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J U N E 2018

YOUR MOMAPPROVED PEDIATRICIANS

DREAM JOBS SUMMER ACTIVITIES FOR FUTURE CAREERS

+

BOYS TO MEN RAISING THE NEXT GENERATION OF MEN IN THE #METOO ERA

MEET

ASHLEY WILLIAMS

OF HGTV’S FLIP OR FLOP

HOW TO CULTIVATE CURIOSITY IN YOUR CHILD

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spec ia

T H E M A G A Z I N E PA R E N T S L I V E B Y I N TA R R A N T C O U N T Y

WAYS TO ENJOY JUNE TOGETHER

*

Guide to Summer Fun


Celebrating 100 years!

At Cook Children’s, our specialists are curing more illnesses every day. So while it may be our birthday, what we’re really celebrating is giving more kids, more tomorrows. The best birthday present ever, is one that gives more kids more reasons to celebrate.

Give today for their tomorrows.

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pages / J U N E

2018

FEATURE

16 About Our Boys

How we define manhood to our boys has big ramifications for their emotional and mental health words Ashley Hays

DEPARTMENTS NOTED 5 Curious Little Minds

Why you should encourage curiosity, according to science

REAL MOMS 9 Mom Next Door / Ashley Williams

Army veteran and co-host of HGTV’s Flip or Flop Fort Worth

12 Datebook

Leon Bridges is in town, plus a can’t- miss art exhibit

14 Routines / Bethany Handy So your kid wants to be a scientist so he can learn how to make bubblegum? We show you where he can learn about his dream job through summer activities. p. 29

ON THE COVER

A visit to the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth is a must to see Takashi Murakami’s works. p. 12

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lauren Niebes

Associate Editor Alexis Manrodt Assistant Editor Lisa Salinas Calendar Editor Elizabeth Smith

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Carrie Steingruber

ART Graphic Designer Susan Horn

PUBLISHER/ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Joylyn Niebes

Cover Kid: Jackson of Fort Worth Photography: Cindy James Hair/Makeup: Jenn Karsner, Wallflower Management Styling: Meredith Mosshart

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher Diana Whitworth Nelson Account Executives Maggie Marston, Nancy McDaniel, Kristen Niebes, Sandi Tijerina, Kerensa Vest Advertising Coordinator Alexa Wilder

The Fort Worth mom runs a business with her husband while raising two kids

KID CULTURE 29 Summer of Dreams 11 summer camps and activities for every kind of kid 35 The Agenda Our favorite family events this month MOM-APPROVED DOCTORS 24 This Month: Pediatricians

Local pediatricians nominated by readers

COLUMNS 38 Confessions / Mommy Fails When bad things happen to good parents

PR/MARKETING Audience Development Director Candace Emerson Promotions Coordinator Beth McGee

ADMINISTRATION Business Manager Leah Wagner Office Manager + Distribution Robbie Scott

FortWorthChild is published monthly by Lauren Publications, Inc. FortWorthChild is distributed free of charge, one copy per reader. Only FortWorthChild authorized distributors may deliver or pick up the magazines. Additional or back copies of FortWorthChild are available for $2 per copy at the offices of Lauren Publications, Inc. We reserve the right to edit, reject or comment editorially on all material contributed. We cannot be responsible for the return of any unsolicited material. FortWorthChild is ©2018 by Lauren Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without express written permission prohibited.

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Look adventure in the eye at the all-new African Savanna! Get up close with our herd of reticulated giraffes as you handfeed these elegant creatures. From a breath away, watch one of the most highly endangered mammals on earth, the southern black rhino. And be nose-to-nose with our amusing hippos, whose underwater viewing exhibit will plunge you beneath a flowing African river. Get closer to these and more ... only at the Fort Worth Zoo.

FORTWORTHZOO.ORG


noted.

CURIOUS LITTLE MINDS WORDS HANNAH BUSH

helping your kids investigate their world

©ISTOCK.COM/ARTMARIE

O

n a recent visit to the Half Pint section of Half Price Books, I grabbed a copy of Curious George and went to sit at a doll-sized table. Right as George was to meet The Man with the Yellow Hat, I met someone of my own. Bryce, 5 years old, wanted to know what I was reading. “Curious George,” I said. “Do you know what it means to be curious?” He did. “It’s what people do when they want to see things.” After we discussed the things he is curious about (blocks, lightning and Superman), he looked up at the paper tree above us. A string of questions followed. “Is that a real tree? Does Curious George live there? Is that his house? Are those leaves fake?”

fortworthchild / june 2018

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noted / C U R I O U S

LITTLE MINDS

While Bryce can now voice all the questioning teaches kids to do the same. thoughts swirling around in his head, he Curious monkey see; curious monkey do. was likely questioning his surroundings long When Nicole Sweeney’s 5- and 8-year-old before he could talk. ask her questions, the Plano mom responds “We are curious from the get-go,” says David with open-ended questions like “I wonder …” Cross, Rees-Jones director at Texas Christian or “What do you think?”—so much so that University’s Karyn Purvis Institute of Child she recalls her oldest saying, frustrated, “You Development. Cross, who has never answer my questions! a doctorate in education and You always ask me what I think psychology, explains that curithe answer is!” BOTTLED osity is an integral component Eight-year-old Brady will CURIOSITY of infant development. “If you have his mom to thank if he watch babies, they are exquisitely For a hands-on someday makes a major scienattuned to their environment. tific discovery. Because the way project that you can do with your little They’ll attend to novel things she sees it, “curious kids are investigator, the early more than familiar things.” likely to experiment with their This act of opening ourselves childhood team at ideas and take the information the Perot Museum of to extract information from they learned and apply it to Nature and Science our environment is called an future curiosities.” recommends making “orienting response” and signals Thomas Close, who a discovery bottle healthy development—meanmanages education programs (also called a sensory ing curiosity is foundational at the Perot Museum of Nature bottle). A discovery bottle uses items found for learning. In fact, according and Science, says the museum around the house to to a study published in the takes a similar approach. encourage curiosity neuroscience journal Neuron “Our educators emphasize and exploration while in 2014, curiosity enhances inquiry-based learning with developing motor skills . brain functioning, allowing us children as a way to get them HERE’S HOW to retain information. (That’s thinking about the knowledge why you might remember more TO MAKE ONE: they already have and connect1. Find a clear, sealable from those college courses ing it to the answers they want bottle (like the empty you weren’t just taking for the to discover,” he explains. plastic water bottle credits.) Research also indicates Until Brady is happily sitting in your cup a correlation between curiosity employed at NASA, Sweeney holder) and fill with and higher levels of well-being, encourages him to play out water or baby oil. Oil is greater life and job satisfaction, more viscous than water, side with his little sister, Molly, and positive social interactions. building lean-tos from fallen allowing the objects But if curiosity is an branches and identifying ani inside to move around more slowly. innate trait, what role can mal shapes on leaves. She sees you play in developing your value in free play, especially 2. Add a few drops of little one’s curiosity? out in nature. And she’s onto food coloring. For starters, Cross suggests something: Play and curiosity 3. Add various small toys, creating environments that fosare closely linked. colorful buttons and ter intrigue, a concept he refers “It’s widely recognized beads, large flake glitter to as environmental engineering. or sequins, marbles, that playfulness, creativity paper clips, metal Kiaran Beck, a music and curiosity are drivers of nuts for magnetic teacher at Borman Elementary well-being,” Cross says. “The exploration and other School in Denton, says singing more curious we are, the more recognizable objects. alone can make her students creative we are, the more playful 4. Tighten the lid and feel vulnerable, putting a we are.” begin exploring with damper on their curiosity. Allowing your children to a magnet or magnifying exercise their curiosity “[Kids] have to be comfort glass. able to create,” she says. through play does more than So she adapts accordingly, just wear them out before changing lesson plans, swapbedtime; it furthers their ping singing for instruments or having investigation of the world, which is likely to students perform in groups. continue so long as there’s support. Sweeney Parents can mimic this at home by believes that rewarding her children’s curieliminating conditions that might trigger osity will keep them wondering, exploring fear or anger, which are incompatible with and questioning—all things that benefit her exploratory play and curiosity. Once children too. Brady and Molly, she acknowledges, see are at ease, they are ready to investigate and the world in a way that she tends to overlook, ask questions—or as Beck puts it, they are reminding her to adjust her own vision. ready to take hold of their own learning. “I’m constantly trying to reframe my He also proposes that parents model parenting lens and encourage my kids to curiosity at home. Demonstrating good keep exploring their world,” she says. 6

