Page 1

107

THINGS TO DO IN

MAY

T H E M A G A Z I N E PA R E N T S L I V E B Y I N D E N T O N C O U N T Y

may 2017 MEET OUR MOM NEXT DOOR

MILK SNOB’S MELANIE DISBROW

TEACHING KIDS TO THINK ON THEIR OWN

happy campers the best texas state parks for families

WOMB FOR RENT looking at both sides of gestational surrogacy

*

special sponsored section:

guide to summer camps


pages /

M AY 2 0 1 7

DEPARTMENTS NOTED 5 Mom as Mind Guide

Tips for teaching kids to make good choices

REAL MOMS 7 Mom Next Door / Melanie Disbrow

Just like her best-selling product, this mom of three is a multitasker 8 Tapped Out The Four Seasons’ renovated taproom is the perfect GNO 8 Throwback Tour Channel your inner teenager and see NKOTB and Paula Abdul live 8 Dance Mom Adult dance classes keep Mom on her toes 10 Routines / Callie Corless One day with a doula-slash-seamstress and her three girls

ID CULTURE K 21 Chasing Pavement Hit the road! Sleep under the stars in one of Texas’ most family-friendly state parks, p. 16

FEATURES

12 16

ON THE COVER

MY BODY, HER BABY

5-year-old Evelyn of Irving Photography: Nick Prendergast Hair/Make-up: Shane Monden, Wallflower Management Styling: Lauren Niebes

Sometimes the final stop on the quest to parenthood involves renting another woman’s womb words Elaine Rogers

TOUR DE TEXAS

Eight state park campgrounds for fresh-air fun words Jessica Myers

Five family-friendly bike trails 23 Agenda Our five favorite things to do this month 24 EveryDay Calendar of events for every day in May

COLUMNS 34 Confessions / Mommy Fails

When bad things happen to good parents

P UB LISHER/ EDITO R- IN- CHIEF Joylyn Niebes C R EATIVE DIRECTOR Lauren Niebes

Managing Editor

ART

Assistant Editor

Susan Horn

Research Editor

Katie Garza

Carrie Steingruber Jessica Myers

EDITO RIAL

Beth McGee

Wendy Manwarren Generes

Elizabeth Smith

Executive Editor

Calendar Editor

Graphic Designer Editorial Designer A DV E R T I SI N G

Associate Publisher

Diana Whitworth Nelson

Account Executives

PR / M AR KET I N G

Samantha Barnhart, Nancy Crosbie, Stacy Howton, Nancy McDaniel, Kristen Niebes, Sandi Tijerina, Kerensa Vest

Advertising Coordinator Amy Klembara

Audience Development Director Candace Emerson

ADM I N I ST R A T I ON

Business Manager Leah Wagner

Office Manager + Distribution Robbie Scott

NorthTexasChild is published monthly by Lauren Publications, Inc. NorthTexasChild is distributed free of charge, one copy per reader. Only NorthTexasChild authorized distributors may deliver or pick up the magazines. Additional or back copies of NorthTexasChild are available for $2 per copy at the offices of Lauren Publications, Inc. We reserve the right to edit, reject or comment editorially on all material contributed. We cannot be responsible for the return of any unsolicited material. NorthTexasChild is ©2017 by Lauren Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without express written permission prohibited.

northtexaschild / may 2017

3


Celebrate Highland Village

M ay

Saturday

Doubletree Ranch Park g n i n e p O n o i t a r b Cele Join us for an afternoon of fun as we start the season.

13 2017

Free hot dogs & snow cones for the first 300 people!

10:45 a.m. ribbon cutting 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.Live music from van gogh’s ear bounce houses/games begin

June 3 at Unity Park Celebrate the beginning of summer with

Celebrate highland village!

Morning activities include a 1k/5k walk/run, a family fish out, and our arbor day proclamation. Be sure to come back in the evening for live music, food, drinks, kid’s activities, and an exciting fireworks extravaganza wrapping up the day.

Morning Activities

6:30 - Race Registration 7:30 - 1k start

*5K to start after last 1K runner

9:00 - Family Fish Out 10:30 - Arbor Day Proclamation 10:45 - Fish Out Awards

You've got a lot on your plate! Introducing three simply fresh selections to enjoy a taste of wholesome Mediterranean to go.

24 DALLAS-FORT WORTH LOCATIONS

4

may 2017 / northtexaschild

Grand Finale Fireworks Extravaganza

visit hvparks.com for more information.

GOODNESS ON-THE-GO

Hummus Duo & Veggies Modern Mediterranean Balanced Bites

Professor D

Bring: Chairs, blankets, bug spray, small coolers, family, and friends! Leave at home: pets and glass.

Visit hvparks.com for details.

NEW! SNACK BOXES

Evening Activities

6:00 - Gates Open 6:30 - live music from


noted.

mom as mind guide

how to help kids think for themselves WORDS MISTY JACKSON-MILLER

©ISTOCK.COM/SOLSTOCK

E

mily Millican’s 1-yearold daughter snatched a toy out of her 3-yearold sister’s hand. Rather than tattle or scream at her younger sibling, the 3-year-old found a replacement toy to give her baby sister. For Millican, 34, it was a proud mom moment. “Our kids are watching us, they are listening to us, even as we say grown-up things.” Before she was a stay-at-home mom, Millican was a clinical social worker at Alliance for Children in Fort Worth (she still subcontracts on occasion). As a clinician trained in parent-child interaction therapy, she worked to empower parents to connect with their children. To Millican, the nurture aspect of the parent-child relationship is the foundation to good mental health in children. “They are a part

of you, and you them. As a parent, you are laying down this foundation every single day.” Though the parent-child bond typically happens quickly, the parent-child relationship develops over time and is influenced by characteristics in the child, characteristics in the parent and the context of the family. Research shows that there is a direct association between parenting styles, a child’s emotions and behaviors and their mental health too. And it starts early. Most brain development in children happens before the age of 3. So parents are encouraged to actively engage in their child’s initial touching, talking, reading and playing experiences, which leads to successful parent-guided parentchild collaborations in the future. That’s right: The molding of good

So how do parents successfully do this to support their child’s mental growth? Explain why you make the decisions you do. It helps kids start to understand the rationale. Give kids time to play freely. Unobstructed play is crucial to raising children who think for themselves. Start with small choices. Dawn Hallman, the executive director of the Dallas Association for Parent Education, suggests parents start by narrowing choices for little ones. Begin with simple either-or decisions such as what to wear. Once your child demonstrates that she can manage the choices she makes and the consequences that come with it, move on to bigger decisions like what to have for dinner or where to go on family vacation. Talk it out. Nudge kids into self-reliance by encouraging them to do things for themselves. Don’t decision-makers starts at infancy offer your opinion. Instead, talk and grows from there. about the decision, all the potential Jennifer Robinson says the role consequences and why they might she now plays in her 9-year-old son’s be leaning one way or another. life is a lot like coachDon’t ignore ing. The 41-year-old poor choices. When psychology doctoral kids make a decision LEAD THE WAY candidate at Texas that disappoints These local resources Woman’s University you, tell them and provide classes to teach in Denton has also explain why. Discuss you how to help your child succeed. taught parenting good alternatives for Irving Family Advocacy classes for the Irving the future. Center provides in-home Family Advocacy Avoid threats mentoring for families, Center in partnerand bribes. Don’t parenting classes and ship with the Irving make promises to more. // Irving, 972/721Police Department, encourage kids to 6555; cityofirving.org and she maintains make favorable Love & Logic Parenting that the most sucdecisions. Classes help parents build caring, respectful cessful parent-child Let them relationships with their relationships feel practice. Kids are children through online more like mentoring. going to make good webinars. // 800/338Partnering with decisions and some 4065; loveandlogic.com kids is key. bad ones too. The The Parenting Center “Collaboration important thing is offers a variety of helps kids develop that we as parents parenting classes each month. May brings a sense of self and provide the foundaworkshops on everything leads to confidence,” tion and freedom to from parenting styles to Robinson says. think on their own. improving communication. And successful “We want to Register online. // Fort collaborations, with help our [kids] Worth, 817/332-6348; theparentingcenter.org kids of any age, begin make their own by setting limits. You choices to help create boundaries for them succeed,” children, but experts say it’s imporMillican says. That’s true for the tant to make boundaries for yourself toddlers they are now and the as the parent too. women they will one day become. northtexaschild / may 2017

5


6

may 2017 / northtexaschild


real moms. F

GERMAN

or Melanie TRANSPLANT AND MOTHER OF THREE, Disbrow, 34, MELANIE DISBROW business and TURNED A MOTHER’S motherhood colNEED INTO A THRIVING NORTH TEXAS-BASED lide on a daily basis, but BUSINESS. she makes it work. Case in point: This interview was conducted in her car, while her 16-month-old daughter, Quinn, rode in the back. She revealed how Milk Snob, a company that makes an allin-one car seat cover, nursing cover and shopping cart cover, became the successful brand it is today. She and her husband Gabriel — who was recently promoted to director of real estate at Aldi stores — are proud parents to Josephine (Josie), 13, Eli, 8, and baby Quinn. Originally from Germany, Disbrow and her family moved to the United States in 2006 and eventually MOM NEXT DOOR / settled in North Texas. It was Disbrow’s own quest to find a fashionable, snug-fitting, multipurpose car seat cover for her oldest that put the wheels in motion for Milk Snob. She INTERVIEW MARGIE JACINTO designed the functional cover herself and was soon knee-deep in orders from local moms. But it was her made baby wraps, nursing kimonos and infant appearance on Shark Tank last November (where and toddler clothing and accessories]. That she partnered with Lori Greiner) that catapulted company morphed into Milk Snob. Milk Snob onto the radar of moms and momsWHAT’S DOES YOUR SCHEDULE to-be across the country — and abroad too. LOOK LIKE THESE DAYS? Monday to HOW DID YOU START DESIGNING CAR Friday, I go to work [after taking the kids SEAT COVERS? There weren’t a lot of neutral to school]. We have a nanny for Quinn. I accessories for baby, so I started making my get to work at 9am and I’m there until 4pm. own. Then one of my good friends, Brittany Then I go home and cook dinner. Woodall, who was photographing Pink’s daughAt the office, I make the schedter Willow, asked me to make a headband for ule work for [the staff] so they’re her [for the shoot]. I did it and when the phoable to be home before their tograph was published, people wanted [to know children come home. It’s where the headband came from]. From there, 1 very important to me I started a company called Faas Design [which

that they have their freedom to be with family.

SO THERE’S NO WORKING ON THE WEEKENDS? If there was some-

thing really important for work that I didn’t get done (or need to do), I usually try to do it early in the morning so we’ll have the day free. WHAT’S THE FIRST THING YOU DO WHEN YOU WAKE UP? I listen

to 15 minutes of positive affirmations. It sounds silly when you first listen to it, but it will change your subconscious; it will change the way you think. DOES YOUR FAMILY FREQUENT ANY PARTICULAR RESTAURANTS?

Melanie Disbrow

PHOTO COURTESY OF MELANIE DISBROW; MILK SNOB

Founder & CEO Milk Snob

1 / Disbrow’s original design, the Milk Snob cover, was featured on Shark Tank and won Lori Greiner’s investment. 2 / Weekends are sacred family time for this party of five (from left): Quinn, 16 months, Disbrow, Eli, 8, Gabriel and Josie, 13.

We like going to our favorite pizza place, Pane Vino in Allen, and our favorite Mexican place is Mexican Sugar in Plano.

HOW ABOUT FOR DATE NIGHTS? We go

to Ruth’s Chris — that’s our favorite place. In the past years, we never had babysitters and were always taking care of the kids, but now that they’re older and we have somebody that we trust, we do little trips. We’ve flown to Colorado; we’ll go to Los Angeles … The trips are really nice because we can spend 2 time together one-on-one and exploring.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE ACTIVITIES TO DO DURING YOUR ME TIME? Horseback riding. I also

do watercolor painting, which relaxes me a lot.

northtexaschild / may 2017

7


real moms /

3 THINGS …

WORDS BETH MCGEE

throwback tour

TAPPED OUT ORDER A SUMMERREADY PANCHO VILLA COCKTAIL WITH PINEAPPLE, GINGER AND LIME.

You deserve a GNO, especially this month. If you’re tired of the same rotation of bars, try OUTLAW Taproom at Four Seasons Resort and Club Dallas at Las Colinas, newly renovated with a modern rustic interior, sleek leather seating and shots of Willie Nelson, Janis Joplin and other “outlaws” of Texas music adorning the walls. Drinks are on theme — and plentiful — so sit back and sip a Bonnie & Clyde (tequila, Grand Marnier

and ruby port) or a Peggy Sue margarita made with grapefruit and agave. The covered patio is equipped with a fireplace to relax by and large ceiling fans so you can play bocce ball even on balmy Texas nights. After you work up an appetite, make the six-minute walk to nearby Via Real to get your fix of upscale Tex-Mex such as crab enchiladas and roasted corn bleu cheese salad. (We recommend reservations.)

