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THE MAGAZINE PARENTS LIVE BY IN DENTON COUNT Y

M A R C H 2018

HOW TO MARIE KONDO YOUR PLAYROOM

WAYS TO WELCOME SPRING PARENTING FAILS YOU’LL RELATE TO

+

MEET MOM NEXT DOOR

TAYLOR TOMASI HILL

WHY YOUR HOUSE MAY BE MAKING YOU SICK

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HEALTHY HOME

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Child Care & Preschool Guide


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Be a part of the celebration and show your support for the kids we care for by changing your porch light or other outside lights to blue the week of our birthday. Get your FREE blue light bulb at select ACE Hardware locations while supplies last. Donations are accepted. For more information, visit cook100years.org.

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pages / M A R C H

2018

FEATURE

16 Home, Toxic Home

Chemicals lurking in your furniture, walls and cleaning supplies could be making your family sick words Heather Duge & Carrie Steingruber

DEPARTMENTS NOTED 7 Extreme Makeover: Playroom Edition

Your kids can help you give their space the Marie Kondo treatment

REAL MOMS 11 Mom Next Door / Taylor Tomasi Hill We chat with the street style star about fashion and life with her little one

14 Routines / Kathy Hoster Get the dirt on the toxic chemicals that may be hiding in your house, p. 16

KID CULTURE 27 The Agenda

ON THE COVER

THE HOME ISSUE

The more the merrier for this Flower Mound mom of 7

Our favorite family events this month Isabella of Irving Photography: Cindy James Hair/Makeup: Jenn Karsner, Wallflower Management Styling: Lauren Niebes

COLUMNS 30 Confessions / Mommy Fails

When bad things happen to good parents

PUBLISHER/ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Joylyn Niebes CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lauren Niebes EDITORIAL Managing Editor Carrie Steingruber

Associate Editor Alexis Manrodt Assistant Editor Lisa Salinas Calendar Editor Elizabeth Smith ART Graphic Designer Susan Horn

Editorial Designer Katie Garza Art Assistant Sara Strugger ADVERTISING Associate Publisher Diana Whitworth Nelson Account Executives Nikki Garrett, Nancy McDaniel,

Kristen Niebes, Sandi Tijerina, Laura Vardell, Kerensa Vest

Promotions Coordinator Beth McGee

Advertising Coordinator Amy Klembara

ADMINISTRATION Business Manager Leah Wagner

PR/MARKETING Audience Development Director Candace Emerson

Office Manager + Distribution Robbie Scott

NorthTexasChild is published monthly by Lauren Publications, Inc. NorthTexasChild is distributed free of charge, one copy per reader. Only NorthTexasChild authorized distributors may deliver or pick up the magazines. Additional or back copies of NorthTexasChild are available for $2 per copy at the offices of Lauren Publications, Inc. We reserve the right to edit, reject or comment editorially on all material contributed. We cannot be responsible for the return of any unsolicited material. NorthTexasChild is Š2018 by Lauren Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without express written permission prohibited.

northtexaschild / march 2018

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M

y twins are almost 7, and their playroom was a wreck. I was side-kicking Legos and Barbie heads inside so I could squeeze the door shut and block off the nightmare. When I turned to my local parenting Facebook page for advice, the name Marie Kondo surfaced. Carmen Falls Hunter, an attorney and Fort Worth mom of three, follows Kondo’s 2014 book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. The Japanese mom has sold millions of copies and was included on Time’s list of 100 most influential people in 2015. The central tenet of Kondo’s method is physically holding every item you own to see if it evokes happiness. If it does, you find a place for it; if it doesn’t, you thank it for its services and then donate or dump it. Her primary rule is also the title of one of her chapters: Sort by Category, Not by Location. “It’s just so practical,” Hunter says. “You take everything out of the room one category at a

northtexaschild / march 2018

7


SPRING BREAK CAMP March 12–18 Grades K–8

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march 2018 / northtexaschild

M A K EOV E R: P L AY R O O M E D I T I O N

time and not worry about who gave it to you favorite glow stick; it reminded her of visiting or where it came from. You just focus on the Grandmother for the Fourth of July. Two joy it brings.” minutes later my son put his tattered baby It may be practical, but the very idea of blanket—one of the first blankets I ever holding every single item in my kids’ playroom bought as a mother—in the Trash pile! was overwhelming. How would I get my kids Hunter’s family also struggled to get rid to help me? Was a 6-year-old of things that were given to even capable of making such them by someone special. heavy decisions? “We had to accept that our READY, After consulting the home could not serve as a experts, three rules proved museum for all these things SORT, GO crucial to Kondo-ing we tied sentimental value to,” How much can your our playroom. she says. “I narrowed it down child contribute? to one box. If it could not fit Gauge their readiness in the box, we would take a 1. TALK TO YOUR based on these four picture of it to remember it KIDS BEFOREHAND. development stages, by and then give it away.” Focus on happiness and the as advised by Sam So my kids and I negotiitems that produce it, but Peters, LPC: ated: I would take a picture tailor your conversation to STAGE 1 (TYPICALLY of the old glow stick, the your child’s maturity. For 1–4 YEARS): Generally not blanket and whatever else example, if you tell your able to fully understand; may brought back happy memo3-year-old that he is never not give accurate responses ries and create a picture when asked if an item makes going to see his neglected them happy. album. That way, we could G.I. Joes again, he might be still be reminded of special reluctant to give them up. STAGE 2 (TYPICALLY 5–6 items without stuffing the Sam Peters, a licensed YEARS): Better able to make sense of the idea that an playroom to the brim. professional counselor in object makes them happy. Lewisville who specializes 3. KEEP IT SIMPLE. in pediatric development, STAGE 3 (TYPICALLY 7–8 I could typically keep the YEARS): Can contextualize explains that a child may and understand that kids focused for 30-minute claim an object still makes something that used to bring intervals, enough time to him happy if he knows the them joy doesn’t anymore. go through 15 to 20 toys, alternative is losing it. STAGE 4 (TYPICALLY 9–12 reminisce and then make the “Typically, the younger YEARS): Can understand critical decision. After two children are, the more degrees of happiness and that long days, our last challenge often you can expect a false something that makes them loomed: finding a place for positive if you tell them that happy could make someone the Keep pile, and making it you are going to give their else even happier. easy for my kids to maintain. belonging away,” Peters says. Valerie Wood, profes“If you don’t tell them what sional organizer for Neat will happen to the object Method in Dallas, believes a child is never too when they say it doesn’t bring them happiyoung to begin keeping her space tidy. “My ness, they may be more likely to give you an 1-year-old, Addison, has color coding all over honest answer.” her room,” she reveals. “Even at her age, she He also says that it’s not necessarily is already able to recognize that red books go about the age of the children but their abilwith red books and blue with blue.” ity to contextualize that determines Wood suggests using bins and how much they can contribute. sorting by texture—woods, If your child is at a higher plastics and foams should developmental level, try explaineach have their own bin, ing the joy he will bring to other for example. “Keeping it as kids by donating his things. simple as possible and not Taking the scary garbage truck getting too detailed will help out of the equation and replacthe child be able to maintain it ing it with a less fortunate little on her own,” she says. boy or girl seemed to help a lot with Telling my son to put up his my kids’ separation anxieties. Lincoln Logs isn’t a painful sentence anymore, as there is a specific place dedicated 2. DON’T LINGER IN MEMORY LANE. to his village-building components. Seriously—don’t even glance that way. It’s been a week since we finished. I’m We started with baby toys and dubbed knocking on wood, but I think this is going three corners as Keep, Donate and Trash. I to stick. Finally, we can stand outside the could not believe the resistance I encountered playroom, breathe deeply, and say, “This when I tried to put a dead glow stick in the brings me happiness.” Trash pile. Turns out, it was my daughter’s