june 2018 / fortworthchild


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TA K A S H I MURAKAMI

JUNE 10–SEPTEMBER 16

MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH

3200 Darnell Street Fort Worth, Texas 76107 817.738.9215 www.themodern.org © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd.

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real moms. mom next door /

ASHLEY WILLIAMS co-host of hgtv’s flip or flop fort worth INTERVIEW NICOLE JORDAN

A

shley Williams and her husband of nine years, Andy, live each day hyperfocused on the mission at hand: Integrating veterans back into civilian life by way of their Fort Worth–based real estate company, Recon Realty. More than a mission, it’s a passion project for Ashley and Andy, who are both military veterans themselves—the couple first met in Iraq. When they moved back to the States in 2012, Ashley had a difficult time making the transition. Then real estate came knocking. Andy had a growing portfolio of rental properties. Ashley discovered her talent for design, and the couple began flipping. In the years since, they’ve spun Recon Realty into a profitable venture that pays the bills and, more to their point, helps fellow veterans find success in civilian life. The couple sees themselves as mentors of sort, training fellow vets and partnering with veteran-owned small businesses. Ashley and Andy added to their A-team with kids Ashton and Amina, and in a serendipitous turn of events, landed an HGTV series, Flip or Flop Fort Worth. PHOTO COURTESY OF HGTV

CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE

THE DEETS

AGE 32 HAILS FROM Chicago LIVES IN Fort Worth SIGNIFICANT OTHER Andy Williams, U.S. Marine Corps veteran, co-host of Flip or Flop Fort Worth and founder of Recon Realty HOW THEY MET In a gym on deployment in Baghdad CHILDREN Ashton, 6, and Amina, 5 CV HIGHLIGHT United States Army veteran

fortworthchild / june 2018

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real moms / A S H L E Y

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WILLIAMS

But despite their crowded schedule, they haven’t lost sight of the goal—changing local communities for the better, one veteran at a time. “People feel your passion,” says Ashley. “It can’t be faked. It exudes out of you. That’s how this all came about.”

WHAT WAS THE CATALYST FOR YOUR MISSION TO EMPOWER VETERANS THROUGH REAL ESTATE?

I was a transitioning veteran who had a hard time reintegrating into civilian life. We thought, “Who better to help begin that transition than someone who has actually experienced it?” It came from a need to figure out what to do when I got out of the military. We also needed a way to provide for our family so Andy didn’t have to go back overseas and work. Once we started having kids, I didn’t want them to have a Skype relationship [with Andy]. It developed from our needs. HOW DID FLIP OR FLOP FORT WORTH COME TO BE?

It was happenstance. We didn’t go out for a casting. We were on vacation talking with someone and didn’t know, at the time, that he was a producer. Andy was talking about our passion for working with veterans. [The producer] took an interest, and a month or so later said he was thinking about pitching a show. WAS IT A DIFFICULT DECISION TO MOVE FORWARD WITH THE SHOW? WERE YOU NERVOUS?

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HOW HAVE YOUR LIVES CHANGED SINCE THE SHOW DEBUTED?

Well, it’s definitely a lot busier. Veterans everywhere are reaching out. The veteran interaction has been the biggest change. We were doing everything on a smaller scale before the show. HAVE THE KIDS PICKED UP ON THE CHANGES?

everything for

newborns ® to toddlers

The good thing about kids is that they’re so resilient. They only see us as Mommy and Daddy. We put the show on and they’re like, “Oh look, there’s Mommy on TV. I want to watch Ninja Turtles now.” It’s their normalcy.

WHAT’S IT LIKE WORKING TOGETHER?

Early on, we didn’t really know our places 10

june 2018 / fortworthchild

HAVE YOU ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN DESIGN?

I wanted to be a nurse but didn’t stick with it because I went to the military. With us having our own real estate business, I was able to design and figured out I’m actually kind of good at it. It grew from there. I got some of the kinks out and learned to be creative without breaking the budget. HOW DO YOU DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE?

I’m definitely modern, but I love bright colors. One of my favorite designers of all time is Diane von Furstenberg. I love all her prints.

WHAT’S YOUR PARENTING STYLE? DO YOU RUN A TIGHT SHIP?

Oh yes, we have a schedule for everything. We have organized play. We have school time, wake-up time. I think kids thrive when they have structure. I think they do best when they can anticipate what’s happening next. I let them have free time, but at a certain time. Every minute of the day I know exactly what they’re doing, even if I’m not there.

WE PUT THE SHOW ON AND THEY’RE LIKE, ‘OH LOOK, THERE’S MOMMY ON TV. I WANT TO WATCH NINJA TURTLES NOW.’”

Definitely. We were fairly private people, and I was very tentative about showing the kids. You’re opening yourself up to scrutiny. But you’re also showing others that normal people can do this. You have the opportunity to take control of your future. Andy asked early on, “Is this really something you want to do?” I told him, “If it helps with the mission, let’s do it.”

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and what our strengths were. But now everything runs pretty smoothly. I have my spot, he has his spot and he lets me do what I need to do. You have to work off of each other’s strengths. You’re going home with that person at night.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST THING YOU’VE LEARNED FROM BEING A MOM?

You can’t control it all. I’m a control freak. I love to keep things organized, and kids have a way of coming in and mixing it up. But it all works. They taught me to be OK with the uncomfortable. When I first had Ashton, I was a nervous wreck. When Amina came, I learned to just let things happen, and she’s so calm. Ashton is a bit higher strung, but I think that’s because I was the one that was high strung. Just letting go ... I’m still learning, but that was a big lesson for me. YOU’RE SO BUSY. HOW DO YOU SPEND TIME TOGETHER AS A FAMILY WHEN YOU GET A BREAK FROM WORK?

The kids’ favorite spot is Main Event, but I think I’m winning them over with Dave & Buster’s. AND DATE NIGHT?

We like to eat. I love movies. Most of the time we go to Movie Tavern by Social House. AND WHAT DO YOU DO FOR YOURSELF?