OUTLAW Taproom, Four Seasons Resort and Club Dallas at Las Colinas // 4150 North MacArthur Blvd., Irving, 972/717-0700 // fourseasons.com/dallas

DANCE MOM

Adult Dance Fitness Classes at Denton Dance Conservatory, $75 for six classes // 4103 Mesa Drive, Denton, 940/383-2623 // dentondance.com

do. Block off the night of Tuesday, May 23, channel your inner ’80s or ’90s girl, and sing along to the sounds of your childhood at the New Kids On The Block concert at the American Airlines Center. NKOTB’s Total Package Tour features the original boy band all grown up, plus Paula Abdul (and her killer choreography) on tour for the first time in 25 years, as well as threefourths of the original Boyz II Men R&B quartet. If you’re willing to splurge, purchase a VIP ticket for floor seating and a meet and greet with the boys from Boston — you’ll walk away with special merchandise and a photo of you and the band. (It’s totally OK if you squeal like a teenage girl.) New Kids On The Block Total Package Tour, tickets start at $29 American Airlines Center 2500 Victory Ave., Dallas, 214/221-8326 americanairlinescenter.com

Dance class isn’t just for your tutu-clad 5-year-old. If you’re looking for a healthy way to work off the stress of your week, let loose (and learn to tighten your pirouettes) in one of Denton Dance Conservatory’s adult dance classes. Beginner, intermediate and advanced levels accommodate all skill sets, whether you danced your way through childhood or have never donned a leotard. Choose tap, hip-hop, jazz or ballet, then plan on sweating for 45–60 minutes one evening a week during the six-week session. Visit the studio’s website to view class dates and register.

8

may 2017 / northtexaschild

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FOUR SEASONS; ©ISTOCK.COM/FREDER/LUCHIOLY

Please don’t go girl — actually, we insist that you


© Copyright 2017 Solis Mammography

C

One more reason to love your neighborhood...

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Peace of Mind is just around the corner Exceptional Experience. Exceptionally Accurate Results. OFFERING

3D MAMMOGRAPHY

21 LOCATIONS IN NORTH TEXAS Online Scheduling: SolisMammo.com | (866) 717.2551

WWHalfpageadMay.qxp_Layout 1 4/7/17 10:24 AM Page 1

A R E

YO U

A N D

YOU R

CHILD

Ready for More?

NEW for Fall 2017!

Extended-Day Montessori Preschool A Special Program Customized for Working Parents • Offered 7:15 a.m. - 6 p.m. daily for one set price • Enhance your child’s daily experience in a world-class learning environment that is STEAM and literature oriented Experienced, Certified Montessori Teachers | Mandarin & Spanish Music, Art, P.E. & Library | New Playground & Indoor Play Area Nationally Ranked for Educational Excellence

Contact 972.239.8598 to schedule your personal tour today! 14340 Proton Road Dallas, TX 75244 (Near the Tollway & Spring Valley) office@westwoodschool.org WWW.WESTWOODSCHOOL.ORG northtexaschild / may 2017

9


ROUTINES

A FR IDAY IN THE LIFE OF

callie corless Callie Corless was born and raised in California, but she now lives in Flower Mound with her three girls: Layora, 9, Allarie, 6, and Maeve, 3. When the stay-at-home mom isn’t attending a birth or teaching childbirth classes (she owns The Swaying Doula, a birth business), she is usually sewing duds for her family or for Lolly Manea Designs, her online shop.

6

:15AM Maeve, my 3-year-old, comes and climbs in my bed. Her sisters wake her up when they get up (way too early) for school. We have a few snuggles and I check my phone and read my scriptures in between her coming in and out of my room. 7:10AM Allarie, my 6-year-old, comes in my room, and I fix her hair before she finishes getting ready for school. I’m usually still in bed when she and Layora, who’s 9, gather their things for school. I’m a night owl, so getting up before 7am isn’t really my thing. Luckily my girls know how to get things done and get ready on their own. 7:25AM My older two head out to walk to school with the neighbors. I grab my planner and look at my to-do list for today. I have a childbirth class starting tonight, so I need to finish preparing and putting all my materials together. I’m not on call for any births. 8:17AM I have breakfast and my 3-year-old joins me. She’s my little hobbit; she likes to

have a second breakfast with me after eating with her sisters earlier in the morning. 9AM I get an idea for a new shirt and suddenly I’m making up a tester even though I probably shouldn’t add more things to my to-do list. Balance has never been my strong suit. My 3-year-old old plays with puzzles while I draft and sew, but that quickly escalates into destroying my room. I’ll have to deal with that later because … priorities. 10:43AM I hop into the shower and am mentally keeping track of what else I need to do. Update my website. Order my daughters’ yearbook. What am I making for dinner? I wonder what my 3-year-old is up to. 11AM Turns out Maeve decided to help herself to some pretzels, since I forgot to lock the pantry. Apparently she also ate them in the living room. On the couch. And in the hallway. I will probably find pretzel pieces in random places for the next few weeks. 12:05PM After helping Maeve vacuum up the last of the crumbs off the couch, we head to the kitchen and have some lunch before I put her down for a nap. She isn’t taking naps much anymore, but I think we’ll try it today even though that usually means she’ll keep her sisters up late. I have to prepare for class tonight, so naptime it is. 1:30PM Well, I see the fabric on the shelf that would be perfect for the shirt I wanted to make. No. Time. Must. Resist. 2:59PM My two older kids will be home any minute from school … and I’m feverishly sewing the last bits of the top I decided to make. I convinced myself if I didn’t sew something I’d have nothing to wear tonight. 4:35PM It’s time to get dinner started already? Didn’t we just have lunch? 6PM The girls’ dad stays with them while I head out to class. Lots of plugs and props to bring. I hope I didn’t forget anything. 6:30PM I meet my students at Dr. Lomonaco’s chiropractic office in Highland Village and we make our introductions. Getting my laptop hooked up to display videos and class content is no easy feat but I make it happen. I’m looking forward to this class — talking about birth is right up my alley. 9:05PM I make it back home after class and see the house. Oy vey. So much to catch up on. I’ve got another order that just came in so I’ll need to work that into my day tomorrow, but right now I need some me time. I’ve been on a big self-care journey ever since a few years ago when stress forced me to slow down and take better care of myself. The girls are already in bed, so I pick a cheesy flick from Amazon that I’ve been meaning to watch and alternate between chocolate and cutting out a sweater for myself while watching. I think I have a multitasking problem. 11:15PM Time for bed. Mmm. Just as I’m about to fall asleep, I hear my 3-year-old

Diaries are penned by moms (and dads) in the North Texas area. The authors volunteer to share a day of their choosing and are not paid or endorsed by NorthTexasChild. Send your diary to editorial@dfwchild.com. All submissions are subject to editing and may be cut for space.

10

may 2017 / northtexaschild

PHOTO COURTESY OF EMILY TEUSCHER

real moms /


print the fine

WHAT SHE’S READING Anything by Brene Brown; currently it’s Rising Strong. SITE WE MIGHT CATCH HER BROWSING ON A fabric website called Knitpop. I love to go and drool over all the beautiful fabric. BEST PURCHASE EVER My home birth for my youngest. Insurance would have paid for most of a hospital birth, but it was worth every penny. BIGGEST CHALLENGE Balance and time management WORDS SHE LIVES BY I love the serenity prayer: “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.” BEAUTY PRODUCT SHE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT

Lip balm. I’ve been addicted since I was a teen. WORKOUT SHE MANAGES TO SQUEEZE IN Dancing to my latest favorite songs while I clean up in the kitchen with my 3-year-old GO-TO UNIFORM Ultra-soft leggings and a long drapey top BY HER BED Homemade shea body butter FAVORITE INDULGENCE This month it’s guacamole. WHAT SHE DOES WHEN LIFE GETS STRESSFUL Vox (a walkietalkie app on my phone) one of my longdistance besties DREAM VACATION I’m not picky — somewhere warm, with a beach, and lots of down time would be amazing.

COME SEE THE UNIQUE LIFESTYLE OF LANTANA

18-HOLE JAY MORRISH GOLF COURSE

4 EXEMPLARY RATED, ON-SITE SCHOOLS

ON-SITE DAYCARE 3,500 HOMES 2 FITNESS CENTERS

RESORT STYLE AMENITIES WITH 5 POOLS

TENNIS + BASKETBALL COURTS HIKE/BIKE TRAILS PARKS ONSITE RESIDENT EVENTS

17 miles from DFW Airport and 5 minutes from shopping in Highland Village

FOR CHILDREN, ADULTS AND FAMILIES

Come see our new models with Highland, CalAtlantic and Newport Homes. WWW.LANTANATX.COM

©ISTOCK.COM/ELENAMEDVEDEVA

We Care About Your Family!

crying and heading to my room. I swear, every time I’m about to sleep she somehow senses it and wakes up. 11:40PM I’ve tucked my daughter in and talked her into going back to sleep by telling her that Bunny needs someone to tell her it’s time to sleep and make her stay tucked in for bed. The opportunity to tell someone what to do is too tempting and Maeve falls right into my trap. It isn’t a foolproof gimmick, but the bedtime gods are smiling on me tonight because it works. She closes her eyes as I leave the room, and I crawl back into bed. My mind is still running with all the things I need to do tomorrow, but I try out some meditation techniques from the Headspace app on my phone and soon I feel myself drifting off as I say a silent prayer of gratitude to be a mother to these three little girls while doing what I love. Motherhood is one wild ride.

Susan Heller, MD

Karen Holland, MD

Joan Kay, MD

P E D I AT R I C S

P E D I AT R I C S

P E D I AT R I C S

Darlene Kurian, MD

Natalya Shannon, MD

Tammi M. Williams, MD

P E D I AT R I C S

P E D I AT R I C S

P E D I AT R I C S

2021 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 250 Irving, TX 75061 6750 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 206 Irving, TX 75039

972-253-4300 WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR INSURANCE PLANS

www.mscitx.com Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm

northtexaschild / may 2017

11


MY BODY, HER BABY


(

Sometimes the final stop on the quest to parenthood involves renting another woman’s womb

(

WORDS ELAINE ROGERS

E

Elizabeth Standridge, 33, is one of those women who loves being pregnant. Her friends who complain incessantly about swollen ankles, nausea and heartburn don’t get much sympathy from her. For the North Richland Hills mom, the gestation process feels like a natural state of being. “I’m just one of those people who would rather be pregnant than not,” she says. “It’s so empowering to know you’re bringing a new life into the world and to feel the baby growing and kicking inside of you. Everything about it is just easy for me. I don’t even think about the potential complications or risks of childbirth.” Standridge gave birth to her own child, a son, three years ago but carried another couple’s daughter to term as a surrogate and is in the process of trying to do so again for a Fort Worth couple experiencing fertility issues. With a day job as a merchant services adviser at a local bank, the single mom is also a full-time student taking classes online with the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. And shortly after her son turned 1, Standridge added gestational carrier to her resume, signing up with DFW Gestational Carriers, a small surrogacy agency, to make extra income by renting her womb.

“I had a friend at church who was considering [becoming a surrogate] and I said, ‘That’s so amazing. I could totally see myself doing that,’” she remembers. “I loved being pregnant with my own son so much, and I thought it would be such a wonderful gift to be able to do this for others who want a child but can’t do it on their own. … Ultimately, my friend decided not to do it, but I was all in.” Paired in 2014 with a couple from Wichita Falls who had frozen their fertilized embryos, Standridge delivered their healthy baby girl in March of last year. She told her own son that she was carrying a baby for another woman who couldn’t do it herself. After the first successful pregnancy and birth, Standridge and the Wichita Falls family tried three more times for a second child using additional sets of the couple’s embryos, but none of the pregnancies took. AN UNUSUAL ENTERPRISE The United States is actually one of the few developed countries where commercial, or paid, surrogacy is allowed — it is illegal in Canada and most of Europe (all forms of surrogacy are prohibited in France, Germany, Italy and Spain). But surrogacy laws here vary widely by state: In Texas, commercial surrogacy is permitted, with restrictions. And there are only a handful of organizations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area to help

northtexaschild / may 2017

13


guide couples with fertility issues through the often complicated legal and logistical maze of hiring a surrogate, which can be as overwhelming as a 10,000-piece jigsaw puzzle. Guidelines recommended by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) involve psychological and physical screenings for women interested in becoming gestational surrogates. In addition, gestational carriers must be between the ages of 21 and 45, have at least one biological child but have had no more than five vaginal births, and come from an emotionally supportive and financially secure home environment. The fees associated with hiring a surrogate are sort of all over the map, but intended parents can typically expect totals to exceed the $100,000 mark. The agency fee alone at Shared Conception in Dallas costs $16,000, for instance. The gestational carrier then makes $24,000–$26,000. The agency fee at Simple Surrogacy, also in Dallas, is $22,000, and their gestational carriers set their own fees, with rates averaging $30,000–$40,000. And at DFW Gestational Carriers, the agency fee is $8,000 and the gestational carrier makes $21,000– $30,000. Intended parents also pay medical bills — health insurance seldom covers a third-party pregnancy, plus there’s the high cost of in vitro — child care costs (for the gestational carrier’s biological children) if bedrest is required, even maternity clothes. And there’s no tax credit for surrogacy. Despite the high costs, however, Stephanie Scott, executive program director at Simple Surrogacy and a one-time gestational carrier, says the com-

“I ought to wear a t-shirt ... that says, ‘Just my oven, not my bun.’”

