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M A R C H 2018

HEALTHY HOME WHY YOUR HOUSE MAY BE MAKING YOU SICK

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HOW TO MARIE KONDO YOUR PLAYROOM

PARENTING FAILS YOU’LL RELATE TO MEET MOM NEXT DOOR

TAYLOR TOMASI HILL

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pages / M A R C H

2018

FEATURE

16 Home, Toxic Home

Chemicals lurking in your furniture, walls and cleaning supplies could be making your family sick words Heather Duge & Carrie Steingruber

DEPARTMENTS NOTED 5 Extreme Makeover: Playroom Edition

Your kids can help you give their space the Marie Kondo treatment

REAL MOMS 9 Mom Next Door / Taylor Tomasi Hill We chat with the street style star about fashion and life with her little one

12 Datebook

Happenings that are perfect for date night or GNO

14 Routines / Shannon Cairns Get the dirt on the toxic chemicals that may be hiding in your house, p. 16

This Fort Worth doctor balances surgeries, two kids and a baby on the way

KID CULTURE 23 Helping Hands

ON THE COVER

THE HOME ISSUE

Sydney of Grand Prairie Photography: Cindy James Hair/Makeup: Jenn Karsner, Wallflower Management Styling: Lauren Niebes

8 ways to serve all year long

35 The Agenda

Our favorite family events this month

COLUMNS 38 Confessions / Mommy Fails

When bad things happen to good parents

PUBLISHER/ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Joylyn Niebes CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lauren Niebes EDITORIAL Managing Editor Carrie Steingruber

Associate Editor Alexis Manrodt Assistant Editor Lisa Salinas Calendar Editor Elizabeth Smith ART Graphic Designer Susan Horn

Editorial Designer Katie Garza Art Assistant Sara Strugger ADVERTISING Associate Publisher Diana Whitworth Nelson Account Executives Nikki Garrett, Nancy McDaniel,

Kristen Niebes, Sandi Tijerina, Laura Vardell, Kerensa Vest

Promotions Coordinator Beth McGee

Advertising Coordinator Amy Klembara

ADMINISTRATION Business Manager Leah Wagner

PR/MARKETING Audience Development Director Candace Emerson

Office Manager + Distribution Robbie Scott

FortWorthChild is published monthly by Lauren Publications, Inc. FortWorthChild is distributed free of charge, one copy per reader. Only FortWorthChild authorized distributors may deliver or pick up the magazines. Additional or back copies of FortWorthChild are available for $2 per copy at the offices of Lauren Publications, Inc. We reserve the right to edit, reject or comment editorially on all material contributed. We cannot be responsible for the return of any unsolicited material. FortWorthChild is Š2018 by Lauren Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without express written permission prohibited.

fortworthchild / march 2018

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noted. EXTREME MAKEOVER:

PLAYROOM EDITION how to clean your kids’ space, kondo-style WORDS ASHLEY HAYS

©ISTOCK.COM/YURII USENKO

M

y twins are almost 7, and their playroom was a wreck. I was side-kicking Legos and Barbie heads inside so I could squeeze the door shut and block off the nightmare. When I turned to my local parenting Facebook page for advice, the name Marie Kondo surfaced. Carmen Falls Hunter, an attorney and Fort Worth mom of three, follows Kondo’s 2014 book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. The Japanese mom has sold millions of copies and was included on Time’s list of 100 most influential people in 2015. The central tenet of Kondo’s method is physically holding every item you own to see if it evokes happiness. If it does, you find a place for it; if it doesn’t, you thank it for its services and then donate or dump it. Her primary rule is also the title of one of her chapters: Sort by Category, Not by Location. “It’s just so practical,” Hunter says. “You take everything out of the room one category at a

fortworthchild / march 2018

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M A K EOV E R: P L AY R O O M E D I T I O N

time and not worry about who gave it to you favorite glow stick; it reminded her of visiting or where it came from. You just focus on the Grandmother for the Fourth of July. Two joy it brings.” minutes later my son put his tattered baby It may be practical, but the very idea of blanket—one of the first blankets I ever holding every single item in my kids’ playroom bought as a mother—in the Trash pile! was overwhelming. How would I get my kids Hunter’s family also struggled to get rid to help me? Was a 6-year-old of things that were given to even capable of making such them by someone special. heavy decisions? “We had to accept that our READY, After consulting the home could not serve as a experts, three rules proved museum for all these things SORT, GO crucial to Kondo-ing we tied sentimental value to,” How much can your our playroom. she says. “I narrowed it down child contribute? to one box. If it could not fit Gauge their readiness in the box, we would take a 1. TALK TO YOUR based on these four picture of it to remember it KIDS BEFOREHAND. development stages, by and then give it away.” Focus on happiness and the as advised by Sam So my kids and I negotiitems that produce it, but Peters, LPC: ated: I would take a picture tailor your conversation to STAGE 1 (TYPICALLY of the old glow stick, the your child’s maturity. For 1–4 YEARS): Generally not blanket and whatever else example, if you tell your able to fully understand; may brought back happy memo3-year-old that he is never not give accurate responses ries and create a picture when asked if an item makes going to see his neglected them happy. album. That way, we could G.I. Joes again, he might be still be reminded of special reluctant to give them up. STAGE 2 (TYPICALLY 5–6 items without stuffing the Sam Peters, a licensed YEARS): Better able to make sense of the idea that an playroom to the brim. professional counselor in object makes them happy. Lewisville who specializes 3. KEEP IT SIMPLE. in pediatric development, STAGE 3 (TYPICALLY 7–8 I could typically keep the YEARS): Can contextualize explains that a child may and understand that kids focused for 30-minute claim an object still makes something that used to bring intervals, enough time to him happy if he knows the them joy doesn’t anymore. go through 15 to 20 toys, alternative is losing it. STAGE 4 (TYPICALLY 9–12 reminisce and then make the “Typically, the younger YEARS): Can understand critical decision. After two children are, the more degrees of happiness and that long days, our last challenge often you can expect a false something that makes them loomed: finding a place for positive if you tell them that happy could make someone the Keep pile, and making it you are going to give their else even happier. easy for my kids to maintain. belonging away,” Peters says. Valerie Wood, profes“If you don’t tell them what sional organizer for Neat will happen to the object Method in Dallas, believes a child is never too when they say it doesn’t bring them happiyoung to begin keeping her space tidy. “My ness, they may be more likely to give you an 1-year-old, Addison, has color coding all over honest answer.” her room,” she reveals. “Even at her age, she He also says that it’s not necessarily is already able to recognize that red books go about the age of the children but their abilwith red books and blue with blue.” ity to contextualize that determines Wood suggests using bins and how much they can contribute. sorting by texture—woods, If your child is at a higher plastics and foams should developmental level, try explaineach have their own bin, ing the joy he will bring to other for example. “Keeping it as kids by donating his things. simple as possible and not Taking the scary garbage truck getting too detailed will help out of the equation and replacthe child be able to maintain it ing it with a less fortunate little on her own,” she says. boy or girl seemed to help a lot with Telling my son to put up his my kids’ separation anxieties. Lincoln Logs isn’t a painful sentence anymore, as there is a specific place dedicated 2. DON’T LINGER IN MEMORY LANE. to his village-building components. Seriously—don’t even glance that way. It’s been a week since we finished. I’m We started with baby toys and dubbed knocking on wood, but I think this is going three corners as Keep, Donate and Trash. I to stick. Finally, we can stand outside the could not believe the resistance I encountered playroom, breathe deeply, and say, “This when I tried to put a dead glow stick in the brings me happiness.” Trash pile. Turns out, it was my daughter’s

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real moms. mom next door /

TAYLOR TOMASI HILL style muse to many, mom to one INTERVIEW NICOLE JORDAN PHOTOGRAPHY STEPHEN KARLISCH

I

f Taylor Tomasi Hill’s flaming red hair looks familiar, it’s with good reason— fashion editors have been splashing her no-holds-barred signature style across their magazines and blogs for years. One of the original street style stars and a former fashion editor herself, the Dallas native was an industry name to know long before she took the helm of creative and women’s fashion at Forty Five Ten. “I found my true passion—discovering untapped, emerging talent—when I worked at Teen Vogue,” she says. “I was the first editor that would walk trade shows to find the needle in the haystack.” Perhaps fated to work in the industry, Tomasi Hill grew up helping her parents write orders and unpack samples for their children’s accessories line. After graduating from Pratt Institute with an industrial design degree, she scored an internship at W Magazine, and her love affair with fashion hit a fever pitch. After departing Teen Vogue, Tomasi Hill, 38, spent time in New York at Marie Claire and Moda Operandi, where she transitioned from editorial to the business side of the industry.

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I’M SO GLAD THE STARS ALIGNED AND WE WERE ABLE TO GET TOGETHER! YOUR SCHEDULE IS CRAZY.

I haven’t mastered work-life balance, for sure. A lot of people seem like they have, but I’ll be the first to tell you I don’t have it figured out. DOES THAT GIVE YOU GUILT? I was raised watching

I

WHAT ARE YOUR GO-TO RESTAURANTS IN DALLAS? When I get off the plane

from Paris, my husband and Wells pick me up and we head directly to Mesero to get the salsa in the veins. I also love the Honor Bar and Flower Child. LET’S TALK ABOUT FASHION. WHAT INSPIRES YOU? It’s not just about picking

what I think is cool; it’s about making sure we’re catering to women and their bodies—not what color is in or what style of jean is of the moment. Having a oneWANT WELLS on-one with a woman and her TO SEE HIS leaving feeling thrilled and confident is what inspires me.

MOM AS A HARDWORKING PERSON, WHO REALLY DOES CONTRIBUTE TO THE FAMILY.

Linking your ability to learning!