I work out. That’s a big thing for me. I picked up running about three years ago. First, it was to lose weight, but then I realized I actually really like running. Distance helps me clear my mind. It’s my “me” time. It’s definitely my Zen.


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real moms / M O M

SOCIAL

WORDS NICOLE JORDAN

DATEBOOK

Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg

stave off summer’s dog days just a little bit longer with a special screening, can’t-miss art exhibit and a broadway musical—all happening this june JUNE 1 -3 M AGNOLIA AT THE MODERN: RBG

Get to know the real Ruth Bader Ginsburg when the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth hosts screenings of RBG, a film documenting the life of the legendary, lace-wearing Supreme. $9. 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth // 817/738-9215 // themodern.org

9 LEON BRIDGES

Show the Fort Worth native a little hometown love as he stops at The Pavilion at Toyota Music Factory in Irving. Jon Batiste and Stay Human, the house band for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, will open for the Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter (who, in case you were wondering, just so happens to turn 29 next month). Starting at $42. 300 W. Las Colinas Blvd., Irving // 972/810-1499 // thepaviliontmf.com

RBG

10 TAK ASHI MURAK A MI: THE OCTOPUS E ATS ITS OWN LEG

If you hit one museum exhibit in June, make it this one. Opening this month at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, the retrospective will feature 50 of Murakami’s works representing three decades of his career. A Japanese artist who’s collaborated with the likes of Kanye West and Louis Vuitton, Murakami is a master at blurring the lines between “high” and “low” culture and melding Japanese tradition with contemporary influences. $16. And be sure to reserve a couple of seats at Café Modern for the Japanese Whiskey Dinner on June 28.

Waitress

19 -24 WAITRESS Takashi Murakami: The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg

16 URBAN TRADERS M ARKET

If you haven’t been to Urban Traders Market yet, see what all the fuss is about during the last show until fall. Inspired by the Portland Saturday Market in Oregon, UTM is not an antique show or a flea market but an eclectic (and dogfriendly!) gathering of local artisans selling everything from edibles to stationery and leather goods. Vendors rotate, so you’ll find new wares to love at each show. Free. 400 E. Division St., Arlington // urbantradersmarket.com

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june 2018 / fortworthchild

The much-buzzed-about musical comes to Bass Performance Hall as part of the Broadway at the Bass series. Based on a 2007 film of the same name by Adrienne Shelley, the musical is produced by an all-female creative team, including Grammy nominee Sara Bareilles, who composed all the music and lyrics. Starting at $44. 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth // 817/212-4450 // basshall.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES; JOAN MARCUS; NATHAN KEAY; ADAM REICH

3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth // 817/738-9215 // themodern.org


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a monday in the life of

BETHANY HANDY It’s a family affair for Bethany Handy, who co-owns ClosedWon, a digital marketing and sales consultancy, with her husband, Chris. They live in Fort Worth with their two children, 3-year-old Harper and 7-monthold Weston.

4

:20AM Weston is stirring. I feed him and hope that he falls back asleep while I get ready to exercise. I’m glad that I set out my workout clothes and put a filled water bottle in the fridge last night so that I’m not running around like a madwoman. 5:15AM Exercise at FIT4MOM in Fort Worth. Even though it can be rough to wake up so early—especially if Weston has been up all night—I love my twice-weekly classes here. They provide me with muchneeded “me” time. 6:15AM Driving home, I feel accomplished and able to set intentions for the day. Plus, I get to choose the music. (No Frozen soundtrack for me!) 6:30AM I take a shower, get dressed and join Chris to work on our consultancy. I review our clients’ live messaging stats from the weekend and assemble progress reports to send out later in the day. 6:45AM Harper is awake. We have eggs delivered weekly from a local farm, and it’s her job to pick ones to eat every morning. After

her selection, I serve the usual breakfast: scrambled eggs, bacon, fruit and yogurt for Harper and Chris and a slice of toast and a cup of hot tea for myself. 7:15AM Chris gets ready to leave by 7:45 while I dress the kids. Weston just hangs out while I help his sister. Harper likes to choose her own outfits—let’s just say she takes some interesting fashion risks. 8:30AM Off to school. The process of getting packed up and into the car can take anywhere from five minutes to 15 minutes, depending on Harper’s temperament and how many things she “needs” in her backpack. 9:15AM Back home. Weston fell asleep in the car so I transfer him to his crib and get to work. Mondays are reserved for planning and business development, so I spend a couple of hours outlining new chatbots and sales email campaigns for clients. 12PM Weston wakes up hungry. I feed him and we play for a while before leaving to pick up Harper from her Spanish immersion preschool. 1PM We arrive at Harper’s school. I catch her having a conversation with a friend in Spanish. I may not have a clue what she is saying, but I’m happy she is able to speak a second language. Harper greets Weston with a kiss and gives me a hug and says, “I love you.” I cherish the fact that she is really happy to see me and share her experiences from the day. 1:15PM We visit Chris at his office. He’s in a master’s program at the University of Texas at Arlington on Mondays until 10pm, so we won’t see him before bed. The whole family looks forward to this quick visit. 2PM Back home. I feed Weston and give Harper an after-school snack, then the three of us have playtime. 3:30PM Harper chooses her leotard for dance class while I check to make sure her ballet and tap shoes are in her dance bag. 4:20PM Load up the car and head to the Studio of MoveMint. 5PM Harper gets her dance on. Weston and I wait in the lobby—he snoozes while I have some grown-up interactions with the other dancers’ parents. It’s a win-win for everyone. 5:45PM We call Chris on the drive home. Harper gives her dad all of the dance class deets and lets him know which sticker she earned from her dance instructor. 6:10PM Dinnertime. We end up having breakfast for dinner, which thankfully Harper loves because it happens a lot. In between bites of eggs, bacon and pancakes, she shares colorful stories about her day. After breakfast-slash-dinner, I feed Weston, and Harper performs dance moves for me. 6:45PM Bathtime. Weston squeals and

Diaries are penned by moms (and dads) in the Fort Worth area. The authors volunteer to share a day of their choosing and are not paid or endorsed by FortWorthChild. Send your diary to editorial@dfwchild.com. All submissions are subject to editing and may be cut for space. 14

june 2018 / fortworthchild

PHOTO COURTESY OF EVER SO LOVELEE PHOTOGRAPHY

real moms / R O U T I N E S


the fine

print

FAVORITE INDULGENCE Justin’s dark chocolate peanut butter cups WHAT’S ON HER DVR This Is Us and The Handmaid’s Tale BEST PURCHASE EVER WinterGreen synthetic grass for our yard WORDS SHE LIVES BY Live every day with intention BLOG SHE FOLLOWS Nat’s Next Adventure BEAUTY PRODUCT SHE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT BeautyCounter No. 1 brightening facial oil LOOKING FORWARD TO Disney World next year WHAT SHE DOES WHEN LIFE GETS STRESSFUL Pray DREAM VACATION

