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THE MAGAZINE PARENTS LIVE BY IN DENTON COUNT Y

J U N E 2018

DREAM JOBS SUMMER ACTIVITIES FOR FUTURE CAREERS

25

WAYS TO ENJOY JUNE

MEET

ASHLEY WILLIAMS

OF HGTV’S FLIP OR FLOP

HOW TO CULTIVATE CURIOSITY IN YOUR CHILD

+

RAISING THE NEXT GENERATION OF MEN IN THE #METOO ERA

g section: tisin ver d la

spec ia

BOYS TO MEN

*

Guide to Summer Fun


pages / J U N E

2018

FEATURE

16 About Our Boys

How we define manhood to our boys has big ramifications for their emotional and mental health words Ashley Hays

DEPARTMENTS NOTED 5 Curious Little Minds

Why you should encourage curiosity, according to science

REAL MOMS 9 Mom Next Door / Ashley Williams

Army veteran and co-host of HGTV’s Flip or Flop Fort Worth

12 Datebook

Leon Bridges is in town, plus a sugar- fueled art show

14 Routines / Amber Honeywell So your kid wants to be a scientist so he can learn how to make bubblegum? We show you where he can learn about his dream job through summer activities. p. 16

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CINDY JAMES; MURAKAMI: COURTESY OF ADAM REICH

ON THE COVER Cover Kid: Maddox of Lantana Photography: Cindy James Hair/Makeup: Jenn Karsner, Wallflower Management Styling: Meredith Mosshart

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lauren Niebes

Associate Editor Alexis Manrodt Assistant Editor Lisa Salinas Calendar Editor Elizabeth Smith

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Carrie Steingruber

ART Graphic Designer Susan Horn

KID CULTURE 31 Summer of Dreams 10 summer camps and activities for every kind of kid 35 The Agenda Our favorite family events this month MOM-APPROVED DOCTORS 27 This Month: Pediatricians

Local pediatricians nominated by readers

COLUMNS 38 Confessions / Mommy Fails When bad things happen to good parents

A visit to the Modern Art Musuem of Fort Worth is a must to see Takashi Murakami’s works. p. 12

PUBLISHER/ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Joylyn Niebes

The beautiful life of the Denton mom-preneur behind an all-natural skin care line

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher Diana Whitworth Nelson Account Executives Maggie Marston, Nancy McDaniel, Kristen Niebes, Sandi Tijerina, Kerensa Vest Advertising Coordinator Alexa Wilder

PR/MARKETING Audience Development Director Candace Emerson Promotions Coordinator Beth McGee

ADMINISTRATION Business Manager Leah Wagner Office Manager + Distribution Robbie Scott

NorthTexasChild is published monthly by Lauren Publications, Inc. NorthTexasChild is distributed free of charge, one copy per reader. Only NorthTexasChild authorized distributors may deliver or pick up the magazines. Additional or back copies of NorthTexasChild are available for $2 per copy at the offices of Lauren Publications, Inc. We reserve the right to edit, reject or comment editorially on all material contributed. We cannot be responsible for the return of any unsolicited material. NorthTexasChild is ©2018 by Lauren Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without express written permission prohibited.

northtexaschild / june 2018

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noted.

CURIOUS LITTLE MINDS helping your kids investigate their world WORDS HANNAH BUSH

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O

n a recent visit to the Half Pint section of Half Price Books, I grabbed a copy of Curious George and went to sit at a doll-sized table. Right as George was to meet The Man with the Yellow Hat, I met someone of my own. Bryce, 5 years old, wanted to know what I was reading. “Curious George,” I said. “Do you know what it means to be curious?” He did. “It’s what people do when they want to see things.” After we discussed the things he is curious about (blocks, lightning and Superman), he looked up at the paper tree above us. A string of questions followed. “Is that a real tree? Does Curious George live there? Is that his house? Are those leaves fake?”

northtexaschild / june 2018

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Now Rome has a heart as strong as her will.

Rome, Age 13 Heart Transplant Patient

After being born with a congenital heart defect, Rome received a lifesaving heart transplant at Children’s HealthSM . Now, with a heart full of determination, she has her sights set on one day becoming the first female president.

Every patient has a dream. Read more at childrens.com/littledreamers


noted / C U R I O U S

LITTLE MINDS

While Bryce can now voice all the questioning teaches kids to do the same. thoughts swirling around in his head, he Curious monkey see; curious monkey do. was likely questioning his surroundings long When Nicole Sweeney’s 5- and 8-year-old before he could talk. ask her questions, the Plano mom responds “We are curious from the get-go,” says David with open-ended questions like “I wonder …” Cross, Rees-Jones director at Texas Christian or “What do you think?”—so much so that University’s Karyn Purvis Institute of Child she recalls her oldest saying, frustrated, “You Development. Cross, who has never answer my questions! a doctorate in education and You always ask me what I think psychology, explains that curithe answer is!” BOTTLED osity is an integral component Eight-year-old Brady will of infant development. “If you have his mom to thank if he CURIOSITY watch babies, they are exquisitely someday makes a major scienFor a hands-on attuned to their environment. tific discovery. Because the way project that you can They’ll attend to novel things she sees it, “curious kids are do with your little more than familiar things.” likely to experiment with their investigator, the early This act of opening ourideas and take the information childhood team at the Perot Museum of selves to extract information they learned and apply it to from our environment is called Nature and Science future curiosities.” recommends making an “orienting response” and Thomas Close, who signals healthy development— a discovery bottle manages education programs (also called a sensory meaning curiosity is founat the Perot Museum of Nature bottle). A discovery dational for learning. In fact, and Science, says the museum bottle uses items found according to a study published around the house to takes a similar approach. in the neuroscience journal “Our educators emphasize encourage curiosity Neuron in 2014, curiosity inquiry-based learning with and exploration while developing motor skills . enhances brain functioning, children as a way to get them allowing us to retain informathinking about the knowledge HERE’S HOW tion. (That’s why you might they already have and connectTO MAKE ONE: remember more from those ing it to the answers they want 1. Find a clear, sealable college courses you weren’t to discover,” he explains. bottle (like the empty just taking for the credits.) Until Brady is happily plastic water bottle Research also indicates a employed at NASA, Sweeney sitting in your cup correlation between curiosity encourages him to play out holder) and fill with and higher levels of well-being, water or baby oil. Oil is side with his little sister, Molly, greater life and job satisfaction, more viscous than water, building lean-tos from fallen and positive social interactions. allowing the objects branches and identifying ani inside to move around But if curiosity is an mal shapes on leaves. She sees more slowly. innate trait, what role can value in free play, especially you play in developing your out in nature. And she’s onto 2. Add a few drops of food coloring. little one’s curiosity? something: Play and curiosity For starters, Cross suggests are closely linked. 3. Add various small toys, creating environments that fos“It’s widely recognized colorful buttons and ter intrigue, a concept he refers beads, large flake glitter that playfulness, creativity to as environmental engineering. or sequins, marbles, and curiosity are drivers of paper clips, metal Kiaran Beck, a music well-being,” Cross says. “The nuts for magnetic teacher at Borman Elementary more curious we are, the more exploration and other School in Denton, says singing creative we are, the more playful recognizable objects. alone can make her students we are.” 4. Tighten the lid and feel vulnerable, putting a Allowing your children to begin exploring with damper on their curiosity. exercise their curiosity a magnet or magnifying through play does more than “[Kids] have to be comfort glass. able to create,” she says. just wear them out before So she adapts accordingly, bedtime; it furthers their changing lesson plans, swapinvestigation of the world, ping singing for instruments or having which is likely to continue so long as there’s students perform in groups. support. Sweeney believes that rewardParents can mimic this at home by ing her children’s curiosity will keep them eliminating conditions that might trigger wondering, exploring and questioning—all fear or anger, which are incompatible with things that benefit her too. Brady and Molly, exploratory play and curiosity. Once children she acknowledges, see the world in a way are at ease, they are ready to investigate and that she tends to overlook, reminding her to ask questions—or as Beck puts it, they are adjust her own vision. ready to take hold of their own learning. “I’m constantly trying to reframe my He also proposes that parents model parenting lens and encourage my kids to curiosity at home. Demonstrating good keep exploring their world,” she says.

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real moms. mom next door /

ASHLEY WILLIAMS co-host of hgtv’s flip or flop fort worth INTERVIEW NICOLE JORDAN

A

shley Williams and her husband of nine years, Andy, live each day hyperfocused on the mission at hand: Integrating veterans back into civilian life by way of their Fort Worth–based real estate company, Recon Realty. More than a mission, it’s a passion project for Ashley and Andy, who are both military veterans themselves—the couple first met in Iraq. When they moved back to the States in 2012, Ashley had a difficult time making the transition. Then real estate came knocking. Andy had a growing portfolio of rental properties. Ashley discovered her talent for design, and the couple began flipping. In the years since, they’ve spun Recon Realty into a profitable venture that pays the bills and, more to their point, helps fellow veterans find success in civilian life. The couple sees themselves as mentors of sort, training fellow vets and partnering with veteran-owned small businesses. Ashley and Andy added to their A-team with kids Ashton and Amina, and in a serendipitous turn of events, landed an HGTV series, Flip or Flop Fort Worth. PHOTO COURTESY OF HGTV

CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE

THE DEETS

AGE 32 HAILS FROM Chicago LIVES IN Fort Worth SIGNIFICANT OTHER Andy Williams, U.S. Marine Corps veteran, co-host of Flip or Flop Fort Worth and founder of Recon Realty HOW THEY MET In a gym on deployment in Baghdad CHILDREN Ashton, 6, and Amina, 5 CV HIGHLIGHT United States Army veteran

northtexaschild / june 2018

9


real moms / A S H L E Y

register with us for great benets

WILLIAMS

But despite their crowded schedule, they haven’t lost sight of the goal—changing local communities for the better, one veteran at a time. “People feel your passion,” says Ashley. “It can’t be faked. It exudes out of you. That’s how this all came about.”

WHAT WAS THE CATALYST FOR YOUR MISSION TO EMPOWER VETERANS THROUGH REAL ESTATE?

I was a transitioning veteran who had a hard time reintegrating into civilian life. We thought, “Who better to help begin that transition than someone who has actually experienced it?” It came from a need to figure out what to do when I got out of the military. We also needed a way to provide for our family so Andy didn’t have to go back overseas and work. Once we started having kids, I didn’t want them to have a Skype relationship [with Andy]. It developed from our needs. HOW DID FLIP OR FLOP FORT WORTH COME TO BE?

It was happenstance. We didn’t go out for a casting. We were on vacation talking with someone and didn’t know, at the time, that he was a producer. Andy was talking about our passion for working with veterans. [The producer] took an interest, and a month or so later said he was thinking about pitching a show. WAS IT A DIFFICULT DECISION TO MOVE FORWARD WITH THE SHOW? WERE YOU NERVOUS?