Feeling burned out, she launched TTH Blooms, a floral design company, in 2013. But when Forty Five Ten came calling, she knew it was time to return to her roots. In 2016, Tomasi Hill moved back to Dallas with her husband of 10 years, Chase, and their son, Wells, now 3. She was named vice president, creative and women’s fashion director of Forty Five Ten and got back to doing what she does best: finding the next big thing.

both my parents work late hours. At the time, it may have felt lonely. But looking back I realize that’s what shaped my work ethic. I want Wells to see his mom as a hardworking person, who really does contribute to the family. SINCE HAVING WELLS, HAS YOUR TRAVEL SLOWED DOWN AT ALL? At the

moment, not so much. Am I working on that? One-hundred percent. It’s not worth it to miss certain moments. I miss his birthday every year because I have to go to fashion week. That’s a tough one.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU OFFER TO OTHER WORKING MOMS? We all have to be a

little easier on ourselves. I hold myself to a high standard, and I’m a perfectionist. But we need to give ourselves credit for everything we juggle. DO YOU HAVE A PHILOSOPHY ON PARENTING? We all lead by example. When

I was growing up, my father would go out to his old ’79 Porsche, put on his driving gloves, heat up the car and take me to school. And every single morning he’d tell me, “Be nice to everyone. Everyone is here for a reason. Be a leader and choose your own path.” I preach that to my son.

March 12–16, 2018 Included in the cost of admission.

HOW DO YOU TAKE TIME FOR YOURSELF? I wish I were better at that … OK, DO YOU TAKE TIME FOR YOURSELF? I just started going to [facialist]

Joanna Czech. The two times I’ve gone I’ve fallen asleep on the table. I’ve been pretty routine about my Bikram yoga practice. I’ve been doing it for 20 years on and off. It’s the only thing that holds my attention.

WHAT IS YOUR ETHOS WHEN IT COMES TO WELLNESS? DO YOU HAVE ONE? When

I travel, I allow myself to eat whatever I want. I had french fries almost every night in Paris. But I’m pretty good about what I eat at home. Lots of ginger shots. 10

march 2018 / fortworthchild

TOMASI HILL

AND YOUR OWN STYLE?

I like to try everything in new and different ways. I often look back and see that 75 percent of what I wore was awful, but it’s fun to just play with fashion. DO YOU HAVE A STYLE ICON? I try not to have too

many references. I want to be genuine. The magic happens when you’re not trying to replicate something. We can help assist you in what works for your body, but it’s not about copying.

DID HAVING WELLS CHANGE HOW YOU GET DRESSED IN THE MORNING? Maybe a

little bit because my hips grew. They did not go back—nope, that’s a lie. My right foot also grew so some of my shoes hurt. I often wear the same thing two days in a row—and I fully own it. I don’t know why you wouldn’t. You can’t plan your life with a child. It worked yesterday so let’s just throw it on again. THAT’S CALLED EFFICIENCY. Exactly! And I am not afraid to admit it. WHAT’S YOUR APPROACH TO DRESSING WELLS? I was adamant about hand-me-

downs and still am. But the website Maisonette completely changed—not changed, tweaked—my hand-me-down philosophy. It’s very well edited. I get caught in a bit of a black hole when I’m on their site late at night. WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU FELT LIKE YOU NAILED IT PROFESSIONALLY?

I don’t know about nailed it, but I’m very excited about the fact that we’re working with Kirsty Hume, an incredible model from the ’90s. She’s a mom and embraces being natural. She can speak volumes to our customer. I’m thrilled that we got her. That was a real win. AND PERSONALLY? Getting through every day—at the end of the day, when I get to have a glass of wine. Or if I can get through half of my emails, that’s a major win. Editor’s Note: As this issue went to press, it was announced that Taylor Tomasi Hill and Forty Five Ten had parted ways. We can’t wait to see what she does (and wears) next.


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real moms / M O M

SOCIAL

WORDS NICOLE JORDAN

DATEBOOK

Grab your favorite girls. It’s National Women’s History Month, and there’s much to do, learn and see in celebration. MARCH 01 WOMEN OF ART

Girl power appears to be the theme du jour at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Round up your squad and see artwork from notable female photographers in exhibits Ellen Carey: Dings, Pulls, and Shadows and In Her Image: Photographs by Rania Matar. And discover names you might not know in Commanding Space: Women Sculptors of Texas, highlighting regional artists. Free. 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth // 817/738-1933 // cartermuseum.org

02 OSCAR SHORTS

The Academy Awards are March 4. Do your homework at Oscar Shorts, a special Magnolia at the Modern screening of 2018 Academy Award nominees for Best Animated and Best Live Action short films. $9; half price for the noon showing on Sunday, March 4.

In Her Image: Photographs by Rania Matar

3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth // 817/738-9215 // themodern.org

28 HA MLET

If you never scored tickets to Hamlet featuring Academy Award nominee Benedict Cumberbatch, catch it at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. National Theatre Live will broadcast the production to cinemas around the world— the next best thing to front-row seats. $20.

29 M AVERICK SPE AKER SERIES: GRETCHEN CARLSON

The best-selling author, broadcast journalist and women’s equality advocate will undoubtedly have much to say during her stop at the University of Texas at Arlington. By sharing her account of sexual harassment at Fox News in a 2016 Time magazine cover story, Carlson became the unofficial face of sexual harassment in the workplace and empowered women across the nation to speak out about abuse they’ve endured. Now hear her story firsthand. $5.

Hamlet

701 W. Nedderman Drive, Arlington // 817/272-2011 // uta.edu/maverickspeakers

30 RED

Based in the late 1950s, Red centers on the late Mark Rothko, an abstract expressionist painter who was commissioned to do a group of murals for the Four Seasons restaurant in New York. Written by John Logan, the Tony award–winning production was dubbed an “enthralling play about art” by the Associated Press after its debut in 2009. Catch it through April 15 at Theatre Arlington. $24.50. 305 W. Main St., Arlington // 817/275-7661 // theatrearlington.org

12

march 2018 / fortworthchild

PHOTOS COURTESY OF RANIA MATAR; JOHAN PERSSON; JOHN JAY CABUAY; ©ISTOCK.COM/RUDCHENKO

3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth // 817/738-9215 // themodern.org


a thursday in the life of

SHANNON CAIRNS Dr. Shannon Cairns is a podiatrist who runs a private practice in Watauga with her husband, Daniel. They live in Fort Worth with their children, 4-year-old Noah, 2-year-old Bethany, and baby number three expected “any day now.”

5

AM Wake up. This is my personal time to read, pray and go over my agenda for the day. Ideally I try to get a little workout in—but at nine months pregnant, I’ve pretty much given up on anything that requires moving. 6AM Noah heads down the stairs. Both he and his sister are supposed to sleep until 7am, but someone always wakes up early. I finish up with my book and make breakfast. I always aim to make something easy and portable, like toaster waffles and fruit. Noah is an especially picky eater—it’s a mystery what he decides he likes from week to week, but waffles are usually a safe choice. 6:15AM Thursday is surgery day so I head upstairs to change into my scrubs. Operations kick off at 7am, and since Daniel and I operate together, we’re both out the door early. Luckily, my mom agrees to help take care of the kids on these busy days. She spends the night on Wednesdays, which

makes these hectic mornings go much more smoothly. 6:30AM Bethany is up. I bring her downstairs to watch cartoons and eat breakfast with her brother. She throws an epic tantrum when I tell her that Nana will take her to “school” because Mommy has surgeries. She screams and cries, “Mommyyy!” It breaks my heart, but I have to get going—my patients depend on me too. I hand the kids off to my mom and rush to the car while clutching my coffee and to-go breakfast. 7AM I arrive at the surgery center, greet our patients and sign consents ahead of the day’s work. We have a busy morning with three surgeries scheduled. At 36 weeks pregnant, it’s getting increasingly difficult to operate all morning but I push through. Still, I make a plan to go home and rest at lunch before we start afternoon clinic. 11AM Our surgeries are well underway when I receive a message from the hospital that they have a consult they would like for us to see. I nicely ask Daniel if he will go see the patient so I can continue with my lunch plans.   11:30AM Lunchtime rolls around so I drop by the house to grab a bite to eat and rest for about an hour. Daniel calls to tell me about the consult and informs me that the patient will need a procedure later today. My schedule is lighter this afternoon so I tell him I’ll head over to the hospital after I’m done with patients in the office. 1PM Afternoon clinic begins. I’m scheduled to see patients until 3pm so that I can pick up my kids to get in some extra quality time, but I usually end up staying an extra hour to catch up on paperwork. 3PM I wrap up my appointments and paperwork on time and head over to the hospital to see our patient. I perform a bedside procedure—which takes about 30 minutes—and do my notes. They don’t tell you this on TV, but there’s always paperwork to be done in medicine. 4PM Done with work for the day. Time to pick up my sweet kiddos and head back home. 5PM After traffic and wrestling Noah and Bethany into their car seats, we finally get home. All I want to do is lounge on the couch and watch movies with the kids, but people need to eat. I get dinner started and run interference to keep everyone from grabbing all the snacks from the pantry.   6PM Daniel is home and it’s time to eat— except the kids decide they don’t like spaghetti today. Noah wants chicken nuggets and Bethany wants macaroni and cheese. No way am I cooking more meals. We struggle until they each eat a few bites.