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smiles while Harper and I wash him. After his bath, we get him dressed and brush his hair—he has a lot of hair for a 7-month-old. If it dries unbrushed, he ends up channeling Martin Van Buren. Next up is Harper. She’s become Miss Independent and doesn’t want any help. 7:15PM Everyone is bathed and in pajamas. Harper picks My No No No Day, Pinkalicious: Tickled Pink and Miss Lina’s Ballerinas for me to read before bed. Both kids really love story time. Harper has two- to three-week obsessions with books, so it’s the 20th time I’m reading these books. I can almost recite them from memory. 7:30PM Lights out for Harper, which means Mommy-Weston time. He does tummy time and we play before he eats. 8PM I put Weston down for the night. The next hour consists of tidying around the house, loading the dishwasher and throwing in a load of laundry. I review my calendar to prep for tomorrow. Thankfully, there is no work to do to get ahead, so I check my work email one last time before retiring for the day. 9PM It’s only 9pm but I’m pretty tired. I brush my teeth, wash my face and slip into bed. I read a few pages of Jim Fay’s Love and Logic Magic for Early Childhood, but my eyelids begin to feel heavy, and I drift off to sleep. fortworthchild / june 2018

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About Our Boys How we define manhood to our boys has big ramifications for their emotional and mental health W O R D S A S H L E Y H AYS ILLUSTRATION JOHN J. CUSTER

C

arla Morton remembers the day she was running errands while her sons, Collin and Ben, now 10 and 8, were buckled up in their car seats practicing gender identifiers. “You are a …?” she prompted. “Boy!” Ben and Collin chimed in. “Good! And Daddy is a …?” “Boy!” “Yes!” praised Morton. “And Mommy is a …?” The boys thought for a moment. “Doctor!” It was a proud moment for Morton, a pediatric neuropsychologist at Cook Children’s in Fort Worth. She continually tries to break the molds of what we consider traditional gender stereotypes in hopes of giving her kids—and any child who needs a voice—the freedom to express themselves independent of social norms. “In my home, we are very progressive and have less-set gender roles,” she says. “My boys may see their dad doing the dishes or housework while I do the finances or computer repairs. That’s their ‘normal.’” We are in a transitional era in which society is becoming more accepting of women and men who depart from stereotypes of femininity and masculinity. But there are still definite expectations that society has put on our boys when it comes to what it means to be a boy—and a man.

Some of those expectations are prohibitive; others, overly permissive. “Historically, we have excused certain behaviors in our boys, more so in socially conservative circles,” Morton says. “Boys will be boys” is a phrase tossed around (often endearingly) by loving parents, well-meaning teachers and doting grandparents. And there is some truth to it—testosterone is widely understood to increase aggression and dominance in boys and may affect cognitive performance, too. But often the phrase is used to justify otherwise unacceptable behavior. Little Jake called Sophie ugly at lunch today? “Aw, he has a crush on her!” Matthew wouldn’t mind his teacher when it was time to come in from recess? “He is such a boy!” Thanks to recent events—the #MeToo movement, for one—the restriction that “boys will be boys” is being challenged. It hasn’t escaped society’s notice that according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the majority of sexual violence perpetrators—against women and men—are men. And so behavior that was previously written off as either playfulness or biologic inevitability (like inappropriate jokes or unwanted advances in the workplace) has come under long-overdue scrutiny. At the same time, society still feeds our boys catchphrases like “boys don’t cry” instead of teaching them how to healthily process and express their emotions—and then we wonder why they act on their feelings in inappropriate, uncontrolled ways. Ah, well. Boys will be boys, right? fortworthchild / june 2018

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Yes, boys will be boys—and inevitably, men. And the way we respond to our boys’ emotions and behavior now is creating the structural boundaries for who they will be and how they will perceive manhood as adults. BOYS VERSUS GIRLS

princess manners and is immediately sternly corrected.” West, who has a doctorate in psychology, has two boys, ages 6 and 2, and a girl, 9. She believes that mothers of boys tend to tolerate or overlook inappropriate behavior by reasoning that boys are more energetic and therefore harder to rein in. Benbrook mom Brandi Thomas agrees. “Boys definitely have more latitude to be wild and crazy,” she says. Her two boys are 11 and 6. “The expectation for them to be able to sit quietly through the same activity as a girl just isn’t there.”

It is undeniable that we manage boys and girls differently. The way we react to a variety of behaviors depends on the child’s gender. Alex Wade, a licensed professional counselor intern at Curis Functional Health and Apple Counseling and Consulting in Dallas, says that as a therapist, she tries to be aware of this proclivity and treats both her male and female patients similarly. BOTTLE IT UP “[Parents] often speak to, At the same time, boys do not discipline or even defend their have the same latitude as girls to children depending on genderexpress and work through their related grounds,” she says. “When emotions. A study published in I point it out during the parent The British Journal of Developmenconsultation, most of them aren’t tal Psychology found that mothers even aware of what they’re doing.” are more prone to use emotional In 2017, the BBC conducted words and content with their a social experiment in which toddler daughters than with their they dressed a male child in girls’ sons. This models to our children clothes and a female child in that sentimental conversations are boys’ clothes and to be reserved for placed both kids in female interactions. a child care room “As a society, with unsuspectwe have not emoing employees. The tionally coached “THE NUMBER our boys to caregivers spoke to the kids differently ONE STATE- identify, express (coddling and cooing or cope with their MENT THAT feelings approprimore to “Sophie,” whose actual name WE MAKE TO ately,” West says. was Edward) and “When a little boy BOYS THAT falls on the playoffered them different toys to play with. SUPPRESSES ground, parents When confronted are more inclined EMOTIONAL to say, ‘You’re with the swap, the employees admitted EXPRESSION OK—brush it off,’ that they were acting when really, that TO PAIN IS, boy is feeling sad, on gender bias. “Think of how lonely.” ‘YOU’RE OK.’” hurtLaorTonya we respond to Dapotty words,” says vison, a licensed Brooke West, a play master social therapist and owner of HOPE worker, social psychologist and Child and Family Center in Dalhost of the radio show Mental las. “When a little boy says a bad Speak, agrees. “The number one word, a dad is more inclined to statement that we make to boys laugh about it while saying, ‘Now that suppresses emotional expreswe don’t say that,’ which sends sion to pain is, ‘You’re OK.’” the little boy a contradicting This simple phrase, meant to message. But if his little girl says toughen up our boys and teach the same word, she isn’t using her them how to be strong, could in18

june 2018 / fortworthchild

stead be detrimental to their emotional well-being by enforcing the idea of locking away or dismissing their feelings. “Boys are seen choking back tears although it is a naturally triggered response to physical or emotional pain,” she adds. For a year and a half, Davison was an adolescent boys’ therapist at a mental health facility in Arlington. The most common issue she dealt with? Boys suppressing their emotions and thoughts. “The suppression is directly related to parental belief systems of how boys ought to react when emotionally triggered,” Davison explains. She’s spent a lot of time helping boys process their feelings regarding these conditioned behaviors but doesn’t believe that they readily associate this with the term “masculinity.” “From an early age, we teach boys that it’s not appropriate to cry, and that if they do, they are not being masculine,” says Paul Bones, an assistant professor in the sociology department at Texas Woman’s University. The belief that boys aren’t supposed to be timid, cautious or fearful is being ingrained into them every day, intentionally or otherwise. The result is not that our sons are any less sensitive— any boy mom will attest to that— but that our sons are holding in their insecurities rather than voicing them, causing an inability to appropriately express or interpret emotional struggles. Terrill Richardson of Fort Worth experienced this firsthand when his son Kyle, a high school football player, broke his leg his sophomore year. He tried to get back in the game once released by a doctor, but “his heart wasn’t in it anymore,” Richardson says. “He tried, but he said he wasn’t as fast, wasn’t as agile. He was really afraid that he’d re-break his leg. A