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HOW HAVE YOUR LIVES CHANGED SINCE THE SHOW DEBUTED?

Well, it’s definitely a lot busier. Veterans everywhere are reaching out. The veteran interaction has been the biggest change. We were doing everything on a smaller scale before the show. HAVE THE KIDS PICKED UP ON THE CHANGES?

everything for

newborns ® to toddlers

The good thing about kids is that they’re so resilient. They only see us as Mommy and Daddy. We put the show on and they’re like, “Oh look, there’s Mommy on TV. I want to watch Ninja Turtles now.” It’s their normalcy.

WHAT’S IT LIKE WORKING TOGETHER?

Early on, we didn’t really know our places 10

june 2018 / northtexaschild

HAVE YOU ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DESIGN?

I wanted to be a nurse but didn’t stick with it because I went to the military. With us having our own real estate business, I was able to design and figured out I’m actually kind of good at it. It grew from there. I got some of the kinks out and learned to be creative without breaking the budget. HOW DO YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE?

I’m definitely modern, but I love bright colors. One of my favorite designers of all time is Diane von Furstenberg. I love all her prints.

WHAT’S YOUR PARENTING STYLE? DO YOU RUN A TIGHT SHIP?

Oh yes, we have a schedule for everything. We have organized play. We have school time, wake-up time. I think kids thrive when they have structure. I think they do best when they can anticipate what’s happening next. I let them have free time, but at a certain time. Every minute of the day I know exactly what they’re doing, even if I’m not there.

WE PUT THE SHOW ON AND THEY’RE LIKE, ‘OH LOOK, THERE’S MOMMY ON TV. I WANT TO WATCH NINJA TURTLES NOW.’”

Definitely. We were fairly private people, and I was very tentative about showing the kids. You’re opening yourself up to scrutiny. But you’re also showing others that normal people can do this. You have the opportunity to take control of your future. Andy asked early on, “Is this really something you want to do?” I told him, “If it helps with the mission, let’s do it.”

Find a store near you or shop online at

and what our strengths were. But now everything runs pretty smoothly. I have my spot, he has his spot and he lets me do what I need to do. You have to work off of each other’s strengths. You’re going home with that person at night.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST THING YOU’VE LEARNED FROM BEING A MOM?

You can’t control it all. I’m a control freak. I love to keep things organized, and kids have a way of coming in and mixing it up. But it all works. They taught me to be OK with the uncomfortable. When I first had Ashton, I was a nervous wreck. When Amina came, I learned to just let things happen, and she’s so calm. Ashton is a bit higher strung, but I think that’s because I was the one that was high strung. Just letting go ... I’m still learning, but that was a big lesson for me. YOU’RE SO BUSY. HOW DO YOU SPEND TIME TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHEN YOU GET A BREAK FROM WORK?

The kids’ favorite spot is Main Event, but I think I’m winning them over with Dave & Buster’s. AND DATE NIGHT?

We like to eat. I love movies. Most of the time we go to Movie Tavern by Social House. AND WHAT DO YOU DO FOR YOURSELF?

I work out. That’s a big thing for me. I picked up running about three years ago. First, it was to lose weight, but then I realized I actually really like running. Distance helps me clear my mind. It’s my “me” time. It’s definitely my Zen.


and

Air North Texas

stroll together breathe better

Walking with your child on the way to school or while running errands gives you more quality time together and helps improve air quality. Learn more about helping our air at airnorthtexas.org.

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Open all summer! Cool off and chill out at Safari Splash! Our 14,000-square-foot splash park is a great way for you and your kids to beat the heat this summer. Equipped with four slides, a water dump tower, animal-shaped water cannons and a designated toddler area, Safari Splash is only $5 with Zoo admission.

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northtexaschild / june 2018

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real moms / M O M

SOCIAL

WORDS NICOLE JORDAN

DATEBOOK

Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg

from can’t-miss art shows to a homecoming act from a grammy nominee, june is full of sweet surprises JUNE 1 SWEET TOOTH HOTEL

Don’t miss Cole and Jencey Keeton’s sugar-fueled art and retail pop-up featuring works from Dallas artists Jeremy Biggers, Shamsy Roomiani and Jojo Chuang and Mexicanborn Ilse Valfré. (Girls night, perhaps? We won’t tell the kids, if you don’t.) Boasting beaucoup eye candy and a large gift shop selling dessert-themed apparel and accessories, the 1,200-square-foot space will call Victory Park home through June 30. $20. 2316 Victory Park Lane, Dallas // sweettoothhotel.com

7 ARTFUL PAIRINGS

Sweet Tooth Hotel

9

LEON BRIDGES

Show the Fort Worth native a little hometown love as he stops at The Pavilion at Toyota Music Factory in Irving. Jon Batiste and Stay Human, the house band for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, will open for the Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter (who, in case you were wondering, just so happens to turn 29 next month). Starting at $42. 300 W. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving // 972/810-1499 // thepaviliontmf.com

The Dallas Museum of Art brings together two of our favorite things: beer tastings, courtesy of Noble Rey Brewing Company, and a tour of the museum galleries. First, guests will sample different Noble Rey brews, learning the story behind each flavor combination, and then enter the galleries for a special curated tour. $65; book in advance. (If you miss this one, tickets go on sale June 8 for the next Artful Pairings event on Aug. 2.) 1717 N. Harwood St., Dallas // 214/922-1200 // dma.org

If you hit one museum exhibit in June, make it this one. Opening this month at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, the retrospective will feature 50 of Murakami’s works representing three decades of his career. A Japanese artist who’s collaborated with the likes of Kanye West and Louis Vuitton, Murakami is a master at blurring the lines between “high” and “low” culture and melding Japanese tradition with contemporary influences. $16. And be sure to reserve a couple of seats at Café Modern for the Japanese Whiskey Dinner on June 28. 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth // 817/738-9215 // themodern.org

Waitress

19 -24 WAITRESS

The much-buzzed-about musical comes to Bass Performance Hall as part the Broadway at the Bass series. Based on a 2007 film of the same name by Adrienne Shelley, the musical is produced by an all-female creative team, including Grammy nominee Sara Bareilles, who composed all the music and lyrics. Starting at $44. 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth // 817/212-4450 // basshall.com

Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg 12

june 2018 / northtexaschild

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SWEET TOOTH HOTEL, JOAN MARCUS, NATHAN KEAY, ADAM REICH

10 TAK ASHI MURAK A MI: THE OCTOPUS E ATS ITS OWN LEG


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a thursday in the life of

AMBER HONEYWELL Amber Honeywell is the owner of Primal Skin Co., an all-natural handcrafted skin care line. She and her husband, Nick, a production manager at DocuScan Guys, live in Denton with their two daughters, 6-year-old Faith and 5-month-old Hattie, and their 2-yearold boxer mix, Sam.

5

AM I reset my over-ambitious alarm before melting back into my bed. One day I will get up at 5 o’clock, but today is not that day. 6AM The most wretched sound on this planet—my alarm clock—rips me from sleep. I deny the impulse to smash my phone into pieces and accept that the day must start. My daughter Faith, a 30-yearold woman in a 6-year-old girl’s body, is dressed, teeth brushed, making her bed and feeding the dog. #LifeGoals. One day I’ll have my life together like my 6-year-old. 6:15AM Faith’s friend Stryker arrives, as he does every morning. The kids decide in new names and which Power Ranger they are for the day. Stryker (now Lloyd) is the Green Ranger. Faith dubs herself Sarah (I have no idea why) and flops between the Pink Ranger and the Queen of Texas, which Stryker refuses to call her. 6:30AM I drink coffee and make breakfast, but most of my mental energy is dedicated

to ensuring that the kids don’t break everything in the house with their ninja moves. Finally, breakfast is ready—turkey bacon and granola with blueberries. In between bites, Stryker explains why baby Hattie cannot possibly be the Dragon Warrior. Faith interrupts with a fascinating conversation starter: “Do you want to know what is unusual about my poop? There was a whole blueberry inside!” Stryker responds with his own fecal discoveries. I should teach them some manners, but I can’t help myself from laughing. Why do kids love all things toilet-related? 7:10AM Our journey to school is one of my favorite times of the day. It’s a full-on jam session, with music blaring (today it’s “Thunder” by Imagine Dragons), crazy dancing and singing too loudly. 8AM Back home. I tidy the house and spend quality time with Hattie. A spit-up incident (best not to elaborate) requires an outfit change for both of us. Whatever she’s left in my hair will have to wait until naptime. 9AM Naptime. (At last!) I quickly shower and go over my to-do list in my head. 9:30AM I handcraft a batch of citrus fresh scrub to fill customer orders. It’s one of Primal Skin Co.’s yummiest-smelling products. I’m revitalized both in the scent and by creating something. Whether it’s making products, building my business or crafting with my kids, I’m energized by creativity. 11AM Naptime ends and I cuddle with my squishy baby. Nowadays, I’m more aware of how quickly time flies, so I am intentional about appreciating the special moments in life. I soak up every second of cuddling, feeding and playing with Hattie. 12:30PM Hattie’s second nap begins. I fold laundry, pay bills, prep dinner and dive back into work. The afternoon is a blur of phone calls, emails, updates with my business partner and organizing tasks for the week. 2:30PM Hattie and I head out to school. I pull into the carpool line early, so I use the downtime to return emails, texts and phone calls. Hattie hates being in her car seat, and her quiet cries of discomfort soon turn into full-on screaming. Faith gets in the car and, completely oblivious to her sister, tells me that her classmate smashed her lollipop on the desk because he was mad that he can’t see his dad for three days. I’m thankful that Faith doesn’t understand that her story is actually very heavy. 3:30PM Home again. Faith and Stryker follow me into the kitchen to supervise my snack preparations. It’s raining outside, and the kids are crabby from being cooped up inside and they begin to fight. I give permission to play in the backyard and watch them through the window while I fold laundry. 4PM These kids crack me up. Faith asks

Diaries are penned by moms (and dads) in the North Texas area. The authors volunteer to share a day of their choosing and are not paid or endorsed by NorthTexasChild. Send your diary to editorial@dfwchild.com. All submissions are subject to editing and may be cut for space. 14

june 2018 / northtexaschild

PHOTO BY RYAN HONEYWELL

real moms / R O U T I N E S


the fine

print

WHAT SHE’S READING Mind Renovation: 21 Days of Thought Transformation by Kris White FAVORITE INDULGENCE Blue Bell Ice Cream Cone flavor ice cream FAVORITE DATE NIGHT SPOT Barley and Board BEVERAGE OF CHOICE Black coffee GUARANTEED TO MAKE HER LAUGH My husband, Nick GUARANTEED TO MAKE HER CRY A video of a soldier returning home equals makeup wrecked 100 percent of the time WORDS SHE LIVES BY “Just keep swimming.”—Dory MOTHERHOOD IN FIVE WORDS Hardest, worst, best thing ever CELEBRITY MOM SHE ADMIRES Sandra Bullock

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Celebrate Highland Village Saturday, June 2 at Unity Park Come out for a 1K/5K and Family Fish Out in the morning. Then enjoy live music from Decades Band, kids activities, and an exciting fireworks show to wrap up the evening.