14

may 2017 / northtexaschild

mercial pregnancy business is booming. Her agency handles 70–100 surrogate pregnancies each year, a 60 percent increase from the company’s start 15 years ago. Clients come from cities and towns across Texas; from places such as New York and Michigan, where surrogacy is prohibited; and from other countries too. Even smaller surrogacy outfits have seen growth. Gayla Wilson, who has been a gestational carrier three times, founded her one-woman DFW Gestational Carriers in North Texas 10 years ago. She only handles 8–10 matchups annually, but she says that’s double what she was doing even a few years ago. The business could easily expand, she admits, if she were willing to take on more clients. “[Some surrogacy] companies may view this simply as a business, a way to make money [using] womens’ bodies,” Wilson says. “But it’s such a personal choice to be a gestational carrier and to do this for others. Your heart has to be in the right place.” And frankly, so does your head. You’re likely too young to remember the case of Baby M, which gained national attention in the ’80s. In 1986, Mary Beth Whitehead, a high school dropout and mother of two, gave birth to a baby girl she conceived through artificial insemination with William Stern, whose wife had multiple sclerosis and was afraid to risk pregnancy. Once the baby was born — her biological daughter — Whitehead felt attached and fought to keep Baby M. A long, ugly legal battle ensued. Ultimately, the Sterns were awarded custody and Whitehead was granted visitation rights. And though traditional surrogacy still exists, where the carrier is also the egg donor, it’s fallen mostly out of favor. Gestational surrogacy, the new norm, is far more clear-cut. It removes the biological connection, meaning the gestational carrier is just that, the carrier; the eggs don’t belong to her.

Still, since Baby M, psychological screenings of surrogates have become more sophisticated too, and experts claim women seem better able to compartmentalize and keep the lines unblurred when the fetus has no relation to them. Standridge admits that prior to carrying Emily Grace, the name the Wichita Falls parents bestowed upon their baby girl, she was nervous about developing a bond with the baby growing inside her. “I didn’t want to call her by her name for fear of getting attached,” Standridge says. “After childbirth, I loved her but realized the connection wasn’t there like it had been with my son, my own biological child. … I ought to wear a T-shirt with the slogan that says, ‘Just my oven; not my bun,’ because that’s really how it is.” A PARENT’S PERSPECTIVE Keva Montrose, 31, and her husband Dan, 42, struggled with infertility for nearly seven years. The Montroses have actually successfully conceived six times. Keva even carried three of the babies — Stella (born August 17, 2009 at 21 weeks), Conal (born March 15, 2010 at 20 weeks) and Declan (born February 13, 2012 at 19 weeks) — into a second trimester before delivering them heartbreakingly early and subsequently burying her children. “Twenty-one weeks is the longest I can make it,” she says. “After that, the baby just gets too heavy. We’d been through everything with all our fertility treatments and surgeries. Basically, my doctor finally told me, ‘That’s it. It’s time to try something else.’ So we knew it was either adoption or surrogacy.” As fate would have it, Montrose won Dallas fertility clinic Sher Fertility’s Facebook contest. Keva and Dan made a video about their tear-jerking journey to become parents (you can see it on dfwchild.com). As winners, they received a free round of in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments to freeze Keva’s eggs — making the surrogacy


choice [to have a biological child] more affordable and viable. Then came finding the right agency, which honestly, left Keva feeling a bit apprehensive. “The profit motive seemed pretty strong [at the first agency],” she says. “And the gestational carriers there didn’t seem that well informed about the process or the meds they have to take or the responsibility of doing this.” But Keva finally found a happy fit with DFW Gestational Carriers, and through Wilson’s coordination, a gestational carrier in Amarillo delivered the Montrose’s healthy baby boy three years ago. Now the couple is hopeful that Standridge can help make them parents a second time. The first implant in January of this year didn’t take; prayers that the second implant, done just as this issue went to print, did. MAKING A BABY The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART), an organization that reports gestational surrogacy in terms of gestational cycles, not all of which lead to live births, reports that only about 40 percent of surrogate implantations result in successful pregnancies and births. “It’s all about the egg,” says Dr. Robert Kaufmann, a reproductive endocrinologist at Fort Worth Fertility. “Your chances of having a successful pregnancy with surrogacy isn’t about the uterus as much as it is about the egg. … For example, if the egg is from a 25-year-old donor (intended maternal parent), you’re probably looking at an 80 percent chance of a successful pregnancy, but if the donor is 41, that rate is closer to 20 to 25 percent. There are a lot of variables.” Here’s how it works if it’s successful: First, Mom and the gestational carrier take medications to sync their cycles. Mom also takes prescriptions to stimulate the development of eggs; the surrogate may be prescribed oral estrogen and progesterone injections to help prepare her uterus and may have to have blood

drawn weekly to ensure adequate hormone levels. Next, Mom’s eggs are fertilized using Dad’s sperm, and the embryos are cultured in the lab. Finally, the fertilized embryos are implanted in the gestational carrier’s uterus. CONTROVERSIAL CONSIDERATIONS Like so many other hot-topic women’s issues, surrogacy is not without its fair share of critics. The Center for Bioethics and Culture Network (CBCN) leads a national campaign trying to make commercial pregnancy illegal. Among the criticisms: children’s rights, the exploitation of poor and low-income women, using a woman’s body as a commercial transaction and others. “Women who choose to [be gestational carriers] should already be financially stable and not in any sort of desperate situation,” Scott advises. “No one should be doing this because they need the fee to pay their electric bill.” Another point of contention? The unknown dangers associated with using hormones and other fertility drugs to prepare the surrogate’s uterus and jumpstart the pregnancy. But experts contend that the low-dose hormones are natural (the body starts producing them anyway during pregnancy), administered over a short period of time (about 10 weeks total) and are safe for a gestational carrier in good health. “[These gestational carriers] have been heavily screened for their health,” Kaufmann adds. “They’ve been picked because they have greatly reduced risks for developing problems like high blood pressure or diabetes during pregnancy.” SURROGACY VS. ADOPTION Surrogacy opponents advocate for hopeful couples to choose adoption over surrogacy. But for parents like the Montroses, it’s just not that simple. Keva and Dan didn’t have a problem getting pregnant; they wanted and still want biological children. And their happy 3-year-old is definitely the spitting image of his mom.

“We only have two transfers left,” Keva says of the implantations taking place this month with Standridge. “If they don’t work, we’ll have to try the egg retrieval again, but with my diminished ovarian function, I might not have enough left. … After that, we might have to look into adoption instead. We’ll cross that bridge if we have to.” But it’s not her first choice. Another big difference between surrogacy and adoption? Birth mothers typically choose the couple they want to parent the child they give birth to. In a surrogate situation, the matchup tends to be a bit more mutual: Intended parents pick from the profiles of prospective gestational carriers, and if the surrogate agrees, the intended parents have the opportunity to get to know the would-be gestational carrier before committing. Then there’s the legal contracts that spell out everything — from how long a surrogate must abstain from sex to how much of a bonus she will be paid for twins — get signed even before there’s a baby in utero. Birth mothers can also request post-placement contact after adoption, either in an open or semiopen arrangement. Gestational carriers, on the other hand, don’t typically stay in touch with the child’s intended parents unless, of course, they want to try for more children using the same surrogate. For now, Montrose isn’t weighing the pros and cons of adoption because she’s hopeful that this implantation takes and results in the birth of another healthy baby. And Standridge foresees moonlighting as a gestational carrier as long as she possibly can (most gestational carriers stop by their early 40s). She looks at it not necessarily as a job but something she’s been called to do, her mission in life. “If God gave you the opportunity to be part of a miracle, to help make something like this happen for others, wouldn’t you want to do that? It just makes sense for me.

Finding Support While there are lots of resources for couples experiencing infertility in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, there aren’t support groups for gestational carriers or parents via surrogacy. But there are plenty of places online that offer support for all types of surrogates and for the intended parents too. AGENCY FOR SURROGACY SOLUTIONS, INC., based in California, offers a virtual chat room where current and previous gestational surrogates can talk, share feelings, thoughts, concerns and joys. surrogacysolutionsinc.com ALL ABOUT SURROGACY is a popular online forum that covers lots of topics, including surrogacy for beginners, insurance issues and support groups for those experiencing failed transfers, among others. There are also “ask-the-expert sections” where those interested in becoming a surrogate get tips from been-there-donethat carriers and intended parents can talk to other moms and dads who became parents through someone else’s womb. allaboutsurrogacy.com SURROGATE MOTHERS ONLINE provides online message boards for both surrogates and intended parents with medical and legal experts available to answer questions. surromomsonline.com

northtexaschild / may 2017

15


F

Tour deTexas Eight state park campgrounds for fresh-air fun

B

e

WORDS JESSICA MYERS

efore the mercury rises to sweltering levels, pack up the kids and spend a weekend or more in one of Texas’ beautiful, family-friendly state parks. There are a number of campgrounds near (and a little farther away) to suit your crew’s comfort and interests — some sites loan rods and tackle boxes to young anglers, for instance. All admit kids 12 and younger for free and all lend littles Junior Ranger Explorer Packs with binoculars, pencils, watercolors and more. Plus, playgrounds, swimming areas and children’s programming add to the fun. Book online at tpwd.texas.gov.

16

may 2017 / northtexaschild

e

Go West DINOSAUR VALLEY STATE PARK

Glen Rose, 254/897-4588 THE PITCH: Campers search the shallow riverbed for the tracks of three-toed theropod and elephant-size sauropod dinosaurs. See a 40-foot-tall T. rex replica (and others too), and borrow a birding kit with binoculars to find endangered species. On weekends, grab a treat at the snow cone truck stationed in front of the park store. GOOD TO KNOW: Pack rain boots or water shoes to traverse the wet, rocky riverbed (which can be anywhere from 6–24 inches deep), and plan to attend one of the free weekend ranger programs such as archery or painting, both on May 13.

COST: Campsites from $15 per day; adult admission $7 per day NEARBY PERK: Book a guided tour or steer your own safari ride to see rhinos, giraffes and more at Fossil Rim Wildlife Center, 15 minutes south of the park. Open daily from 8:30am–4:30pm; drive admission from $21.95 per adult and $15.95 per child age 3 and older. Call for tour prices.

LAKE MINERAL WELLS STATE PARK & TRAILWAY

Mineral Wells, 940/328-1171 THE PITCH: Walk a bit of the Trailway (it’s 20 miles long), which parallels an abandoned railroad, or descend the stone steps and narrow canyons of Penitentiary Hollow to a lakeside overlook. Then lounge on the beach or rent kayaks, canoes and rowboats.


»

GOOD TO KNOW: Every Saturday in May, park rangers host one- to two-hour family-friendly activities. Identify flowers during the afternoon Wildflower Walk on May 6 or learn safety strategies at Kid’s Wilderness Survival on May 13. COST: Campsites from $10 per day; adult admission $7 per day NEARBY PERK: Spend a morning 10 miles west at Mineral Wells Fossil Park. Dig up shark tooth fossils from 300 million years ago.

COPPER BREAKS STATE PARK

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DAVID OWENS; TYLER STATE PARK; BRIAN HEID

THE PITCH:

Spot members of the state-protected longhorn herd in the Panhandle Plains three hours northwest of Denton. Borrow a tackle box and reel, throw in a line and wait for the rainbow trout to bite. Hike the mile-long Bull Canyon Trail – Short Loop, and stop frequently for scenic views of the prairie. GOOD TO KNOW: The preserved rural area offers the best views of constellations, planets, moons and stars. Book a guided StarWalk night hike near Big Pond. COST: Campsites from $8 per day; adult admission $2 per day NEARBY PERK: Drive through the ghost town of Medicine Mound in Hardeman County, 12 miles east of Quanah, to see 200-foot-tall mounds revered by the Comanche tribes for their sacred ceremonial and religious purposes. Trespassing is prohibited, but you can learn more at the Downtown Medicine Mound Museum open Saturdays 9–11am (other days by appointment) or Quanah Depot Museum, where kids can also see a space room furnished by NASA.

GARNER STATE PARK

Concan, 830/232-6132 THE PITCH: Six hours southwest of Denton, camp along the

NEARBY PERK: Now

to September, the Mexican free-tailed bats put on an evening show at Frio Cave 20 minutes south of the park. Arrive before sunset to see millions of bats evacuate the cave.