Diaries are penned by moms (and dads) in the Fort Worth area. The authors volunteer to share a day of their choosing and are not paid or endorsed by FortWorthChild. Send your diary to editorial@dfwchild.com. All submissions are subject to editing and may be cut for space. 14

march 2018 / fortworthchild

PHOTO COURTESY OF BREE LINNE PHOTOGRAPHY

real moms / R O U T I N E S


the fine

print

ILLUSTRATION BY KATIE GARZA

WHAT SHE’S READING The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren WHAT’S ON HER DVR The Goldbergs, Modern Family, The Walking Dead FAVORITE INDULGENCE Cheesecake WHERE SHE GOES FOR RETAIL THERAPY Target BEVERAGE OF CHOICE Diet Coke with cherry from Sonic FAVORITE PODCAST “The Dave Ramsey Show” FAVORITE APP Ibotta BEAUTY PRODUCT SHE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT Mascara ON GIRLS NIGHT OUT, WE’LL FIND HER Sharing wine and good conversation BLOG OR INSTAGRAM SHE FOLLOWS Garvin and Co. LEAST-FAVORITE CHORE Folding laundry ONGOING PROJECT Organizing pictures into photo books; I’m always trying to catch up on this. HOBBIES Watching football, family outings and lifestyle blogging LOOKING FORWARD TO The birth of our third child WORDS TO LIVE BY “If you want to bring happiness to the whole world, go home and love your family.”—Mother Teresa

6:30PM We head upstairs for bath time, jammies and lots of nighttime snuggles. This is my favorite time of day. I love snuggly clean babies! It’s also the most exhausting part, and I’m looking forward to relaxing and sleeping once the kids go down. 7PM We read books, sing songs and put Bethany to bed. Noah pleads for extra stories, more television time, a glass of water, milk, snacks and anything else that will delay bedtime.   7:30PM Noah is finally down for the night (or at least contained to his room). Daniel and I team up to tidy the house, clean the kitchen and fold some laundry. 8PM Time to relax and watch a little Netflix. Since I’m very pregnant right now, I’m lucky if I can make it through an episode without falling asleep. Though we work together every day, I treasure this quality time with my husband away from the office. 10PM Off to bed and ready to start it all over again in the morning. I’m excited and a little scared to see how our family’s routine will change once we add baby number three to the equation. fortworthchild / march 2018

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HOME,

HOME 16

march 2018 / fortworthchild

©ISTOCK.COM/VASILIKI/UNIZYNE

TOXIC


Chemicals lurking in your furniture, walls and cleaning supplies could be making your family sick WORDS HEATHER DUGE & CARRIE STEINGRUBER

R

EBECCA BLACK HAS ALWAYS BEEN A PROBLEM-SOLVER.

So when her son, Barron, now 10, was diagnosed with autism in 2009, her fix-it mentality kicked in: After diving into research on autism, Black, 40, decided their Highland Park home needed to be gutted. Built in 1915, the house had been renovated several times, but Black suspected that behind the walls lurked mold, a toxin that can cause developmental delays. Testing confirmed Black’s suspicions: Mold was found between the framing of the house and the brick. She also found out the paint on the outside of the house contained lead. “When your child is struggling, everything is a big deal,” Black says. In addition to developmental challenges, Barron was “covered in rashes” and had eczema and stomach problems. Black’s daughter, Avery, was experiencing severe sinus issues. “I didn’t want one thing on my house that had touched lead paint,” Black says. But as Black found during the 18-month renovation, mold and lead were just the first two ingredients in the chemical cocktail cooking in their home. Average Americans spend 90 percent of their life indoors, much of that time at home, says Samantha Dunne, sustainable designer and process analyst at TreeHouse in Dallas. “We are breathing in and exposed to whatever toxins are within our walls,” she explains. That’s especially scary considering that furniture, cookware and even your shower curtain can contain chemicals like phthalates, formaldehyde and other carcinogens—yet many of us aren’t even aware of these toxins or the ways they are damaging our family’s health. “Effects from exposure to these toxins can show up in subtle ways, such as coughing, sneezing or an itchy throat—essentially indoor allergies,” Dunne says. “However, effects can also be much worse—causing headaches, chronic migraines, asthma, increased risk of cancer, and even damage to the kidneys and central nervous system.”

Erin Maxwell, NMD, a naturopathic doctor with a practice in Lewisville, adds that many of the toxins found in homes can affect children’s behavior. “A child might be hyperactive if he comes in contact with certain chemicals,” she explains. Maxwell reveals she’s seeing a “significant increase of toxins in the home.” Yet these substances are often scantily regulated and poorly labeled so parents often have no idea their families are at risk—or how to go about coming clean. TOTAL DETOX

Black’s family of four moved out in 2010 and began the process of making their craftsman home toxin-free from top to bottom, starting with the wood. Like most manufactured products, composite wood off-gasses, or releases harmful chemicals, as it breathes and expands—think that “new” smell. Formaldehyde is the most common output. At low levels, it causes irritation; at higher levels, it’s a known carcinogen. In 2016, the EPA published a new rule on formaldehyde emission standards to limit the offgassing potential of composite wood—the results of a yearslong research process after the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite Wood Products Act was passed by Congress in 2010—but the rule doesn’t take effect until December of this year. Black checked every piece of wood entering her home to ensure it came straight from the lumberyard. But she says some wood used in the new framing may have been manufactured to allow it to bear more weight, an opportunity for formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to be introduced into the wood—and from there, into the air inside her home. “The best way to fight off-gassing if these toxins are in materials is to let them breathe,” Black explains. “We not only allowed the wood to breathe for six weeks, but we also soaked it with water hoses to speed along any off-gassing in order to rid the wood of toxins prior to walling the house.”

fortworthchild / march 2018

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The Blacks’ new floors are made of repurposed wood, which has had years to off-gas toxins, and solid pine, which is natural and untreated. And Black made sure all that craftsman carpentry was sealed with beeswax instead of traditional sealant, another off-gassing culprit. (To fight water stains without a traditional sealant, the Blacks found an unlikely but safe water stain remover: mayonnaise.) Her new stone countertops are natural and untreated too—just like wood, stone off-gases toxins if they are present. “Your family eats food prepared and served from countertops,” Black says. So instead of serving supper with a side of toxins, she chose 100 percent natural stone that doesn’t have toxins to off-gas. Black filled the house with organic furniture and mattresses that are clean of flame retardants and stain- and waterproofing materials. Though many furniture manufacturers have phased out harmful flame retardants since California law stopped requiring them in 2014, the foam in older furniture may still harbor carcinogens that offgas and make their way into the dust floating around your home. And the polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs or PFCs) used to repel water and stains are still found in some consumer goods, even though research has suggested links to cancer, developmental problems and higher cholesterol. In other words, it may be a good idea to skip the flea market and invest in a nontoxic slipcover.

To cover the floors, Black sprang for 100 percent woven wool rugs without fire-retardant chemicals and special carpet tiles that are woven together—no need for toxic glues. All the walls sport zero-VOC paint as opposed to enamel-based color that off-gases for years. “The paint is not as convenient since it’s flat and shows fingerprints, but it’s all worth it,” Black says. That’s because the Blacks noticed a difference in their health almost immediately when they moved back in. Allergies that were a constant issue now only flare up on occasion, Black says, and Avery, now 11, rarely experiences sinus problems. Barron’s autism hasn’t gone away—he still has anxiety and auditory processing issues—but his random rashes and eczema disappeared along with his chronic ear infections. “Did our nontoxic renovation aid in some of the healing that is necessary when raising a child with autism to enable him to see gains like typical children? Absolutely,” she says. “Living in a toxic home was adding weight to all of us. For Barron, the weight was too much on top of the load he was already carrying.”

step one. Ironically, the myriad sprays, wipes, detergents and even scented candles we use to keep our homes clean and fresh can do exactly the opposite. For example, candles made from paraffin wax produce harmful benzene and toluene when burned. Maxwell points out that benzene, which has been linked to leukemia and breast cancer, can also be found in glue, furniture wax and detergent. Suspect ingredients like benzene are the reason Black uses mostly vinegar to clean her toxin-free home, plus an all-purpose cleaner from the Young Living essential oils line. In fact, oils are diffused throughout the house daily instead of scented candles, which now give the family severe headaches. Preston Hollow mom Jennifer Helms, 47, has overhauled her clean routine too. Before, the mom of two found herself at the pediatrician’s office all too often with her son, Jack, who had problems ranging from chronic ear infections and stomach pain to developmental challenges like feeding issues and sensory sensitivities to infections like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rotavirus. After years of doctors and therapists, and no real remedy, Helms looked to her chemical cabinet.

“Since the FDA does not regulate these products, thousands of chemicals can be hidden in them without people realizing it.”

KEEPING IT CLEAN

Creating a toxin-free home is only

“My husband, John, and I had childproofed the home with locks on cabinets to keep Jack and Grace away from products like Windex and bleach, and I began thinking why we even had those products in the first place,” Helms recalls. “It never occurred to me back then that there might be safer product choices that would not harm my children.” Her own research and consultation with an osteopathic doctor revealed that the toxins in her everyday household products could be contributing to her son’s neurological, developmental and immune system challenges. Mary Ann Block, DO, medical director of The Block Center in Hurst, says fragrances found in detergents can wreak havoc on the body. “These petroleum products are manipulated to smell better,” she says. “Since the FDA does not regulate these products, thousands of chemicals can be hidden in them without people realizing it.” It’s true: The Food and Drug Administration and the Consumer Product Safety Commission have banned very few chemicals, and new ingredients are innocent until proven guilty by the government. For now, there are also limited labeling requirements for household products, making it hard for consumers to spot harmful ingredients—especially fragrance components, which have historically been included within the unhelpful catchall “fragrance.” That could be changing in the next few years. California passed a law in October that requires manufacturers to list certain chemical

CHEAP TRICKS

Don’t have the budget for a total reno? Erin Maxwell, NMD, a naturopathic doctor who practices in Lewisville, offers these low-cost tips for detoxing your home: » » LE AR N T O R EA D L A BE L S. The first item listed is the most potent, and the density decreases as you go down the list. Research the ingredients before buying. For example, MSG (also labeled as glutamic acid and monosodium glutamate) can cause ADD-like symptoms in children. » » SW I T C H O UT P L A S T I C containers for glass or stainless steel. » » M A KE Y O UR O W N CL E A N I N G PR OD U C TS with vinegar, water, baking soda and lemon juice. » » T A KE Y O UR S H O ES OF F AT THE D OOR. All kinds of toxins, including pesticides, collect on the bottom of your shoes and hitch a ride into your home. » » LE AV E D R Y C L EA N I NG I N THE G AR AG E for a week to allow the chemicals to off-gas. » » WA T C H W H A T Y O U E AT. The environment at home also includes what you put into your body. The fresher the food, the better it is for you.