PHOTO COURTESY OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE/TEN SPEED PRESS

noted / E X T R E M E


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real moms. mom next door /

TAYLOR TOMASI HILL style muse to many, mom to one INTERVIEW NICOLE JORDAN PHOTOGRAPHY STEPHEN KARLISCH

I

f Taylor Tomasi Hill’s flaming red hair looks familiar, it’s with good reason— fashion editors have been splashing her no-holds-barred signature style across their magazines and blogs for years. One of the original street style stars and a former fashion editor herself, the Dallas native was an industry name to know long before she took the helm of creative and women’s fashion at Forty Five Ten. “I found my true passion—discovering untapped, emerging talent—when I worked at Teen Vogue,” she says. “I was the first editor that would walk trade shows to find the needle in the haystack.” Perhaps fated to work in the industry, Tomasi Hill grew up helping her parents write orders and unpack samples for their children’s accessories line. After graduating from Pratt Institute with an industrial design degree, she scored an internship at W Magazine, and her love affair with fashion hit a fever pitch. After departing Teen Vogue, Tomasi Hill, 38, spent time in New York at Marie Claire and Moda Operandi, where she transitioned from editorial to the business side of the industry.

northtexaschild / march 2018

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real moms / T A Y L O R

I’M SO GLAD THE STARS ALIGNED AND WE WERE ABLE TO GET TOGETHER! YOUR SCHEDULE IS CRAZY.

I haven’t mastered work-life balance, for sure. A lot of people seem like they have, but I’ll be the first to tell you I don’t have it figured out. DOES THAT GIVE YOU GUILT? I was raised watching

I

WHAT ARE YOUR GO-TO RESTAURANTS IN DALLAS? When I get off the plane

from Paris, my husband and Wells pick me up and we head directly to Mesero to get the salsa in the veins. I also love the Honor Bar and Flower Child. LET’S TALK ABOUT FASHION. WHAT INSPIRES YOU? It’s not just about picking

what I think is cool; it’s about making sure we’re catering to women and their bodies—not what color is in or what style of jean is of the moment. Having a oneWANT WELLS on-one with a woman and her TO SEE HIS leaving feeling thrilled and confident is what inspires me.

MOM AS A HARDWORKING PERSON, WHO REALLY DOES CONTRIBUTE TO THE FAMILY.

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Feeling burned out, she launched TTH Blooms, a floral design company, in 2013. But when Forty Five Ten came calling, she knew it was time to return to her roots. In 2016, Tomasi Hill moved back to Dallas with her husband of 10 years, Chase, and their son, Wells, now 3. She was named vice president, creative and women’s fashion director of Forty Five Ten and got back to doing what she does best: finding the next big thing.

both my parents work late hours. At the time, it may have felt lonely. But looking back I realize that’s what shaped my work ethic. I want Wells to see his mom as a hardworking person, who really does contribute to the family. SINCE HAVING WELLS, HAS YOUR TRAVEL SLOWED DOWN AT ALL? At the

moment, not so much. Am I working on that? One-hundred percent. It’s not worth it to miss certain moments. I miss his birthday every year because I have to go to fashion week. That’s a tough one.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU OFFER TO OTHER WORKING MOMS? We all have to be a

little easier on ourselves. I hold myself to a high standard, and I’m a perfectionist. But we need to give ourselves credit for everything we juggle.

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DO YOU HAVE A PHILOSOPHY ON PARENTING? We all lead by example. When

I was growing up, my father would go out to his old ’79 Porsche, put on his driving gloves, heat up the car and take me to school. And every single morning he’d tell me, “Be nice to everyone. Everyone is here for a reason. Be a leader and choose your own path.” I preach that to my son. HOW DO YOU TAKE TIME FOR YOURSELF? I wish I were better at that … OK, DO YOU TAKE TIME FOR YOURSELF? I just started going to [facialist]

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march 2018 / northtexaschild

TOMASI HILL

Joanna Czech. The two times I’ve gone I’ve fallen asleep on the table. I’ve been pretty routine about my Bikram yoga practice. I’ve been doing it for 20 years on and off. It’s the only thing that holds my attention.

WHAT IS YOUR ETHOS WHEN IT COMES TO WELLNESS? DO YOU HAVE ONE? When

I travel, I allow myself to eat whatever I want. I had french fries almost every night in Paris. But I’m pretty good about what I eat at home. Lots of ginger shots.

AND YOUR OWN STYLE?

I like to try everything in new and different ways. I often look back and see that 75 percent of what I wore was awful, but it’s fun to just play with fashion. DO YOU HAVE A STYLE ICON? I try not to have too

many references. I want to be genuine. The magic happens when you’re not trying to replicate something. We can help assist you in what works for your body, but it’s not about copying.

DID HAVING WELLS CHANGE HOW YOU GET DRESSED IN THE MORNING? Maybe a

little bit because my hips grew. They did not go back—nope, that’s a lie. My right foot also grew so some of my shoes hurt. I often wear the same thing two days in a row—and I fully own it. I don’t know why you wouldn’t. You can’t plan your life with a child. It worked yesterday so let’s just throw it on again. THAT’S CALLED EFFICIENCY. Exactly! And I am not afraid to admit it. WHAT’S YOUR APPROACH TO DRESSING WELLS? I was adamant about hand-me-

downs and still am. But the website Maisonette completely changed—not changed, tweaked—my hand-me-down philosophy. It’s very well edited. I get caught in a bit of a black hole when I’m on their site late at night. WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU FELT LIKE YOU NAILED IT PROFESSIONALLY?

I don’t know about nailed it, but I’m very excited about the fact that we’re working with Kirsty Hume, an incredible model from the ’90s. She’s a mom and embraces being natural. She can speak volumes to our customer. I’m thrilled that we got her. That was a real win. AND PERSONALLY? Getting through every day—at the end of the day, when I get to have a glass of wine. Or if I can get through half of my emails, that’s a major win. Editor’s Note: As this issue went to press, it was announced that Taylor Tomasi Hill and Forty Five Ten had parted ways. We can’t wait to see what she does (and wears) next.


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13


a tuesday in the life of

KATHY HOSTER Kathy Hoster lives in Flower Mound with her husband of 25 years, Jeff. When she’s not working on the women’s ministry team at church, she home-schools five of her seven children: Elizabeth, 17; Philip, 15; James, 14; David, 12; and Luke, 10. Her oldest sons Andrew, 20, and Michael, 19, attend Liberty University in Virginia.

5

:50AM Jeff wakes for his Bible study session on Skype. I’m able to sleep a little longer. 8:45AM Kids are stirring from a late night. We stayed up watching old family videos way too late. 9:15AM It’s a slow start today. Morning coffee and quiet time while kids get dressed and have breakfast. 9:35AM I step outside for fresh air. My oldest child, Andrew, has a big philosophy test today so I text to let him know that I am praying for him. 9:45AM Kids take their laundry baskets to their rooms. The younger two, David and Luke, keep singing out loud as they put away their laundry. I try to keep them quiet since Elizabeth and Philip are reading and Jeff is on the phone. The kids move on to work on independent lessons while I float around helping with various subjects. 10:20AM Jeff comes upstairs between calls to talk as I sit at the table working with the boys. 11:06AM I enjoy a warm cup of green tea with honey while James reads The Sign of the Beaver aloud. I love to hear his inflection as he reads the different character voices.