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Visit HVParks.com for the complete schedule. if Stryker still wants to be friends when they’re grown-ups. “We can be spies,” she says. “I would love to be your partner.” Stryker says that he wants to be a spy and football player, and Faith assures him that he can do both. “That’s OK, I’m going to be a pen importer and a spy.” 5PM The time of day when everything happens at once. All hands on deck! (What, I only have two hands?!) Stryker goes home. I feed Hattie. Faith practices her spelling words. I cook dinner. Faith takes a bath. I put away laundry. Nick arrives home, and we eat dinner. Tonight, it’s chicken tacos, which Faith can’t eat without mutilating the shell. Kitchen cleanup. Pack lunches. Teeth brushing. Baby rocking. Baby changing. Take out garbage. Prayers. Kids are tucked in. Phew! 7PM Nick and I collapse on the couch and try to reconnect with the nonhuman-napkin part of our identities. Nick goes to the gym while I finish up work on Primal Skin Co. and strategize tomorrow’s tasks. I wrap up my to-do’s by updating the grocery list and steaming a tutu for Faith’s dance recital. 8:30PM Husband and wife time. We talk about our days and watch episodes of Brooklyn Nine-Nine. After an hour, we get ready for bed. 10PM I slip into bed. Somehow, the baby senses my comfort and immediately starts crying. 11PM After soothing Hattie back to sleep, I finally return to bed and hope for rest of my own. Before snoozing, I set my alarm for 5am again.

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june 2018 / northtexaschild


About Our Boys How we define manhood to our boys has big ramifications for their emotional and mental health W O R D S A S H L E Y H AYS ILLUSTRATION JOHN J. CUSTER

C

arla Morton remembers the day she was running errands while her sons, Collin and Ben, now 10 and 8, were buckled up in their car seats practicing gender identifiers. “You are a …?” she prompted. “Boy!” Ben and Collin chimed in. “Good! And Daddy is a …?” “Boy!” “Yes!” praised Morton. “And Mommy is a …?” The boys thought for a moment. “Doctor!” It was a proud moment for Morton, a pediatric neuropsychologist at Cook Children’s in Fort Worth. She continually tries to break the molds of what we consider traditional gender stereotypes in hopes of giving her kids—and any child who needs a voice—the freedom to express themselves independent of social norms. “In my home, we are very progressive and have less-set gender roles,” she says. “My boys may see their dad doing the dishes or housework while I do the finances or computer repairs. That’s their ‘normal.’” We are in a transitional era in which society is becoming more accepting of women and men who depart from stereotypes of femininity and masculinity. But there are still definite expectations that society has put on our boys when it comes to what it means to be a boy—and a man.

Some of those expectations are prohibitive; others, overly permissive. “Historically, we have excused certain behaviors in our boys, more so in socially conservative circles,” Morton says. “Boys will be boys” is a phrase tossed around (often endearingly) by loving parents, well-meaning teachers and doting grandparents. And there is some truth to it—testosterone is widely understood to increase aggression and dominance in boys and may affect cognitive performance, too. But often the phrase is used to justify otherwise unacceptable behavior. Little Jake called Sophie ugly at lunch today? “Aw, he has a crush on her!” Matthew wouldn’t mind his teacher when it was time to come in from recess? “He is such a boy!” Thanks to recent events—the #MeToo movement, for one—the restriction that “boys will be boys” is being challenged. It hasn’t escaped society’s notice that according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the majority of sexual violence perpetrators—against women and men—are men. And so behavior that was previously written off as either playfulness or biologic inevitability (like inappropriate jokes or unwanted advances in the workplace) has come under long-overdue scrutiny. At the same time, society still feeds our boys catchphrases like “boys don’t cry” instead of teaching them how to healthily process and express their emotions—and then we wonder why they act on their feelings in inappropriate, uncontrolled ways. Ah, well. Boys will be boys, right? northtexaschild / june 2018

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Yes, boys will be boys—and inevitably, men. And the way we respond to our boys’ emotions and behavior now is creating the structural boundaries for who they will be and how they will perceive manhood as adults. BOYS VERSUS GIRLS

princess manners and is immediately sternly corrected.” West, who has a doctorate in psychology, has two boys, ages 6 and 2, and a girl, 9. She believes that mothers of boys tend to tolerate or overlook inappropriate behavior by reasoning that boys are more energetic and therefore harder to rein in. Benbrook mom Brandi Thomas agrees. “Boys definitely have more latitude to be wild and crazy,” she says. Her two boys are 11 and 6. “The expectation for them to be able to sit quietly through the same activity as a girl just isn’t there.”

It is undeniable that we manage boys and girls differently. The way we react to a variety of behaviors depends on the child’s gender. Alex Wade, a licensed professional counselor intern at Curis Functional Health and Apple Counseling and Consulting in Dallas, says that as a therapist, she tries to be aware of this proclivity and treats both her male and female patients similarly. BOTTLE IT UP “[Parents] often speak to, At the same time, boys do not discipline or even defend their have the same latitude as girls to children depending on genderexpress and work through their related grounds,” she says. “When emotions. A study published in I point it out during the parent The British Journal of Developmenconsultation, most of them aren’t tal Psychology found that mothers even aware of what they’re doing.” are more prone to use emotional In 2017, the BBC conducted words and content with their a social experiment in which toddler daughters than with their they dressed a male child in girls’ sons. This models to our children clothes and a female child in that sentimental conversations are boys’ clothes and to be reserved for placed both kids in female interactions. a child care room “As a society, with unsuspectwe have not emoing employees. The tionally coached “THE NUMBER our boys to caregivers spoke to the kids differently ONE STATE- identify, express (coddling and cooing or cope with their MENT THAT feelings approprimore to “Sophie,” whose actual name WE MAKE TO ately,” West says. was Edward) and “When a little boy BOYS THAT falls on the playoffered them different toys to play with. SUPPRESSES ground, parents When confronted are more inclined EMOTIONAL to say, ‘You’re with the swap, the employees admitted EXPRESSION OK—brush it off,’ that they were acting when really, that TO PAIN IS, boy is feeling sad, on gender bias. “Think of how lonely.” ‘YOU’RE OK.’” hurtLaorTonya we respond to Dapotty words,” says vison, a licensed Brooke West, a play master social therapist and owner of HOPE worker, social psychologist and Child and Family Center in Dalhost of the radio show Mental las. “When a little boy says a bad Speak, agrees. “The number one word, a dad is more inclined to statement that we make to boys laugh about it while saying, ‘Now that suppresses emotional expreswe don’t say that,’ which sends sion to pain is, ‘You’re OK.’” the little boy a contradicting This simple phrase, meant to message. But if his little girl says toughen up our boys and teach the same word, she isn’t using her them how to be strong, could in18

june 2018 / northtexaschild

stead be detrimental to their emotional well-being by enforcing the idea of locking away or dismissing their feelings. “Boys are seen choking back tears although it is a naturally triggered response to physical or emotional pain,” she adds. For a year and a half, Davison was an adolescent boys’ therapist at a mental health facility in Arlington. The most common issue she dealt with? Boys suppressing their emotions and thoughts. “The suppression is directly related to parental belief systems of how boys ought to react when emotionally triggered,” Davison explains. She’s spent a lot of time helping boys process their feelings regarding these conditioned behaviors but doesn’t believe that they readily associate this with the term “masculinity.” “From an early age, we teach boys that it’s not appropriate to cry, and that if they do, they are not being masculine,” says Paul Bones, an assistant professor in the sociology department at Texas Woman’s University. The belief that boys aren’t supposed to be timid, cautious or fearful is being ingrained into them every day, intentionally or otherwise. The result is not that our sons are any less sensitive— any boy mom will attest to that— but that our sons are holding in their insecurities rather than voicing them, causing an inability to appropriately express or interpret emotional struggles. Terrill Richardson of Fort Worth experienced this firsthand when his son Kyle, a high school football player, broke his leg his sophomore year. He tried to get back in the game once released by a doctor, but “his heart wasn’t in it anymore,” Richardson says. “He tried, but he said he wasn’t as fast, wasn’t as agile. He was really afraid that he’d re-break his leg. A

few weeks in, he made the decision to quit.” What affected Richardson the most was not that Kyle decided to quit, but that he was actually afraid to tell his father. “I think he probably went to practice a lot longer and went to games a lot longer than he wanted to in order to please me,” Richardson says. “The thing is… I was actually relieved that he quit.” Kyle’s reluctance to share his feelings is not uncommon, according to Davison. “Many [boys] share in therapy that they try to tell adults how they feel but have felt shut down when they attempt,” she reports. These “shutdowns” are surfacing in areas of these boys’ lives that are supposed to provide security. To show feelings in school is to make oneself vulnerable to bullying and ridicule by other children. To show feelings at home is pointless from their perspective, as they feel that they will be shut down regardless. “When shut down, the response is depression, anxiety or uncontrollable outbursts of aggression,” Davison says. It’s like that big splash bucket at the water park that tips when it gets too full: At some point, all those pent-up feelings have to find a release. That release could be defiant or aggressive behavior—which society often tells our boys is OK, even when talking about their feelings is not—or a serious mental health crisis. It’s worth noting that boys are more likely than girls to commit violent crime, including sexual violence and gun violence. Boys are also less likely to seek professional mental health care, which might prevent those uncontrollable outbursts.