few weeks in, he made the decision to quit.” What affected Richardson the most was not that Kyle decided to quit, but that he was actually afraid to tell his father. “I think he probably went to practice a lot longer and went to games a lot longer than he wanted to in order to please me,” Richardson says. “The thing is… I was actually relieved that he quit.” Kyle’s reluctance to share his feelings is not uncommon, according to Davison. “Many [boys] share in therapy that they try to tell adults how they feel but have felt shut down when they attempt,” she reports. These “shutdowns” are surfacing in areas of these boys’ lives that are supposed to provide security. To show feelings in school is to make oneself vulnerable to bullying and ridicule by other children. To show feelings at home is pointless from their perspective, as they feel that they will be shut down regardless. “When shut down, the response is depression, anxiety or uncontrollable outbursts of aggression,” Davison says. It’s like that big splash bucket at the water park that tips when it gets too full: At some point, all those pent-up feelings have to find a release. That release could be defiant or aggressive behavior—which society often tells our boys is OK, even when talking about their feelings is not—or a serious mental health crisis. It’s worth noting that boys are more likely than girls to commit violent crime, including sexual violence and gun violence. Boys are also less likely to seek professional mental health care, which might prevent those uncontrollable outbursts.


“Guys don’t talk about their feelings, we don’t seek help when we need it, and we feel like asking for help makes us lesser,” Bones says, going so far as to link the bottling up of emotions to men’s shorter average life expectancy. “It’s because men are told that asking for help is a sign of weakness and a departure from masculinity. It’s why we don’t go to the doctor unless we’re on death’s door. And forget about seeking psychological help.” IN NEED OF A DETOX

While parents may play a role in advancing these stereotypes, they’re far from the only influence. Society in general—and media in particular—has a big impact on how boys view masculinity. “It’s generally between the ages of 8 and 9 that kids start becoming more self-reflective and looking to outside factors for confirmation that they are ‘normal,’” Morton says. “It’s those external factors that parents really need to concern themselves with.” YouTube, for example, serves as a major platform for such persuasive manifestos. Jordan Peterson, a clinical psychologist and professor at the University of Toronto, uses his channel to rebuke the idea of male weakness with excerpts from his best-selling book 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos and abrasive comments such as “Don’t be dependent. At all. Ever. Period.” These are the kinds of ideas of what it means to be a man that are promoted to our boys—and we’re buying it. More than 700,000 copies of it. Peterson’s YouTube channel is only a fraction of the screen time equation. West is adamant that the overuse of screen time is detrimental to children’s development, for boys in particular. “What do I really think about screen time? I think that it’s creating monsters,” she says, explaining that as it becomes more and more acceptable for families to rely on electronics, our boys need a parent’s presence more than ever. “The very first issue I address with my male clients’ parents is

their screen time and use of elecencourage emotional health (see tronics,” she says. “As a society, we sidebar at right for phrases to are allowing unlimited exposure to avoid) and paying closer attenthese, which can model violence tion to the behaviors we promote and crude behavior to impressionand accept. able and vulnerable minds.” “My goal is to encourage as While studies disagree about much ‘personhood’ as I can to the long-term impacts of violent them versus defined ‘manhood,’” entertainment, West believes that Morton says. screen time itself, no matter what’s She urges her male clients to on said screen, is toxic. Namely, embrace what they like without the instant gratification that focusing on the outside reactions comes with befrom their ing constantly family, peers “plugged in” or social media is robbing our platforms. boys of the For moms ability to apand dads, it propriately exis critical to On Thursday, June 14, the city press empathy, stress to our of Fort Worth is airing a free compassion boys the value screening of THE MASK YOU LIVE and patience. in their distinct IN , which “follows boys and The first personalities, young men as they struggle to thing she interests and stay true to themselves while advises for characteristics negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity.” The her patients is without pushing film is meant to educate and an “electronic them toward spread awareness and underdetox,” during what society standing, not to lecture. The film which the boys says they should is also available on Netflix or unplug and are be like. for rent or purchase on Amazon encouraged to “It’s impor($4.99 to rent, $12.99 to own) spend more tant that we and Vudu ($2.99 to rent, $9.99 time outdoors encourage our to own) for at-home viewing. riding bikes or boys to be indiModern Art Museum of Fort playing board viduals rather Worth, 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth games with than modeling Register online at fortworththeir families. themselves texas.gov/moviesthatmatter. “We need after what to take back society expects the power from them to be,” iPads, tablets, video games, and Wade emphasizes. smartphones,” West says. “If we Efforts such as the #MeToo don’t, we are losing our ability to movement have provided raise our kids into good people, not platforms for this reformation of just people with good behavior.” manhood, similar to the cultural changes we experienced within the THE NEW MANHOOD last generation regarding our girls. It’s hard in the moment to picture “It used to be that girls our rambunctious little boys as needed to be quiet, passive and grown adults, but it is crucial that ladylike. Then we realized that we turn our focus on just that. those messages weren’t the best “The definition of masculinfor our girls,” Bones explains, ity is rapidly changing,” Davison adding that over time, society says. “The nature of what masbegan to encourage girls to be culinity has been, and what it is more assertive, independent and becoming, is contingent upon true to themselves. the changing of past beliefs. “We didn’t ban or demonize Parents need to adopt what boys femininity; we just decided to are saying they require emotiondrop some of these damaging ally and mentally.” ideas of what it means to be a This means policing the girl. That’s what we’re doing with language we use with our boys to boys now.”

Movies That Matter

You Don’t Say

Feeling disconnected from your boy? Here is a list of common no-no’s when attempting to bond with your son, and what you can say instead. DON’T SAY

“You (throw/hit/act/fill in the blank) like a girl.” Not only is this promoting sexism, but you are creating a wall between your son and yourself using humiliation as your tactic. DO SAY

“I can tell you are trying—is there a way I can help?” Acknowledge that he’s making an effort, and offer your time and attention in helping. DON’T SAY

“Well you just won’t talk to me so I don’t know how to help you.” Boys often want to communicate, but feel uncomfortable initiating it. Don’t get frustrated when your attempts to engage with him are met with shrugs. Be patient. DO SAY

“I can tell when something is bothering you. When you need me, I am ready to listen.” Letting your son know that you are tuned in and all ears during an awkward situation for him can ease him into letting his guard down. DON’T SAY

“How was your day?” This staple dinner-table question is typically met with one of two answers: “Fine” or “Good.” Not exactly a conversation starter, much to a parent’s disdain. DO SAY

“Did anything interesting or abnormal happen today?” Asking open-ended questions that require a thought-out response will naturally create a flow of conversation. And if he responds with, “Not really,” don’t push him. Forced conversation is just as bad as none.

fortworthchild / june 2018

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MAPPING YOUR FAMILY’S

SUMMER OF FUN

Sweet summertime is finally here. This comprehensive directory features Dallas-Fort Worth’s top destinations that are perfect for keeping the whole family entertained all summer long. The best part? We’re giving away weekly passes to your favorite local spots through our Summer Fun Map contest. Learn more about how to participate by sharing your insta-worthy shots on page 23. 1.

