4. Outdoor Air Ventilation

3 4.1

 

4.2 4.3

5. Local Exhaust

6. Distribution of Space Heating and Cooling

5.1 5.2 5.3 6.1 6.2 6.3

7. Air Filtering

7.1 7.2 7.3

8. Contaminant Control

 

8.3

9. Radon Protection

 

9.1

8.1 8.2

10. Garage Pollutant Protection

9.2 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4

1. Education of the Homeowner or Tenant

 

2. Education of Building Manager

1.1 1.2 1.3 2

Maybe

No

Y/Pts

0 6 10 1, 2009 November No

Y/Pts

Prereq

0

Efficient Hot Water Distribution Pipe Insulation

2 1

0 0

0 0

0 0

Refrigerant Charge Test Appropriate HVAC Refrigerants

Prereq

0

0

0

1

(Minimum of 2 MR Points Required) Framing Order Waste Factor Limit Detailed Framing Documents Detailed Cut List and Lumber Order Framing Efficiencies Off-site Fabrication

OR

38 Max

MR 1.5 MR 1.5 MR 1.5

1 1 3 4

FSC Certified Tropical Wood Environmentally Preferable Products

Prereq

Construction Waste Management Planning Construction Waste Reduction

Prereq

8 3

(Minimum of 6 EQ Points Required) ENERGY STAR with Indoor Air Package

16

OR

Max

Basic Combustion Venting Measures Enhanced Combustion Venting Measures

EQ 1 EQ 1

Prereq

Moisture Load Control

EQ 1

1

Basic Outdoor Air Ventilation Enhanced Outdoor Air Ventilation Third-Party Performance Testing

EQ 1

Prereq

EQ 1

2 1

Basic Local Exhaust Enhanced Local Exhaust Third-Party Performance Testing

EQ 1

Prereq

Room-by-Room Load Calculations Return Air Flow / Room by Room Controls Third-Party Performance Test / Multiple Zones

EQ 1 EQ 1 EQ 1

Prereq

EQ 1 EQ 7.3

Prereq

Indoor Contaminant Control during Construction Indoor Contaminant Control Preoccupancy Flush

EQ 1

Radon-Resistant Construction in High-Risk Areas Radon-Resistant Construction in Moderate-Risk Areas

EQ 1 EQ 1

Prereq

EQ 1 EQ 1, 10.4 EQ 1, 10.4 EQ 1

Prereq

Good Filters Better Filters Best Filters

13

EQ 1

No HVAC in Garage Minimize Pollutants from Garage Exhaust Fan in Garage Detached Garage or No Garage

26 Y/Pts

0

0 Maybe

26 No

Y/Pts

Prereq

Sub-Total for EQ Category:

Awareness and Education (AE)

Y/Pts

Maybe

0

Sub-Total for MR Category:

Indoor Environmental Quality (EQ)

1. ENERGY STAR with IAP

15 Max

Y/Pts

34

Sub-Total for EA Category:

Materials and Resources

1. Material-Efficient Framing

Project Points Preliminary Final

(Minimum of 3 WE Points Required) Rainwater Harvesting System Graywater Reuse System Use of Municipal Recycled Water System

(Minimum of 0 AE Points Required) Basic Operations Training Enhanced Training Public Awareness

2

1 1

1 1 3 0

0 0 0 0

8

0

1 1 3 0 8

3

3

16 Y/Pts

0 Maybe

16 No

Y/Pts

0

0

0

2

0

2

1

0

1

2 1

0 0

2 1

1 1

0 0

1 1

1 2

0 0

1 2

1 2

0 2

0 0

0 2

1 2 1

1 2 1

0 0 0

1 2 1

1 2

1

1

0

1

2 1 3

0 0 3

0 0 0

0 0 3

21

21

Max

Y/Pts

0 Maybe

21 No

Y/Pts

Prereq

Education of Building Manager Sub-Total for AE Category:

1 1

1 1

0 0

1 1

1

1

0

1

3

3

0

3

LEED for Homes Simplified Project Checklist

Addendum: Prescriptive Approach for Energy and Atmosphere (EA) Credits

Points cannot be earned in both the Prescriptive (below) and the Performance Approach (pg 2) of the EA section. Energy and Atmosphere (EA) (No Minimum Points Required) 2.1 2. Insulation Basic Insulation 2.2 Enhanced Insulation 3. Air Infiltration