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march 2018 / fortworthchild


ingredients in household products right on the label beginning in 2021. (Cleaners are included, but personal care products like shampoo are not.) New York is working on a similar initiative, and the new rules are likely to be followed nationwide. In the face of consumer calls for transparency, SC Johnson (maker of Glade) and other companies have voluntarily begun publishing detailed ingredient lists for the fragrances in their products. Though transparent labeling will help savvy parents avoid cleaning supplies and scented candles with unwanted toxins, it may take longer for those toxins to exit the market entirely. Progress was made in June 2016 when the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act was passed to reform the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), a law that famously didn’t even confer the power to ban asbestos. Now all new and existing chemicals must be evaluated for health risks by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and companies can’t necessarily hide behind claims of confidentiality and proprietary recipes. The EPA has already begun prioritizing chemicals for risk assessment (asbestos was high on the list), but considering there are about 85,000 chemicals in the TSCA inventory, removing all toxins from the grocery store shelves won’t be a quick process. ON A MISSION

In the meantime, Block explains, many people just don’t know how these ingredients are affecting them. At The Block Center, she has treated many patients who did not realize their health conditions were caused by their environment until they removed toxins from their homes. She says some patients who had been taking asthma medication no longer needed it after cleaning up their environment. “The improvement once these products are removed can be very dramatic,” she says.

Yes and NO

Eco-healthy design store TreeHouse and Highland Park mom Rebecca Black give their take on products to buy and products to avoid to keep your home healthy.

Use This

Instead of This

Plant-based cleaners and detergents Recommended brands: Ecos, Eco Nuts, Nellies AllNatural, Babyganics, Seventh Generation

Keep away from artificially scented products, chemical-based products and limit exposure to antibacterial products, as they can actually weaken your immune system.

CARB II compliant (California Air Resources Board Phase 2), NAUF (no added urea formaldehyde) or no VOC (volatile organic compound) flooring and installation material Recommended brands: Kährs, Tesoro Woods, Cali Bamboo Recommended types: cork, bamboo, engineered wood

Consider price and company mission when purchasing flooring. Unrealistically low prices or strong-smelling products often indicate shortcuts taken during the manufacturing stage—largely possible due to dependence on hazardous chemicals.

Low or zero VOC cabinetry options and countertops that are installed with low-VOC adhesives and don’t require sealing. Recommended brands: Crystal Cabinet Works, Caesarstone (countertops), Dekton (surfaces)

Typically, off-the-shelf cabinets have years of off-gassing to cycle through before they can be considered healthy. Do your homework before you invest in a cabinet line. Countertops made from granite or other porous materials require sealing and are often installed with toxic adhesives.

Organic furniture with nontoxic foam Recommended stores: Verellen, Lee

Buy newer models. Furniture produced before 2013 probably contains flame-retardant chemicals.

To cook

Kitchenware that minimizes exposure to toxins Recommended materials: ceramic, cast iron, stainless steel

Kitchenware containing BPA or PFCs (nonstick chemicals) and a lack of ventilation while cooking increases your exposure to toxins.

To paint a room

Zero-VOC paint by companies that provide clear and thorough product safety sheets demonstrating they meet the requirement of 5 grams per liter or less. There are alternative all-natural paints to consider as well, such as all-natural mineral paint and clay plaster. Recommended brands: Dunn-Edwards (latex), Mythic (latex), American Clay (plaster), Romabio (mineral)

Not all zero-VOC paints are equal. Be sure to check product safety sheets. If the company does not have them easily accessible to customers, question the integrity of their zero-VOC claim and move on to a more transparent brand.

To freshen the air

Indoor plants and HEPA air purifiers will help to keep your indoor air clean and smelling good. Invest in airsealing services that seal off all the duct work and wall penetrations to prevent the transfer of unhealthy attic air to the living space. Recommended brands: Austin Air, Airmega, Fresh Wave

Artificially scented sprays and petroleumbased candles simply add more toxins to the air and mask odors instead of eliminating them. Additionally, unless fans are used in conjunction with air purifiers, they simply push bad air around.

To clean your home To redo your floor

To remodel your kitchen To furnish your home

Five years ago, Helms slowly started detoxing her family’s home and implemented dietary changes to clean up their eating habits too. Soon she noticed that the monthly doctor visits became more spread out. Daily trips to the school nurse ended. Over time, many of her son’s chronic issues have become nearly nonexistent. Jack, now 14, sees the doctor once a year for his annual checkup.  “It was shocking the difference all of it made,” Helms says. “I kept

thinking if someone could have taught me how to eliminate toxins and provided me with a list, it wouldn’t have taken so long.” Helms’ wish for specialized detox services led her to leave her 18-year career as a lawyer to start Cleerlife, a company with a mission to teach people how to reduce toxins in their homes. Helms and her business partner research brands in order to sell safe products—they’re expert label readers, clueing in other moms to the meaning of confusing terms like “fragrance-free”

and “unscented.” (The former means no fragrance has been added, while the latter means a chemical has been added to mask the smell.) “We meet people where they are, understanding that everyone doesn’t have the means to renovate their home,” she says. “And we know that children can’t live in a bubble, but as a mom, if you can control the home environment, even small changes like toxin-free laundry detergent and cleaners can make a big difference.” fortworthchild / march 2018

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SPRING FAMILY FUN D I R E C T O R Y

Spring is just around the corner. So shed your winter coats, grab the kids and check out all the season has to offer.

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COMPANY NAME

DETAILS

Adventure Kids Playcare web.adventurekidsplaycare.com 214/295-5877

Adventure Kids Playcare is a unique drop-in childcare and entertainment center for kids ages 6 weeks to 12 years old with theme nights, spring break camp, summer camps, daily activities, STEAM and more! See ad on page 7.

Bureau of Engraving and Printing bep.gov/wcfspecialevents.html 817/231-4000

Annual employee craftsmanship demonstrations are held three times per year. During these special event weeks, BEP employees share the history of the U.S. paper currency printing process through live demonstrations of their artistry and craftsmanship. See ad on page 7.

Crockett Row at W. 7th crockettrow.com 817/810-9076

Crockett Row is your destination to eat, drink, shop and explore in the heart of the Cultural District. Like and follow the Crockett Row social pages for the latest on the #CrockettCraves and #CrockettKids series.

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History fortworthmuseum.org 817/255-9300

Have a rockin’ good time at the Museum! Explore the science of sound in our newest exhibit, GUITAR: The Instrument That Rocked The World, and experience America's Musical Journey in the Omni Theater. See ad on page 22.

Fort Worth Stockyards stockyardsstation.com 817/625-9715

Spring Break kicks off at the Fort Worth Stockyards March 12, Goat Yoga March 14, Sippin and Shoppin March 15, Cowtown Goes Green March 17 and our Texas-Sized Easter Egg Hunt March 31. See ad on page 25.

Fort Worth Zoo fortworthzoo.org 817/759-7555

Zoo Run—Race Day: April 7. Join the stampede by participating in a 1k or 5k race and help support our education and conservation efforts. For more info and to register, please visit fortworthzoo.org. See ad on page 7.

Frank Buck Zoo frankbuckzoo.com 940/668-4539

In celebration of Frank Buck’s birthday, admission is just $2 for everyone on March 14 only. Join us at 1pm for free birthday cake while it lasts!

march 2018 / fortworthchild


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

COMPANY NAME

DETAILS

Grapevine Convention & Visitors Bureau grapevinetexasusa.com 800/457-6338

Hop over to Grapevine for family-friendly fun this spring! Enjoy activities including vintage train excursions, experience history coming alive at interactive heritage workshops and events, catch a movie and so much more. See ad on page 22.

Kemah Boardwalk kemahboardwalk.com 281/535-8100

Spring Break at the Kemah Boardwalk just 40 minutes south of Houston! Bring the family for waterfront dining, live music and amusement rides. Weekend Adventure Passes available for unlimited visits. Purchase online today! See ad on page 34.

Kimbell Art Museum kimbellart.org 817/332-8451

Celebrate Spring Break at the Museum with ongoing art activities, interactive family tours, storybook readings, teen studios led by guest artists and children’s films. Spring Break programs are free; no reservations required.

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth themodern.org 817/738-9215

Spring Break Wonders includes a tour and project focused on selected works in the Modern’s galleries. Limited to 45 children per session; admission is free. March 12–15, 11am and 2pm. See ad on page 25.

Museum of the American Railroad museumoftheamericanrailroad.org 866/468-7630

Join us at Day Out with Thomas in downtown Grapevine! Enjoy family fun, activities, train ride with Thomas and more! Meet Sir Topham Hatt. For tickets phone 866-468-7630 or visit historictrains.org. #HistoricTrains #GrapevineTX #ThomasAndFriends #DayOutWithThomas

North East Mall shopnortheastmall.com 817/284-3427

Easter Bunny Photos: March 9 thru April 1—hop over to Center Court to meet him for yourself. Visit simonbunny.com. Caring Bunny: March 11—a private photo event for children with special needs.

NRH Parks and Recreation nrhcentre.com 817/427-6600

NRH spring family fun! Easter in the Park: March 24, Sounds of Spring Fridays April 13–May 18, and on April 7: Mayor’s 5K, April Pools Day and Youth Summer Activities Fair!

Pawnee Bill's Wild West Show stockyardsrodeo.com 817/625-1025

Historical reenactment of the original Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show. The show features trick roping, trick shooting, trick riding and cowboy songs. Historical figures such as Pawnee Bill come to life and transport you back in time.

Ridgmar Mall ridgmar.com 817/731-6591

Visit the Easter Bunny at Ridgmar Mall, March 9–31. Kids receive a free gift from the bunny! Photo packages are available for purchase. Pet Photo Nights are March 20 and 27. See ad on page 15.