“Guys don’t talk about their feelings, we don’t seek help when we need it, and we feel like asking for help makes us lesser,” Bones says, going so far as to link the bottling up of emotions to men’s shorter average life expectancy. “It’s because men are told that asking for help is a sign of weakness and a departure from masculinity. It’s why we don’t go to the doctor unless we’re on death’s door. And forget about seeking psychological help.” IN NEED OF A DETOX

While parents may play a role in advancing these stereotypes, they’re far from the only influence. Society in general—and media in particular—has a big impact on how boys view masculinity. “It’s generally between the ages of 8 and 9 that kids start becoming more self-reflective and looking to outside factors for confirmation that they are ‘normal,’” Morton says. “It’s those external factors that parents really need to concern themselves with.” YouTube, for example, serves as a major platform for such persuasive manifestos. Jordan Peterson, a clinical psychologist and professor at the University of Toronto, uses his channel to rebuke the idea of male weakness with excerpts from his best-selling book 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos and abrasive comments such as “Don’t be dependent. At all. Ever. Period.” These are the kinds of ideas of what it means to be a man that are promoted to our boys—and we’re buying it. More than 700,000 copies of it. Peterson’s YouTube channel is only a fraction of the screen time equation. West is adamant that the overuse of screen time is detrimental to children’s development, for boys in particular. “What do I really think about screen time? I think that it’s creating monsters,” she says, explaining that as it becomes more and more acceptable for families to rely on electronics, our boys need a parent’s presence more than ever. “The very first issue I address with my male clients’ parents is

their screen time and use of elecencourage emotional health (see tronics,” she says. “As a society, we sidebar at right for phrases to are allowing unlimited exposure to avoid) and paying closer attenthese, which can model violence tion to the behaviors we promote and crude behavior to impressionand accept. able and vulnerable minds.” “My goal is to encourage as While studies disagree about much ‘personhood’ as I can to the long-term impacts of violent them versus defined ‘manhood,’” entertainment, West believes that Morton says. screen time itself, no matter what’s She urges her male clients to on said screen, is toxic. Namely, embrace what they like without the instant gratification that focusing on the outside reactions comes with befrom their ing constantly family, peers “plugged in” or social media is robbing our platforms. boys of the For moms ability to apand dads, it propriately exis critical to On Thursday, June 14, the city press empathy, stress to our of Fort Worth is airing a free compassion boys the value screening of THE MASK YOU LIVE and patience. in their distinct IN , which “follows boys and The first personalities, young men as they struggle to thing she interests and stay true to themselves while advises for characteristics negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity.” The her patients is without pushing film is meant to educate and an “electronic them toward spread awareness and underdetox,” during what society standing, not to lecture. The film which the boys says they should is also available on Netflix or unplug and are be like. for rent or purchase on Amazon encouraged to “It’s impor($4.99 to rent, $12.99 to own) spend more tant that we and Vudu ($2.99 to rent, $9.99 time outdoors encourage our to own) for at-home viewing. riding bikes or boys to be indiModern Art Museum of Fort playing board viduals rather Worth, 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth games with than modeling Register online at fortworththeir families. themselves texas.gov/moviesthatmatter. “We need after what to take back society expects the power from them to be,” iPads, tablets, video games, and Wade emphasizes. smartphones,” West says. “If we Efforts such as the #MeToo don’t, we are losing our ability to movement have provided raise our kids into good people, not platforms for this reformation of just people with good behavior.” manhood, similar to the cultural changes we experienced within the THE NEW MANHOOD last generation regarding our girls. It’s hard in the moment to picture “It used to be that girls our rambunctious little boys as needed to be quiet, passive and grown adults, but it is crucial that ladylike. Then we realized that we turn our focus on just that. those messages weren’t the best “The definition of masculinfor our girls,” Bones explains, ity is rapidly changing,” Davison adding that over time, society says. “The nature of what masbegan to encourage girls to be culinity has been, and what it is more assertive, independent and becoming, is contingent upon true to themselves. the changing of past beliefs. “We didn’t ban or demonize Parents need to adopt what boys femininity; we just decided to are saying they require emotiondrop some of these damaging ally and mentally.” ideas of what it means to be a This means policing the girl. That’s what we’re doing with language we use with our boys to boys now.”

Movies That Matter

You Don’t Say

Feeling disconnected from your boy? Here is a list of common no-no’s when attempting to bond with your son, and what you can say instead. DON’T SAY

“You (throw/hit/act/fill in the blank) like a girl.” Not only is this promoting sexism, but you are creating a wall between your son and yourself using humiliation as your tactic. DO SAY

“I can tell you are trying—is there a way I can help?” Acknowledge that he’s making an effort, and offer your time and attention in helping. DON’T SAY

“Well you just won’t talk to me so I don’t know how to help you.” Boys often want to communicate, but feel uncomfortable initiating it. Don’t get frustrated when your attempts to engage with him are met with shrugs. Be patient. DO SAY

“I can tell when something is bothering you. When you need me, I am ready to listen.” Letting your son know that you are tuned in and all ears during an awkward situation for him can ease him into letting his guard down. DON’T SAY

“How was your day?” This staple dinner-table question is typically met with one of two answers: “Fine” or “Good.” Not exactly a conversation starter, much to a parent’s disdain. DO SAY

“Did anything interesting or abnormal happen today?” Asking open-ended questions that require a thought-out response will naturally create a flow of conversation. And if he responds with, “Not really,” don’t push him. Forced conversation is just as bad as none.

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Staying home this Summer but still want to have big fun? DART has you covered. Check out our DARTable Staycations for adventures the whole family will enjoy. From entertainment to dining, these local hidden gems have a little something for everyone to enjoy. And the best part? It’s all DARTable!

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MAPPING YOUR FAMILY’S

SUMMER OF FUN

Sweet summertime is finally here. This comprehensive directory features Dallas-Fort Worth’s top destinations that are perfect for keeping the whole family entertained all summer long. The best part? We’re giving away weekly passes to your favorite local spots through our Summer Fun Map contest. Learn more about how to participate by sharing your insta-worthy shots on page 24. 1.

Alamo Drafthouse Multiple locations. 972/534-2120. drafthouse. com/dfw. Affordable family films for maximum family fun! Choose your ticket price and buy online to reserve seats. Proceeds benefit HopeKids North Texas.

11. The Dallas World Aquarium Dallas. 214/720-2224. dwazoo.com. Indoor aquarium features exotic marine life, OrinocoSecrets of the River rainforest (primates, crocodiles, free-flying birds) and Mundo Maya— home to ocelots, sharks, owls and eagles.

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Alley Cats Entertainment alleycatsbowl.com. Arlington. 817/784-2695. Hurst. 817/589-0523. Plenty of fun for everyone! Bowling, laser tag, Putt-Putt Golf, arcade games, go-carts, more. Attractions vary by location.

12. Denton County Historical Park Denton. 940/349-2850. dentoncounty.com/chos. The park is home to historic Denton County structures like the Bayless-Selby and Quakertown House museums. Come visit—admission is free! Guided tours are available.

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Altitude Trampoline Park Fort Worth. 817/741-5867. altitudefw.com. Altitude Trampoline Parks are the world’s premier trampoline facilities that offer fun and exercise for people of all ages. Amon Carter Museum of American Art Fort Worth. 817/738-1933. cartermuseum. org. Free fun all summer at Amon Carter! Storytime, Wednesdays June 6–July 25. Sunset Cinema showing Homeward Bound (1993), July 12. Visit cartermuseum.org for details. Bowl & Barrel Dallas. 214/363-2695. bowlandbarrel.com. Strike up the party! Our boutique bowling alley is great for kids 6 and up. With party packages, kid-friendly food, ramps, bumpers and more. Bureau of Engraving and Printing Fort Worth. 817/231-4000. bep.gov. See billions of dollars printed at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Fort Worth, where the nation’s paper currency is produced. Admission is free! The COOP Frisco. 972/668-1100. thecoopfrisco.com. The COOP was built for kids but designed for you! Bring the kids to play and enjoy a coffee, free Wi-Fi and much more. Crayola Experience Plano Plano. 469/642-2901. crayolaexperience.com/ plano. Crayola Experience Plano is 60,000 square feet of hands-on fun! Most families spend 3–4 hours exploring our 22 one-of-akind attractions. Let your creativity run free. The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden Dallas. 214/515-6500. dallasarboretum.org. Family Fun Fridays: Beginning June 1–July 27. Enjoy face painting, a petting zoo and Kindermusik in Pecan Grove from 10am– 2pm.

10. Dallas Firefighter’s Museum Dallas. 214/821-1500. dallasfiremuseum.com. Imagine being a firefighter! At the Dallas Firefighter’s Museum come see the past and present in firefighting trucks, gear, etc. Fun for all ages.

13. Dinosaur World Glen Rose. 254/898-1526. dinosaurworld.com. Go back in time and see them alive. Over 150 life-size dinosaurs, fossil dig, Dino Gem Excavation, Prehistoric Museum, animatronics, playground, etc. Open every day. 14. Epic Waters Indoor Waterpark Grand Prairie. 972/337-3131. epicwatersgp. com. Beat the heat at Epic Waters Indoor Waterpark. Eleven slides, Texas’ longest indoor lazy river and tiny tot area make it epic in every wave! 15. Fort Worth Museum of Science and History Fort Worth. 817/255-9300. fwmuseum.org. Explore the ugly side of human and animal nature in our newest exhibits Grossology and Animal Grossology. Then, experience Pandas in the Omni Theater. 16. Fort Worth Stockyards Fort Worth. 817/625-9715. fortworthstockyards.com. Channel your inner cowboy or cowgirl, experience the longhorns, master the Maze and have the time of your life at our unique and quirky attractions. 17. Fort Worth Zoo — African Savanna Fort Worth. 817/759-7555. fortworthzoo.org. Look adventure in the eye at the all-new African Savanna! Experience the Fort Worth Zoo like never before with giraffe feeding and underwater hippo viewing. 18. The Frog Pond Water Park at the Farmers Branch Aquatics Center Farmers Branch. 972/919-8720. fbh2o.com. Our mini neighborhood water park features a waterslide tower, lazy river, and activity and lagoon pools. We also offer swim lessons, pool parties and indoor swimming! 19. Galveston Island Historic Pleasure Pier Galveston Island. 1-855/789-7437. pleasurepier.com. Featuring waterfront fun and entertainment, the Pleasure Pier features family-oriented attractions including rides, midway games, a wide selection of food venues and retail shops.