INKS LAKE STATE PARK

Burnet, 512/793-2223 THE PITCH: During a trip to Inks Lake, one hour north of Austin, grab an interpretive guide for the 3.3-mile Pecan Flats Trail, suitable for the whole family (you don’t have to walk all 3 miles), and learn about native plants and wildlife from 22 trail markers along the way. Sign up for a guided canoe tour (includes life jackets and paddles). Or swim Devil’s Waterhole, a safe swim spot for families, surrounded by restrooms with showers and picnic areas. The park has three playgrounds too. GOOD TO KNOW: Rangers bring out the telescope for free stargazing parties several times a month. Other all-ages events include fishing, making s’mores and Underwater Discovery — use a weighted net to find what lurks beneath the lake’s surface. COST: Campsites from $11 per day; adult admission $6 per day NEARBY PERK: Explore the underbelly of the Hill Country at Longhorn Cavern 10 minutes

south of the park. Book a daily 1.5-mile easy walking tour (not strollerfriendly). Guided tours: $16 per adult; $12 kids (ages 3–12); free for ages 2 and younger.

Go North RAY ROBERTS LAKE STATE PARK

Pilot Point, 940/686-2148 THE PITCH: A marina with boat rentals, a kids’ fishing pond, and playgrounds at each campsite mean no shortage of entertainment. Swim, hike the easy half-mile Lost Pines Nature Trail or rent a rod and lures to fish in Johnson Branch. GOOD TO KNOW: Park rangers host stargazing workshops, evening bike rides (borrow bikes for free) and more several times a month. See the events online. COST: Campsites from $15 per day; adult admission $7 per day NEARBY PERK: Go horseback riding through scenic equestrian trails from Black Mustang Ranch in the Jordan Unit of the state park, less than 1 mile from camp. Rides from $40 per person.

Go East

COOPER LAKE STATE PARK — SOUTH SULPHUR UNIT

Sulphur Springs, 903/945-5256 THE PITCH: The few remaining areas of Texan tallgrass prairie can be found two hours east of Denton on the south side of Cooper Lake. Embark on the easy, 30-minute Honey Creek trail or book a guided one-hour canoe tour on the lake for $12 per canoe (each seats two). Then fish for crappie and catfish from any of the piers. GOOD TO KNOW: Use binocu-

»

lars to spot bald eagles, bluebirds, white-tailed deer, bobcats and beavers. Let the kids learn how native mammals adapt to their environment in weekend programs. And once a month, a certified archery instructor teaches kids 8 and older how to shoot an arrow (reservations required). COST: Campsites from $10 per day; adult admission $5 per day NEARBY PERK: Let kids see how ice cream, butter and cheese are made at the Southwest Dairy Museum just 25 minutes south of the lake. The museum is open Monday–Friday 9am–4pm.

TYLER STATE PARK

»

Quanah, 940/839-4331

Frio River at the Pecan Grove or Oakmont campgrounds, where kids will find sand volleyball and basketball courts. From here, gain access to the easy, half-mile Blinn River Trail. Attend a geocaching mission with a park ranger, rent tubes to float the river or play mini golf. GOOD TO KNOW: Book a cabin now for the fall to see the cypress trees turn colors. COST: Campsites from $15 per day; adult admission $8 per day

Tyler, 903/597-5338 THE PITCH: This sprawling system of campsites, trailer hookups and cabins in the Eastern Piney Woods offers 13 miles of trails and two fishing piers for catching trout, catfish and bass. Lead the kids to a wading pool and small waterfall on the short Whispering Pines Nature Trail, which provides plenty of shade too. Canoe, kayak and peddle boat rentals available too. GOOD TO KNOW: Explore the Lakeshore trail and cross the bridge for a view of a working beaver dam. There are two restrooms along the 2-mile walk and plenty of spots to picnic and rest. Trail maps available at the ranger station. COST:

Campsites from $16 per day; adult admission $6 per day

NEARBY PERK:

The largest house made of salt can be found at the Salt Palace Museum in Grand Saline, 40 minutes west of the park. Open Monday–Saturday 9am–4pm.

northtexaschild / may 2017

17


PRESENTS THE

20TH ANNUAL

baby Fair & model search SATURDAY, MAY 20 10AM–3PM STONEBRIAR CENTRE 2601 PRESTON RD., FRISCO

$35 ONLINE REGISTRATION $45 ON-SITE REGISTRATION

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Photo by Hoyoung Lee

DFWCHILD.COM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CAMP GUIDE D AY & O V E R N I G H T C A M P S / C L A S S E S / S P O R T S Summer Camp at LLELA Nature Preserve This summer, mosey down a shady trail, paddle a kayak, do the “chores” at a real log house, catch a tadpole, and have a wild summer adventure! Enroll your child in the entire week, or M/W/F only. Three one-week camps starting June 5 for children entering 2nd through 7th grades. Each camp day runs from 8:30am–2:30pm. An extended day option is available from 2:30–4pm.

Kids’ Wilderness Survival Camp at LLELA Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville, TX 972-219-3550 LLELA.org

For something even a little wilder, join us for a week-long outdoor survival adventure day camp! Build shelters, find edible wild plants, make fire the way of the Native Americans, learn to blend into your surroundings with camouflage, try your hand at archery, and much more! June 26–30, 9am–Noon. Ages 6–13. More information at LLELA.org. For registration information, call 972-219-3550.

Camp Summit is a one-of-a-kind camp for children and adults with disabilities where the emphasis is on the campers’ abilities rather than their disabilities. Traditional camp activities are adapted to each individual and are provided in our barrier-free facilities and implemented by trained, caring staff. Our campers are grouped by age, providing the opportunity to make friends within peer groups while having fun and experiencing new adventures. 270 Private Rd. 3475 Paradise, TX 76073 972-484-8900 camp@campsummittx.org www.campsummittx.org

Camp Summit is located just north of DFW on 460 beautiful acres of land. We are accredited by the American Camp Association and licensed as a Youth Camp in the State of Texas.

Build Confidence and Create Memories

1141 Flower Mound Rd, Ste 600 Flower Mound, TX 75028 469-980-1220 tlgflowermoundtx@thelittlegym.com www.thelittlegym.com/flowermoundtx

3000 Waketon Rd. Flower Mound, TX 75028 972-355-9988 www.winkids.net

Super Quest Summer Camp is an adventure-filled, 3-hour camp for children ages 3–8 years. Each camp theme is based on fun, exciting missions or “Quests” that the kids are challenged to complete each day! Each day of camp involves a fun, creative storyline with music that will incorporate opportunities for the kids to build self-confidence, exercise their muscles, and stimulate their imagination while working together to complete each Quest. Call for deals!

Win Kids…Famous for first-class summer camps for children. From themes like Kritter Kids to Ninja Warriors, Police and Fire and more, our caring teachers will treat your child to the super-fun camps we are famous for! Come experience sports and fitness “The Win Kids Way!” Your child will be handled with love in a high-quality environment! Ages 2½–12. Full and half-day options. Camps fill fast so enroll early. Enrollment is now in progress! northtexaschild / may 2017

19


kid culture. chasing pavement

2

take a spin on family-friendly bike trails WORDS BETH MCGEE

W

hether you’re hearing “Look, Mom, no hands!” or your littles aren’t quite ready to pop off the training wheels, a family bike ride is a good excuse for vitamin D and some uninterrupted time together.

Here, we’ve mapped out five of the best trails in North Texas, for

©ISTOCK.COM/SHTONADO; PHOTOS COURTESY OF LEWISVILLE’S CENTRAL PARK; OAK GROVE PARK; ©ISTOCK.COM/ MONKEYBUSINESSIMAGES

short legs and long.

CENTRAL PARK, LEWISVILLE This looping, 1-mile trail is the perfect excursion for little legs that can’t do long distances. Enter off Edmonds and park near the playground (which is worth a stop before or after your ride). Along the paved trail that circles the park, enjoy the wooded landscape and protection from the hot summer sun. The trail is only 3–4 feet wide, so encourage your littles to steer to the right. 1899 S. Edmonds Lane, Lewisville, 972/219-3400; cityoflewisville.com CORINTH COMMUNITY PARK, CORINTH Pack your sports gear and head to

1

Corinth Community Park. Park in the lot between the baseball and softball fields for direct access to the 1.5-mile paved trail that meanders past the sports fields (look out for foul balls!), and put down your kickstands for a break at the playground next to field 4. If you have mini ballers in tow, make sure to hit the basketball courts just past the playground for a game of horse. To stay on the paved trail, turn around when you reach Corinth Parkway. 3700 Corinth Parkway, Corinth, 940/498-3200; cityofcorinth.com LEONARD JOHNS PARK, FLOWER MOUND There are distractions aplenty for curious kiddos along the trails at

Leonard Johns Park. Park next to the Lewisville ISD Natatorium, then cycle east on the sidewalk along Timber Creek Road and turn left when you reach the 8-foot-wide paved trail. You’ll roll past four tennis courts, so bring along your rackets for some friendly competition. By the water’s edge, your little ones can spot bass, perch and other fish (or even cast a line). The looping trail is less than a mile, so once you circle through the mix of wooded and open scenery, make the quick and easy .9-mile ride south to Parker Square for a well-deserved pizza at Enzo’s. 1850 Timber Creek Road, 972/874-6000; flower-mound.com RAY ROBERTS LAKE STATE PARK, PILOT POINT Explore Ray Roberts Lake State Park on 12 miles of multiuse trails — for shorter legs, we recommend the Randy Bell Scenic Trail in the Isle du Bois Unit. To get there from the park’s main gate, ask for directions to the Hawthorn camping area, which provides plenty of parking and easy access

to the 2.2-mile, paved center loop. (You’ll need to pay the $7 per person entrance fee, but kids 12 and younger are free.) Bring your pup — leashed pets are allowed on the trails too. Midride, take a detour down to the water, where you’ll find a playground, swimming area and picnic tables. 100 PW 4137, Pilot Point, 940/3497275; twpd.texas.gov/state-parks/ ray-roberts-lake OAK GROVE PARK, GRAPEVINE The paved Oak Grove Trail at the southern end of Lake Grapevine is hemmed in by trees but wide enough for the whole gang. Park in the lot north of the baseball complex on Oak Grove Loop, then head west to the corner to hop on the trail. Ride south past sports fields before plunging into the forest for a few miles of lakeside scenery (the 1.3-mile trail is linear, so you’ll have to turn around when you meet up with the Dove Loop 3 Trail) and stop at the shaded picnic tables for a snack along the way. Wrap up your ride with burgers on the dock at Big Daddy’s Ship Store. 2520 Oak Grove Loop S., Grapevine; lake-grapevine.com/trails

1 // At Central Park in Lewisville, you’ll find picnic tables and restrooms along the route. 2 // Oak Grove Park is one of the largest and most scenic parks on Lake Grapevine. 3 // Always wear helmets while biking any trail.

northtexaschild / may 2017

21


Texas-sized fun, all in one glorious place! May 26 - September 4, 2017

Enjoy family fun inspired by the Lone Star State: • Junior chef camp, Hank’s Outlaw Scavenger Hunt, kids crafts and Build-A-Bear Workshop® • Escape the Wild West Escape Room and Crazy Pete’s Panning Adventure interactive experiences • Rock Out Glow Party, Legends of the Lone Star Wild Wild West Show and Friday Night Fireworks • Aquafina® Splash Party, Paradise Springs resort pool & lazy river, dining events and so much more!

Book Your Summer Getaway Today!

GaylordTexan.com/SummerFest

PEPSI_H1_NB_SM_4C (FOR USE .25” 1.5" )

| (817) 778-1000

PEPSI, PEPSI-COLA and the Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc., AQUAFINA® is a registered trademark of PepsiCo, Inc., © & ® Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

CMYK

PROUD PARTNER

PEPSI_H1_NB_MEDIUM_4C (FOR USE 1.5" TO 4") CMYK


kid culture /

AGENDA WORDS ELIZABETH SMITH

5 best things to do this …

WANT TO FIND MORE OF THE BEST FAMILY-FRIENDLY ENTERTAINMENT IN NORTH TEXAS? SIGN UP FOR THE WEEKEND GUIDE AT DFWCHILD.COM/ NEWSLETTER.

ILLUSTRATION ALANA LOUISE

play

eat

make

see

do

With the recent crop of indoor play places popping up all around North Texas, one has finally sprouted in Denton. Penny’s Playtown, open for playtime 9am–5pm Monday–Saturday, has about a dozen storefront-style areas, including a library where kids can really check out a book. Admission for all-day play is $8.50; $6.50 per additional sibling. Check their site for occasional visits by magicians or costumed characters.

If you have a mommy’s little helper in the kitchen, do not miss the Step Stool Chef at Taste of Irving on Saturday, May 20, at Cimarron Park Recreation Center. Watch the boy chef and his assistant, Sous Chef Mommy, present a live demo designed to encourage kids to cook, and then make your way around Restaurant Row to sample foods from over two dozen vendors. Free festival admission.

What’s more precious than helping your littles create their own finger paintings? Having a tidy playroom. Get out of the house on Saturday, May 6, for the Highland Village Art Festival with art activities and over 30 artist displays in the courtyard outside Barnes & Noble. For more art inspiration, step inside for a reading of the justpublished picture book Dragons Love Tacos 2 at 11am. Free.