Alamo Drafthouse Multiple locations. 972/534-2120. drafthouse. com/dfw. Affordable family films for maximum family fun! Choose your ticket price and buy online to reserve seats. Proceeds benefit HopeKids North Texas.

11. The Dallas World Aquarium Dallas. 214/720-2224. dwazoo.com. Indoor aquarium features exotic marine life, OrinocoSecrets of the River rainforest (primates, crocodiles, free-flying birds) and Mundo Maya— home to ocelots, sharks, owls and eagles.

2.

Alley Cats Entertainment alleycatsbowl.com. Arlington. 817/784-2695. Hurst. 817/589-0523. Plenty of fun for everyone! Bowling, laser tag, Putt-Putt Golf, arcade games, go-carts, more. Attractions vary by location.

12. Denton County Historical Park Denton. 940/349-2850. dentoncounty.com/chos. The park is home to historic Denton County structures like the Bayless-Selby and Quakertown House museums. Come visit—admission is free! Guided tours are available.

3.

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7.

8.

9.

Altitude Trampoline Park Fort Worth. 817/741-5867. altitudefw.com. Altitude Trampoline Parks are the world’s premier trampoline facilities that offer fun and exercise for people of all ages. Amon Carter Museum of American Art Fort Worth. 817/738-1933. cartermuseum. org. Free fun all summer at Amon Carter! Storytime, Wednesdays June 6–July 25. Sunset Cinema showing Homeward Bound (1993), July 12. Visit cartermuseum.org for details. Bowl & Barrel Dallas. 214/363-2695. bowlandbarrel.com. Strike up the party! Our boutique bowling alley is great for kids 6 and up. With party packages, kid-friendly food, ramps, bumpers and more. Bureau of Engraving and Printing Fort Worth. 817/231-4000. bep.gov. See billions of dollars printed at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Fort Worth, where the nation’s paper currency is produced. Admission is free! The COOP Frisco. 972/668-1100. thecoopfrisco.com. The COOP was built for kids but designed for you! Bring the kids to play and enjoy a coffee, free Wi-Fi and much more. Crayola Experience Plano Plano. 469/642-2901. crayolaexperience.com/ plano. Crayola Experience Plano is 60,000 square feet of hands-on fun! Most families spend 3–4 hours exploring our 22 one-of-akind attractions. Let your creativity run free. The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden Dallas. 214/515-6500. dallasarboretum.org. Family Fun Fridays: Beginning June 1–July 27. Enjoy face painting, a petting zoo and Kindermusik in Pecan Grove from 10am– 2pm.

10. Dallas Firefighter’s Museum Dallas. 214/821-1500. dallasfiremuseum.com. Imagine being a firefighter! At the Dallas Firefighter’s Museum come see the past and present in firefighting trucks, gear, etc. Fun for all ages.

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june 2018 / fortworthchild

13. Dinosaur World Glen Rose. 254/898-1526. dinosaurworld.com. Go back in time and see them alive. Over 150 life-size dinosaurs, fossil dig, Dino Gem Excavation, Prehistoric Museum, animatronics, playground, etc. Open every day. 14. Epic Waters Indoor Waterpark Grand Prairie. 972/337-3131. epicwatersgp. com. Beat the heat at Epic Waters Indoor Waterpark. Eleven slides, Texas’ longest indoor lazy river and tiny tot area make it epic in every wave! 15. Fort Worth Museum of Science and History Fort Worth. 817/255-9300. fwmuseum.org. Explore the ugly side of human and animal nature in our newest exhibits Grossology and Animal Grossology. Then, experience Pandas in the Omni Theater. 16. Fort Worth Stockyards Fort Worth. 817/625-9715. fortworthstockyards.com. Channel your inner cowboy or cowgirl, experience the longhorns, master the Maze and have the time of your life at our unique and quirky attractions. 17. Fort Worth Zoo — African Savanna Fort Worth. 817/759-7555. fortworthzoo.org. Look adventure in the eye at the all-new African Savanna! Experience the Fort Worth Zoo like never before with giraffe feeding and underwater hippo viewing. 18. The Frog Pond Water Park at the Farmers Branch Aquatics Center Farmers Branch. 972/919-8720. fbh2o.com. Our mini neighborhood water park features a waterslide tower, lazy river, and activity and lagoon pools. We also offer swim lessons, pool parties and indoor swimming! 19. Galveston Island Historic Pleasure Pier Galveston Island. 1-855/789-7437. pleasurepier.com. Featuring waterfront fun and entertainment, the Pleasure Pier features family-oriented attractions including rides, midway games, a wide selection of food venues and retail shops.

20. Galveston Island Visitor Information Center Galveston Island. 409/797-5144. galveston. com. Whether you’re a history buff, thrill seeker or beach bum, Galveston Island has something for you. Let us help you plan the perfect island getaway. 21. Gaylord Texan Resort Grapevine. 817/778-1000. gaylordtexan.com/ summerfest. Experience Gaylord Texan’s SummerFest featuring the Smurfs with activities such as Junior Chef Camp, Scavenger Hunt, pool parties, dining events, live music and more. 22. Go Ape Oak Point Park Plano. 800/971-8271. goape.com/locations/ texas/plano. Take family adventure to new heights at Go Ape Oak Point! Challenge yourselves to zip, swing and climb through the treetops while creating lasting memories. 23. Grapevine Convention and Visitors Bureau Grapevine. 800/457-6338. grapevinetexasusa. com. Celebrate Grapevine’s 10th Annual SummerBlast Memorial Day through Labor Day! Enjoy fun for the whole family including waterparks, fireworks, exhibits, outdoor activities, shopping and more. 24. Hydrous Wake Parks Multiple locations. 214/310-1105. hydrouswakeparks.com. What could be better than spending time on the water learning how to wakeboard? Sign up now. Hydrous Wake Parks camps, parties and lessons. 25. iT’Z Family Food & Fun Euless. 817/283-3700. itzusa.com/pricingspecials-deals-coupons. iT’Z the summer fun hangout with an arcade, laser tag, bumper cars, rock climbing and bowling. The Annual Pass offers the best value at $9.99/visit! 26. JCC Dallas Dallas. 214/239-7138. jccdallas.org. Experience the ultimate social magnet for fitness, wellness and culture. We serve every age and stage of life. All are welcome. 27. Kemah Boardwalk Kemah. 877/285-3624. kemahboardwalk.com. The Kemah Boardwalk is open daily providing fun for everyone! Located just 20 miles from downtown Houston. 28. LEGOLAND Discovery Center Dallas/Fort Worth Grapevine. 469/444-3050. dallasfw.legolanddiscoverycenter.com. LEGOLAND Discovery Center is the ultimate indoor LEGO® playground full of amazing play, creativity and building fun designed for families. Come and explore!


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29. Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament Dallas. 888/935-6878. medievaltimes.com. Kids free this summer with any full price adult admission Monday–Thursday. Code: DCKF Come see the new show as the new queen rules the castle.