20. Galveston Island Visitor Information Center Galveston Island. 409/797-5144. galveston. com. Whether you’re a history buff, thrill seeker or beach bum, Galveston Island has something for you. Let us help you plan the perfect island getaway. 21. Gaylord Texan Resort Grapevine. 817/778-1000. gaylordtexan.com/ summerfest. Experience Gaylord Texan’s SummerFest featuring the Smurfs with activities such as Junior Chef Camp, Scavenger Hunt, pool parties, dining events, live music and more. 22. Go Ape Oak Point Park Plano. 800/971-8271. goape.com/locations/ texas/plano. Take family adventure to new heights at Go Ape Oak Point! Challenge yourselves to zip, swing and climb through the treetops while creating lasting memories. 23. Grapevine Convention and Visitors Bureau Grapevine. 800/457-6338. grapevinetexasusa. com. Celebrate Grapevine’s 10th Annual SummerBlast Memorial Day through Labor Day! Enjoy fun for the whole family including waterparks, fireworks, exhibits, outdoor activities, shopping and more. 24. Hydrous Wake Parks Multiple locations. 214/310-1105. hydrouswakeparks.com. What could be better than spending time on the water learning how to wakeboard? Sign up now. Hydrous Wake Parks camps, parties and lessons. 25. iT’Z Family Food & Fun Euless. 817/283-3700. itzusa.com/pricingspecials-deals-coupons. iT’Z the summer fun hangout with an arcade, laser tag, bumper cars, rock climbing and bowling. The Annual Pass offers the best value at $9.99/visit! 26. JCC Dallas Dallas. 214/239-7138. jccdallas.org. Experience the ultimate social magnet for fitness, wellness and culture. We serve every age and stage of life. All are welcome. 27. Kemah Boardwalk Kemah. 877/285-3624. kemahboardwalk.com. The Kemah Boardwalk is open daily providing fun for everyone! Located just 20 miles from downtown Houston. 28. LEGOLAND Discovery Center Dallas/Fort Worth Grapevine. 469/444-3050. dallasfw.legolanddiscoverycenter.com. LEGOLAND Discovery Center is the ultimate indoor LEGO® playground full of amazing play, creativity and building fun designed for families. Come and explore!

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29. Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament Dallas. 888/935-6878. medievaltimes.com. Kids free this summer with any full price adult admission Monday–Thursday. Code: DCKF Come see the new show as the new queen rules the castle.

Ripley’s Odditorium, the Palace Of Wax, the Enchanted Mirror Maze, the 7D Moving Theater and the Impossible Laser Race.

30. Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas. 214/242-5100. nashersculpturecenter.org. Visit one of the best collections of modern sculpture in the world. Family activity guides and free admission days monthly. 31. NRH20 Family Water Park North Richland Hills. 817/427-6500. nrh2o.com. NRH2O features over 24 slides and attractions with family fun for everyone! Great place for birthday parties. Dive-in movies and fireworks shows on select nights. 32. Play Street Museum Multiple locations. playstreetmuseum.com. Play Street Museum is a network of interactive children’s museums purposefully designed to encourage a young child’s sense of independence, exploration and creativity. 33. Pump It Up Multiple locations. pumpitupparty.com. Our indoor arenas feature gigantic inflatables that are ideal for your child’s 100 percent private birthday party, or check our online calendar for weekday public playtimes.

36. SEA LIFE Grapevine Aquarium Grapevine. 469/444-3050. visitsealife.com/ grapevine. Dive into SEA LIFE Grapevine and become a turtle expert. Rescue, rehabilitate and release your turtle back to the ocean in the Sea Turtle Rescue Center! 37. SeaQuest Interactive Aquarium Fort Worth Fort Worth. 682/235-5752. fortworth.visitseaquest.com. Touch, feed and interact with stingrays, sharks and many other animals as you go on a quest through five continents during a journey at SeaQuest! 38. Seaworld San Antonio. 210/520-4732. seaworld.com/ san-antonio. Little ones can discover big thrills at rides, shows and summer attractions, plus dance and sing at the all–new Sesame Street® Party Parade! 39. The Shops at Willow Bend Plano. 972/202-4904. shopwillowbend.com. The Shops at Willow Bend features Crayola Experience, Plano Children’s Theatre, Janie & Jack, Vineyard Vines and Justice making it the perfect family destination.

34. Reunion Tower Dallas. 214/712-7040. reuniontower.com. Beat the heat at the top spot for summer fun! Plan a daytime visit for weekday activities on the GeoDeck. Visit reuniontower.com/summer for details.

40. SPARK! Dallas. 214/421-7727. sparkdallas.org. The creative adventure starts at SPARK! Explore a 6,000-foot climb, Crawl Slide Sculpture. Engage with pop-up creative activities. Enjoy summer camps. Family days Saturday and Sunday.

35. Ripley’s Believe It Or Not! Grand Prairie. 972/263-2391. ripleys.com/ grandprairie. Experience all five cool attractions:

41. Studio Movie Grill Multiple locations. 972/388-7888. studiomoviegrill.com. Studio Movie Grill is the leader of

in-theater dining where the passion is film, food and fun! 42. Texas Discovery Gardens Dallas. 214/428-7476. txdg.org. Don’t miss our Butterfly Tea Parties, June 14, July 19 and August 23! The perfect event for a Mommyand-me outing or a meetup with friends. 43. Topgolf Multiple locations. 817/349-4002. topgolf.com/ kidzone. No golf skill required to register for Topgolf’s Summer Academy, but each kiddo leaves with new talents, friends and fun memories from this weeklong camp! 44. Town of Little Elm Little Elm. 972/731-3296. lakefrontlittleelm.com. The only beach in North Texas! Sand volleyball, fire pits, open swim, kayaks/SUPs, great restaurants, cable wakeboarding and much more. Little Elm has it all. 45. Trinity Forest Adventure Park Dallas. 214/391-1000. trinitytreetops.com. Trinity Forest Adventure Park is the largest aerial park in the Metroplex and offers high ropes adventure for ages 4 and up. 46. Urban Air Adventure Park Multiple locations. 1-800/960-4778. urbanairparks.com. Urban Air is a fullservice family entertainment center and the perfect destination for family fun. Urban Air provides unforgettable birthday party experiences for all ages. 47. Water Works Park Denton. 940/349-8800. dentonwaterworks.com. Enjoy a new wave pool and concessions, in addition to five giant slides, two toddler slides, lazy river, children’s play pool, pavilions, cabanas and more!

Win a seaside family vacation! Join in on the Summer Fun Photo Contest for a chance to win weekly giveaways to our featured destinations. With every shared photo, you will be automatically entered to win the grand prize: A three-night beach house stay in historic Galveston, Texas! Here’s how to enter:

MAPPING YOUR FAMILY’S

SUMMER OF

FUN

1. Follow @dfwchildmag on Instagram 2. Visit any of the locations on the Summer Fun Map 3. Snap a picture and post it to Instagram 4. Use hashtag #DFWChildSummerFun and be sure to tag us @DFWChildMag SPONSORED BY

#DFWChildSummerFun Photo Contest Contest closes July 31, 11:59pm. Winners will be announced August 1. Winners selected at random. Must be 21 years or older to enter.

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june 2018 / northtexaschild


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Celebrating 100 years!

At Cook Children’s, our specialists are curing more illnesses every day. So while it may be our birthday, what we’re really celebrating is giving more kids, more tomorrows. The best birthday present ever, is one that gives more kids more reasons to celebrate.

Give today for their tomorrows.

#cook100years

cook100years.org


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THIS MONTH:

18

PEDIATRICIANS WORDS NORTHTEXASCHILD EDITORS

Happy birthday to you! That’s what your child should be singing to make sure they’ve washed their hands an appropriate amount of time. (You can bet we’ll be singing it too.) Below, more surprising and helpful tidbits on kids’ health from our expert sources.

B

TODDL IES & E AB

RS

HAPPY BIRTHDAY... HAPPY BIRTHDAY...

COLDS PER YEAR FOR

HOW LONG SHOULD KIDS WASH THEIR HANDS? LONG ENOUGH TO SING “HAPPY BIRTHDAY” TWICE (OR ONCE VERY SLOWLY).

8–10

6 MONTHS OLD IS WHEN THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS RECOMMENDS THAT KIDS START GETTING ANNUAL FLU SHOTS

mom-approved | P E D I AT R I C I A N S

ERGARTENE R ND

KI

KIDS SHOULD APPLY SUNSCREEN 15–30 MINUTES BEFORE SUN EXPOSURE.

9

The kitchen is the GERMIEST PLACE in the house

A CHILD’S NORMAL BODY TEMPERATURE

S

SOURCES: KIDSHEALTH.ORG; COOK CHILDREN’S; AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS; HEALTHYCHILDREN.ORG; MEDLINEPLUS; NSF INTERNATIONAL; WEBMD; ASTHMA AND ALLERGY FOUNDATION OF AMERICA; COSTHELPER

ESCHOOLERS PR

12 OLESCENTS AD

CAN RANGE FROM 97.9ºF TO 100.4ºF.

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mom-approved | P E D I AT R I C I A N S

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ALLERGY & IMMUNOLOGY

Mireku, Nana MD USMD Specialty Care Las Colinas, Irving See ad on page 29.

FAMILY MEDICINE

Brito Telles, Marcelo MD Clinicas Mi Doctor, Lewisville See ad on page 29.

PEDIATRICS

Adams, Amy MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Denton Arca, Sandra MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Flower Mound

Clifford, Susan MD USMD Las Colinas MacArthur, Irving

Georgulas, Anne MD Dr. Anne Pediatrics, Coppell See ad on page 28.

Day, Jeffrey MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics South Denton

Goff, David MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics South Denton

Dhaliwal, Harminder MD Pediatric and Family Physicians, Flower Mound Dhoot, Shrikant MD Pediatric Physicians, Flower Mound Dutton, Karri MD Corinth Family Medicine & Pediatrics Fitzgerald, Ralph MD MD Pediatric Associates, Flower Mound See ad on page 29.

Bhatt, Anand MD Baylor Scott & White Pediatrics Las Colinas, Irving

Forbes, Michelle MD MD Pediatric Associates, Flower Mound See ad on page 29.

Brown, Mary MD Clinical Pediatric Associates of North Texas, Irving

Fowers, Michelle MD Baylor Scott & White Pediatrics Las Colinas, Irving

Powell, Susan MD MacArthur Pediatrics, Irving Schleier, Sue MD Pediatric Center of Las Colinas, Irving

Jones, Carrie MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Denton

Sias, Tricia MD Kid’s First Pediatrics, Highland Village See ad on page 28.

Kay, Joan MD Medical and Surgical Clinic of Irving See ad on page 29.

Torrie, Susan MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics South Denton

Kurian, Darlene MD Medical and Surgical Clinic of Irving See ad on page 29.

Venkatachalam, Vani MD MD Pediatric Associates, Coppell See ad on page 29.

Peak, Sandra MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Lewisville

Wisler, Carolyn MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Flower Mound

To view comments on all nominated doctors, visit dfwchild.com/doctors.

6-TIME

Anne Georgulas, MD

WINNER

Pediatrics Being small is a big deal. Trust your child with Dr. Anne, a board-certified pediatrician. She is your trusted advisor. You are empowered with information. You call the shots. Dr. Anne takes time with you. She understands the whole child — physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual. Dr. Anne takes care to get the big picture first.