We’re still nursing mixed feelings about the end of Ringling Bros. after 146 years, but the cast of Circus 1903 – The Golden Age of Circus carries on the tradition in a different way. Take a trip out to Fair Park’s Music Hall (you won’t regret it) to watch strong men and giant puppet elephants created by the puppeteers from the Broadway musical War Horse in an all-ages show May 23–June 4. Tickets from $20.

You’ve heard of triathlons, but what about an aquathlon? On Sunday, May 21, experience the Splash N Dash made for kids at Denton’s Water Works Park. The twopart race begins with a ride down the slide, continues with a 150yard swim around the lazy river, then a halfmile run (for ages 6–10; longer distances for 11 and older). $25; $6 for spectator access to the post-race party.

Irving, 972/910-0702 cityofirving.org

Highland Village, 972/317-8741 theshopsathighlandvillage.com

Dallas, 214/421-5678 dallassummermusicals.org

Denton, 940/222-5350 pennysplaytown.com

Denton, 214/697-6922 playtri.com/watersplash-n-dash

northtexaschild / may 2017

23


everyday. kid culture

EDITED BY ELIZABETH SMITH

05/27 ADVENTURES WITH CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG @ FORT WORTH MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND HISTORY

1 MONDAY EXHIBIT

The Ultimate Octonauts Experience Sea Life Aquarium Grapevine, 3000 Grapevine Mills Pkwy., Grapevine. 877/819-7677. visitsealife.com/grapevine. On view through Dec 31. 10am–6pm Mon–Sat; 11am–5pm Sun. Attraction remains open two hours after last admission. Explore a mysterious cave with Captain Barnacles, look for treasure with Kwazii and help Peso clean up the coral reef in this exhibit based on the hit animated TV series. Free with admission: $20 adults; $16 kids 3–12.

PARADE

Fort Worth Herd Fort Worth Stockyards, 130 E. Exchange Ave., Fort Worth. 817/625-9715. stockyardsstation.com. 11:30am and 4pm daily, weather permitting. Line up along the streets to see genuine cowhands and a herd of 15 Texas longhorns in the world’s only twice-daily cattle drive. FREE

EXHIBIT

Dora and Diego – Let’s Explore Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, 1600 Gendy St., Fort Worth. 817/255-9300. fwmsh.org. Extended through Labor Day. 10am–5pm Mon–Sat and 12–5pm Sun. Learn words in Spanish and play with Dora, her animal-

24

may 2017 / northtexaschild

rescuing cousin and their friends from Nickelodeon’s hit preschool series in this interactive exhibit that encourages role-playing, sharing and problem-solving. Free with admission: $15 adults; $12 youth 2–18. Free for museum members.

CONTINUING:

See dfwchild.com for more events.

2 TUESDAY NATURE

Bella’s Book and Nature Club Botanical Research Institute of Texas, 1700 University Dr., Fort Worth. 817/3324441. brit.org. 10:30am–12pm May 2–3. Join Bella the begonia hand puppet for story readings in the Burk Children’s Library, guided outdoor explorations and more for kids in preschool. Registration is required. $10 per family per visit; free for BRIT members.

ARTS & CRAFTS

First Tuesday at the DMA Dallas Museum of Art, 1717 N. Harwood St., Dallas. 214/922-1200. dma.org. 11am–2pm. Meet in the Center for Creative Connections for art activities, story readings, performances and gallery activities that celebrate Cinco de Mayo. Designed for children ages 5 and younger. FREE

ARTS & CRAFTS

Pictures and Pages Kimbell Art Museum, 3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth. 817/3328451. kimbellart.org. 10:30–11:45am. Meet in the Piano Pavilion Education Studios to read The Magic Horse of Han Gan by Chen Jiang Hong and do simple art activities. For ages 4–6; max of two kids per adult. Call to register. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1.

3 WEDNESDAY ARTS & CRAFTS

Crafternoon! Flower Vase Collage Scrap Denton, 420 S. Bell Ave., Denton. 940/808-1611. scrapdenton.org. 3:30–5:30pm May 3; 1–3pm May 7. Repurpose egg cartons, paper towel rolls and collage paper to create a 3-D flower vase collage during this make-and-take craft workshop for kids ages 6–12. Walk-ins encouraged. $5 per child.

PLAYTIME

Family Fun Night – Geronimo Stilton Party Valley Ranch Library, 401 Cimarron Trl., Irving. 972/721-4669. cityofirving.org/library. 7–7:45pm. Celebrate the mouse

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FORT WORTH MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND HISTORY; BREAKTHRU FILMS

MAY

05/06 MAGIC PIANO @ WINSPEAR OPERA HOUSE


adventurer with crafts, snacks and a visit from Geronimo himself. FREE

STORY TIME

Kids Story and Craft Time Whole Foods Market, 4041 Waller Creek, Highland Village. 972/5389710. wholefoodsmarket.com. 10:30–11:30am each Wed. Bring your kids ages 2–6 for stories, crafts and healthy snacks at the store’s kids’ area near the cafe. FREE

Jun e

FILM

SMG Classics Mother’s Day Studio Movie Grill, all DFW locations. studiomoviegrill.com. 7:45pm each Wed in May. Celebrate Mother’s Day by watching a movie musical each week: Singin’ in the Rain on May 3; The Wizard of Oz on May 10; An American in Paris on May 17; Anchors Aweigh on May 24; and The Band Wagon on May 31. $5.

Ages 4-16

5-A

ugu

st 1

1

14

camps!

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Bella’s Book and Nature Club See May 2.

4 THURSDAY ON STAGE

Disney’s The Lion King Experience Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theater, 100 N. Charles St., Lewisville. 972/219-8446. actingstudiotx.tix. com. May 4–7. Watch the kids of Acting Studio Productions sing and dance on stage as Simba, Nala, Mufasa and more characters from the original Disney movie. Tickets start at $18.

SCIENCE

First Thursday Late Night – Archaeology Perot Museum of Nature and Science at Victory Park, 2201 N. Field St., Dallas. 214/428-5555. perotmuseum.org. Museum open for extended hours 5–9pm. Activities from 7–9pm. Dig through artifacts and learn about ancient civilizations through the Perot’s traveling exhibition Maya – Hidden Worlds Revealed. Free with admission: $20 adults; $13 kids 2–17.

REGISTER NOW! Kids stay cool and experience the Summer of ’17: Peace, Love & Art vibe through 14 unique adventures in visual arts, theatre, music, creative writing at Irving Arts Center.

FOR A COMPLETE LISTING OF CAMPS AND TO REGISTER, VISIT www.irvingartscenter.com Open 7 days a week • Free parking • 3333 N. MacArthur Blvd. • Irving, TX, 75062

Smithsonian Affiliate

ARTS & CRAFTS

JumpstART Stories & Art Irving Arts Center, 3333 N. MacArthur Blvd., Irving. 972/252-2787. irvingartscenter.com. 10am. In honor of Mother’s Day, listen to stories and join a related art project during this monthly program for ages 2 and older. FREE

FESTIVAL

Mayfest Trinity Park, 2401 University Dr., Fort Worth. 817/332-1055. mayfest.org. 3:30–10pm May 4–5; 10am–10pm May 6; 11am–7pm May 7. Take the kids to the 45th annual festival overlooking the Trinity River for more than 20 activity booths in the Tom Thumb Children’s Area and more entertainment in the Frost Zone area. $8 adults; $5 for ages 3–12. Family and friends pass is $25 for five people. Free admission on Thu.

MUSIC

Twilight Tunes Denton Courthouse on the Square, 110 W. Hickory St., Denton. 940/3677321. discoverdenton.com. 6:30–8pm each Thu through Jun 29. Lounge on the courthouse lawn, watch the sunset and listen to a different band perform each week during the Denton Main Street Association concert series. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1.

10.30 Daily Giraffe Feeding Summer Hours: 9am - 5pm (last tickets 4:30pm)

Gainesville, Texas

5 FRIDAY SAFETY

Biking in Denton Emily Fowler Central Library, northtexaschild / may 2017

25


kid culture /

CITY OF LEWISVILLE

SUMMER

502 Oakland St., Denton. 940/349-8752. dentonlibrary.com. 2pm. For National Bike Month, join Denton’s bike and pedestrian coordinator Julie Anderson for a program that covers the best bike routes, safety and rules. No need to bring your bike. For all ages. Registration is requested. FREE

BREAK CAMP 11-WEEK CAMP

EVERYDAY

MUSIC

Concert on the Lawn The Square at Old Town Coppell, 768 W. Main St., Coppell. 972/462-5100. coppelltx.gov/ events. 7–9pm. Listen to a live concert while the kids splash in the interactive fountain or play on the playground in celebration of Old Town Coppell’s anniversary. Picnics welcome. FREE

AGES

Concerts in the Park Heritage Park, 800 Spinks Rd., Flower Mound. 972/874-7275. flower-mound. com/concerts. 7pm. Listen to live music by a different band each Fri this month: Cover Down Band on May 5, Journey tribute band Escape on May 12, Live 80! on May 19, and Audio House on May 26. FREE

June 5–August 18 7:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

ON STAGE

For more information: 972.219.3560 972.219.5061 cityoflewisville.com

Stockyards Championship Rodeo Cowtown Coliseum, 121 E. Exchange Ave., Fort Worth. 817/625-1025. stockyardsrodeo.com. 8pm every Fri and Sat. Watch real cowboys and cowgirls compete in the world’s only year-round rodeo and let your kids go down into the arena to participate in the calf and mutton scrambles. $19 adults; $10 kids 3–12. $3.50 surcharge for online tickets.

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Disney’s The Lion King Experience See May 4. Mayfest See May 4.

WANT MORE FREE FUN?

SPECIAL EVENT

On Mother’s Day,

First Friday Denton Downtown Denton square, 110 W. Hickory St., Denton. discoverdenton.com. 5–9pm. Stroll through downtown and stop in to businesses and art venues open late including A Creative Art Studio. FREE

we remember all the mothers who have babies in heaven.

HISTORY

First Fridays at the Farm Nash Farm, 626 Ball St., Grapevine. 817/410-3185. nashfarm.org. 10am– 12pm. Learn how crops were vital to the financial success of 1800s family farms and see what grows at Nash Farm today. $3 per person.

MUSIC

Keeping Tradition Alive Old Town Lewisville, Wayne Ferguson Plaza, 151 W. Church St., Lewisville. 972/219-3710. cityoflewisville.com. 6–10pm. Music begins at 7pm. Watch and listen to firefighters from across the world as they play bagpipes and drums in the 10th annual concert. Bring lawn chairs and blankets and enjoy kids’ activities and a performance by Little Skynyrd. FREE

M.E.N.D.

Mommies Enduring Neonatal Death 972-506-9000 / rebekah@mend.org

www.mend.org

©

Ads with © are © of Lauren Publications, Inc. 2017.

We are a Christian, nonprofit organization that reaches out to families who have suffered the loss of a baby through miscarriage, stillbirth or early infant death. We publish free bimonthly newsletters, hold two commemorative ceremonies each year and host support groups in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

African Delights Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden, 8525 Garland Rd., Dallas. 214/515-6615. dallasarboretum.org. 11am and 1pm. Listen to storytelling by Bernadette Nason, an awardwinning storyteller, writer and actress who regularly performs in one-woman shows and regional theatrical productions. $3 for timed ticket, plus general admission to the Dallas Arboretum: $15 adults; $10 kids 3–12.

ON STAGE

Blue Dallas Children’s Theater, 5938 Skillman St., Dallas. 214/740-0051. dct.org. 1:30 and 4:30pm May 6–7. Take your toddlers to see this all-new show about what happens when color comes into your life. This simple, gentle play introduces the idea of tolerance and understanding in an age-appropriate and theatrical experience. $16.

NATURE

BRIT First Saturday Botanical Research Institute of Texas, 1700 University Dr., Fort Worth. 817/3324441. brit.org. 9am–12pm. Talk to a real botanist, join plant walks and meet Bella the begonia hand puppet for a story time and activities at this monthly event. FREE

FESTIVAL

ON STAGE

MARKET

Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach Dallas Children’s Theater, 5938 Skillman St., Dallas. 214/740-0051. dct.org. May 5–7, 13–14, 20–21 and 27. Watch as James and his oversized friends, Grasshopper, Centipede, Ladybug, Earthworm and Spider, go on a great adventure that lands them in New York City and at the center of atten-

EDUCATIONAL

EDUCATIONAL

ARTS & CRAFTS

Mother’s Day Help-Create Events Vetro Glassblowing Studio & Gallery, 701 S. Main St., Ste. 103, Grapevine. 817/251-1668. vetroartglass.com. Bowl: 2–5pm May 5. Flower: 12–4pm May 6. Select your colors and assist the glassblowers in creating a glass-blown flared bowl or flower using Vetro’s 2,000-degree furnace. $65 per flared bowl; $30 per flower.