Luke and David are on the floor with Legos, taking a break between subjects. Philip works on driver’s education while Elizabeth works on geometry. As I observe my kids, I’m distracted for a moment by all that needs to be done around the house since we moved here just three months ago. 11:48AM We move on to our audio history class, and I listen about freedom in South America in the early 1800s. 12:23PM Leftovers for lunch: pizza, deer chili, or chicken and vegetable bone broth soup. I’m thankful for easy choices today. I take a moment to listen to Philip playing the piano. 1:15PM I help Luke and David make copies for a small neighborhood business they started together. It’s a full-on craft session as the other kids work on decorating cards. I clean up lunch and respond to a few emails. 2:35PM I walk away from all the glitter to do science with my youngest two. David reads aloud about the Kuiper Belt before Luke reads about Pluto. Physics, chemistry and pre-algebra studies are going on in other spots. I help the boys set up a science experiment to make clouds. They like it so much that they repeat it several times. 3:00PM We all gather in the living room to watch a history DVD about personal stories in World War I—a great depiction to experience beyond a textbook. 3:50PM I call to schedule seven dentist appointments. I don’t know why making appointments hangs over my head like a dark cloud. The logistics of getting all nine of us scheduled is never easy. Elizabeth leaves with the younger boys to run errands, and I leave shortly after to do the same. Jeff, working from home, stays with the rest of the kids. I check with my mom to see if my parents will come for dinner tomorrow. 5:11PM I’m back home looking around the kitchen—still full of dishes from lunch, strawberries drying in order to be dipped in chocolate, muffins to bake for tomorrow’s breakfast and 20 bags of pretzels and saltines needing to be transformed into special snacks for the choir mission trip bake sale. 5:54PM I find taco meat in the freezer and decide to make soft tacos for dinner tonight. Elizabeth and David are making the muffins. I dip the strawberries and Philip finishes off the chocolate-covered pretzels.     6:30PM The younger boys play basketball in the driveway, Elizabeth plays the piano and I talk with Andrew on the phone while I clean dishes in the kitchen. He got the package I mailed him. 7:00PM We all eat dinner together, and then relax together and watch the Olympics.   8:13PM I visit with Elizabeth in her room, and then text my second oldest child, Michael, to see if he’s feeling better.

Diaries are penned by moms (and dads) in the North Texas area. The authors volunteer to share a day of their choosing and are not paid or endorsed by NorthTexasChild. Send your diary to editorial@dfwchild.com. All submissions are subject to editing and may be cut for space. 14

march 2018 / northtexaschild

PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHY HOSTER

real moms / R O U T I N E S


the fine

print

WHAT SHE’S READING Discerning the Voice of God by Priscilla Shirer RESTAURANT SHE FREQUENTS AS A FAMILY

Does Chick-Fil-A count? FAVORITE DATE NIGHT SPOT La Madeleine BEVERAGE OF CHOICE Sweet tea, but I’m trying to give up sugar—so water wins WORDS SHE LIVES BY Don’t repay a wrong for a wrong BEAUTY PRODUCT SHE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT Coconut oil and frankincense for my face and Burt’s Bees for my lipstick FAVORITE SCENT my essential oils (unless frying bacon and coffee count) GO-TO UNIFORM Jeans, a flannel shirt or T-shirt, and Birkenstocks BY HER BED my Bible, some oils, a water bottle, hand lotion and a wedding picture MOTHERHOOD IN FIVE WORDS Blessed, thankful, crazy, hard, rewarding SHE WISHES SHE HAD MORE TIME TO get caught up, write LOOKING FORWARD TO taking Elizabeth to Virginia to visit the boys at Liberty and our 25th wedding anniversary trip to Hawaii FAVORITE GIFT TO GIVE FRIENDS my essential oil diffuser necklaces I make from organic cedar wood from the ranch.

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8:40PM I walk on the treadmill. I wanted to walk outside today with the kids but school and life kept me inside. 9:00PM I plan our dinner for tomorrow, which will be a larger-than-normal meal. In addition to my parents, we are having a family of six over for dinner. A friend of mine lost her battle with cancer, leaving behind five children, so we want to love on them as much as possible. 9:18PM I rinse the dishes while the rest of the family pitches in to pick up around the house for our friends tomorrow. 9:45PM Kids take showers and get ready for bed, which takes some coordination. It takes time with all of us sharing bathrooms. 10:30PM We hold an impromptu family meeting then pray together. 10:48PM I clean up around the house while Jeff cleans toilets. I am thankful for his help. 11:00PM I shower and get ready for bed while Jeff checks to make sure kids’ electronics are in the kitchen for curfew. 12:15AM I turn off the lights, lay my head on my pillow and thank God for another day.

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northtexaschild / march 2018

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HOME,

HOME 16

march 2018 / northtexaschild

©ISTOCK.COM/VASILIKI/UNIZYNE

TOXIC


Chemicals lurking in your furniture, walls and cleaning supplies could be making your family sick WORDS HEATHER DUGE & CARRIE STEINGRUBER

R

EBECCA BLACK HAS ALWAYS BEEN A PROBLEM-SOLVER.

So when her son, Barron, now 10, was diagnosed with autism in 2009, her fix-it mentality kicked in: After diving into research on autism, Black, 40, decided their Highland Park home needed to be gutted. Built in 1915, the house had been renovated several times, but Black suspected that behind the walls lurked mold, a toxin that can cause developmental delays. Testing confirmed Black’s suspicions: Mold was found between the framing of the house and the brick. She also found out the paint on the outside of the house contained lead. “When your child is struggling, everything is a big deal,” Black says. In addition to developmental challenges, Barron was “covered in rashes” and had eczema and stomach problems. Black’s daughter, Avery, was experiencing severe sinus issues. “I didn’t want one thing on my house that had touched lead paint,” Black says. But as Black found during the 18-month renovation, mold and lead were just the first two ingredients in the chemical cocktail cooking in their home. Average Americans spend 90 percent of their life indoors, much of that time at home, says Samantha Dunne, sustainable designer and process analyst at TreeHouse in Dallas. “We are breathing in and exposed to whatever toxins are within our walls,” she explains. That’s especially scary considering that furniture, cookware and even your shower curtain can contain chemicals like phthalates, formaldehyde and other carcinogens—yet many of us aren’t even aware of these toxins or the ways they are damaging our family’s health. “Effects from exposure to these toxins can show up in subtle ways, such as coughing, sneezing or an itchy throat—essentially indoor allergies,” Dunne says. “However, effects can also be much worse—causing headaches, chronic migraines, asthma, increased risk of cancer, and even damage to the kidneys and central nervous system.”