That extra care can make all the difference. Big care for small packages. Call Dr. Anne. 150 S. Denton Tap Rd., Ste. #116 Coppell,TX 75019 972-304-0091 www.drannemd.com

Tricia Sias, MD

3-TIME

WINNER

Pediatrics I joined Kids First in 2014 after completing my residency program at Children’s Medical Center in Dallas. I enjoy providing education and guidance during each new and exciting stage of a child’s life! My clinical interests include asthma, mental health issues and preventative medicine. My husband, Chris, and I have fallen in love with the state of Texas

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june 2018 / northtexaschild

and are excited about building our lives here with our son, Luke, and two Labrador retrievers. 2200 Village Pkwy. Highland Village, Texas 75077 972-317-6000 www.kidsfirstpediatrics.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Marcelo Brito Telles, MD Family Medicine MD Medical Group’s mission is to provide easy access to health services. Clinics throughout DFW offer same-day appointments and extended hours for patient convenience and accept most health insurance plans, including CHIP and Medicaid. Dr. Brito Telles joined Clinicas Mi Doctor in 2014. He is known by his patients for being thorough, compassionate and understanding. He was awarded the Outstanding Patient

Satisfaction Award in 2017. He is bilingual, offering medical care to patients of all ages in Spanish and English. He enjoys playing and watching basketball and soccer, hiking and camping, and the beach. He loves spending time traveling with his family. MD Medical Group Clinicas Mi Doctor 701 S. Stemmons Fwy. Lewisville, TX 75067 972-316-6495 • F 972-316-6500 www.clinicasmidoctor.com

Ralph Fitzgerald, MD; Michelle Forbes, MD; & Vani Venkatachalam, MD

5-TIME

WINNER

Pediatrics With extended hours, same-day appointments and two locations, MD Pediatrics works around busy schedules and helps keep families healthy. Dr. Ralph Fitzgerald has been practicing with MD Pediatrics since 1996. His special medical interests include sports injury prevention and asthma maintenance. Dr. Michelle Forbes joined the MD Pediatrics team in 2014. She is interested in the impact physical fitness has on brain function and mental health.

Dr. Vani Venkatachalam joined the MD Pediatrics team in 2015 and sees patients in Coppell. Dr. Venkatachalam grew up in India and speaks many languages, including Telugu, Tamil and Hindi. Her medical interests include newborn care and travel medicine.

760 N. Denton Tap, #120, Coppell,TX 75019 2560 Central Park Ave., #195, Flower Mound, TX 75028 972-420-1475 • www.mdpedi.com

Joan Kay, MD & Darlene Kurian, MD

5-TIME

WINNER

Pediatrics

2021 N. Mac Arthur Blvd., Ste. 250 Irving, TX 75061 972-253-4300 www.mscitx.com

Nana Mireku, MD

2-TIME

WINNER

Allergy & Immunology Dr. Mireku is a board-certified pediatric allergist/immunologist who has been serving allergic patients in the DFW Metroplex for 10 years. As an allergy sufferer herself and being the parent of a food–allergic child, she is passionate about providing relief for her allergic patients. She believes in empowering her patients and their families through education of their diseases. In her spare time, she continues her passion for children and education through her role

as chief operating officer of the Little Medical School of Dallas/Fort Worth. This is an educational program that brings medicine, science and the importance of health to children in an entertaining and fun way. USMD Allergy/Immunology 6750 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 350 Irving, TX 75039 972-996-5735 • www.usmdinc.com www.littlemedicalschool.com/dallasfortworth  1-833-DOC-KIDS northtexaschild / june 2018

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mom-approved | P E D I AT R I C I A N S

Dr.’s Kurian and Kay have combined over 30 years experience as pediatricians for the Medical and Surgical Clinic of Irving. They provide quality Pediatric Care to the residence of Irving, Las Colinas and Coppell. “Healthy children grow up to be healthy adults”. Our team of board-certified pediatricians cares for children from the moment they’re born through their developmental years with two locations and after hours care.


Look adventure in the eye at the all-new African Savanna! Get up close with our herd of reticulated giraffes as you handfeed these elegant creatures. From a breath away, watch one of the most highly endangered mammals on earth, the southern black rhino. And be nose-to-nose with our amusing hippos, whose underwater viewing exhibit will plunge you beneath a flowing African river. Get closer to these and more ... only at the Fort Worth Zoo.

FORTWORTHZOO.ORG


kid culture. ACT O R

Sorry, no Minions, but your kiddos ages 8–14 can hone their musical theater skills at

THE ACTORS CONSERVATORY THEATRE. Summer camp pro-

ductions include musical classics Willy Wonka and The Lion King; during each two-week session, future babes on Broadway will learn choreography, stage direction and singing skills. Register online; for more information, email info@ getintotheact.org. WHEN: June 25–July 8 (Willy Wonka), July 30–Aug. 12 (The Lion King) COST: $250 per session; $225 per session sibling discount WHERE: 359 Lake Park Road, Suite 118, Lewisville; 972/4368228; getintotheact.org

“I want to be a movie star or play a Minion on TV.” —Rainn, 5

SUMMER OF DREAMS 10 summer camps and activities to match your kids’ future ambitions

WORDS ALEXIS MANRODT & LISA SALINAS PHOTOGRAPHY CINDY JAMES

W

hat do your children want to be when they grow up? Maybe a movie star, a scientist, a singer or Spiderman—the possibilities are as endless as their imaginations, and North Texas has got kidapproved activities to match. We asked kids from our 2018 Model Search what they want to be when they’re older and rounded up the best summer camps, museums and other local destinations to help them achieve their dreams. Read on to find summer suggestions for your own budding banker or aspiring artist.

“I want to be a banker during the week and a dance instructor on the weekend.” —Jake, 9

BANKER

Youngsters who want to get an early start on their finances can see where more than half the country’s money is printed at the BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING. Learn all about money and its history through interactive exhibits and even take a peek at the moneyprinting process. June 26–29 and July 24–27, the Bureau hosts its annual Employee Craftsmanship Demonstrations, where kiddos can make their own currency. COST: Free WHERE: 9000 Blue Mound Road Fort Worth; 817/231-4000 moneyfactory.gov

“I want to be an artist because I’m a good artist here, right? That’s why I want to be an artist.” —Madeline, 5

ART I S T

If pipe cleaners and glitter glue are too passé, consider SCRAP DENTON’s weeklong, full-day Camp Scrap. Instead of traditional art supplies, campers in first through sixth grade use recycled materials like plastic spoons, cardboard, paint samples and beads to create works of art. Register online. WHEN: June 4–Aug. 3 COST: $200 per week; $180 for siblings WHERE: 420 S. Bell Ave., Denton; 940/808-1611; scrapdenton.org

“I want to be a basketball star and play for the San Antonio Spurs.” —Armando, 5

BASKETBALLER

Ballers ages 5–6 can take the court at BOWMEN BASKETBALL ACADEMY camp, hosted by Flower Mound Parks and Recreation at the Community Activity Center. During the half-day camp, boys and girls will learn basketball basics, play northtexaschild / june 2018

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kid culture / S U M M E R games and compete in daily team scrimmages. WHEN: Aug. 6–9 COST: $65 CAC members; $72 nonmembers WHERE: 1200 Gerault Road, Flower Mound; 972/874-7275; bowmensports.com

OF DREAMS “I want to be a scientist so I can create formulas and figure out how to make my own gum.” —Zion, 6

to the test at LITTLE MEDICAL SCHOOL. Weeklong camps for kids in kindergarten to sixth grade teach the importance of overall health, medicine and science through interactive crafts and activities, like a good game of pin the organ on the body. And forget camp T-shirts—campers don white coats and even receive a diploma at the end of the program. Camps are available throughout Dallas-Fort Worth. WHEN: June 11–August 10 COST: $175–$300 per week Multiple locations; 833/362-5437; littlemedicalschool.com

and put on a concert for their adoring fans (that’s you!) at the end of each camp. WHEN: June 4–Aug. 17 COST: $495 per week WHERE: 3501 Long Prairie Road, Flower Mound; 972/5390761; schoolofrock.com

“I want to be a baker just like my mom.” —Sophia, 4

CHEF

Sign your sweet tooth up for one of TASTE BUDS KITCHEN’s weeklong summer camps for age 4 to teens, like Baking 101 or Chocolate Lovers. If your babe has her nose in a book and her hand in the cookie jar, sign up for Tasty Tales, where chefs ages 4–8 learn how to make treats from popular storybooks. Basic kitchen techniques—from mixing ingredients to proper knife use—are addressed in each session. WHEN: May 28–Aug. 24 COST: $49–$75 per day; $200– $315 per week WHERE: 2140 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake; 817/488-0538; tastebudskitchen.com

“I want to be a girl pilot so that I can fly high in the sky.” —Claudette, 4

PILOT

If your young pilot dreams of building her own flying machine, DESTINATION SCIENCE is the camp for her. Kids 5–11 can invent the next SpaceX spacecraft or build a working roller coaster during weeklong camps at North Lake College’s Coppell campus. Each week, campers work on different scientific experiments, so your kiddos can sign up for all three themed sessions and never get bored with their discoveries. WHEN: July 16–Aug. 3 COST: $309 per week; after-hours care available for an additional cost WHERE: 101 S. Royal Lane, Coppell; 972/860-4400; destinationscience.org

SCIENTIST

“I want to be a brain surgeon so that I can help people get better.” —Andrew, 8

DOCTOR

The Doogie Howser in your life can put his stethoscope skills 32

june 2018 / northtexaschild

We can’t promise you’ll make your own gum, but each themed week at WIN KIDS’ Specialty Science summer camp will have kiddos 5 and up making something scientific—from lava lamps and papier-mache volcanoes (to learn about the earth) to fish

prints and shell castings (to learn about the sea). Register for the weeklong, half-day camps over the phone or in person. WHEN: June 18–Aug. 2 COST: $180 per week, plus $25 fee for supplies WHERE: 3000 Waketon Road, Flower Mound; 972/355-9988; winkids.net

“I want to be a zookeeper so I can drive the tour bus around to show people the animals and feed the kangaroos.” —Sydney, 8

ZOOKEEPER

“I want to be a singer.” —Holland, 8

SINGER

If your kiddo already has the rock star attitude, SCHOOL OF ROCK’s weeklong camps will give her the singing skills to go with. Kids ages 7–17 of all skill levels get a backstage pass to studio recording sessions, one-on-one instruction and a full rock ’n’ roll education, from Aretha to Zeppelin. Campers will learn up to six songs from legendary artists

Take a walk on the wild side at ELM FORK EDUCATION CENTER’S Explorer Camp and learn about the creatures roaming free in Denton’s natural ecosystems. During half-day programs that vary by week and age group, kids in second through eighth grade examine local critters and habitats, solve environmental problems and dig for archaeological clues. WHEN: June 11–July 20 COST: $110–$140 per week; multi-week discounts available WHERE: 1155 Union Circle, Denton; 940/565-4912; efec.unt.edu


THE SOURCE

LAKELAND

PRESCHOOL LAKELAND CHRISTIAN ACADEMY PRESCHOOL

MOM ZEN

Enroll Now 2018–2019 12 MOS.–PRE-KINDERGARTEN

– TOUR TODAY – Celebrating God’s Greatest Creation ... a Child.