River Legacy Living Science Center riverlegacy.org 817/860-6752

Join us for daily Family Spring Break activities the week of March 12–16. Activities will take place at 11:30am, 1:30pm and 3:30pm. Cost is $2 per person. Ages 2 and under free. See ad on page 28.

SeaQuest Interactive Aquarium Fort Worth fortworth.visitseaquest.com 817/731-5357

SeaQuest Fort Worth takes you on a journey through the wonders of our planet. Interact and feed sharks, stingrays, capybara, giant sulcata tortoises, large exotic birds species and thousands of other creatures along the way! See ad on page 24.

fortworthchild / march 2018

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UPCOMING SPECIAL EVENTS

WOW Membership is the perfect opportunity to enhance your museum experience and typically pays for itself in two visits! fortworthmuseum.org

We’ve Got The Inside Track On Fun

Spring Break Trains Daily train excursions during Spring Break

March 12, 13, 14, 15 & 16

TICKE ON SA TS L NOW! E

Grapevine One-Hour Train Excursion March 15 at 10 a.m. Easter Bunny Train • April 1 Day Out With Thomas™ • April 13, 14, 15, 20, 21 & 22 For tickets, schedules and train information visit www.GVRR.com or call 817.410.3185.

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2/8/18 10:37 AM

AT XPLOR PRESCHOOL

New discoveries, great friends, and fun times. • • • • • • •

xplortoday.com/fortworth

Day camp with extended hours Field trips and events Nature and science Arts and crafts Sports and games Music, dance and drama Swimming

877-322-2891

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kid culture.

HELPING HANDS year-round volunteer

opportunities to serve fellow fort worthians WORDS JESSICA MYERS

T

he holidays are behind us, and gone are the Red Kettles and coat drives. But worthy causes in the area need volunteers year-round.

PHOTO COURTESY OF COOK CHILDREN’S

There are numerous volunteer opportunities in the Fort Worth area. Sign up your family for a year-round opportunity to help fellow Fort Worthians who are hungry, vulnerable, sick or homebound. Begin here and find a local cause that tugs on your family’s heartstrings.

fortworthchild / march 2018

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Now Open at Ridgmar Mall!

kid culture / H E L P I N G

HANDS

Your Quest

Begins Here! help hungry families

explore

inspire

SPRING BREAK SAVINGS

25% OFF

DAILY ADMISSION NOW through April 30th, 2018! Use promo code PASSPORT to receive discount!

snorkel with stingrays birthday parties field trips

visitseaquest.com • 682-235-5752 1974 Green Oaks Rd, Fort Worth, TX, 76116 24

march 2018 / fortworthchild

PREVIOUS PAGE // Kids can spread the love on their birthdays by asking for new Lego sets, cars and other toys to donate to the pediatric patients at Cook Children’s. ABOVE // On your next Target run, load up the car with essentials for the women and children fleeing domestic violence at SafeHaven’s emergency shelter. BELOW // Volunteers at Animal Hope Adoptions refill food and water dishes, walk dogs and even cuddle with cats.

Rise and shine to pulling weeds, raking beds and harvesting the fruits of your labor at TA RR A NT A R E A FO O D B A N K ’s Learning Garden in Fort Worth. Every Tuesday morning (and second and fourth Saturdays), volunteers age 8 and older learn the different ways to grow food and build raised beds and watering systems. They also help feed hungry families by donating crops to WestAid Food Pantry down the road, and little stewards tend the Kindred Spirits Kitchen Garden, growing food for the Community Kitchen and Cooking Matters cooking program for low-income families. Sign up online or email volunteer coordinator Kayla Davis at kayla. davis@tafb.org. Dig into the spirit of service every third Saturday at 6 S TO N E S ’ urban farm pilot project. Their goal is to donate half of the sustainable garden’s produce to New Hope Center food pantry, which provides food and clothes to families in need in the HurstEuless-Bedford area. During these garden workdays, you and the kids can help plant, weed and harvest, as well as learn sustainable practices from master gardeners. Additionally, the New Hope Center is always

in need of volunteers to stock, organize and tidy the free clothing closet. Sign up online for monthly Family Serve Days in the garden or warehouse. Tarrant Area Food Bank, 2600 Cullen St., Fort Worth, 817/857-7101; tafb.org // 6 Stones, 209 N. Industrial Blvd., Suite 241, Bedford, 817/8687400; 6stones.org

help rescued animals

A N IM AL HOPE A DO P TIO N S

gives animals that are sick or have behavioral issues a second chance. Before finding these pets a forever home, Animal Hope volunteers help them recuperate from medical treatment and offer therapy they couldn’t get in a regular shelter. As volunteers, you and your animal-loving kiddos can attend two-hour weekday shifts to clean rooms and cat condos, do laundry, wash and refill food and water dishes, scoop the yard, walk the animals and (the best part) cuddle with a free-roaming feline in the cat room. Walk in to submit a volunteer application and sign a release waiver. Animal Hope Adoptions, 6708 S. Hulen St., Fort Worth, 817/984-1129; animalhope.org

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SAFEHAVEN; ©ISTOCK.COM/FATCAMERA

discover


SPRING BREAK

at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

Spring Break Wonders; March 12–15, 11 am and 2 pm Take advantage of family programming at the Modern over the course of the week while your school-aged children are on Spring Break. Each session is led by a docent and includes a gallery project designed by the education department. Both the tour and project focus on selected works in the Modern’s collection and the special exhibition, New Works by Ron Mueck. Attendance is limited to 45 children per session; admission is free.

The Modern is open and free to the public the Monday of Spring Break, March 12! Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth 3200 Darnell Street Fort Worth, Texas 76107 817.738.9215

FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS GOAT YOGA MAR 14

SIPPIN’ AND SHOPPIN’ MAR 15

COWTOWN GOES GREEN MAR 17

IN THE HISTORIC FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS

www.fortworthstockyards.com | 817.625.9715 130 E. Exchange Ave. | Fort Worth, Texas

fortworthchild / march 2018

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help the environment

For now, only teens can help beautify the FO R T WO R TH B OTA N I C G A R D E N

on a regular basis, but your younger kids can lend a green thumb on free Family Exploration Saturdays starting in March. The brand-new program, a collaboration with the Botanical Research Institute of Texas (aka BRIT), welcomes families with budding environmental stewards of all ages to help plant seeds, compost, tend the pollinator garden, restore the vegetable plot and learn sustainable gardening practices from master gardeners. Stop by early afternoon on select Saturdays to pitch in; don’t forget a water bottle. Visit the botanic garden’s website for more information. Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth, 817/392-5510; fwbg.org

help refugees

Through WO R L D R E L I E F FO R T WO R TH , your family can help refugee families from Africa, Iran, Iraq, Burma and other countries assimilate to life in Tarrant County. Sign your bunch up to be a Family Friend and fellowship with refugees for at least one hour a week for three months. Or go on a yard sale scavenger hunt for furniture, decor and small household appliances that will furnish a new apartment for one of these peace-seeking families. To sign up, first fill out a volunteer application online. World Relief Fort Worth, 4059 Bryan Ave., Fort Worth, 817/924-0748; worldrelieffortworth.org

help senior citizens

2

Kids show respect for their elders when they adopt a lawn through the volunteer programs of M I D - C ITI E S C A R E CO R P S in Hurst. Children old enough to handle yard equipment (with a parent’s supervision) spend at least three hours a

HANDS

month mowing, weeding, raking and edging. Other service opportunities include driving clients to and from medical appointments on weekdays and to the grocery store, bank, pharmacy and even hair appointments on Saturdays. Or sign up to be a Visiting Friend, and you and the kids will meet with a senior once or twice a month for 1–2 hours to play games, read books, talk or go on a walk. Fill out a volunteer application online.

1

Mid-Cities Care Corps, 745 W. Pipeline Road, Hurst, 817/282-0531; midcitiescarecorps.org

help kids in the hospital

There are a few ways to brighten a child’s day at CO O K C H I L D R E N ’ S hospitals in Tarrant County. One is to have kids make sympathy cards for patients. Instead of generic messages like “Get well soon,” encourage kids to find other ways to express sympathy like drawing happy, uplifting pictures or writing knock-knock jokes. You can also drop off Lego sets, Uno decks, plastic animals, travel-size toiletries, light-up toys, Play-Doh and other much-needed items to the volunteer services department (find the wish list online). And when your child’s birthday nears, she can participate in the Peter Pan Birthday Club by asking for new games, dolls, books and even Mr. Potato Head toys for the patients instead of presents for herself. Drop the goods off at the information desk Monday–Friday 8am–8pm or Saturday and Sunday 10am–4pm. Cook Children’s, 801 Seventh Ave., Fort Worth, 682/885-4590; cookchildrens.org

help vulnerable families

Each year, S A F E H AV E N provides emergency shelter to nearly a thousand women and children fleeing domestic violence. Local families have an opportunity to meet their needs by donating pillows and pillowcases, bath towels, cough drops and pajama pants for adults and medicine syringes, diapers and bottles for infants. Contact Cristie King to sign up and for drop-off locations cking@safehaventc.org.

SafeHaven, 1100 Hemphill St., Suite 303, Fort Worth, 817/502-7154; safehaventc.org

1 // Brighten a senior citizen’s life by signing up to visit once or twice a month through Mid-Cities Care Corps. 2 // The Fort Worth Botanic Garden is launching Family Exploration Saturdays to teach young environmental stewards how to tend a garden. 26

march 2018 / fortworthchild

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MID-CITIES CARE CORPS; ©ISTOCK.COM/ULZA

kid culture / H E L P I N G


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE

CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOL G U I D E Want more information? Find these child care centers and preschools on our website. dfwchild.com

fortworthchild / march 2018

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THE CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOL GUIDE

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Parker Pre-kindergartener Rising soccer star, problem solver and future architect

Pursue All His Passions At The Oakridge School, students at all grade levels are engaged in innovative, authentic learning environments that foster exploration to help your child discover his or her best self. WWW.THEOAKRIDGESCHOOL.ORG BEHIND THE SCENES: AN EARLY CHILDHOOD SHOWCASE APRIL 3 FINE ARTS NIGHT | MAY 11

RSVP to Amy Wilson, Director of Admissions, or contact us to schedule a personal tour!