6 SATURDAY

A Night Under the Stars Rafes Urban Astronomy Center, 2350 Tom Cole Rd., Denton. 940/595-4001. exploriumdenton.org. 7–10pm, weather permitting. Gates open at 4:30pm. Join UNT Astronomy at this star party fundraiser benefiting Explorium Denton and including star talks, live music, an on-site food truck, raffle items and space activities. $5 per person; free for ages 4 and younger. Cash only.

Use the search function on our online calendar to find free events in your area at dfwchild.com.

Disney’s The Little Mermaid Casa Mañana Theatre, 3101 W. Lancaster Ave., Fort Worth. 817/332-2272. casamanana.org. Each Fri–Sun through May 14. Watch the children’s theater production based on the classic animated film about the girl who trades her fins for legs. Runs 1 hour 30 minutes with a 20-minute intermission. Tickets start at $20.

©

may 2017 / northtexaschild

RODEO

MUSIC

8–12

$125 PER WEEK

26

tion. For ages 5 and older. Tickets start at $15. $5 for sensory-friendly shows.

Cinco de Mayo Quakertown Park, 321 E. McKinney St., Denton. 940/349-7275. denton5demayo. wixsite.com/denton5demayo. 10am–10pm. In commemoration of the Battle of Puebla, watch a parade from Texas Woman’s University to the civic center. Then head to Quakertown Park for live music, the Little Miss Cinco de Mayo pageant, piñatas for ages 1–6 and traditional Mexican crafts. FREE Denton Community Market Denton County Historical Park, 317 W. Mulberry St., Denton. 940/268-4326. dentoncommunitymarket.com. 9am–1pm each Sat. Browse local vendors for fresh produce and artisan-made products, listen to music and join kid-friendly activities such as crafts and yoga classes. Free activities; costs vary for products.


Garland · The Colony · Mansfield · Roanoke · Waco ARTS & CRAFTS

Family Workshop Amon Carter Museum of American Art, 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth. 817/738-1933. cartermuseum.org. 10:30am–12:30pm. Discover the art of Helen Frankenthaler and other artists who worked with various printing techniques, and then try your hand at printmaking. Designed for kids ages 7–12. Registration is required. FREE

NATURE

Family Zoo Adventures Dallas Zoo, 650 S. R.L. Thornton Fwy., Dallas. 469/5547300. dallaszoo.com. 9:15–11:15am. Learn about the fierce felines of the African savanna during this program with activity stations, animal encounters and zoo tours for ages 4–12. $15 zoo members; $20 nonmembers.

ON STAGE

Festival Cinco de Mayo Palace Theatre, 300 S. Main St., Grapevine. 817/410-3100. palace-theatre.com. 8pm. Celebrate Cinco de Mayo by attending this concert of new music from Mariachi Allende and dancing by Fort Worth’s Ballet Folklorico Azteca. For all ages. $15 in advance; $20 at the door.

Enjoy unlimited visits to all five locations all summer long at Hawaiian Falls with a Season Pass.

EDUCATIONAL

Flint Knapping and Arrowhead Hunting Clear Creek Natural Heritage Center, 3310 Collins Rd., Denton. 940/349-8152. clearcreekdenton.com. 9:30am–12pm. Head to Clear Creek for the first workshop in the free Heritage Series. Learn about the tools used by Native Americans and the secrets to creating traditional tools using both modern and ancient instruments. FREE

NATURE

Garden Time for Kids Old Town Coppell, 768 W. Main St., Coppell. coppellfarmersmarket.org. 10:30am program; 8am–12pm farmers market. During the weekly Coppell Farmers Market, meet under the flagpole in the Learning Garden for a hands-on lesson in how gardens work and what is growing this week. FREE

Our safe, clean, family-friendly environment is fun for all ages!

HISTORY

Grapevine Fun Trains Cotton Belt Depot, 705 S. Main St., Grapevine. 817/4103185. gvrr.com. 10–11am each Sat. Boarding begins at 9:30am. Climb aboard the authentic 1920s-era Victorian coaches for a one-hour ride on the Grapevine Vintage Railroad. This shortened excursion is ideal for families with younger children. $10 adults; $8 kids 13 months–12 years.

ARTS & CRAFTS

Highland Village Art Festival The Shops at Highland Village, 1701 Shoal Creek, Highland Village. 972/317-8741. theshopsathighlandvillage.com. 10am–6pm. See demos and displays from more than 30 artists, join children’s art activities and listen to live music in the south courtyard between Chico’s and Patrizio. FREE

BUY YOUR SEASON PASS AT FOR THE BEST PRICE OF THE SEASON!

NATURE

International Migratory Bird Day Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area, 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. 972/219-7980. llela.org. 8am–1pm. Participate in Bird Olympics, compare your wingspan to a pelican’s, go birding by boat, and watch as scientists capture birds in mist nets, weigh and measure them, band them and release them. Gate entry fee of $5 per vehicle; cash or check only. Some activities require pre-registration and have a fee.

RECREATION

Kid Fish Rheudasil Park, 2401 Lake Forest Blvd., Flower Mound. 972/874-6276. flower-mound.com. 9am–12pm. Bring your own rod, reel and bait or use provided tackle to fish for catfish in the freshly stocked pond. Prizes and awards will be given in several categories. For ages 16 and younger. FREE

ARTS & CRAFTS

Kids Skill Building Workshop Scrap Denton, 420 S. Bell Ave., Denton. 940/8081611. scrapdenton.org. 11am–1pm. Sign up for this workshop focused on building techniques for ages 6–12. $15.

ARTS & CRAFTS

Kimbell Kids Drop-In Studio – Faraway Places Kimbell Art Museum, 3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth. 817/332-8451. kimbellart.org. 1–1:45pm May 6, 20 and 27. Join a gallery activity and related studio art project in the Piano Pavilion Education Studios. For kids 12 and younger and their adult companions. Signup begins one hour before the program. FREE

ON STAGE

SAVE

30!

$

UP TO

ONLY $69 99 PLUS TAX FOR A LIMITED TIME!

Magic Piano Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St., Dallas. 214/443-1000. dallasopera.org/events. 2pm. Listen to the music of Chopin in BreakThru Films’ animated adventure about two children in Warsaw who discover an old piano that becomes their magical ride through the skies above Europe. $10.

ARTS & CRAFTS

Mother’s Day Pottery Painting Northwest Park Recreation Center, 2800 Cheyenne St., Irving. 972/721-2529. cityofirving.org. 11am–3pm. Make mom a one-of-akind gift using your handprint. Register by May 4. Prices vary by item.

RODEO

Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show Cowtown Coliseum, 121 E. Exchange Ave., Fort Worth. 817/625-1025. stockyardsrodeo.com. 2:30 and 4:30pm. Watch trick riding and listen to cowboy songs during a historical re-enactment of the original show. $18.50 adults; $11.50 children.

www.hfalls.com •

fit

northtexaschild / may 2017

27


kid culture /

EVERYDAY

MUSIC

Safari Nights Dallas Zoo, 650 S. R.L. Thornton Fwy., Dallas. 469/554-7500. dallaszoo.com. Activities begin at 5pm; music at 7pm. Watch the zoo’s Animal Adventures and Wonders of the Wild presentations and listen to live music on the Cat Green: Los Texmaniacs on May 6; Petty Theft on May 13; Memphis Soul on May 20; A Hard Night’s Day on May 27. Free with admission: $15 adults; $12 kids 3–11. Free for kids under 2 and zoo members.

PLAYTIME

SPARK! Saturdays SPARK! 1409 S. Lamar St., Ste. 004, Dallas. 214/421-7727. sparkdallas.org. 10am–4pm every Sat. Explore the 6,000-square-foot Climb, Crawl, Slide sculpture and enjoy pop-up activities such as the giant light bright, recycled art, chalk art, poetry magnets and percussion. For kids in second grade and up. $8 per person in advance; $10 at the door.

SPORTS

Strider Cup Race Sundance Square, 420 Main St., Fort Worth. 605/342-0266. striderbikes.com/ fortworth. 8am–4pm. Practice and race on Strider no-pedal balance bikes at this series event for kids 18 months to 5 years and those with special needs of all ages. Note: Only Strider-brand balance bikes are permitted to race and will be available for purchase. $25; free for spectators and special needs. Advance registration required. Free admission to Adventure Zone riding area.

ARTS & CRAFTS

lems in S c Prob hool?

Target First Saturdays Nasher Sculpture Center, 2001 Flora St., Dallas. 214/242-5100. nashersculpturecenter.org. Open 10am–5pm; activities 10am–2pm. Make pattern frames at this family day for preschoolers and elementary-age children. Plus, listen to a story reading, join a yoga session in the garden, and enjoy more family programming. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Disney’s The Lion King Experience See May 4. Mayfest See May 4. Disney’s The Little Mermaid See May 5. Mother’s Day Help-Create Events See May 5. Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach See May 5. Stockyards Championship Rodeo See May 5.

7 SUNDAY NATURE

Neurofeedback Training A medication-free alternative for ADD/ADHD, behavior and learning disorders.

Richard E. Davis, M.S.

Licensed Professional Counselor Nationally certified and 20+ years experience in neurofeedback with children and adults

940-243-7586 817-589-1300 4232 N. I-35, Denton, TX 76207

www.neurotherapyassociatestx.com

28

may 2017 / northtexaschild

Coppell Nature Park Hike Biodiversity Education Center at Coppell Nature Park, 367 Freeport Pkwy., Coppell. 972/304-3581. coppelltx.gov/bec. 1:45 and 2:30pm. Take a 40-minute hike through the park led by a North Texas master naturalist. Registration is required. FREE

RECREATION

CycloDia City Hall parking lot, 215 E. McKinney St., Denton. 940/349-7718. bikewalkdenton.com. 1–5pm. Come to Bike and Walk Denton’s first open streets event when sections of McKinney, Austin and Hickory streets will be closed to traffic for biking, walking and skateboarding. Win helmet giveaways and join an adaptive bike rodeo and fitness classes. FREE

ARTS & CRAFTS

DMA Family Days Dallas Museum of Art, 1717 N. Harwood St., Dallas. 214/922-1200. dma.org/ familydays. 11am–5pm May 7 and 14. Get free admission to the special exhibit México 1900–1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde and enjoy art-making activities, music, bilingual tours and DMA gallery activities for all ages. FREE

ARTS & CRAFTS

Drawing from the Collection for Children The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth. 817/738-9215. themodern.org. 2–3:30pm. Bring a sketchbook and pencils to join informal drawing exercises led by Diamond Gray and Elizabeth Hurtado for ages 5–12. Arrive early and sign up at the information desk. FREE

ARTS & CRAFTS

Wild About Art Dallas Zoo, 650 S. R.L. Thornton Fwy., Dallas. 469/554-7500. dallaszoo.com. 1–3pm. Get creative with a variety of materials and art techniques in an animal-inspired project led by an instructor, then join a zoo tour and meet an animal up close. For ages 5–8. Online registration is required. $15 per participant for zoo members; $20 for nonmembers.

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Crafternoon! Flower Vase Collage See May 3. Disney’s The Lion King Experience See May 4. Mayfest See May 4. Disney’s The Little Mermaid See May 5. Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach See May 5. Blue See May 6.

8 MONDAY ARTS & CRAFTS

Flower Crown Workshop BackYard on Bell, 410 N. Bell Ave., Denton. 940/222-2928. 7feathersdenton. com. 6–8pm. Meet at the family and dog-friendly food truck park to make your own springtime headdress at this craft workshop presented by 7Feathers. Take it home and wear it later to 7Feathers’ May Day Festival on May 13. $5.

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1.

9 TUESDAY BOOKS & AUTHORS

Firecracker Book Club Flower Mound Public Library, 3030 Broadmoor Ln., Flower Mound. 972/874-6167. fmlibrary.net. 4–5pm. Join a book discussion and do related activities for children in third–fifth grades. Call ahead for the month’s featured title. FREE

EDUCATIONAL

Preschool Music Exploration Class South Branch Library, 3228 Teasley Ln., Denton. 940/349-8752. dentonlibrary.com. 10–11am. Discover a variety of instruments during this class with music stations for kids 1–5 years. FREE

NATURE

Seedlings – Nature Painting Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth. 817/392-5510. fwbg.org. 11–11:45am. Bring your own gardening gloves and make works of art using natural materials. For kids ages 4–6. Two kids per caregiver. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1.

10 WEDNESDAY DANCE

Creative Dance Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St., Denton. 940/349-8752. dentonlibrary. com. 10am. Explore the fundamentals of modern dance with imaginative play and short dance exercises. Led by local dance educator Lily Sloan. For children 3–4 and their caregivers. Registration is required. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May


1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Kids Story and Craft Time See May 3. SMG Classics Mother’s Day See May 3.

11 THURSDAY EDUCATIONAL

Science in 30 – Catapults Irving Public Library, multiple locations. irvinglibrary. org. May 11: 4:30–5pm at South Irving Library; May 20: 11–11:30am at West Irving Library; May 24: 4:30–5pm at East Branch Library. Learn about energy and kinetic energy while building and experimenting with your very own catapult. For students ages 4–12. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Twilight Tunes See May 4.