A Wellness Event

• • • • • •

Saturday, June 9 | 9–11am

Nasher Sculpture Center

PILATES • YOGA

Followed by bites, beverages + pampering

ABeka Reading Curriculum Academically Accredited Preschool Hands-on Exploring and Learning On-site Library & Gymnasium Art and Music • Computer Lab Hands-on Math & Science Labs

397 S. STEMMONS FWY. • LEWISVILLE, TX 75067 972-219-3939 • LCAPRESCHOOL.ORG

Register at dfwchild.com

facebook.com/LakelandChristianAcademyPreschool

TICKETS $8 All proceeds benefit the Nasher

SUMMER BLAST 2018

reworks Friday Night Fi Packages ✦ Great Hotel and Deals*

ions ® Family Attract ® Ninjago City

✦ 

including LEGO Pirate Beach at Adventure and , ® Discovery Center LEGOLAND at er nt Ce ue sc Sea Turtle Re ine Aquarium, SEA LIFE Grapev Railroad e ag nt Grapevine Vi and Nash Farm

now through labor day weekend For the full calendar of events, tickets and more information, visit

GrapevineTexasUSA.com/Summer or call 817-410-3185 28330 GCVB_Child_Mags_SB_June_2018_ad_v2.indd 1

opping Outstanding Sh Dining and Delectable

*Subject to availability and rates subject to change. Restrictions apply. Special packages and rates vary by hotel property. See website for complete details.

5/4/18 4:23 PM

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WORDS ELIZABETH SMITH

25 F A M I L Y - F R I E N D L Y E V E N T S Y O U C A N ’ T M I S S I N

JUNE Table seating from $35 for adults and $19 for children. 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/665-6000 fwsymphony.org

CELEBRATE HIGHLAND VILLAGE

JUNE 1–3 // SCENES FROM TEXAS BALLET THEATER’S SWAN LAKE AT WINSPEAR OPERA HOUSE, WITH LIVE MUSIC BY THE DALLAS OPERA ORCHESTRA.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF STEVEN VISNEAU; IRVING PARKS & REC DEPARTMENT; PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE

FRITZ PARK PETTING FARM

IRV ING’ S F RI T Z PARK June 1–July 31 Friendly sheep, horses, rabbits, turkeys (OK, they’re probably ornery) and more farm animals return to the city of Irving’s free petting zoo, which first opened in 1970, for another summer under the shade trees at Fritz Park. Come out on Tuesdays through Sundays (weather permitting) and enter through the red barn facade. The covered pavilion makes for a great picnic lunch spot. FREE 312 E. Vilbig St., Irving; 972/721-2640 cityofirving.org

TEXAS BALLET THEATER’S SWAN LAKE

W IN SPE AR OPE R A HOUSE June 1–3 The Black Swan character of this most classic of ballets is no ugly duckling. Dress up your family’s most cultured members (if you wish) to see the beautiful costumes, sets and artistry of a Texas Ballet

Theater live show, accompanied with live music by The Dallas Opera Orchestra. Tickets for this kid-friendly show start at $20. $35 VIP Experience add-on tickets include exclusive souvenirs and a post-performance backstage tour. 2403 Flora St., Dallas; 877/828-9200 texasballettheater.org

CONCERTS IN THE GARDEN

FORT WORTH B OTANIC GAR DEN June 1–July 4 This weekend concert series features the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, tribute bands and grand finale fireworks shows each night at the botanic garden. Don’t miss the Star Wars music plus laser light shows June 15–17 for the best dressup opportunity (and people watching). Pack your own picnic or preorder a Central Market Picnic Pack ($8 each for kids’ meals) and bring a blanket or chairs to settle into the lawn. $25 adults; free for children 10 and younger.

UNIT Y PA RK June 2 This Saturday festival schedule has a built-in naptime: Come early for the morning 1K/5K run and family fishing competition at the pond. Then after the heat of the day recedes, come back in the evening when the kids’ zone opens at 6pm and the fireworks show lights up after dark. Coolers and chairs welcome. Free event admission. Registration from $10 for the 1K; 5K from $20 for students and $25 for adults. 2200 Briarhill Blvd., Highland Village; 972/317-7430 highlandvillage.org

VOLY IN THE PARK

KLYDE WA RRE N PA RK June 2 Now is the time for your kids’ summer service project. Bring them with you to this fifth annual volunteerism festival hosted by VolunteerNow, Inc. and meet reps from 75 local nonprofits. Enjoy kid-friendly entertainment while you visit the booths to learn all about the community issues that may spark your child’s interest (list of participating profits online) and learn how to join meaningful volunteer projects as a family. FREE 2012 Woodall Rodgers Freeway, Dallas; 214/826-6767 volnow.org

FAMILY FESTIVAL – PASSPORT TO ASIA

KIMBE LL A RT MUSE UM June 2 Enjoy free admission to the Kimbell’s special exhibition From the Lands of Asia (saving you $14 for adults and

$10 for the kids) on view in the Renzo Piano Pavilion and head outside onto the lawn for kid-friendly fun. Craft demos, art activities and cultural performances run from noon–5pm. FREE 3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/332-8451 kimbellart.org

THE BABY EVENT

T HE SHOP S AT WILLOW BE ND June 2 Want to see your child on the cover of Dallas-Fort Worth Baby magazine? Don’t miss our 21st annual cover model search, open to babies 12 months and younger. Reps from our magazine and the Kim Dawson Agency will be waiting in the Plano mall’s Grand Court to meet your child. After your child’s walk across the runway, check out the vendor booths for must-have mommy swag and top local resources for new and expecting parents. Free expo admission. $45 day-of registration for model search. 6121 W. Park Blvd., Plano; 972/447-9188 dfwchild.com/events

TARGET FIRST SATURDAYS

NASHE R SCULP T URE CE NT E R June 2 Have your littles begun their own collection of treasures? Explore the Nasher’s Big Idea of collecting during this family fun day featuring a collage art project and followed by more entertainment designed for preschoolers to elementaryage kids: artist demos, story time and yoga out in the sculpture garden. Museum open from 10am–5pm with activities from 10am–2pm. FREE 2001 Flora St., Dallas;

214/242-5100 nashersculpturecenter.org

SUMMER NIGHTS

PE ROT M U SEUM OF NAT UR E A ND SCIE NCE June 7 Each first Thursday in June, July and August, the Perot stays open late through 9pm for special programming in the plaza and throughout the exhibit halls. First up this month features musicthemed fun, such as building instruments out of unusual objects and making your own ice cream in a bag with the help of the Perot Café chefs. Free with general admission: $20 adults; $13 youth 2–17. 2201 N. Field St., Dallas; 214/428-5555 perotmuseum.org

THE AMAZING RACE – FATHER-SON EDITION

PA RR PA RK June 9 Reality TV Amazing Race contestant and Fort Worth local Tanner Kloven hosts this friendly competition for dads and their sons age 5 and older. For some pre-Father’s Day fun, team up as a family to complete challenges and bypass road blocks, all the while learning about different countries and the tasks indigenous to that country. $15 per person by June 3; $20 beginning June 4. Tickets will not be sold at the door. Fathers are allowed to participate with up to three sons. 3010 Parr Lane, Grapevine; 817/410-3450 gograpevine.com/fatherson

CANAL FEST

L AS C OLINAS URBA N CE N T ER June 9 Bounce to the rhythm of African drum beats and

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DAIRY DAY

NASH FA RM June 9 June is National Dairy Month—aka a great excuse to eat ice cream and experience the Southwest Dairy Farmers’ mobile milking parlor when it stops by Nash Farm. Learn about both the old and new ways of producing milk, butter and cheese, put some elbow grease into the butter churner, and visit the farm’s sheep, chickens, turkeys and rabbits during this all-ages educational day. Registration is required. $3 per person. 626 Ball St., Grapevine; 817/410-3185 nashfarm.org

ARTROCKS!

NORT H PARK C E N TE R June 9 Meet at NorthCourt on level one for an afternoon of family art projects that explore the surrealist and abstract expressionist work of French-American artist Louise Bourgeois, who often focused on themes of family and domesticity. Local creatives with Artist DIY, Creative Arts Center, KidArt and Sour Grapes lead kid-friendly introductions to the high art forms, and more educators lead walkSTEM tours and a Bookmarks library scavenger hunt. FREE 8687 N. Central Expressway, Dallas; 214/363-7441 northparkcenter.com/events

WONDERFUL WEDNESDAY

T H E MODE RN ART M USEUM OF F ORT WORTH June 13 Venture out to the Fort Worth Cultural District for a kid-friendly introduction to the Modern’s latest exhibit, Takashi Murakami— The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg (opening June 10) during this program for ages 5–12. A docent 36

leads them on a tour and gallery project that focuses on the 50-work retrospective for the Japanese artist, known for his vibrant anime-inspired characters and collaborations with Kanye West and fashion house Louis Vuitton. The program begins at 4pm and space is limited. Sign-up opens at the front desk the day of the program. FREE 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth; 817/738-9215 themodern.org

THE LAVA LUAU

D OW NTOW N CAR ROLLTON June 16 Share in all the fun of Hawaiian traditions (but far from the recent lava flow from the volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island) when Aloha Amigo Productions throws this summertime kick-off party in the Carrollton square. This local luau features hula dancing and instruction, live bands and food trucks including Tikiz Shaved Ice & Ice Cream. Be sure to compete in the limbo and hula-hooping contests and stay for sunset at the square. FREE 1106 S. Broadway St., Carrollton; 214/641-4620 thelavaluau.com

LEGO MINI BRICKFACTOR BUILD-OFF

LEGOL AND DISC OV ERY CENTER June 21 Long before Lego Batman swooped in, did you know the 1978 Police Officer was one of the first modern Lego Minifigures? Legoland Discovery Center celebrates the 40th anniversary of their beloved mini-people with a building competition for kids ages 5–15. Preregister online by June 11 and participate for a chance to win a one-day apprenticeship with the master model builder. See the brand–new collection of Minifigs and enjoy more 40th birthday surprises June 23–24 and June 30– July 1. Competition is free. Other activities included with admission: $21.95 for age 3 and older. 3000 Grapevine Mills Parkway, Grapevine; 877/818-1677

june 2018 / northtexaschild

dallasfw.legolanddiscoverycenter.com

ULTIMATE DINOSAURS EXHIBIT

PE ROT MUSE UM OF NAT URE A ND SCIE NCE Opens June 23 Using augmented reality technology and hands-on activities, discover a “new” breed of dinosaurs—including Giganotosaurus (real name), T. rex’s bigger cousin—when this special exhibit opens to the public. Ultimate Dinosaurs tells the story of the breakup of supercontinent Pangaea and how the continental drift affected the evolution of dinosaurs who lived in isolation in South America, Africa and Madagascar. $30 adults; $21 youth 2–12; free for children under 2. $7 for Perot members. Member preview days June 21–22. 2201 N. Field St., Dallas; 214/428-5555 perotmuseum.org