Ripley’s Odditorium, the Palace Of Wax, the Enchanted Mirror Maze, the 7D Moving Theater and the Impossible Laser Race.

30. Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas. 214/242-5100. nashersculpturecenter.org. Visit one of the best collections of modern sculpture in the world. Family activity guides and free admission days monthly. 31. NRH20 Family Water Park North Richland Hills. 817/427-6500. nrh2o.com. NRH2O features over 24 slides and attractions with family fun for everyone! Great place for birthday parties. Dive-in movies and fireworks shows on select nights. 32. Play Street Museum Multiple locations. playstreetmuseum.com. Play Street Museum is a network of interactive children’s museums purposefully designed to encourage a young child’s sense of independence, exploration and creativity. 33. Pump It Up Multiple locations. pumpitupparty.com. Our indoor arenas feature gigantic inflatables that are ideal for your child’s 100 percent private birthday party, or check our online calendar for weekday public playtimes.

36. SEA LIFE Grapevine Aquarium Grapevine. 469/444-3050. visitsealife.com/ grapevine. Dive into SEA LIFE Grapevine and become a turtle expert. Rescue, rehabilitate and release your turtle back to the ocean in the Sea Turtle Rescue Center! 37. SeaQuest Interactive Aquarium Fort Worth Fort Worth. 682/235-5752. fortworth.visitseaquest.com. Touch, feed and interact with stingrays, sharks and many other animals as you go on a quest through five continents during a journey at SeaQuest! 38. Seaworld San Antonio. 210/520-4732. seaworld.com/ san-antonio. Little ones can discover big thrills at rides, shows and summer attractions, plus dance and sing at the all–new Sesame Street® Party Parade! 39. The Shops at Willow Bend Plano. 972/202-4904. shopwillowbend.com. The Shops at Willow Bend features Crayola Experience, Plano Children’s Theatre, Janie & Jack, Vineyard Vines and Justice making it the perfect family destination.

34. Reunion Tower Dallas. 214/712-7040. reuniontower.com. Beat the heat at the top spot for summer fun! Plan a daytime visit for weekday activities on the GeoDeck. Visit reuniontower.com/summer for details.

40. SPARK! Dallas. 214/421-7727. sparkdallas.org. The creative adventure starts at SPARK! Explore a 6,000-foot climb, Crawl Slide Sculpture. Engage with pop-up creative activities. Enjoy summer camps. Family days Saturday and Sunday.

35. Ripley’s Believe It Or Not! Grand Prairie. 972/263-2391. ripleys.com/ grandprairie. Experience all five cool attractions:

41. Studio Movie Grill Multiple locations. 972/388-7888. studiomoviegrill.com. Studio Movie Grill is the leader of

in-theater dining where the passion is film, food and fun! 42. Texas Discovery Gardens Dallas. 214/428-7476. txdg.org. Don’t miss our Butterfly Tea Parties, June 14, July 19 and August 23! The perfect event for a Mommyand-me outing or a meetup with friends. 43. Topgolf Multiple locations. 817/349-4002. topgolf.com/ kidzone. No golf skill required to register for Topgolf’s Summer Academy, but each kiddo leaves with new talents, friends and fun memories from this weeklong camp! 44. Town of Little Elm Little Elm. 972/731-3296. lakefrontlittleelm.com. The only beach in North Texas! Sand volleyball, fire pits, open swim, kayaks/SUPs, great restaurants, cable wakeboarding and much more. Little Elm has it all. 45. Trinity Forest Adventure Park Dallas. 214/391-1000. trinitytreetops.com. Trinity Forest Adventure Park is the largest aerial park in the Metroplex and offers high ropes adventure for ages 4 and up. 46. Urban Air Adventure Park Multiple locations. 1-800/960-4778. urbanairparks.com. Urban Air is a fullservice family entertainment center and the perfect destination for family fun. Urban Air provides unforgettable birthday party experiences for all ages. 47. Water Works Park Denton. 940/349-8800. dentonwaterworks.com. Enjoy a new wave pool and concessions, in addition to five giant slides, two toddler slides, lazy river, children’s play pool, pavilions, cabanas and more!

Win a seaside family vacation! Join in on the Summer Fun Photo Contest for a chance to win weekly giveaways to our featured destinations. With every shared photo, you will be automatically entered to win the grand prize: A three-night beach house stay in historic Galveston, Texas! Here’s how to enter:

MAPPING YOUR FAMILY’S

SUMMER OF

FUN

1. Follow @dfwchildmag on Instagram 2. Visit any of the locations on the Summer Fun Map 3. Snap a picture and post it to Instagram 4. Use hashtag #DFWChildSummerFun and be sure to tag us @DFWChildMag SPONSORED BY

#DFWChildSummerFun Photo Contest Contest closes July 31, 11:59pm. Winners will be announced August 1. Winners selected at random. Must be 21 years or older to enter.

fortworthchild / june 2018

23


THIS MONTH:

18

PEDIATRICIANS WORDS NORTHTEXASCHILD EDITORS

Happy birthday to you! That’s what your children should be singing to make sure they’ve washed their hands an appropriate amount of time. (You can bet we’ll be singing it too.) Below, more surprising and helpful tidbits on kids’ health from our expert sources.

BA

S & TODDLE BIE

RS

HAPPY BIRTHDAY... HAPPY BIRTHDAY...

COLDS PER YEAR FOR

HOW LONG SHOULD KIDS WASH THEIR HANDS? LONG ENOUGH TO SING “HAPPY BIRTHDAY” TWICE (OR ONCE VERY SLOWLY).

6 MONTHS

OLD IS WHEN THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS RECOMMENDS THAT KIDS START GETTING ANNUAL FLU SHOTS

24

june 2018 / fortworthchild

9

The kitchen is the GERMIEST PLACE in the house

ERGARTENE ND

RS

KIDS SHOULD APPLY SUNSCREEN 15–30 MINUTES BEFORE SUN EXPOSURE.

OO SCH LERS RE

A CHILD’S NORMAL BODY TEMPERATURE CAN RANGE FROM 97.9ºF TO 100.4ºF.

12 OLESCENTS AD

2-4

SOURCES: KIDSHEALTH.ORG; COOK CHILDREN’S; AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS; HEALTHYCHILDREN.ORG; MEDLINEPLUS; NSF INTERNATIONAL; WEBMD; ASTHMA AND ALLERGY FOUNDATION OF AMERICA; COSTHELPER

P

8–10

KI

mom-approved | P E D I AT R I C I A N S

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION


SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

ALLERGY & IMMUNOLOGY

Mireku, Nana MD USMD Specialty Care Las Colinas, Irving See ad on page 27

Champion, John MD Office of Dr. Champion, Fort Worth

Jain, Rashmi MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Lake Worth

Pilgrim-King, Karen MD Bright Star Pediatrics, Arlington

Charette, Vanessa MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Magnolia, Fort Worth

Joki, Melvin MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Mansfield

Rafati, Joyce MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Magnolia, Fort Worth

Coutoumanos, Julia MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Hurst

CARDIOLOGY

Roten, Lisa MD Cook Children’s Heart Center, Fort Worth

DERMATOLOGY

Volkman, Heather DO Dr. Robin Roberts Dermatology, Fort Worth

FAMILY MEDICINE

Benzick, Arthur MD Southlake Family Medicine

Inman, Jamie DO Family Health Services, Fort Worth Lee, Song MD Office of Dr. Lee, Colleyville