Erin Maxwell, NMD, a naturopathic doctor with a practice in Lewisville, adds that many of the toxins found in homes can affect children’s behavior. “A child might be hyperactive if he comes in contact with certain chemicals,” she explains. Maxwell reveals she’s seeing a “significant increase of toxins in the home.” Yet these substances are often scantily regulated and poorly labeled so parents often have no idea their families are at risk—or how to go about coming clean. TOTAL DETOX

Black’s family of four moved out in 2010 and began the process of making their craftsman home toxin-free from top to bottom, starting with the wood. Like most manufactured products, composite wood off-gasses, or releases harmful chemicals, as it breathes and expands—think that “new” smell. Formaldehyde is the most common output. At low levels, it causes irritation; at higher levels, it’s a known carcinogen. In 2016, the EPA published a new rule on formaldehyde emission standards to limit the offgassing potential of composite wood—the results of a yearslong research process after the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products Act was passed by Congress in 2010—but the rule doesn’t take effect until December of this year. Black checked every piece of wood entering her home to ensure it came straight from the lumberyard. But she says some wood used in the new framing may have been manufactured to allow it to bear more weight, an opportunity for formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to be introduced into the wood—and from there, into the air inside her home. “The best way to fight off-gassing if these toxins are in materials is to let them breathe,” Black explains. “We not only allowed the wood to breathe for six weeks, but we also soaked it with water hoses to speed along any offgassing in order to rid the wood of toxins prior to walling the house.”

northtexaschild / march 2018

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The Blacks’ new floors are made of repurposed wood, which has had years to off-gas toxins, and solid pine, which is natural and untreated. And Black made sure all that craftsman carpentry was sealed with beeswax instead of traditional sealant, another off-gassing culprit. (To fight water stains without a traditional sealant, the Blacks found an unlikely but safe water stain remover: mayonnaise.) Her new stone countertops are natural and untreated too—just like wood, stone off-gases toxins if they are present. “Your family eats food prepared and served from countertops,” Black says. So instead of serving supper with a side of toxins, she chose 100 percent natural stone that doesn’t have toxins to off-gas. Black filled the house with organic furniture and mattresses that are clean of flame retardants and stain- and waterproofing materials. Though many furniture manufacturers have phased out harmful flame retardants since California law stopped requiring them in 2014, the foam in older furniture may still harbor carcinogens that offgas and make their way into the dust floating around your home. And the polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs or PFCs) used to repel water and stains are still found in some consumer goods, even though research has suggested links to cancer, developmental problems and higher cholesterol. In other words, it may be a good idea to skip the flea market and invest in a nontoxic slipcover.

To cover the floors, Black sprang for 100 percent woven wool rugs without fire-retardant chemicals and special carpet tiles that are woven together—no need for toxic glues. All the walls sport zero-VOC paint as opposed to enamel-based color that off-gases for years. “The paint is not as convenient since it’s flat and shows fingerprints, but it’s all worth it,” Black says. That’s because the Blacks noticed a difference in their health almost immediately when they moved back in. Allergies that were a constant issue now only flare up on occasion, Black says, and Avery, now 11, rarely experiences sinus problems. Barron’s autism hasn’t gone away—he still has anxiety and auditory processing issues—but his random rashes and eczema disappeared along with his chronic ear infections. “Did our nontoxic renovation aid in some of the healing that is necessary when raising a child with autism to enable him to see gains like typical children? Absolutely,” she says. “Living in a toxic home was adding weight to all of us. For Barron, the weight was too much on top of the load he was already carrying.”

step one. Ironically, the myriad sprays, wipes, detergents and even scented candles we use to keep our homes clean and fresh can do exactly the opposite. For example, candles made from paraffin wax produce harmful benzene and toluene when burned. Maxwell points out that benzene, which has been linked to leukemia and breast cancer, can also be found in glue, furniture wax and detergent. Suspect ingredients like benzene are the reason Black uses mostly vinegar to clean her toxin-free home, plus an all-purpose cleaner from the Young Living essential oils line. In fact, oils are diffused throughout the house daily instead of scented candles, which now give the family severe headaches. Preston Hollow mom Jennifer Helms, 47, has overhauled her clean routine too. Before, the mom of two found herself at the pediatrician’s office all too often with her son, Jack, who had problems ranging from chronic ear infections and stomach pain to developmental challenges like feeding issues and sensory sensitivities to infections like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rotavirus. After years of doctors and therapists, and no real remedy, Helms looked to her chemical cabinet.

“Since the FDA does not regulate these products, thousands of chemicals can be hidden in them without people realizing it.”

KEEPING IT CLEAN

Creating a toxin-free home is only

“My husband, John, and I had childproofed the home with locks on cabinets to keep Jack and Grace away from products like Windex and bleach, and I began thinking why we even had those products in the first place,” Helms recalls. “It never occurred to me back then that there might be safer product choices that would not harm my children.” Her own research and consultation with an osteopathic doctor revealed that the toxins in her everyday household products could be contributing to her son’s neurological, developmental and immune system challenges. Mary Ann Block, DO, medical director of The Block Center in Hurst, says fragrances found in detergents can wreak havoc on the body. “These petroleum products are manipulated to smell better,” she says. “Since the FDA does not regulate these products, thousands of chemicals can be hidden in them without people realizing it.” It’s true: The Food and Drug Administration and the Consumer Product Safety Commission have banned very few chemicals, and new ingredients are innocent until proven guilty by the government. For now, there are also limited labeling requirements for household products, making it hard for consumers to spot harmful ingredients—especially fragrance components, which have historically been included within the unhelpful catchall “fragrance.” That could be changing in the next few years. California passed a law in October that requires manufacturers to list certain chemical

CHEAP TRICKS

Don’t have the budget for a total reno? Erin Maxwell, NMD, a naturopathic doctor who practices in Lewisville, offers these low-cost tips for detoxing your home: » » LE AR N T O R EA D L A BE L S. The first item listed is the most potent, and the density decreases as you go down the list. Research the ingredients before buying. For example, MSG (also labeled as glutamic acid and monosodium glutamate) can cause ADD-like symptoms in children. » » SW I T C H O UT P L A S T I C containers for glass or stainless steel. » » M A KE Y O UR O W N CL E A N I N G PR OD U C TS with vinegar, water, baking soda and lemon juice. » » T A KE Y O UR S H O ES OF F AT THE D OOR. All kinds of toxins, including pesticides, collect on the bottom of your shoes and hitch a ride into your home. » » LE AV E D R Y C L EA N I NG I N THE G AR AG E for a week to allow the chemicals to off-gas. » » WA T C H W H A T Y O U E AT. The environment at home also includes what you put into your body. The fresher the food, the better it is for you.

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march 2018 / northtexaschild


ingredients in household products right on the label beginning in 2021. (Cleaners are included, but personal care products like shampoo are not.) New York is working on a similar initiative, and the new rules are likely to be followed nationwide. In the face of consumer calls for transparency, SC Johnson (maker of Glade) and other companies have voluntarily begun publishing detailed ingredient lists for the fragrances in their products. Though transparent labeling will help savvy parents avoid cleaning supplies and scented candles with unwanted toxins, it may take longer for those toxins to exit the market entirely. Progress was made in June 2016 when the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act was passed to reform the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), a law that famously didn’t even confer the power to ban asbestos. Now all new and existing chemicals must be evaluated for health risks by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and companies can’t necessarily hide behind claims of confidentiality and proprietary recipes. The EPA has already begun prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment (asbestos was high on the list), but considering there are about 85,000 chemicals in the TSCA inventory, removing all toxins from the grocery store shelves won’t be a quick process. ON A MISSION

In the meantime, Block explains, many people just don’t know how these ingredients are affecting them. At The Block Center, she has treated many patients who did not realize their health conditions were caused by their environment until they removed toxins from their homes. She says some patients who had been taking asthma medication no longer needed it after cleaning up their environment. “The improvement once these products are removed can be very dramatic,” she says.

Yes and NO

Eco-healthy design store TreeHouse and Highland Park mom Rebecca Black give their take on products to buy and products to avoid to keep your home healthy.

Use This

Instead of This

Plant-based cleaners and detergents Recommended brands: Ecos, Eco Nuts, Nellies AllNatural, Babyganics, Seventh Generation

Keep away from artificially scented products, chemical-based products and limit exposure to antibacterial products, as they can actually weaken your immune system.