5900 W. Pioneer Pkwy. Arlington, TX 76013 817-451-4994

The Oakridge School does not discriminate on the basis of color, creed, sex or national and ethnic origin in school-administered programs.

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march 2018 / fortworthchild

OAK Fort Worth Child March Preschool Ad.indd 1

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Saints Will practice self-reflection.

THE CHILD CARE & PRESCHOOL GUIDE

EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM

Schedule a Personal Tour Today! aseschool.org/Admission Students in All Saints’ Early Childhood program engage in developmentally appropriate learning activities that promote a balance of academic, social, emotional, physical and spiritual skills. Whether going from our 3-year-old class to Pre-K or from Pre-K or Bridge K on to Kindergarten, deliberate planning in all content areas ensures our students are prepared for the next step in their educational journey. Learn more at aseschool.org/EarlyChildhood.

LIFE LESSONS FOR, WELL, LIFE. 9700 Saints Circle, Fort Worth, Texas 76108 | 817.560.5700 | aseschool.org All Saints’ Episcopal School of Fort Worth administers its personnel, academic, extracurricular and tuition assistance programs without regard to gender, race, religion, ethnicity or national origin.

Which swim school is right for my child? We have an answer for that.

The Children’s Spot 1222 E. Debbie Ln., Mansfield, TX 76063 info@childrensspot.net // 817-473-0441

www.childrensspot.net Get your most-trusted special needs resource delivered to your inbox. Sign up at dfwchild.com.

We are now enrolling for all ages including an Accelerated Pre-K Class this Fall! • Sign language

• S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology,

• Cooking Classes

Engineering, Math)

• Spanish Classes

• Frogstreet Curriculum

“Where learning never ends!” fortworthchild / march 2018

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BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BESTSummer EVER EPIC SUMMER PLANNING STARTS HERE

Impacting Students for Christ in North Richland Hills since 1958! At Fort Worth Christian School, parents experience a Christ-centered community focused on the formation of their students for the future! In this rigorous academic setting, PK3 to 12th grade students are taught excellence in and out of the classroom. Coming up on our 60th anniversary since opening in northeast Tarrant County, FWC graduates have gone on to great success and lives of service at the university level and beyond!

6200 Holiday Lane North Richland Hills, TX 76180 817-520-6200 www.fwc.org/camps

All Saints’ Episcopal School 9700 Saints Circle Fort Worth, TX 76108 www.aseschool.org/SummerUniversity

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During our FWC Summer Program, our campus remains constantly busy! Camps are operated by our FWC staff who love Jesus! These Godhonoring men and women seek to provide the most engaging camp experience in the context of a loving, safe environment where your children will be known, loved and valued, just as if they are fulltime FWC students during the school year. Our camp offerings challenge students in the areas of athletics, STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math), fine arts and creative academic programs to continue sharpening the minds of students while enjoying a fun, relaxed atmosphere. We have a variety of camps for all ages, so check out fwc.org/camps and fill up your child’s summer with fun activities that help form them for success in the future!

Summer University at All Saints’ offers more than 140 classes to encourage academic growth, stimulate imagination and keep students active. Students ages 3 through high school seniors can participate in classes including (varies by age) Robot Transformer Creation, Equestrian, Art, Sky Ranch Launch Camp, Field Hockey, ACT/SAT Prep, Golf, LEGO® Engineering, Choir, Sailing, Chess, College Application Essay Writing, Cooking and many more. Come join the summer fun!


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

The #1 Summer STEM Camp Learn new skills and discover a passion for technology! At iD Tech, students ages 7–18 learn to code apps, design video games, learn programming with Roblox, mod Minecraft, engineer robots, discover cyber security, create levels in virtual reality, build websites, create 3D-print objects and much more.

1-844-788-1858 info@idtech.com www.iDTechCamps.com

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

In each weeklong session, students explore a top campus, learn from top-tier instructors, create an impressive project and build in-demand skills that last long after summer. Campers are taught in small groups of just an average of eight students per instructor for the most personalized instruction. iD Tech summer programs are held at 150 prestigious campuses nationwide, including TCU, Westlake Academy, The University of Texas at Dallas, SMU, Rice, Stanford, MIT and more. While most programs are weeklong (overnight stays optional at many locations), teens can enroll in two-week, pre-college academies for the most immersive, in-depth instruction. Join us this summer to see why over 300,000 camp alumni can’t stop talking about iD Tech summer camps. Visit www.iDTechCamps.com or call 1-844-788-1858 to find the right program for your student.

Summer Camp Experiences That Speak to Creatives!

3901 S. Hulen St. Fort Worth, TX 76109 Darla Jones, Outreach Coordinator darla.jones@artsacademics.org 817-766-2390   www.ArtsAcademics.org

From innovative “maker” camps to intensive skill-building arts camps, we’re sure you’ll find the perfect creative outlet your student needs this summer. With a strong emphasis on creative problem-solving and artistic skill development, our interactive camps will engage and inspire creative campers no matter their artistic abilities. Add to this a staff of highly skilled summer camp instructors and certified educators from a variety of creative industries, and you’re looking at the most inspirational summer camp options in our region! Creative Time-Travelers Camps Every Week in June // Ages 5–9   Deserted Island Camp June 4–8, 11–15 // Ages 10–13   Zombie Survival Camp June 4–8, 11–15 // Ages 14–18   Junior Visual Arts Camp June 4–8, 11–15 // Ages 8–11   Senior Visual Arts Camp June 18–22, 25–29 // Ages 12+   Jr./Sr. Opera Intensive Camp  (In Partnership with Fort Worth Opera) June 18–22, 25–29 // Grades 3–12 f o rftowr o tw r tohrct h icl hd i l/d f /e bmr au racr hy 2 0 1 8

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

YMCA Camp Grady Spruce promotes Caring, Honesty, Respect and Responsibility through faithbased character-building activities that encourage campers to establish their own identities. Campers discover their confidence when they face their fears, try, try again and achieve!

3000 Park Rd. 36 Graford, TX 76449 214-319-9944 ccunningham@ymcadallas.org

Whether your camper is learning to jump the wake on water skis, building up the confidence to ride a horse or hitting a bull’s-eye in archery, Camp Grady Spruce is the place for your child. Parents appreciate a child that returns home more mature and independent with a better ability to problem solve. Campers leave with friendships that will last a lifetime and memories that will tide them over until they can return the following year!

Animals • Science • Adventure There is no better place for an animal lover! Camp is home to more than 300 animals including lemurs, llamas, miniature horses, cats & dogs, hedgehogs, wallabies and that’s only a few! There are over 100 hands-on activities campers may choose to do while at camp:

Cub Creek Science & Animal Camp Rolla, Missouri 573-458-2125 www.MoScienceCamp.com

• • • • •

Animal Care Pottery Crime Science Survival Skills Archery

• • • • •

Culinary Science Veterinary Medicine Arts & Crafts Ropes Course and more

Spend just a week making friends and memories that will last a lifetime!

Summer just got more awesome!

3000 Meadowmere Ln. Grapevine, TX 76051 For questions: 817-228-9104   www.GoGrapevine.com/DoveCreek

The shores of Grapevine Lake can be your child’s next summer adventure — full of watersports, wilderness skills, camp games, archery and so much more! Dove Creek Day Camp offers your child the experience of overnight camp without the hassle of packing for a full week. Multi-child and multi-week discounts are available for families. We can’t wait to see you this summer for all the fun we have planned! Visit GoGrapevine.com/DoveCreek for dates, times and complete details. Dove Creek — DFW’s all day adventure Day Camp!

Camp Clayton 5/29–8/10

Fort Worth and Keller 817-923-9888 www.claytonyouth.org

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6 Day Camp locations in Keller ISD, 1 in downtown Fort Worth, and 1 in Crowley area Keller & Fort Worth — $140/wk Crowley area — $115/wk   Sibling discounts and financial assistance available. Register by May 1st and receive 50% off registration fee. Registration fee: $50 one child / $90 family   Ask About Our Specialty Camps! Science, Art, Cooking and Travel $195/wk for select weeks and locations


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

DESTINATION SCIENCE

Multiple Locations in Dallas Fort Worth Area Colleyville, Coppell, Dallas, Fort Worth, Frisco, Keller, Plano 888-909-2922 • www.destinationscience.org

920 US Hwy. 287, Suite 300 Mansfield TX 76063 682-400-8383 www.kidcreatestudio.com

Save $30/wk! Ends 3/31/2018 Come to our Open Houses on March 17, fun outing on the beautiful Guadalupe River near Kerrville. Separate boy/girl camps owned and operated by Ragsdale family, Camp Stewart for boys 6–16, and Heart O’ the Hills Camp for Girls 6–16. Worldwide, limited enrollment, personable and fun! Instructionoriented, offering more than 50 activities—including English and western riding, Red Cross swimming instruction, sports, canoeing, archery, tennis, climbing and rappelling, survival skills, crafts. Stewart has a unique Trail of Advancement for all boys; older boys specialize in equestrian, ranchman, outdoorsman, sportsman, or campmaster. The Heart has tradition of etiquette. Also intangibles—self-confidence, teamwork, leadership, individual identity, dealing with challenges. New one-week term (Stewart only), two- and four-week terms.

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

2430 Hwy. 39, Hunt, TX 78024 830-238-4650 • 830-238-4670 jane@hohcamp.com • conor@campstewart.com www.hohcamp.com • www.campstewart.com

The fun science day camp where kids ages 5–11 get to have “Aha!” moments of creativity and discovery while building and experimenting with unique takehome toys, astonishing gadgets and fantastic gizmos. Our top-notch, enthusiastic educators make STEM learning an adventure! 2018 topics include Science Makers & Inventors Camp, Amusement Park Science Camp, Transforming Robots Camp and Rovers Rocketing to Space Camp!