SUNDAY FUNDAYS

PA NT HE R ISL A ND PAVILION Opens June 24 Through September 2, spend your lazy Sunday afternoons at a beach party on the shores of Panther Island Pavilion. Float the Trinity River in inner tubes ($5 to rent) or check out the other watersports including kayaks, canoes and pedal boats. Admission, child-friendly PoserKids Yoga on select Sundays and activities such as giant Jenga are all free. On June 24, buy one and get one free tube rental with a food donation for the Tarrant Area Food Bank. 395 Purcey St., Fort Worth; 817/698-0700 sundayfundayfw.com

CURRENCY CRAFTSMANSHIP DEMONSTRATIONS

WE ST E RN CURRE NCY FACILIT Y June 26–29 Assigning extra chores around the house this summer? Show your kids where their allowance comes from by visiting the Bureau of Engraving and Printing facility that produces over half of the nation’s paper money. All week, select employees lead educational activities, including Intaglio engraving demonstrations and a create-your-owncurrency craft station for age 8 and older. FREE

MUST-SEE MUSICALS

Go on a musical journey with your family’s favorite characters from Disney tales and other stories when a marionette theater, a Broadway touring production and local children’s theaters take to the stage. DISNEY’S PETER PAN, JR.

A RT I S A N C H I L DR E N ’ S T H E AT E R June 9–July 14 It’s the “second star to the right and straight on till morning” to Neverland for local kids performing in the Hurst theater production each Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Watch the live adventures of the Lost Boys, mermaids and Captain Hook in this hourlong musical based on the 1953 animated film and J.M. Barrie’s original play. $11 adults; $7 children age 12 and younger. 444 E. Pipeline Road, Hurst; 817/284-1200 artisanct.com

THE LION KING BROADWAY MUSICAL

M U SIC HA L L AT FA I R PA R K June 13–July 7 “Hakuna matata” is Swahili for “get your tickets now so you won’t worry about missing The Lion King.” The smash hit Disney musical appeared on Broadway more than 20 years ago and continues as a must-see for all ages. Tickets from $28. Here’s a tip: Try to snag an aisle seat on the bottom level for the best view of the masked dancers and animal puppets as they parade down the aisles to the stage. 909 First Ave., Dallas; 866/870-2717 dallassummermusicals.org

HOW I BECAME A PIRATE

DA L L A S C H I L DR E N ’ S T H E AT E R June 15–July 8 After a year on the road, DCT’s national touring production of the comedy musical How I Became a Pirate sails back into North Texas. Come early for kid-friendly activities in the lobby before each show and sing along to “A Good One to Boot” and “Green Teeth” as the young Jeremy Jacobs and the pirate crew search for a place to bury their treasure. Recommended for 4 years and older. Tickets from $17. 5938 Skillman St., Dallas; 214/740-0051 dct.org

CHILDREN’S DAY AT THE THEATER

I RV I N G A RT S C E N T E R June 19 See the Cowardly Lion, the Tin Man and more handcarved characters from over the rainbow when the talented artisans of Le Theatre de Marionette perform a live musical marionette adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Tickets for the all-ages shows at 11am and 2:30pm are first come, first served and are available one hour before showtime. No advance tickets will be offered. FREE 3333 North MacArthur Blvd., Irving; 972/252-7558 irvingartscenter.com

9000 Blue Mound Road, Fort Worth; 817/231-4000 moneyfactory.gov/fortworthtxtours.html

CELEBRATE COPPELL – PARTY IN THE PARK

A NDREW BROW N PA RK EAST June 30 On the Saturday before Coppell’s Independence Day parade, come out to celebrate our nation’s birthday at this family fun day at the park.

Lace up for the morning 5K benefiting Special Olympics teams of Coppell and come back at 4pm to share a turkey leg or indulge in deep-fried Twinkies. The main draw—the fireworks show— begins around 9:30pm. Free admission. 5K run registration from $20. Kids 5 and younger are free for fun run, but sign up is required. 260 E. Parkway Blvd., Coppell; 972/462-5100 celebratecoppell.com

F O R M O R E F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY F U N T H I S M O N T H , C H E C K O U R O N L I N E C A L E N DA R AT D F W C H I L D.CO M/C A L E N DA R. A N D W H I L E Y O U ’ R E T H E R E , S I G N U P F O R O U R W E E K LY E-NEWSLETTERS: THE WEEKEND GUIDE.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DEEN VAN MEER; ©ISTOCK.COM/OORKA; ©ISTOCK.COM/JOE LENA

witness Polish folk dancing, fire-twirling hula dancers and more multicultural experiences during this fifth annual international festival. Take a stroll along Irving’s Mandalay Canal (which itself was inspired by Venice, Italy) to experience the food, children’s crafts and dress-up photo stations and three performance stages. FREE 200 E. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving; 972/721-2501 irvingevents.org


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

EPIC SUMMER PLANNING STARTS HERE

The Children’s Courtyard 30 DFW area locations 877-701-4908 www.ChildrensCourtyard.com/summer

575 Hyatt Lost Pines Rd. Lost Pines, TX 78612 512-308-1234 lostpines.regency.hyatt.com

3000 Waketon Rd. Flower Mound, TX 75028 972-355-9988 winkids.net

Make this summer exceptional. Enjoy a wide variety of weekly themed experiences (exploring interesting subjects such as science, art, animals, history, fitness, world cultures and games), engaging activities, fun field trips, and healthy meals and snacks. Choose your favorite weekly camp themes, or spend the whole summer here. Plus, campers get a new T-shirt, water bottle, and drawstring bag for all their summer adventures! Sounds great, right? Then what are you waiting for? Sign up now for our Summer to Discover Camp, only at The Children’s Courtyard®. Call 877-701-4908 or visit ChildrensCourtyard.com/summer to learn more and find your local school.

Take the ultimate getaway to Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort & Spa this summer. Whether you’re looking for an action-packed vacation or some time to reconnect with one another, Hyatt Regency Lost Pines has it all. From taking Colorado River excursions or horseback rides through the Loblolly Pines to visiting the nearby Zip Lost Pines attraction and floating the lazy river at the resort’s Crooked River Water Park, families can beat the summer heat with an assortment of fun-filled experiences.   The resort also features Camp Hyatt in which children enjoy activities while their parents take time away at the resort’s Spa Django or experience world-class golf at Wolfdancer Golf Club. 

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

BESTSummer EVER

Win Kids…famous for first-class summer camps for children. From themes like Kritter Kids to Ninja Warriors, Police and Fire and more, our caring teachers will treat your child to the super-fun camps we are famous for! Come experience sports and fitness “The Win Kids Way!” Your child will be handled with love in a high-quality environment! Ages 2½–12. Full and half-day options. Camps fill fast so enroll early. Enrollment begins March 5th. northtexaschild / june 2018

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confessions

“My gut begins rumbling while standing in line at Disney. After the ride, I sprint to the bathrooms. During my bathroom break, I hear my son tell my daughter, ‘NO!!!! Don’t lick the trash can!’”

MOMMY FAILS

—BECKY, ALEDO

ILLUSTRATION MARY DUNN

IT WAS I was planning RAINING WHEN I the perfect first ARRIVED HOME WITH MY SON. birthday party for my son, with custom plates. Didn’t notice I misspelled his name… I GRABBED MY Happy Birthday Natheniel.” USUAL LOAD TO BRING “My husband routinely “My kids were INSIDE AND and playfully slaps me arguing and I just on the butt, saying, PUT SLEEPING didn’t have patience ‘Hey, Boo.’ As we were BABY ON MY visiting him at his job, to respond calmly. SHOULDER. MY my son DJ walks up In anger, I picked up FOOT SLIPPED behind my husband’s a wooden stool and AND I FELL. boss, slaps her on slammed it several the butt and LUCKILY, I WAS says, ‘Hey, Boo!’” times on the floor STILL HOLDING while screaming HIM PERFECTLY at them to stop. AND ONLY I broke one of MOMMY WAS Got a parenting fail you’d SOAKED.” the stool’s legs.” like to share? We’d love to —MARIA, DALLAS

—KELLINY, CEDAR HILL

—ELIZABETH, CARROLLTON

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june 2018 / northtexaschild

hear from you. Send it to editorial@dfwchild.com.

—KRISTIE, RICHARDSON

I’M AT TARGET AND MY 3-YEAR-OLD TELLS ME HE NEEDS TO GO POTTY. I FIGURE I MIGHT AS WELL USE IT WHILE I’M THERE TOO. AS SOON AS I SIT DOWN, MY SON YELLS, ‘MOMMY, ARE YOU MAKING POO-POO TOO?! ARE YOU GOING TO HAVE BAD POOPS LIKE ME?!’ THE WOMEN IN THE OTHER STALLS BURST INTO LAUGHTER.” —ANGELA, LAS COLINAS


I FEED HER BRAIN A HEALTHY BREAKFAST. GO PUBLIC. â„¢

KERA Kids has a world of teacher-tested, kid-approved content, online and on the air. Go for the shows, videos and games. Go because fun and learning go hand-in-hand. Go to enrich their education, with the same member-supported organization that probably helped support yours. Go Public.

KERAKIDS.ORG


Texas-sized fun, all in one Smurftastic place! Now - September 3, 2018 Enjoy family fun inspired by The Smurfs: • Papa Smurf’s Search Party Scavenger Hunt, Le Smurfs Art Corner and Sweet Shop • Breakfast with The Smurfs, Magical Meadow & Forbidden Forest Escape Rooms and Gargamel’s Wizard Academy • 3D Visual Light Show and Splash Party, both presented by bubly™ • Build-A-Bear Workshop® • Paradise Springs resort pool & lazy river, dining events and so much more!

Book Your Summer Getaway Today!

GaylordTexan.com/SummerFest 2018 Licensed through I.M.P.S. (Brussels) www.smurf.com

| (817) 778-1000

AQUAFINA is a registered trademark of PepsiCo, Inc. © 2018 BUBLY and the Bubly Designs are trademarks. © & ® Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

NorthTexasChild June 2018  

The magazines parents live by in Denton County

NorthTexasChild June 2018  

The magazines parents live by in Denton County