3.1 3.2

U.S. Green Building Council

3.3

4. Windows

4.1 4.2 4.3

5. Heating and Cooling Distribution System

5.1 5.2 5.3

6. Space Heating and Cooling Equipment

7. Water Heating

6.1 6.2 6.3 7.1 7.2 7.3

8. Lighting

8.1 8.2 8.3

9. Appliances 10. Renewable Energy 11. Residential Refrigerant Management

9.1 9.2

10 11.1 11.2

Reduced Envelope Leakage Greatly Reduced Envelope Leakage Page 2 of 3 Minimal Envelope Leakage Good Windows Enhanced Windows Exceptional Windows Reduced Distribution Losses Greatly Reduced Distribution Losses Minimal Distribution Losses Good HVAC Design and Installation High-Efficiency HVAC Very High Efficiency HVAC

Max Points OR *

Project Points Preliminary Final Y/Pts

2

Maybe

No

Y/Pts

2

0

0 3

0 0

2

0 3

0 0

0 3

2 0

0 0

2 0

2 4

0 4

0 0

0 4

2 1 3

2 1 3

0 0 0

2 1 3

2 3

2

0 0

2

2 1 10

2 1

0 0

2 1

0

0

Prereq

EA*3.2

2 3

0 1, 2009 November 3

Prereq

EA 4.2

2 3 Prereq

EA 5.2

2 3 Prereq

EA 6.2

Efficient Hot Water Distribution Pipe Insulation Efficient Domestic Hot Water Equipment ENERGY STAR Lights Improved Lighting Advanced Lighting Package

Max Prereq

Prereq

EA 8.2

High-Efficiency Appliances Water-Efficient Clothes Washer Renewable Energy System Refrigerant Charge Test Appropriate HVAC Refrigerants

Prereq

Sub-Total for EA Category:

0

1

1

0

1

38

26

0

26

HOR+W // icarch house of red + white competition

A tragedy on the level of the Katyn massacre is impossible for most to imagine. Over a period of only a few months in 1939, the Soviet Union attacked the Polish people, killing nearly 22,000 civilians and military personnel to maintain control over the recently conquered nation. No one was safe from the heavy hand of the Soviets as everyone, from generals to pilots to teachers and scientists, was taken from their homes and families and unceremoniously killed in the forests of Eastern Europe. The House of Red and White examines what it means to have twenty-two thousand lives extinguished. Standing alone in a clearing in the same woods as the largest burial site, the seemingly derelict structure corrodes along, reflecting on the corrosion of the lives of the families that had their loved ones ripped from them. The form is punctured with twenty-two thousand holes; each a black void staring back at the approaching patron, each a notation of loss, each a symbolic grave for those who never had one. Upon entering the form, the openings are arranged to face towards the three largest mass-grave sites [Tver to the northeast, Katyn in the ground the form stands on and Kharkov to the southeast] with each cluster representing the number of lives lost at each location. As April 3 approaches, the date on which most of the massacre occurred, the holes project onto the wall opposite, creating twenty-two thousand points of light, the opposite of the voids experienced from the exterior. As the patron leaves the form, the understanding of the Katyn massacre is fundamentally altered, as the individuals involved are no longer seen as a general collective but as unique losses and as individuals. Completed in collaboration with Jacqueline Twardowski and Nicholas Weiss

03

SUB|CITY // HOTEL LOYOLA // RECOMPOSITION

SUB|CITY // studio critic: ming tang, cincinnati

This project began as an investigation of the green space surrounding the site in the Fulton River District, just west of downtown Chicago. As the diagram demonstrates, few significant parks are located near the building, and the largest portion of green space is located near highway 90, rendering the space completely unusable. Therefore, the primary goal of this project was to address both the suburban and urban conditions of park and plaza and create suburban/urban space that could be enjoyed by the building’s users, local residents, and visitors to the area. The parametric design of the project began by first addressing the materiality of both the neighborhood and the city to the east. 3’ by 6’ panels were developed and offset to maintain a brick-like pattern while utilizing modern steel and glass materials that reflect the specific characteristics of both parts of the city. The opening of each panel was controlled by the program located directly inside while the overhang of the panels was established through solar radiation calculations on the building’s facades. As a further reflection of the difference between SUBurbs|CITY, the facades facing west and north were designed to support vegetation growth, allowing the building to act as a beacon for sustainable design and the green movement.