CARB II compliant (California Air Resources Board Phase 2), NAUF (no added urea formaldehyde) or no VOC (volatile organic compound) flooring and installation material Recommended brands: Kährs, Tesoro Woods, Cali Bamboo Recommended types: cork, bamboo, engineered wood

Consider price and company mission when purchasing flooring. Unrealistically low prices or strong-smelling products often indicate shortcuts taken during the manufacturing stage—largely possible due to dependence on hazardous chemicals.

Low or zero VOC cabinetry options and countertops that are installed with low-VOC adhesives and don’t require sealing. Recommended brands: Crystal Cabinet Works, Caesarstone (countertops), Dekton (surfaces)

Typically, off-the-shelf cabinets have years of off-gassing to cycle through before they can be considered healthy. Do your homework before you invest in a cabinet line. Countertops made from granite or other porous materials require sealing and are often installed with toxic adhesives.

Organic furniture with nontoxic foam Recommended stores: Verellen, Lee

Buy newer models. Furniture produced before 2013 probably contains flame-retardant chemicals.

To cook

Kitchenware that minimizes exposure to toxins Recommended materials: ceramic, cast iron, stainless steel

Kitchenware containing BPA or PFCs (nonstick chemicals) and a lack of ventilation while cooking increases your exposure to toxins.

To paint a room

Zero-VOC paint by companies that provide clear and thorough product safety sheets demonstrating they meet the requirement of 5 grams per liter or less. There are alternative all-natural paints to consider as well, such as all-natural mineral paint and clay plaster. Recommended brands: Dunn-Edwards (latex), Mythic (latex), American Clay (plaster), Romabio (mineral)

Not all zero-VOC paints are equal. Be sure to check product safety sheets. If the company does not have them easily accessible to customers, question the integrity of their zero-VOC claim and move on to a more transparent brand.

To freshen the air

Indoor plants and HEPA air purifiers will help to keep your indoor air clean and smelling good. Invest in airsealing services that seal off all the duct work and wall penetrations to prevent the transfer of unhealthy attic air to the living space. Recommended brands: Austin Air, Airmega, Fresh Wave

Artificially scented sprays and petroleumbased candles simply add more toxins to the air and mask odors instead of eliminating them. Additionally, unless fans are used in conjunction with air purifiers, they simply push bad air around.

To clean your home To redo your floor

To remodel your kitchen To furnish your home

Five years ago, Helms slowly started detoxing her family’s home and implemented dietary changes to clean up their eating habits too. Soon she noticed that the monthly doctor visits became more spread out. Daily trips to the school nurse ended. Over time, many of her son’s chronic issues have become nearly nonexistent. Jack, now 14, sees the doctor once a year for his annual checkup.  “It was shocking the difference all of it made,” Helms says. “I kept

thinking if someone could have taught me how to eliminate toxins and provided me with a list, it wouldn’t have taken so long.” Helms’ wish for specialized detox services led her to leave her 18-year career as a lawyer to start Cleerlife, a company with a mission to teach people how to reduce toxins in their homes. Helms and her business partner research brands in order to sell safe products—they’re expert label readers, clueing in other moms to the meaning of confusing terms like “fragrance-free”

and “unscented.” (The former means no fragrance has been added, while the latter means a chemical has been added to mask the smell.) “We meet people where they are, understanding that everyone doesn’t have the means to renovate their home,” she says. “And we know that children can’t live in a bubble, but as a mom, if you can control the home environment, even small changes like toxin-free laundry detergent and cleaners can make a big difference.” northtexaschild / march 2018

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972-869-9145 missbloomingdales.com northtexaschild / march 2018

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BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BESTSummer EVER EPIC SUMMER PLANNING STARTS HERE

The #1 Summer STEM Camp Learn new skills and discover a passion for technology! At iD Tech, students ages 7–18 learn to code apps, design video games, learn programming with Roblox, mod Minecraft, engineer robots, discover cyber security, create levels in virtual reality, build websites, create 3D-print objects and much more. In each weeklong session, students explore a top campus, learn from top-tier instructors, create an impressive project and build in-demand skills that last long after summer. Campers are taught in small groups of just an average of eight students per instructor for the most personalized instruction. 1-844-788-1858 info@idtech.com www.iDTechCamps.com

While most programs are weeklong (overnight stays optional at many locations), teens can enroll in two-week, pre-college academies for the most immersive, in-depth instruction. Join us this summer to see why over 300,000 camp alumni can’t stop talking about iD Tech summer camps. Visit www.iDTechCamps.com or call 1-844-788-1858 to find the right program for your student.

Summer just got more awesome!

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iD Tech summer programs are held at 150 prestigious campuses nationwide, including Westlake Academy, The University of Texas at Dallas, TCU, SMU, Rice, Stanford, MIT and more.

march 2018 / northtexaschild

The shores of Grapevine Lake can be your child’s next summer adventure — full of watersports, wilderness skills, camp games, archery and so much more! Dove Creek Day Camp offers your child the experience of overnight camp without the hassle of packing for a full week. Multi-child and multi-week discounts are available for families. We can’t wait to see you this summer for all the fun we have planned! Visit GoGrapevine.com/DoveCreek for dates, times and complete details. Dove Creek — DFW’s all day adventure Day Camp!


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

It’s Your Child’s Summer to Shine! Boost your child’s creativity, confidence and talent.

14340 Proton Rd. Dallas, TX 75244 972-239-8598 www.westwoodschool.org/summer

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

The Westwood School Summer Camps are designed for MORE FUN at every age! An exciting daily schedule to include art, games, cooking & more. A special guest each week and Pizza/Splash Fridays. Session themes such as Chef’s Showcase, Mad Science, Make It Take It Art, Circus Theater, Kid Nation, Lego Engineering, Around the World & The Great Outdoors. Camp times: 9am–12pm or 9am–3pm, plus Extended Day & Childcare available. Contact Ellen Woodbridge: EWoodbridge@westwoodschool.org. Register by May 1st for $50 Early Bird Discount.

YMCA Camp Grady Spruce promotes Caring, Honesty, Respect and Responsibility through faithbased character-building activities that encourage campers to establish their own identities. Campers discover their confidence when they face their fears, try, try again and achieve!

3000 Park Rd. 36 Graford, TX 76449 214-319-9944 ccunningham@ymcadallas.org

Whether your camper is learning to jump the wake on water skis, building up the confidence to ride a horse or hitting a bull’s-eye in archery, Camp Grady Spruce is the place for your child. Parents appreciate a child that returns home more mature and independent with a better ability to problem solve. Campers leave with friendships that will last a lifetime and memories that will tide them over until they can return the following year!

Animals • Science • Adventure There is no better place for an animal lover! Camp is home to more than 300 animals including lemurs, llamas, miniature horses, cats & dogs, hedgehogs, wallabies and that’s only a few! There are over 100 hands-on activities campers may choose to do while at camp:

Cub Creek Science & Animal Camp Rolla, Missouri 573-458-2125 • www.MoScienceCamp.com

3000 Waketon Rd. Flower Mound, TX 75028 972-355-9988 www.winkids.net

• Animal Care • Culinary Science • Pottery • Veterinary Medicine • Crime Science • Arts & Crafts • Survival Skills • Ropes Course • Archery Spend just a week making friends and memories that will last a lifetime!

Win Kids…famous for first-class summer camps for children. From themes like Kritter Kids to Ninja Warriors, Police and Fire and more, our caring teachers will treat your child to the super-fun camps we are famous for! Come experience sports and fitness “The Win Kids Way!” Your child will be handled with love in a high-quality environment! Ages 2½–12. Full and half-day options. Camps fill fast so enroll early. Enrollment begins March 5th. northtexaschild / march 2018

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPRING FAMILY FUN D I R E C T O R Y

Spring is just around the corner. So shed your winter coats, grab the kids and check out all the season has to offer.