Kidcreate Studio is an art studio just for kids! Our award-winning summer camps are designed to inspire and educate young artists, ages 3 to 12, in an environment where giggles and grins are encouraged. Children get messy with paint, clay and so much more! This summer’s camps include Glitter & Glow, Mad About the Masters, Shopkins Cute, Sparkle Power and many more! Making a mess is the best at Kidcreate!

We produce three completely different musical theater camps!

1300 Gendy St. Fort Worth, TX 76107 817-737-5437 • www.kidswhocare.org

5900 W. Pioneer Pkwy. Arlington, TX 76013 www.theoakridgeschool.org/summerprograms

Mini Musical Theatre // Ages: 4–7 June 5–9, 8:30am–12:30pm. Family Showcase: June 9, 10:30am   Intensive Musical Theatre // Ages: 1st–12th Grades June 10–24. Experience what it is like to be a full-time actor for two weeks while producing Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat   KidPower International // Ages: 1st–12th Grades July 8–29. Join an international cast and make friends of all ages from around the world while producing an original musical! 

Summer at The Oakridge School allows children, age 3 through 4th grade to discover a world of possibilities! Summer Days (K–4th grade) allow boys and girls to engage in academic, arts, technology and other enrichment classes. Oakridge Sports Camps (1st–9th grade) offer baseball, football, tennis and other athletic opportunities. Programs are open enrollment. Visit theoakridgeschool.org/summerprograms or call 817-563-9742 for more information.

Ballet Basics introduces boys and girls, ages 3 to 6, to the fundamentals of ballet. The camp experience also includes crafts, story time and choreography to correlate with the theme of the week. 1540 Mall Cir., Fort Worth, TX 76116 817-763-0207 Option 3 www.texasballettheater.org/summer-program

Young Dancer Intensive and Junior Intensive broaden the perspective of 7–13-year-old ballet students with a variety of classes including ballet, modern and jazz.

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o t y a w a t Ge

MAKE THE KEMAH BOARDWALK YOUR FAVORITE DESTINATION

Waterfront Restaurants • Boutique Hotel • Amusement Rides Stingray Reef & Exhibits • Boardwalk FantaSea Yacht Dinner Cruises Live Entertainment • Speedboat Thrill Ride • Banquet Rooms Iron Eagle Zipline • Unique Retail Stores • Midway Games Arcade • Special Events • Marina

Stay the weekend! 281.334.9880

2018 C A L E N D A R O F EV E N T S O N LIN E

$5 OFF ALL DAY ALL RIDES PASS Clip out and present this coupon to receive $5.00 off an All Day All Rides Pass. Coupon valid for up to five (5) people/five (5) passes. Includes unlimited access to the rides at the Kemah Boardwalk. Does NOT include the Boardwalk Beast, Stingray Reef or Iron Eagle. Coupon must be exchanged at the amusements ticket booth for actual dated wristband. Wristband is valid for day of redemption only. Not valid with any other promotions or offers. No cash value. Tax not included. Must present coupon at ticket booth to be valid. Expires 8/31/18 DC

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215 KIPP AVENUE

KEMAH, TX 77565 281-535-8100 KEMAHBOARDWALK.COM Just minutes from Houston on Galveston Bay.

• 16 Amusement Rides • Midway Games • Shopping • Live Music • Kiddie Big Top Area • Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. • Lt. Dan’s hideaway • Pier Party Zone • Group Events & Packages • Chick-Fil-a express • 5D THEATER RIDE • Much More!

$5 OFF ALL DAY ALL RIDES PASS Clip out and present this coupon to receive $5.00 off an All Day All Rides Pass. Coupon valid for up to five (5) people/ five (5) passes. Includes unlimited access to the rides at the Pleasure Pier. Coupon must be exchanged at the amusements ticket booth for actual dated wristband. Wristband is valid for day of redemption only. Not valid with any other promotions or offers. No cash value. Tax not included. Must present coupon at ticket booth to be valid. Expires 8/31/18 DC TM

2501 Seawall Blvd • Galveston Island, TX 77550 409.766.4950 • 855.789.7437 • pleasurepier.com


kid culture

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WORDS ELIZABETH SMITH

2 5 F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY E V E N T S Y O U C A N ’ T M I S S I N

MARCH kick off their new collaboration called GROW at this family fun day with art in the garden, a scavenger hunt and composting activities at stations throughout the garden. Then come back regularly for the new Family Exploration Saturdays, offered every Saturday of every month. FREE 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/332-4441 brit.org/grow

FROM THE LANDS OF ASIA EXHIBIT

PHOTOS COURTESY OF LEGOLAND DISCOVERY CENTER; VSTAR ENTERTAINMENT GROUP; ©ISTOCK.COM/NATALIIA PYZHOVA

FIRST FRIDAYS AT THE FARM

N A S H FA R M March 2 Flying a kite is much harder than it looks and so is crafting one by hand, but the friendly staff at Nash Farm makes it possible. Join the monthly pioneer skills program in March to learn how to build your own 19th century-style kite from paper, and then enjoy the simple pastime as a family. $3 per person. 626 Ball St., Grapevine; 817/410-3185 nashfarm.org

SPACE MISSION EXHIBIT

LEGOLAND D I S C O V E RY C E N T E R Opens March 3 Inspired by the SpaceX launch last month? Build your own spaceship and make a Lego rocket blast off into outer space in a plume of smoke in this new intergalactic building experience, on view through the end of the year. Free with admission: $21.95 at the door; discount tickets online in advance. Free for age 2 and younger. 3000 Grapevine Mills Park-

way, Grapevine; 877/818-1677 dallasfw.legolanddiscoverycenter.com

MUSACCHIO MUD MOUNTAIN CHALLENGE

C I N NA M ON CREEK RANCH March 3 Sign up online for the inaugural mud run at this Roanoke archery range and then prepare to get down and dirty clawing your way through obstacles on a kid-friendly course. The after party includes bounce houses, food and archery. $20 Kids K for ages 7–12; $30 for 2-mile challenge; $40 for 4-mile. Proceeds benefit Arrows for Heroes, a nonprofit that provides archery lessons and activities for disabled veterans. 13794 Old Denton Road, Roanoke; 817/439-8998 cinnamoncreekranch.com

GROWING IN THE GARDEN DAY

F ORT WORT H B O TA N I C G A R D E N March 3 This spring marks a new season for the Fort Worth Botanic Garden and Botanical Research Institute of Texas. Help

KIMBELL ART MUSEUM Opens March 4 The Kimbell shows off its latest special exhibition inside the Renzo Piano Pavilion: 400-plus historic objects chosen from the Sam and Myrna Myers Collection and representing key periods in the history of the art of China, Japan, Tibet, Mongolia, Korea and Vietnam. See it now or March 13–16 during the museum’s free Spring Break Art Extravaganza. Special exhibit: $14 adults; $10 children 12 and younger. Half-price admission all day on Tuesdays and after 5pm on Fridays. 3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/332-8451 kimbellart.org

BUBBLE GUPPIES LIVE! READY TO ROCK

V E R I Z O N T H E AT R E March 4 Rock out to an under-the-sea concert with the merkids from Nickelodeon’s preschool series Bubble Guppies. Molly, Gil and the whole crew stir up the ocean floor in a live stage production on Sunday afternoon. Tickets from $29.75. $129.75 for the preshow meet and greet package.

1001 Performance Place, Grand Prairie; 972/854-5050 axs.com

DISNEY FANTASIA LIVE IN CONCERT

BASS PERFORMANCE HA L L March 9–11 The Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra performs a live soundtrack to scenes from Walt Disney’s Fantasia 2000 and the 1940 original projected on stage in high def. Watch and listen as Mickey rolls up his sleeves to make mischief for the sorcerer and the cartoon characters dance to a classical score. Tickets from $33. 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth; 817/665-6000 fwsymphony.org

DONUTS WITH DONKEYS

T H E AT R E ARLINGTON March 10 After the 2pm performance of Shrek the Musical Jr., join Donkey and friends in the lobby for a donut hole decorating class. Donkey demonstrates how to create Shrek character faces on donut holes during this cooking show-style program. $25 includes the donut bar, swamp juice and a professionally decorated donut hole. Show ticket required to participate: $16.50. 305 W. Main St., Arlington; 817/275-7661 theatrearlington.org

WETTEST EGG HUNT

THE REC OF GRAPEVINE March 10 Switch up your Easter traditions and make a mad splash for the floating plastic eggs at the REC

Aquatic Center. Look online to find the egg hunt start time for your child’s age group. No registration required. Free for REC members; $5 per person for nonmembers. 1175 Municipal Way, Grapevine; 817/410-3450 gograpevine.com

FLYFEST

R I V E R PA R K TRAILHEAD March 10 Got waders? You’ll need them for the Tarrant Regional Water District’s third annual fly fishing event, a family festival in and along the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. Bring your own pole or use provided kid-size poles for fishing from the stocked Kid Fish Tank on the lawn. All-day offerings include rock climbing, face painting, food trucks and expert-led casting classes. FREE 3100 Bryant Irvin Road, Fort Worth trwdflyfest.com

CHALK ART IN THE SQUARE

SOUTHLAKE T O W N S Q UA R E March 12 Meet in the square’s Rustin Family Park, across the street from Southlake Town Hall, for a morning of creativity on the concrete. Use provided chalk to decorate the sidewalks around the pavilion or around the pond and enjoy more fun with lawn games and bubbles. FREE 1400 E. Main St., Southlake; 817/748-8243 cityofsouthlake.com