12 FRIDAY ON STAGE

Chickens – The Barnyard Musical Greater Lewisville Community Theatre, 160 W. Main St., Lewisville. 972/221-7469. glct.org. May 12–14, 19–21 and 26–28. Watch this PG-rated musical comedy about a husband and wife who immerse themselves into the world of raising exotic chickens while the roosters and chickens in the coop deal with their own set of pressures. Tickets start at $22.

SPECIAL EVENT

Cookout and Campfire Mustang Park Recreation Center, 2223 Kinwest Pkwy., Irving. 972/556-1334. cityofirving.org/mustang. 7–9pm. Eat a dinner of grilled hamburgers, cheeseburgers and veggie burgers with chips and drinks. Then enjoy s’mores by the campfire while singing karaoke on the big screen. $5 per person.

NATURE

Family Campfire Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area, 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. 972/219-3550. llela.org. 7:45–9:45pm. Watch the sun set and the stars appear at this traditional campfire program with stories, songs and s’mores. Registration is required by 11am May 11. $10 per person, or $30 per family of 4–6 people.

HISTORY

Frontier Forts Muster Stockyards Station, 130 E. Exchange Ave., Fort Worth. 817/625-9715. stockyardsstation.com. May 12–13. Experience an authentic representation of Texas frontier life at this 16th annual event with infantry and artillery demonstrations, streets lined with encampments, and military parades in commemoration of the Chisholm Trail’s 150th anniversary. FREE

MUSIC

Irving Concert Series Whistlestop Plaza, 123 W. Irving Blvd., Irving. 972/721-2501. cityofirving.org. 7–8:45pm. Bring a blanket or chair and listen to live music by T’Monde on May 12 and Big AS$ Brass Band on May 26 in this concert series that features the music of New Orleans. FREE

ARTS & CRAFTS

Mother’s Day Crafts with the Garden Culture Club North Branch Library, 3020 N. Locust St., Denton. 940/349-8752. dentonlibrary.com. 4pm. Show Mom how much you care by making a nature-themed gift. For ages 5–12. FREE

FILM

Movies in the Park Quakertown Park, 321 E. McKinney St., Denton. 940/3498733. dentonparks.com. 8pm activities; movie at 9pm or dusk. Roast marshmallows, make crafts and bring a blanket or chairs to watch Disney’s Moana on an outdoor screen. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Concerts in the Park See May 5. Disney’s The Little Mermaid See May 5. Stockyards Championship Rodeo See May 5.

13 SATURDAY SPORTS

1860s Baseball Game Nash Farm, 626 Ball St., Grapevine. 817/410-3185. nashfarm.org. 6pm. Watch an evening baseball game played according to the rules and customs of the 1860s. Join in or cheer on the teams and enjoy popcorn and lemonade. For all ages. $5.

NATURE

Bird Walk Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area, 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. 972/219-7980. llela.org. 7:30–10am. Bring your binoculars and join an expert birder in exploring prime birding locations along LLELA’s nature trails. For children ages 10 and older. Free with gate entry: $5 per vehicle; cash or check only.

ON EXHIBIT MAY 27! visit fortworthmuseum.org

FITNESS

Buffalo Boogie Fort Worth Nature Center and Refuge, 9601 Fossil Ridge Rd., Fort Worth. 817/392-7410. buffaloboogie.org. 8–11am. Look for live bison

FW Child MAY 2017

northtexaschild / may 2017

29


SLOAN-NTXC Summer.qxp:Layout 1

4/9/17

4:13 PM

Page 1

kid culture /

Check out Summer at

EVERYDAY

grazing in the bison range during this 25th annual event featuring a 10K, 5K and 1-mile fun run through the nature center. Registration includes breakfast, face painting, balloon animals, crafts and expo. $35 on race day. $5 dog registration includes a bandana.

MUSIC

Castle Hills Spring Concert Series Castle Hills Village Shops, 2540 King Arthur Blvd., Lewisville. 972/4106500. castlehillsvillageshops.com. Activities at 6:30pm; music at 7 and 8pm. Get dinner from on-site food trucks and listen to live music while the kids enjoy bounce houses, carnival games and face painters at this third annual concert series. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Disney’s The Little Mermaid See May 5. Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach See May 5. Stockyards Championship Rodeo See May 5. Denton Community Market See May 6. Garden Time for Kids See May 6. Grapevine Fun Trains See May 6. Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show See May 6. Safari Nights See May 6. SPARK! Saturdays See May 6. Chickens See May 12. Frontier Forts Muster See May 12.

14 SUNDAY

DANCE

Break Kids Klyde Warren Park, 2012 Woodall Rodgers Fwy., Dallas. 214/716-4500. klydewarrenpark. org. 12–1pm. Meet under the Muse Family Performance Pavilion for basic breakdancing classes led by Realstreetjams. For kids, teens and adults. FREE

PLAYTIME

Christian Foundation, Experienced Staff, Daily Field Trips, Swim Lessons, Soccer Camp, Science Camp & Theater Camp! 3131 N. O’Connor Rd. • Irving, Texas 75062 972-659-1199 • www.thesloanschool.com

CozbyCon Cozby Library and Community Commons, 177 N. Heartz Rd., Coppell. 972/304-3655. coppelltx.gov/residents/publiclibrary. 12–4pm. Put on your best cosplay outfit to make crafts, shop and play games at the library’s seventh annual comic book and anime convention. Look at the art contest entries and enter for a chance to win door prizes. FREE

SCIENCE

WANT MORE EVENTS? Search our upto-the-minute online calendar by date, location and event type at dfwchild.com.

Discovery Day – Meteorology Perot Museum of Nature and Science at Victory Park, 2201 N. Field St., Dallas. 214/428-5555. perotmuseum.org. 10am–4pm; sneak peek for members only from 9–10am. Learn all about the weather as you create your own storm, explore lightning and make your own weather forecast to become a junior meteorologist for a day. Free with admission: $20 adults; $13 kids 2–17. Free for museum members.

FESTIVAL

CHIROPRACTIC FOR HEALTHY KIDS Enhanced Focus/Concentration Strengthen Immunity Enhance Restful Sleep Accelerate Injury Recovery Improve Balance and Coordination

• • • • •

Natural, healing support for headaches, muscle & joint pain, sports injuries, vertebral subluxations, poor posture SERVICES OFFERED: Chiropractic Adjustments Nutritional Counseling & Support Therapy Modalities & Rehab Massage

• • • •

30

may 2017 / northtexaschild

May Day Festival Denton Plaza near Juice Lab, 508 S. Elm St., Denton. 940/222-2928. 7feathersdenton.com. 4pm–12am. Join this familyfriendly block party with live music on multiple stages, local foods and drinks, craft vendors, live artists and workshops in celebration of the spring season. Proceeds benefit the Denton Animal Support Foundation. $10 per person. $25 for family pack; includes two adults and up to five kids.

ARTS & CRAFTS

Paint and Take Pottery Lee Park Recreation Center, 3000 Pamela Dr., Irving. 972/721-2508. cityofirving. org. 11am–3pm. Register by May 11 to join this craft program; no glazing or firing required. For ages 5 and older. Prices vary per piece.

FESTIVAL

Prairie Day Botanical Research Institute of Texas, 1700 University Dr., Fort Worth. 817/332-4441. brit.org. 9am–3pm. In celebration of BRIT’s 30th anniversary, join this family-friendly festival for bird of prey and reptile demonstrations, Bella’s Story Time for preschoolers, food trucks and kids’ activities including a petting zoo, pony rides and face painting. FREE

HISTORY

Second Saturday Sid Richardson Museum, 309 Main St., Fort Worth. 817/332-6554. sidrichardsonmuseum.org. 2–3pm tour; 3–3:20pm performance. Join a public tour of the museum and stay to watch Roberta Atkins in costume as Nancy Cooper Russell, wife of cowboy artist Charles Russell, in a 20-minute living history performance that highlights the artist’s career. FREE

ARTS & CRAFTS

Second Sunday Funday Irving Arts Center, 3333 N. MacArthur Blvd., Irving. 972/252-2787. irvingartscenter.com. 1–4pm. Commemorate Mother’s Day by creating a project based on famous mothers in art through the ages. Gallery inspiration: Texas & Neighbors exhibition. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Disney’s The Little Mermaid See May 5. Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach See May 5. DMA Family Days See May 7. Chickens See May 12.

15 MONDAY RECREATION

Cycle with the City Parking lot at corner of Oak and Oakland streets, Denton. 940/349-7718. bikewalkdenton.com. 6pm. Bring your bike for the third annual event, a 4- to 5-mile ride led by city staff through the city that highlights completed and upcoming bike projects. Ride is family-friendly and slow-paced. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1.

16 TUESDAY CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1.

17 WEDNESDAY ARTS & CRAFTS

Crafternoon! Button Snails Scrap Denton, 420 S. Bell Ave., Denton. 940/808-1611. scrapdenton.org. 3:30–5:30pm May 17; 1–3pm May 21. Repurpose old CDs and DVDs, loose buttons and other materials to make a summer snail during this make-and-take craft workshop for kids ages 6–12. Walk-ins encouraged. $5 per child.

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Kids Story and Craft Time See May 3. SMG Classics Mother’s Day See May 3.


18 THURSDAY NATURE

Family Fun – Create Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth. 817/392-5510. fwbg.org. 6–7pm. Meet in the Leonard Courtyard outside the Garden Center for this children’s Green Thumb Club program. Learn how to make leaf rubbings and use rubber stamps to make works of art. FREE

DFWCHILD

CAMP FAIR 2017

EDUCATIONAL

STEAM Ahead – Vehicles South Branch Library, 3228 Teasley Ln., Denton. 940/349-8752. dentonlibrary.com. 4pm. Explore energy, simple machines and buoyancy with different vehicles during this program for kids ages 8–11. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Twilight Tunes See May 4.

THANKS for Another Great Year!

19 FRIDAY ON STAGE

Alice in Wonderland Bass Performance Hall, 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth. 877/828-9200. texasballettheater.org. 8pm May 19; 2 and 8pm May 20; 2 and 7pm May 21. Watch a bouncing rabbit, a beguiling cat and a crazy queen in Texas Ballet Theater’s production choreographed by Ben Stevenson and featuring accompaniment by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra. Tickets start at $20.

ARTS & CRAFTS

Late Night at the DMA Dallas Museum of Art, 1717 N. Harwood St., Dallas. 214/922-1200. dma.org. 6pm–12am. Watch the 1944 film María Candelaria, listen to author Susana Martínez Vidal present her book Frida Kahlo – Fashion as the Art of Being and experience more family-friendly entertainment in celebration of the exhibit México 1900–1950. $15; free for kids 11 and younger and DMA members. Some exhibitions require an additional ticket.

FESTIVAL

Main Street Fest Historic Downtown Grapevine, 636 S. Main St., Grapevine. 817/410-3185. grapevinetexasusa.com/mainstreetfest. May 19–21. Take the family to the 33rd annual festival with carnival rides, midway games and a singing contest. Stop by the KidZone for a petting zoo, the Sea Life Aquarium touch pool and Legoland Discovery Center building competition. $7 adults; $5 kids 6–12. Free on Fri until 5pm. $15 weekend pass; $20 souvenir weekend pass.

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Concerts in the Park See May 5. Stockyards Championship Rodeo See May 5. Chickens See May 12. Movies in the Park See May 12.

20 SATURDAY SPECIAL EVENT

20th Annual DFWBaby Fair and Model Search Stonebriar Centre, 2601 Preston Rd., Frisco. 972/447-9188. dfwchild.com/events. 10am–3pm. Register your baby age newborn–12 months for a chance to be the next DFWBaby magazine cover model. Then explore the Baby Fair to register for mommy swag and learn about new products and services. $45 for walk-up registration; $35 in advance.

February 25–26, 2017

EDUCATIONAL

Didn’t make it to Camp Fair this year? See page 19 or visit dfwchild.com to find the perfect summer camp.

Africa Day Celebration Dallas Arboretum, 8525 Garland Rd., Dallas. 214/5156615. dallasarboretum.org. 2–3pm May 20–21. Head to the Marketplace to hear the ZimSculpt team speak about how they celebrate Africa Day in Zimbabwe. $15 adults; $10 kids 3–12.

NATURE

Presenting sponsor

Birding in North Texas Biodiversity Education Center at Coppell Nature Park, 367 Freeport Pkwy., Coppell. 972/304-3581. coppellnaturepark.org. 8–9:45am bird walk; 10am–12pm program. Try to spot some of the 220 species of birds that migrate through the nature center during an early morning bird tour and then stay for an educational program. FREE

ARTS & CRAFTS

HISTORY

Saturday at the Cabin Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area, 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. 972/219-7980. llela.org. 12–3pm. Tour the Minor-Porter log home, smokehouse, dugout and homestead grounds and make an 1870s-era craft during this come-and-go program with docents and local musicians. Free with gate entry: $5 per vehicle; cash or check only.