N

E

S

W

0’

10’

35’

85’

HOTEL LOYOLA // studio critic: ralph hammann, illinois

The concept for this boutique hotel began with the development of the units. Focusing on Loyola University visitors as hotel guests, interaction emerged as a driving concept. Rather than being segregated by type, rooms are mixed to encourage interaction and dialogue between students, parents, and instructors. The room arrangement creates a unique and dynamic façade pattern that interrupts the generic and typical façades seen on neighboring buildings. Green space provides an additional opportunity for interaction through the use of living walls. A large, exterior, west-facing living wall is used to grow fruits and vegetables. Guests and visitors are able to pick goods that will be used in the hotel kitchen. These on-site gardens, along with the purchase of locally grown foods, reduces the hotel’s dependence on delivered goods — benefitting the environment and fostering further interaction within the community. Incorporating green roofs and terraces provides unique spaces not typically seen in hotel chains. **Earl Prize Nominee, Fall 2009

STUDENT

PARENT

INSTRUCTOR

Affordable

Comfort

Long-term

+

+

=

0’

5’

20’

45’

Living wall

Frosted glass

Bamboo

Concrete

FCH + AHU

Supply

Return

HWS + HWR

CWS + CWR

RECOMPOSITION // studio critic: matthew niermann, illinois

All music begins as a collection of different parts. Through rehearsal, these parts come together to form a perfect and harmonious composition. The form of this performance space was inspired by this concept. The seemingly random structural members become progressively more ordered as one enters the music hall. These members merge into one climactic point signifying the conclusion of a particular musical journey for the performers and audience. The exterior stages serve not only as rehearsal spaces for the public and performers, but also as reminders of the beginning of their journey. **Earl Prize Nominee, Fall 2008

Exterior stage

Side stages

Lobby Restrooms

Main hall

Mechanical + storage

Green room + dressing rooms

Main stage

04

KAP ARCHITECTURE // CANNON DESIGN //

KAP ARCHITECTURE //

CANNON DESIGN //

05

PHOTOGRAPHY // RÉSUMÉ

PHOTOGRAPHY //

DYLAN GARRIDO FISCHER fischer.dylan@gmail.com | +1 847 532 0038

EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI | M ARCH II CANDIDATE – 2013

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS @ URBANA-CHAMPAIGN | BSAS FALL 2006 – SPRING 2010

+ Major GPA: 3.90; Cumulative GPA: 3.76; Graduated with High Honors

EXPERIENCE CANNON DESIGN | ARCHITECTURAL INTERN BOSTON, MA | JUNE 2011 – SEPTEMBER 2011

+ Worked in Revit to create existing and new construction models for Fairfield University RecPlex expansion project + Created 3-D models and renderings for Fairfield University RecPlex and Stadium projects + Created animation in SketchUp and renderings for KOC University in Istanbul, Turkey + Assembled and created presentation materials for project interview + Created wood and foam presentation and study models

EHDD ARCHITECTURE | INTERN ARCHITECT SAN FRANCISCO, CA | JANUARY 2011 – MARCH 2011

+ Worked in CA on Exploratorium, a Net Zero Energy science museum in San Francisco + Created building plans, sections, elevations, and 3-D models + Created documentation maps for LEED credits SSc3 and SSc4.1 and water reduction calculations for WEc3 + Researched regenerative design strategies and technology for future project

KAP ARCHITECTURE | INTERN ARCHITECT CHAMPAIGN, IL | MAY 2010 – SEPTEMBER 2011

+ Prepared various construction document drawings + Created building plans, sections, elevations, and 3-D models + Created project renderings and presentations for client review

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY | CONSTRUCTION VOLUNTEER WAUKEGAN, IL | JUNE 2009 – AUGUST 2009

+ Helped with construction of affordable housing + Responsible for any assigned construction tasks + Worked with and read construction documents

SKILLS COMPUTER

+ 3D Studio Max, AutoCAD, Ecotect, Illustrator, InDesign, Maya, Photoshop, Revit, Rhino, SketchUp, Podium, Vasari

HAND

+ Drafting, Modeling, Sketching

PHOTOGRAPHY

+ Digital SLR, Film, Photo Editing

AWARDS + HONORS M ARCH MERIT SCHOLARSHIP $6,000 DAAP SCHOLARSHIP EARL PRIZE AWARD NOMINEE

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS | FALL 2008 + FALL 2009

CAMPUS MERIT AWARD + PRESIDENT’S AWARD UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Sincerest thanks to my mother, father, and sister, my family, collaborators [Jacqueline Twardowski, Brian Vesely, and Nicholas Weiss], my friends, classmates, professors and studio critics. You have all enriched my life and knowledge, and without your continued support and encouragement I would not be where I am today. This portfolio is dedicated to you.


Portfolio 2012