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COMPANY NAME

DETAILS

Actors Conservatory Theatre getintotheact.org 972/436-8228

Bring your kiddos to see a live stage production of Winnie the Pooh Kids during spring break, complete with singing and dancing! March 17–18. Tickets $5, available on our website after March 12. See ad on page 8.

Adventure Kids Playcare adventurekidsplaycare.com 214/295-5877

Adventure Kids Playcare is a unique drop-in childcare and entertainment center for kids ages 6 weeks to 12 years old with theme nights, spring break camp, summer camps, daily activities, STEAM and more! See ad on page 8.

City of Highland Village hvparks.com 972/317-7430

Family Campout, April 21–22. Pack up your family and head to Pilot Knoll Park for fun activities, contests and a movie. $50/campsite. Register by April 13. Visit hvparks.com for the schedule and registration. See ad on page 15.

City of Lewisville cityoflewisville.com 972/219-5061

31st Annual Funny Bunny Festival, Toyota of Lewisville Railroad Park Baseball Complex, 1301 S. Railroad St., Saturday, March 24, 9:30am–12:30pm. Free! Egg hunts, face painting, petting zoo, pancake breakfast and much more. See ad on page 13.

ColorPalooza lewisvillecolorpalooza.com 972/219-3401

ColorPalooza is a free event in Old Town Lewisville. It includes a tie dye t-shirt station, music and dance performances, rides for kids and the Chalk This Way chalk art competition. April 14, 10 am–5pm. See ad on page 6.

Denton Community Market dentonmarket.org 940/268-4326

April 7 is opening day of the Denton Community Market. Local farm products, art, music, cooking demonstration, 9am–1pm! Family/pet-friendly. Opening Day music: Platos Theory, Brendan Malloy and Joel White Duo, Alton Bridge, Slightly Highly Lovely.

march 2018 / northtexaschild


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

COMPANY NAME

DETAILS

Denton Parks and Rec dentonparks.com 940/349-7275

Free Easter Eggstravaganza, Saturday, March 31, at Quakertown Park and Denton Civic Center. 9:30–11:30am, bounce house fun, arts and crafts, and 10:45am magic show. The Easter egg hunt begins promptly at 11:30am. See ad on page 2.

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History fortworthmuseum.org 817/255-9300

Have a rockin' good time at the Museum! Explore the science of sound in our newest exhibit, GUITAR: The Instrument That Rocked The World, and experience America's Musical Journey in the Omni Theater. See ad on page 13.

Fort Worth Zoo fortworthzoo.org 817/759-7555

Zoo Run — Race Day: April 7. Join the stampede by participating in a 1k or 5k race and help support our education and conservation efforts. For more info and to register, please visit: fortworthzoo.org. See ad on page 6.

Frank Buck Zoo frankbuckzoo.com 940/668-4539

In celebration of Frank Buck’s birthday, admission is just $2 for everyone on March 14 only. Join us at 1pm for free birthday cake while it lasts!

Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau grapevinetexasusa.com 800/457-6338

Hop over to Grapevine for family-friendly fun this spring! Enjoy activities including vintage train excursions, experience history coming alive at interactive heritage workshops and events, catch a movie and so much more. See ad on page 13.

Irving Arts Center irvingartscenter.com 972/252-7558

Irving Arts Center is home to two theaters, four galleries and an outdoor sculpture garden. Year-round youth and family programs include story times, Art Adventure camps, live performances and Second Sundays Family Fundays. See ad on page 15.

Keep Denton Beautiful, Inc. kdb.org 940/349-8737

Keep Denton Beautiful hosts the 25th Annual Denton Redbud Festival, Saturday, April 21, at the Denton Civic Center, 321 E. McKinney St., 10am–4pm. This event features fun for all ages!

Kemah Boardwalk kemahboardwalk.com 281/535-8100

Spring break at the Kemah Boardwalk just 40 minutes south of Houston! Bring the family for waterfront dining, live music and amusement rides. Weekend Adventure Passes available for unlimited visits. Purchase online today. See ad on page 26.

Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area (LLELA) llela.org 972/219-3550

At LLELA, families can enjoy hiking, camping, fishing and exploring through 2,600 acres of marshland, forest and prairie. With guided nature walks, kayak tours and interpretive programs, you can confidently discover nature with your family. See ad on page 9.

Museum of the American Railroad museumoftheamericanrailroad.org 866/468-7630

Join us at Day Out with Thomas in downtown Grapevine! Enjoy family fun, activities, train ride with Thomas and more. Meet Sir Topham Hatt. For tickets, phone 866-468-7630 or visit historictrains.org. #HistoricTrains #GrapevineTX #ThomasAndFriends #DayOutWithThomas

northtexaschild / march 2018

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o t y a w a t Ge

MAKE THE KEMAH BOARDWALK YOUR FAVORITE DESTINATION

Waterfront Restaurants • Boutique Hotel • Amusement Rides Stingray Reef & Exhibits • Boardwalk FantaSea Yacht Dinner Cruises Live Entertainment • Speedboat Thrill Ride • Banquet Rooms Iron Eagle Zipline • Unique Retail Stores • Midway Games Arcade • Special Events • Marina

Stay the weekend! 281.334.9880

2018 C A L E N D A R O F EV E N T S O N LIN E

$5 OFF ALL DAY ALL RIDES PASS Clip out and present this coupon to receive $5.00 off an All Day All Rides Pass. Coupon valid for up to five (5) people/five (5) passes. Includes unlimited access to the rides at the Kemah Boardwalk. Does NOT include the Boardwalk Beast, Stingray Reef or Iron Eagle. Coupon must be exchanged at the amusements ticket booth for actual dated wristband. Wristband is valid for day of redemption only. Not valid with any other promotions or offers. No cash value. Tax not included. Must present coupon at ticket booth to be valid. Expires 8/31/18 DC

! s u o r u t n e v d A

e B

215 KIPP AVENUE

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• 16 Amusement Rides • Midway Games • Shopping • Live Music • Kiddie Big Top Area • Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. • Lt. Dan’s hideaway • Pier Party Zone • Group Events & Packages • Chick-Fil-a express • 5D THEATER RIDE • Much More!

$5 OFF ALL DAY ALL RIDES PASS Clip out and present this coupon to receive $5.00 off an All Day All Rides Pass. Coupon valid for up to five (5) people/ five (5) passes. Includes unlimited access to the rides at the Pleasure Pier. Coupon must be exchanged at the amusements ticket booth for actual dated wristband. Wristband is valid for day of redemption only. Not valid with any other promotions or offers. No cash value. Tax not included. Must present coupon at ticket booth to be valid. Expires 8/31/18 DC TM

2501 Seawall Blvd • Galveston Island, TX 77550 409.766.4950 • 855.789.7437 • pleasurepier.com


kid culture

R DAILY

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HILD.C

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the agenda M

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WORDS ELIZABETH SMITH

2 4 F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY E V E N T S Y O U C A N ’ T M I S S I N

MARCH Bring the kids for a materialthemed activity, plus art demonstrations, family tours and yoga out in the sculpture garden. Can’t get enough of the Nasher? Come back for more during special spring break programming March 13–18. FREE 2001 Flora St., Dallas; 214/242-5100 nashersculpturecenter.org

FROM THE LANDS OF ASIA EXHIBIT

PHOTOS COURTESY OF LEGOLAND DISCOVERY CENTER; VSTAR ENTERTAINMENT GROUP; DONN PEARLMAN

FIRST FRIDAYS AT THE FARM

N A S H FA R M March 2 Flying a kite is much harder than it looks and so is crafting one by hand, but the friendly staff at Nash Farm makes it possible. Join this monthly pioneer skills program in March to learn how to build your own 19th century-style kite from paper, and then enjoy the simple pastime as a family. $3 per person. 626 Ball St., Grapevine; 817/410-3185 nashfarm.org

SPACE MISSION EXHIBIT

LEGOLAND D I S C O V E RY C E N T E R Opens March 3 Inspired by the SpaceX launch last month? Build your own spaceship and make a Lego rocket blast off into outer space in a plume of smoke in this new intergalactic building experience, on view through the end of the year. Free with admission: $21.95 at the door; discount tickets online in advance. Free for age 2 and younger.