Supporting sponsors

PHOTOGRAPHY: WILLIAM NEAL

Itty-Bitty Art Amon Carter Museum of American Art, 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth. 817/738-1933. cartermuseum.org. 9:30–10:30am. Bring your baby (up to 11 months) for art-filled experiences in play, creative movement and infant massage, presented in separate sessions. Sign up only for one session per day. Registration opens the first day of the month and fills quickly. FREE

Benefitting

northtexaschild / may 2017

31


kid culture /

EVERYDAY

FESTIVAL

Treat your tadpole to a free kids meal *

Taste of Irving Cimarron Park Recreation Center, 201 Red River Trl., Irving. cityofirving.org. 12–6pm. Check out the culinary demos at this outdoor festival with live music, a craft marketplace and a children’s fun zone featuring face painting, balloon twisting, a climbing wall and giant slide. Free activities; food truck and restaurant items for $5 or less.

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach See May 5. Stockyards Championship Rodeo See May 5. Denton Community Market See May 6. Garden Time for Kids See May 6. Grapevine Fun Trains See May 6. Kimbell Kids Drop-In Studio See May 6. Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show See May 6. Safari Nights See May 6. SPARK! Saturdays See May 6. Science in 30 See May 11. Chickens See May 12. Alice in Wonderland See May 19. Main Street Fest See May 19.

21 SUNDAY RECREATION

Kayak Tour Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area, 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. 972/219-3550. llela.org. 2–4pm. Drift down either McWhorter Creek or the Beaver Pond, both havens for wildlife, during this intro to kayaking and water safety program. For ages 7 and older. Registration is required by 11am the Fri before the program. $20 per person. $5 per vehicle gate fee, cash or check only.

FITNESS

Splash N Dash Water Works Park and Denton Natatorium, 2400 Long Rd., Denton. 214/697-6922. playtri.com/water-splash-n-dash. 8:30am. Register online for this Youth Aquathlon Series event that starts with a ride down the slide and includes different swimming and running distances for kids ages 6–10 and 11–15. Stay for the post-race party with carnival games and sand volleyball. $25 for race participants; $6 for spectators.

Don’t miss our Wednesday Kid’s Nights! Grapevine Mills • 972.539.5001 Rainforestcafe.com

CONTINUING:

*With the purchase of an adult entrée. Not valid with any other offer, discount or promotion including Landry’s Select Club. Offer valid at Grapevine location only.

We’ve Got the Inside Track on Fun. AIR-CONDITIONED FIRST CLASS COACHES

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach See May 5. Chickens See May 12. Crafternoon! Button Snails See May 17. Alice in Wonderland See May 19. Main Street Fest See May 19. Africa Day Celebration See May 20.

22 MONDAY CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1.

23 TUESDAY ON STAGE

Circus 1903 – The Golden Age of Circus Music Hall at Fair Park, 909 First Ave., Dallas. 214/421-5678. dallassummermusicals.org. May 23–28 and May 30–Jun 4. Watch elephants in puppet form, strong men, contortionists and high-wire walkers in a worldwide cast of circus performers in an all-ages show presented by Dallas Summer Musicals. Tickets start at $20.

NATURE

Little Sprouts – Roots Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth. 817/392-5510. fwbg.org. 9:30–10am. Look at the root vegetable carrot and then do gardening tasks. For ages 18–36 months. One child per caregiver. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1.

24 WEDNESDAY NATURE

All About Amphibians Flower Mound Public Library, 3030 Broadmoor Ln., Flower Mound. 972/874-6165. fmlibrary.net. 6:30pm. Listen to a master naturalist discuss traits of frogs, toads, newts, salamanders and caecilians. Then immediately join a frog walk at the Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Center to look and listen for amphibians. For all ages. Call to register. FREE

CONTINUING:

HOP ABOARD the Grapevine Vintage Railroad and ride between Grapevine’s Cotton Belt Depot and the Fort Worth Stockyards, or on the Stockyards Trinity River Ride.* Travel in authentic 1920s Victorian-era coaches.

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Kids Story and Craft Time See May 3. SMG Classics Mother’s Day See May 3. Science in 30 See May 11. Circus 1903 See May 23.

For tickets, schedules and train information visit www.GVRR.com or call 817.410.3185. *Stockyards Trinity River Ride departs from Fort Worth Stockyards Station.

32

MUSIC

Irving Concert Series 4 Kids Irving Soccer Complex, 3585 World Cup Way, Irving.

may 2017 / northtexaschild

23824_GCVB_Child_Mags_May_2016_train_ad_v1.indd 1

25 THURSDAY

4/8/16 4:57 PM


THE SOURCE STORY TIME

Tall Tales Story Time Reunion Tower GeO-Deck, 300 Reunion Blvd. East, Dallas. 214/712-7040. reuniontower.com. 11–11:30am. Take a seat for this story program on the GeO-Deck 470 feet up in the air. For ages 2–5. Call to register. $17 adults; $8 kids 4–12; free for 3 and younger.

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Twilight Tunes See May 4. Circus 1903 See May 23.

26 FRIDAY EDUCATIONAL

Montessori Preschool STEAM Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St., Denton. 940/349-8752. dentonlibrary.com. 9:30am. Experiment with a variety of science projects and materials from certified Montessori instructor Cassidy Fuess. For ages 3–6. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Concerts in the Park See May 5. Stockyards Championship Rodeo See May 5. Chickens See May 12. Irving Concert Series See May 12. Circus 1903 See May 23.

27 SATURDAY EXHIBIT

Adventures with Clifford The Big Red Dog Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, 1600 Gendy St., Fort Worth. 817/255-9300. fwmsh.org/clifford. On view through Sep 24. 10am–5pm Mon–Sat and 12–5pm Sun. Discover the world of Clifford, Emily Elizabeth and all of the residents of Birdwell Island by exploring this children’s exhibit with slides, Clifford’s Doghouse and the Birdwell Island Ferry. Free with admission: $15 adults; $12 youth 2–18. Free for museum members.

EDUCATIONAL

Heroes Day Celebration Dallas Arboretum, 8525 Garland Rd., Dallas. 214/515-6615. dallasarboretum. org. 2–3pm May 27–28. Head to the Marketplace to hear the ZimSculpt team speak about how they celebrate Heroes Day in Zimbabwe. $15 adults; $10 kids 3–12.

NATURE

Stars on the Prairie Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area, 201 E. Jones St., Lewisville. 972/2193550. llela.org. 8:30–10:30pm. Trek through LLELA’s prairie restoration area for a view of the everchanging night sky through the use of binoculars and your naked eye. For ages 5 years and older. Registration is required by 11am on the previous Fri. $10 per person.

EDUCATIONAL

Time to Ride – A Bike Repair Workshop Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St., Denton. 940/349-8752. dentonlibrary.com. 2–4pm. Join Querencia Community Bike Shop’s Karl Gossot for an informative program that covers bike types, basic maintenance, repairs, adjustments and quick checks to get your bike ready for spring. For all ages. Registration is requested. FREE

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach See May 5. Stockyards Championship Rodeo See May 5. Denton Community

Market See May 6. Garden Time for Kids See May 6. Grapevine Fun Trains See May 6. Kimbell Kids Drop-In Studio See May 6. Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show See May 6. Safari Nights See May 6. SPARK! Saturdays See May 6. Chickens See May 12. Circus 1903 See May 23.

We

Come To You!

28 SUNDAY CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show See May 6. Chickens See May 12. Circus 1903 See May 23. Adventures with Clifford The Big Red Dog See May 27. Heroes Day Celebration See May 27.

TEDDY BEAR WORKSHOP! Hand Stuff Your Own Furry Friend! Birthday Parties, Daycares & more

29 MONDAY

www.stuffablepetshop.com

(817) 919-5165

SPECIAL EVENT

Memorial Day Observance Flower Mound Town Hall, 2121 Cross Timbers Rd., Flower Mound. 972/874-6300. flower-mound.com. 9am. Honor the memory of fallen U.S. soldiers at this program featuring keynote speakers, color guard, bagpipers and a wreath presentation. Submissions for the Wall of Honor accepted through May 12. FREE

Parties

Daycares

RECREATION

Churches

Splashtacular Flower Mound Community Activity Center, 1200 Gerault Rd., Flower Mound. 972/8747275. flower-mound.com/cac. 1–5pm. Celebrate the Memorial Day holiday with games and activities at the CAC outdoor water park. Nonresidents: $8 adults; $6 kids. Residents: $6 adults; $4 kids.

Sing-alongs, Stories, Puppets & Fun!

Mr. Willy

CONTINUING:

Singer-Songwriter Children’s Book Author

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Adventures with Clifford The Big Red Dog See May 27.

214-328-2223 www.misterwilly.com misterwilly@msn.com

©

30 TUESDAY PLAYTIME

Puppet Play and Read Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St., Denton. 940/349-8752. dentonlibrary.com. 11am. Help your child’s early literacy skills at this playtime with age-appropriate books matched with puppets for ages 3–5. FREE

• Cognitive Assessment • Cognitive Brain Training • Sensory Integration/Focusing • Visual Math/Algebra Tutoring

CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Circus 1903 See May 23. Adventures with Clifford The Big Red Dog See May 27.

www.MindMenders.net pat_staf@msn.com 214-755-4386

31 WEDNESDAY CONTINUING:

Dora and Diego See May 1. Fort Worth Herd See May 1. The Ultimate Octonauts Experience See May 1. Kids Story and Craft Time See May 3. SMG Classics Mother’s Day See May 3. Circus 1903 See May 23. Adventures with Clifford The Big Red Dog See May 27.

FREE denotes free event admission. Other costs, such as parking, may apply. Times, dates and locations are subject to change. Please call ahead before every event. If you have an event that you’d like us to consider for the next calendar, please go to dfwchild.com and click on calendar to submit your event. Or fax to 972/4470633 by the 10th of the month prior to the month of publication. Events must be open to the public and of interest to families in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Please include name and description of event, address, phone number, website, time, date, cost and age served. We reserve the right to edit or withhold submissions.

Want to see even more events? Search our up-to-the-minute online calendar by date, location and event type at dfwchild.com.

Actors Conservatory Theatre AUDITIONS JUNE 3 & 5

Ads with © are © of Lauren Publications, Inc. 2017.

972/721-2501. cityofirving.org. Gates open at 9am; show at 10am. Come early for playtime on the covered playground. Then dance and sing to the three-piece power pop band Big Bang Boom. Designed for kids ages 5 and younger. FREE

SEE OUR SUMMER

CAMPS FOR AGES 4–18

972-436-8228 / www.GetIntoTheACT.org © northtexaschild / may 2017

33


confessions

“I had taken my 2-yearold to the Perot Museum of Nature and Science with another friend and her son. After putting my son in the car — but before buckling him in — I stood there chatting with the other mom. After about 10 minutes, I opened the door to strap my son in and saw that he had found my pink Sharpie and colored the seats, the steering wheel and the windows.” —MARTHA, DALLAS

mommy fails ILLUSTRATION MARY DUNN

MY DAUGHTER WAS 17 MONTHS OLD WHEN MY SON WAS BORN, AND I WAS SO PROUD OF MYSELF WHEN I WOULD GET ALL THREE OF US OUT THE DOOR. BUT ON TWO SEPARATE OCCASIONS I CAME HOME TO FIND OUR FRONT DOOR WIDE OPEN.”

My 9-year-old twins got a swingset for Christmas, and I think I’ve promised them every weekend we would put it together. Well, I just tripped over it (again!) walking through the front door.” —KRISTY, FORT WORTH “I thought it was a right of passage for a little boy to go tee tee outside in the bushes. So I let him do it a couple of times in our backyard. One day, while I was talking to our neighbor in the front yard, he decided to drop trouser and pee right there.” —NATALIE, DALLAS

—ALEX, DALLAS

Got a parenting fail you’d like to share? We’d love to hear from you. Send it to editorial@dfwchild.com.

34

may 2017 / northtexaschild

“I ran to the bathroom after making my 4-year-old her lunch — eggs and sausage with ketchup to dip. I came back to find her food untouched while she squeezed ketchup into her mouth.” —JEN, HURST

THERE WAS A LITTLE DOUGHNUTSAND-COFFEE SOCIAL AT CHURCH FOLLOWING ONE OF THE SERVICES. WE HAD OUR FIVE CHILDREN PLUS OUR TWO NIECES WITH US. WHEN WE GOT HOME, I REALIZED WE LEFT ONE OF OURS BEHIND.” —MARY, SOUTHLAKE


So today’s dreamers can grow into tomorrow’s doers. When you see the world through the eyes of a child, you don’t see limitations — you see possibilities. At Children’s HealthSM, we believe that sickness should never stand in the way of childhood. For more than 100 years, we’ve been committed to providing the highest quality treatment for the most serious pediatric illnesses. Today, we’re the only area provider to be ranked in all U.S. News & World Report pediatric specialties, the only children’s Level I Trauma Center and the only one with eight care certifications by the Joint Commission. Now as a system, we’re by your side in more ways than ever with 50 specialties, virtual medicine, innovative research and locations throughout North Texas. All because we believe in supporting children who dream as big as we do.

Learn more at childrens.com

NorthTexasChild May 2017  

The Magazine Parents Live by in Denton County

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you