SPRING BREAK WONDERS

THE MODERN ART MUSEUM OF F ORT WORT H March 12–15 The Modern waives admission

fortworthchild / march 2018

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and opens on the Monday of spring break for special art entertainment, designed for kids ages 5–12, through that Thursday. Show up before the 11am or 2pm session led each day by artist Christopher Blay and focused on selected works in the Modern’s collection and the recently opened exhibition New Works by Ron Mueck. FREE 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth; 817/738-9215 themodern.org

SPRING FLING TRAIN RIDES

G R A P E V I N E V I N TA G E R A I L R OA D March 12–16 During the spring break week off school, Grapevine Vintage Railroad offers additional round-trip rides to the Fort Worth Stockyards with games and activities while aboard. Each trip includes two hours allowed for exploring the stockyards before the return ride. Claim your seats on Vinny, a 1953 diesel locomotive, for $26 for first class or $18 for touring class. $18 for kids’ engineer costume kit. 705 S. Main St., Grapevine; 817/410-3185 gvrr.com

EMPLOYEE CRAFTSMANSHIP DEMOS

B U R E AU O F E N G R AV I N G A N D P R I N T I N G FA C I L I T Y March 13–16 Meet the people responsible for printing America’s paper money when the staff at Fort Worth’s Western Currency Facility welcomes spenders and savers of all ages for crafts and live demonstrations. Take a tour on the elevated walkway above the production floor, see damaged notes reconstructed piece by piece and design your own currency to bring home. FREE 9000 Blue Mound Road, Fort Worth; 817/231-4000 moneyfactory.gov/wcfspecialevents.html

THE GREAT INFLATABLE RACE

L O N E S TA R PA R K March 17 Love bounce houses? Level 36

AGENDA

up your game by climbing over, sliding down and plowing through 10 or so custom-designed inflatables spread throughout the running course. Admission is steep: $75, but proceeds benefit the nonprofit Trinity River Mission and kids 3 and younger run for free. $90 VIP ticket includes access to the Inflatable Village, a separate area with unlimited bouncing on additional inflatables. $15 for Inflatable Village only. 1000 Lone Star Parkway, Grand Prairie; 781/786-8447 thegreatinflatablerace.com/ fortworth

3101 W. Lancaster Ave., Fort Worth; 817/332-2272 casamanana.org

TWILIGHT COMMUNITY EGG HUNT

O A K G R O V E PA R K March 23 Come armed with your Easter basket and flashlights for this after-dark family party at the soccer field. Keep your eyes peeled for the brightly colored eggs during five egg hunts, divided by age group, and stay for the face painting, bounce houses and food vendors. FREE 1299 Oak Grove Loop North, Grapevine; 817/410-3450 gograpevine.com/easter

TENTS AND TALES CAMPOUT

FINDING NEVERLAND

BASS PERFORMANCE HA L L March 20–25 You and your littles have read Peter Pan. (Maybe not? No judgment.) Now discover the story behind the story in this Broadway touring musical about playwright J.M. Barrie who finds his inspiration in four imaginative boys and their widowed mother. The show runs long, 2.5 hours with one intermission, and is recommended for kids 7 and older. Tickets from $44. 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth; 817/212-4280 basshall.com

MADAGASCAR – A MUSICAL ADVENTURE

C AS A M A ÑA NA Opens March 23 If your family couldn’t get enough of the Madagascar films and its Penguins spinoffs, this new musical is for you. During a three-weekend run, see Alex the Lion, Marty the Zebra, Melman the Giraffe and Gloria the Hippo bust out of the Central Park Zoo and into a pickle. Tickets from $17.

march 2018 / fortworthchild

RIVER LEGACY PA R K S March 23 Swap your cozy beds for sleeping bags and “rough it” for one night during this family campout from 4pm Friday to 8am Saturday. Pitch your tent and unplug for a sleeping bag story time, a singalong around the campfire, dinner and a screening of Despicable Me 3 under the stars. $10 per person. Register online. 701 NW Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington; 817/459-5474 naturallyfun.org

SOUTHLAKE’S EASTER IN THE PARK

N O R T H PA R K March 24 Prepare for grass stains and some friendly competition at this good old-fashioned egg hunt. The free-for-all begins at 9am, with hunts separated by age group to prevent too much competition. The petting zoo and inflatables remain open through noon, and photos with Mr. and Mrs. Easter Bunny come with one free 4-by-6 print per family. FREE 200 E. Dove Road, Southlake; 817/748-8019 experiencesouthlaketexas.com

SHAMROCKIN’ PARTY

Revel in a bit o’ St. Paddy’s Day fun at these kid-friendly parades of Texas shenanigans and an art program that nods to one of Ireland’s most cherished symbols. COWTOWN GOES GREEN

S T O C K YA R D S S TAT I O N March 17 In our own Texas way, take part in “The Wearing of the Green” at Cowtown’s largest and most family-friendly St. Patrick’s Day celebration from noon–5pm. Cheer on entries in this Irish and Western-themed parade stepping off after the 4pm cattle drive. The energized day includes a Cow Camp for children, gunfight reenactments and live music. FREE // 130 E. Exchange Ave., Fort Worth; 817/625-9715 // stockyardsstation.com

ST. PADDY’S PICKLE PARADE AND PALOOZA

D O W N T O W N M A N S F I E L D March 16–17 Celebrate both St. Patrick’s Day and Mansfield’s own wellpreserved traditions when the Pickle Capital of Texas goes all out for its seventh annual festival. Watch the inaugural beer keg races on Friday night and multiple parades on Saturday, including the first-ever baby parade at 10am. Free festival admission. Pickle Run: $10 for fun run; $20 for 5K; and $25 for 10K. // Main and Broad streets, Mansfield; 817/988-0104 // pickleparade.org

WALKUP WORKSHOPS

S I N A C A S T U D I O S March 23 If the holiday festivities feel as fleeting as a rainbow, here’s one way to make them last. Show up for this glassblowing studio’s kid-friendly workshop to make a shamrock keepsake (or other shapes planned for that Friday night). Simply pick a color and then help manipulate the glass before an instructor finishes the piece. Space is first-come, first-served. $40 per person per item. // 1013 W. Magnolia Ave., Fort Worth; 817/899-0024 // sinacastudios.org/youth-programing

THE LITTLE MERMAID

ARTISAN CENTER T H E AT E R Opens March 30 The Artisan tackles this Disney juggernaut on its Main Stage for the first time. Bring Ariel lovers old and young to see how the Broadway musical expands on the story from the movie and includes more songs from King Triton and Prince Eric. Tickets from $22 for adults and $10 for children 12 and younger. 444 E. Pipeline Road, Hurst; 817/284-1200 artisanct.com

TEXAS-SIZED EASTER EGG HUNT

STO C K YA R D S S TAT ION March 31 Collect a basket full of Easter eggs like only Texans can: in the company of Texas longhorns at the Fort Worth Stockyards. See more of the longhorns during the Cow Camp and the day’s two cattle drives at 11:30am and 4pm. The egg hunt on the lawn begins at high noon, with Easter Bunny photos and pony rides continuing through 4pm. FREE 130 E. Exchange Ave., Fort Worth; 817/625-9715 stockyardsstation.com

F O R M O R E F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY F U N T H I S M O N T H , C H E C K O U R O N L I N E C A L E N DA R AT D F W C H I L D.CO M/C A L E N DA R.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CAROL ROSEGG; ©ISTOCK.COM/GLOBALP/PPCAVALRY/TFORGO

kid culture / T H E


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confessions

MOMMY FAILS ILLUSTRATION MARY DUNN

I accidentally threw away my kid’s homework and had to email the teacher begging them not to punish my child.” —CHRISSY, DENTON

THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU LEAVE THE KIDS IN THE BACKYARD TO OPEN THE FRONT DOOR: YOUR TODDLER STARTS EATING DIRT FROM A PLANT POT. SHE WANTS TO BE ‘CRUNCHIER’ THAN HER MOMMA.” —CRYSTAL, FORT WORTH

“When my son was 2, he had a stuffed puppy he took everywhere named ‘Baby Sister.’ One day we went to the store and he screamed, ‘Mommy, we left Baby Sister at home on the bathroom floor!’ Everyone stared at me. We couldn’t leave fast enough.” —STEPHANIE, FLOWER MOUND

Got a parenting fail you’d like to share? We’d love to hear from you. Send it to editorial@dfwchild.com.

“My 1 ½-year-old walked in on me using the bathroom and saw me putting a tampon in. Later that day I find her in the bathroom, and there are tampons all over the floor, in the bathtub, a few opened ones. She was trying to be like Mommy!” —ASHLEY, ALLEN

“My husband took the kids to day care for years, and every time he forgot something in the backpack (extra change of clothes, bottles, etc.), the day care would get onto me about it, and I would get embarrassed and get onto him about it. This year I get to take the kids to day care. On the first day, I forgot the backpacks.” —VICTORIA, MCKINNEY

IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT, MY 2-MONTHOLD STARTED CRYING FOR MILK. I GOT UP, GRABBED A BOTTLE, MIXED THE FORMULA, SAT THE BOTTLE ON THE NIGHTSTAND AND WENT RIGHT BACK TO SLEEP. LUCKILY MY SON WASN’T TOO HUNGRY BECAUSE HE FELL ASLEEP TOO.” —LATARI, CEDAR HILL

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march 2018 / fortworthchild


I’M ALMOST AFRAID TO TELL THEM IT’S EDUCATIONAL. GO PUBLIC. ™

KERA Kids has a world of teacher-tested, kid-approved content, online and on the air. Go for the shows, videos and games. Go because fun and learning go hand-in-hand. Go to enrich their education, with the same member-supported organization that probably helped support yours. Go Public.

KERAKIDS.ORG


It’s our 100th birthday!

Let your lights shine

MARCH

18-2 24 4

Be a part of the celebration and show your support for the kids we care for by changing your porch light or other outside lights to blue the week of our birthday. Get your FREE blue light bulb at select ACE Hardware locations while supplies last. Donations are accepted. For more information, visit cook100years.org.

#cook100years

FortWorthChild March 2018  
FortWorthChild March 2018