3000 Grapevine Mills Pkwy., 877/818-1677 dallasfw.legolanddiscoverycenter.com

TOUCH-A-TRUCK

C.H. COLLINS S TA D I U M March 3 Let your littles sit in the driver’s seat and honk the horns of dozens of vehicles during Explorium Denton’s fourth annual fundraiser. Check out the fleet of trucks and emergency vehicles, plus food trucks, in the parking lot from 9am–1pm. The first hour from 9–10am is a quiet hour and exclusively for kids with special needs. $2 suggested donation per person. 1500 Long Road, Denton; 940/595-4001 exploriumdenton.org

TARGET FIRST SATURDAYS

NASH E R S C U L P T U R E CENTER March 3 From stone to paper to steel, the range of materials used in the Nasher’s artworks on view serves as inspiration for this monthly family day.

KIMBELL ART MUSEUM Opens March 4 The Kimbell shows off its latest special exhibition in the Renzo Piano Pavilion: 400-plus historic objects chosen from the Sam and Myrna Myers Collection and representing key periods in the history of the art of China, Japan, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea and Vietnam. See it now or March 13–16 during the museum’s free Spring Break Art Extravaganza. Special exhibit: $14 adults; $10 children 12 and younger. Half-price admission all day on Tuesdays and after 5pm on Fridays. 3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/332-8451 kimbellart.org

BUBBLE GUPPIES LIVE! READY TO ROCK

V E R I Z O N T H E AT R E March 4 Rock out to an under-thesea concert on a Sunday afternoon with the merkids from Nickelodeon’s preschool series Bubble Guppies. Molly, Gil and the whole crew stir up the ocean floor in a live stage production on Sunday afternoon. $129.75 for the preshow meet and greet

package. General tickets from $29.75. 1001 Performance Place, Grand Prairie; 972/854-5050 axs.com

NATIONAL COIN AND MONEY SHOW

I RV I N G CONVENTION CENTER March 8–10 Snap a photo with your face inside a giant $100,000 bill (the highest-denomination paper money the U.S. ever produced) and go on a treasure trivia scavenger hunt at this educational fair for collectors and families alike. Check out the Kids’ Zone and see more than $100 million worth of rare coins and colorful paper currency on view and for sale. $8 adults; free for children age 12 and younger. Free admission for everyone on Saturday. 500 W. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving; 719/482-9867 nationalmoneyshow.com

TEXAS STORYTELLING FESTIVAL

DENTON CIVIC CENTER March 8–11 Usually being called a liar is a bad thing, but not at the 33rd annual Texas Storytelling Festival. Listen to award-winning storytellers from across the country spin tall tales during the Liars Contest, and for extra kid-friendly entertainment, check out the Kids’ Day on Saturday, beginning with a family concert, more storytelling for ages

3–14 and a pizza lunch. Free for Kids’ Day; individual event tickets from $10. 321 E. McKinney St., Denton; 940/380-9320 tejasstorytelling.com/festival

MOVIE IN THE PARK

G E R A U LT PA R K March 9 Move your family movie night out of doors when the town of Flower Mound offers a screening of the live-action Beauty and the Beast at the park. Bring lawn chairs or a blanket to stretch out under the stars and dine alfresco with your choice of grub from on-site food trucks. The movie begins around 7pm. FREE 1200 Gerault Road, Flower Mound; 972/874-7275 flower-mound.com/ specialevents

DISNEY FANTASIA LIVE IN CONCERT

BASS PERFORMANCE HA L L March 9–11 The Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra performs a live soundtrack to scenes from Walt Disney’s Fantasia 2000 and the 1940 original projected on stage in high def. Watch and listen as Mickey rolls up his sleeves to make mischief for the sorcerer and the cartoon characters dance to classical music. Tickets from $33. 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth; 817/665-6000 fwsymphony.org

CODING DISCOVERY DAY

PEROT MUSEUM O F N AT U R E A N D SCIENCE March 10 In honor of Raspberry Pi’s

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sixth birthday, feed your brain by discovering all you can do with the versatile minicomputer. This family science day explores the process of coding, virtual reality, how video games are made and, best of all, how to turn everyday objects into computer keyboards. $20 adults; $13 kids ages 2–17. Museum members get in free and get a sneak preview from 9–10am. 2201 N. Field St., Dallas; 214/428-5555 perotmuseum.org

AGENDA

performers, including a world champion hoop dancer and an expanded children’s area. $2; includes access to event and amusement park for ages 4 and older. 1800 Sandy Lake Road, Carrollton; 972/480-5310 santafedays.com

YANA WANA’S LEGEND OF THE BLUEBONNET

SPRING BREAK WONDERS

THE MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORT H March 12–15 The Modern waives admission and opens on the Monday of spring break for special art entertainment, designed for kids ages 5–12, through that Thursday. Show up before the 11am or 2pm sessions led each day by artist Christopher Blay and focused on selected works in the Modern’s collection and the recently opened exhibition New Works by Ron Mueck. FREE 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth; 817/738-9215 themodern.org

PI DAY FESTIVAL

S A M M O N S PA R K AT AT & T P E R F O R M I N G ART S CENTER March 14 The mathletes of your family know the significance of March 14, and this second annual celebration honors Pi Day with math-related activities and actual pie. Nibble on complimentary samples from Emporium Pies and join a guided walkSTEM through the Dallas Arts District. Registration is requested online. FREE 2403 Flora St., Dallas; 214/880-0202 attpac.org

SANTA FE DAYS IN THE PARK

SANDY L AKE A M U S E M E N T PA R K March 17–18 Indigenous dancers and artisans from Santa Fe, Texas’, own Alabama-Coushatta tribe and beyond travel to Carrollton for this annual cultural celebration. Load up the whole family to experience the headlining 28

Easter basket and flashlights for this after-dark family party at the soccer field. Keep your eyes peeled for the brightly colored eggs during five egg hunts, divided by age group, and stay for the face painting, bounce houses and food vendors. FREE 1299 Oak Grove Loop North, Grapevine; 817/410-3450 gograpevine.com/ easter

FINDING NEVERLAND

BASS PERFORMANCE HA L L March 20–25 You and your littles have read Peter Pan. (Maybe not? No judgment.) Now discover the story behind the story in this Broadway touring musical about playwright J.M. Barrie who finds his inspiration in four imaginative brothers and their widowed mother. The show runs long, 2 ½ hours with one intermission, and is recommended for kids 7 and older. Tickets from $44. 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth; 817/212-4280 basshall.com

MADAGASCAR – A MUSICAL ADVENTURE

CASA M A ÑA NA Opens March 23 If your family couldn’t get enough of the Madagascar films and its Penguins spinoffs, this new musical is for you. During a three-weekend run, see Alex the Lion, Marty the Zebra, Melman the Giraffe and Gloria the Hippo bust out of the Central Park Zoo and into a pickle. Tickets from $17. 3101 W. Lancaster Ave., Fort Worth; 817/332-2272 casamanana.org

TWILIGHT COMMUNITY EGG HUNT O A K G R O V E PA R K March 23 Come armed with your

march 2018 / northtexaschild

LUCK O’ THE IRISH

Revel in St. Patrick’s Day fun at these familyfriendly festivals and performances featuring Irish step dancing, Celtic music and a dash of Texas shenanigans.

DA L L A S CHILDREN’S T H E AT E R March 23–April 8 This play is not based on the 1983 children’s book but is a new retelling of the ancient Native American legend about the origins of the blue flower and the power of heritage. Bring your family to watch the world premiere, recommended for kids age 6 and older. Tickets from $17. 5938 Skillman St., Dallas; 214/740-0051 dct.org

S T O C K YA R D S S TAT I O N March 17 Wear your green to Cowtown’s largest and most familyfriendly St. Patrick’s Day celebration from noon–5pm. The famous Fort Worth Stockyards energizes the day with Cow Camp, gunfights and live music. An Irish and Westernthemed parade steps off after the 4pm cattle drive. FREE // 130 E. Exchange Ave., Fort Worth; 817/625-9715 // stockyardsstation.com

FUNNY BUNNY FESTIVAL

RIVERDANCE 20TH ANNIVERSARY WORLD TOUR

ST. PADDY’S TEXAS STYLE

WAY N E F E R G U S O N P L A Z A March 17 Stomp and clap along to Texas country music, Celtic rock and Irish step dancing from the stage during Lewisville’s second annual celebration of the Irish holiday. A screening of Disney’s Brave begins after dark. For a direct route to the end of the rainbow, take turns down the 40-foot zip line in the kids’ zone. FREE // 150 W. Church St., Lewisville; 972/219-3401 // visitlewisville.com

COWTOWN GOES GREEN

L O N E S TA R T O Y O TA OF LEWISVILLE R A I L R O A D PA R K March 24 A week before the official day, get your bunny fix with (gentle) playtime in a petting zoo, a morning Easter egg hunt and a ride (or three) on the Boogie Woogie Choo Choo train. Mr. and Mrs. Bunny will be hopping around for hugs and photos. FREE 1301 S. Railroad St., Lewisville; 972/219-5061 cityoflewisville.com/ pardspecialevents

on the surface. Register your children (open to 3–12 years) for their spot at Flower Mound’s annual wet and wild Easter party with a visit by the Easter Bunny, crafts, games and additional swim time in the pool. $5 for CAC members; $6 nonmembers. 1200 Gerault Road, Flower Mound; 972/874-6280 flower-mound.com/cac

UNDERWATER EGG HUNT

DALLAS BLOOMS – A WORLD OF FLOWERS

COMMUNITY ACTIVIT Y CENTER INDOOR POOL March 31 Instead of making a mad dash over grass, make a splash into the pool for the sea of plastic eggs floating

W I N S P E A R O P E R A H O U S E March 20–25 You may think you know Riverdance, but nothing compares to the rumble and energy of a live performance. Introduce your littles to the Irish dance phenomenon with featured flamenco dancers and a Russian ensemble. Tickets from $25. For Neiman Marcus Kids Night on Wednesday, get a special discount of free child admission with a purchased adult ticket and come before the show for Irish-themed art activities, animal appearances and a cast meet and greet in the lobby. // 2403 Flora St., Dallas; 214/880-0202 // attpac.org

DA L L A S A R B O R E T U M Through April 8 The massive flower festival at the Dallas Arboretum and

Botanical Garden continues with 500,000 flowers in bloom, kid-friendly entertainment daily and themed weekends. Make March 2–4 a Dr. Seuss Weekend with special activities in the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden and don’t miss the Eddie Coker concert on Good Friday at the concert stage. $15 adults; $10 kids ages 3–12. $3 for children’s garden. 8525 Garland Road, Dallas; 214/515-6615 dallasarboretum.org

F O R M O R E F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY F U N T H I S M O N T H , C H E C K O U R O N L I N E C A L E N DA R AT D F W C H I L D.CO M/C A L E N DA R.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CAROL ROSEGG; ©ISTOCK.COM/GLOBALP/PPCAVALRY/VIDOK

kid culture / T H E


SPRING BREAK

at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Spring Break Wonders; March 12–15, 11 am and 2 pm Take advantage of family programming at the Modern over the course of the week while your school-aged children are on Spring Break. Each session is led by a docent and includes a gallery project designed by the education department. Both the tour and project focus on selected works in the Modern’s collection and the special exhibition, New Works by Ron Mueck. Attendance is limited to 45 children per session; admission is free.

The Modern is open and free to the public the Monday of Spring Break, March 12! Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth 3200 Darnell Street Fort Worth, Texas 76107 817.738.9215

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confessions

MOMMY FAILS ILLUSTRATION MARY DUNN

I accidentally threw away my kid’s homework and had to email the teacher begging them not to punish my child.” —CHRISSY, DENTON

THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU LEAVE THE KIDS IN THE BACKYARD TO OPEN THE FRONT DOOR: YOUR TODDLER STARTS EATING DIRT FROM A PLANT POT. SHE WANTS TO BE ‘CRUNCHIER’ THAN HER MOMMA.” —CRYSTAL, FORT WORTH

“When my son was 2, he had a stuffed puppy he took everywhere named ‘Baby Sister.’ One day we went to the store and he screamed, ‘Mommy, we left Baby Sister at home on the bathroom floor!’ Everyone stared at me. We couldn’t leave fast enough.” —STEPHANIE, FLOWER MOUND

Got a parenting fail you’d like to share? We’d love to hear from you. Send it to editorial@dfwchild.com.

“My 1 ½-year-old walked in on me using the bathroom and saw me putting a tampon in. Later that day I find her in the bathroom, and there are tampons all over the floor, in the bathtub, a few opened ones. She was trying to be like Mommy!” —ASHLEY, ALLEN

“My husband took the kids to day care for years, and every time he forgot something in the backpack (extra change of clothes, bottles, etc.), the day care would get onto me about it, and I would get embarrassed and get onto him about it. This year I get to take the kids to day care. On the first day, I forgot the backpacks.” —VICTORIA, MCKINNEY

IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT, MY 2-MONTHOLD STARTED CRYING FOR MILK. I GOT UP, GRABBED A BOTTLE, MIXED THE FORMULA, SAT THE BOTTLE ON THE NIGHTSTAND AND WENT RIGHT BACK TO SLEEP. LUCKILY MY SON WASN’T TOO HUNGRY BECAUSE HE FELL ASLEEP TOO.” —LATARI, CEDAR HILL

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march 2018 / northtexaschild


I’M ALMOST AFRAID TO TELL THEM IT’S EDUCATIONAL. GO PUBLIC. ™

KERA Kids has a world of teacher-tested, kid-approved content, online and on the air. Go for the shows, videos and games. Go because fun and learning go hand-in-hand. Go to enrich their education, with the same member-supported organization that probably helped support yours. Go Public.

KERAKIDS.ORG


Children never stop innovating. Neither do we.

At Children’s HealthSM, the dreams and ambitions of our patients are what fuel our passion every day. It’s why we’ve been providing best-in-class care for more than 100 years, and why we continue to focus on the future health of our region. As the only academically-affiliated pediatric hospital in North Texas, our groundbreaking research, innovative technologies and life-changing treatments ensure we remain at the forefront of medical care, so that your little dreamer can grow up to catch every dream they’re chasing.

Learn more at childrens.com/littledreamers

NorthTexasChild March 2018  
NorthTexasChild March 2018