GENETICS

Gamble, Candace MD Cook Children’s Genetics, Fort Worth

INTERNAL MEDICINE

Chang, Sarah MD Baylor Scott & White Primary Care, Trophy Club

NEUROLOGY

Ryals, Brian MD Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center, Fort Worth

Quatro, Christine DO Varsity Orthopedics, Hurst See ad on page 27

PEDIATRICS

Abitoye, Omolara MD Acclaim Pediatrics, Grand Prairie See ad on page 26 Arnaout, Diane MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics, Willow Park Arouse, Ayman MD First Step Pediatric Associates, Cleburne Baird, Tiffany MD HMA Pediatrics, Burleson

Dao, Vuong DO Cook Children’s Pediatrics Arlington See ad on page 26 Dosu, Babtunde MD Metroplex Pediatrics, Fort Worth Fowler, Gina DO Little Plum Blossom Pediatrics, Aledo Friedman, James MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Clearfork, Fort Worth Garza, Sara MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Keller Parkway, Keller Ghaffar, Faryal MD Dallas Pediatrics and ID Associates, Grapevine

Joslin, Shirley MD Baylor Scott & White Family Medical Center, Midlothian

Ruas, Virginia MD Cook Children’s Neighborhood Clinic – Renaissance, Fort Worth

Karimi, Shams MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Hurst

Saksena, Prem MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Hurst

Knapp, Roger MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Southlake

Selzer, Anji MD Kid Care Pediatrics, Keller

Leung, Christina MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Bedford

Senevey, Steven MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Clearfork, Fort Worth

Lopez, David DO Cook Children’s Pediatrics Hurst Mandal, Kathryn MD Continuum Internal Medicine & Pediatrics, Fort Worth See ad on page 27 Mann, Robert MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Mansfield

Gibson-Hull, Stacey MD SGH Pediatrics, Arlington

Martin, Bruce MD Alliance Pediatrics, Fort Worth

Gittleman, Jennifer DO Cook Children’s Pediatrics Clearfork, Fort Worth

Martin, Devona MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Willow Park

Gomez, Omar MD Kid Care Pediatrics, Keller

Masters, Heeten DO Cook Children’s Pediatrics Arlington See ad on page 26

Goodrich, Toyya DO Patient Care Center, Fort Worth Guthrie, Lisa MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Southwest Harris Parkway, Fort Worth Hafeez, Raheela MD UNT Pediatric Clinic, Fort Worth Halpenny, Walter MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Southwest Harris Parkway, Fort Worth Hampton, Catherine DO Cook Children’s Pediatrics Keller Parkway, Keller Harris, Desiree MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Arlington See ad on page 26 Harston, Melanie DO Cook Children’s Pediatrics Hurst Hayward, Tamara MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Southwest Harris Parkway, Fort Worth Henderson, Elizabeth MD Baylor Scott & White Family Medicine, Colleyville

Robinson, Christina MD UNT Health & Pediatrics, Fort Worth

Matlock, Kimberly MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Keller Parkway, Keller McCoy, Michael MD Practical Pediatrics, Grapevine McGehee, Frank MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Magnolia, Fort Worth McKane, Michelle MD Kid Care Pediatrics, Keller Mercer, Bradley MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Forest Park, Fort Worth Morrow, Julee MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Southwest Harris Parkway, Fort Worth Nash, Lisa MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Hurst Nicholas, Catherine MD Cook Children’s Neighborhood Clinic – McCart, Fort Worth

Hopkins, Eric MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Grapevine

Olvera, Rebecca MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Southwest, Fort Worth

Jacob, Shelby MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Keller Heritage, Fort Worth

Phillips, Alice MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Cityview, Fort Worth

Shaw, Daphne MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Henderson, Fort Worth Shori, Vanita MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Grapevine Smith, Justin MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Trophy Club Subramanian, Kalaimani MD Tarrant Community Pediatric, Richland Hills Terk, Jason MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Keller Parkway, Keller Terrell, Amani MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Keller Parkway, Keller Tomberlin, Julie MD Julie Tomberlin MD, Mansfield Vert, Deborah DO Cook Children’s Pediatrics Burleson Wallace, Erin MD USMD Pediatrics, Mansfield Wineriter, Nicole MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Keller Heritage, Fort Worth Young, John MD Young Kids Pediatrics, Fort Worth

RHEUMOTOLOGY

Guirola, Ricardo MD Cook Children’s Rheumatology Clinic, Fort Worth

All Mom-Approved Doctors are nominated by parents. For our full methodology, visit dfwchild.com/doctors.

fortworthchild / june 2018

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mom-approved | P E D I AT R I C I A N S

ORTHOPEDICS

Capelo, Roderick MD Pediatric Sports and Spine Associates, Grapevine See ad on page 26

Daniels, Clive MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Mansfield

Jones, Mark MD Cook Children’s Pediatrics Henderson, Fort Worth


mom-approved | P E D I AT R I C I A N S

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

6-TIME

Vuong Dao, DO; Desiree Harris, MD; & Heeten Masters, DO

WINNER

Pediatrics Cook Children’s Arlington pediatricians understand that taking care of kids means including the whole family. Our board-certified doctors — Vuong Dao, DO; Desiree Harris, MD; Heeten Masters, DO; and Wilfred Raine, MD — are specialists in the health care of infants, children and adolescents. We’re here to help you with well-child visits, vaccines, illnesses, behavior problems or learning disorders or to answer questions all parents have. Our families know their doctor will spend as much time with each patient as necessary, going above and beyond to make sure every child receives the best care possible. Our diverse team includes doctors who have been practicing over 30 years to those recently out of medical school and equipped with the latest knowledge and techniques. Two of our pediatricians are doctors of osteopathic medicine, giving parents the benefit of a variety of perspectives and treatment options. If there is one thing that is of utmost importance to all pediatricians at Cook Children’s Arlington, it is the concept of prevention. Whether it is counseling about how to keep your child well and safe or providing life-saving immunizations to prevent serious infectious diseases, we would much rather prevent a disease than have to treat one. From toddler tummy bugs to navigating the teenage years, our team is with you every step of the way. 3131 S. Center St., Arlington, TX 76014 817-375-1413 www.cookchildrens.org/arlington

Omolara Abitoye, MD, MPH, FAAP Pediatrics Dr. Abitoye is an experienced physician dedicated to the care of children. She is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She has a Master of Public Health Degree from Harvard University and trained at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) where she worked after her residency. Dr. Abitoye currently practices in the DFW area. She loves working with children and

hopes to provide quality care to the pediatric population in the DFW metroplex. When not caring for kids, Dr. Abitoye loves to spend time with her family.

688 W. Pioneer Pkwy., Ste. 120 Grand Prairie, TX 75051 972-642-7337 • 972-642-PEDS • F 972-642-7339 www.acclaimpediatrics.com

Roderick Capelo, MD Pediatric Orthopedics Dr. Capelo completed his orthopedic surgery residency at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth. During his rotation in pediatric orthopedics, Dr. Capelo instantly found his calling, and dedicated his life to treating children. He completed a pediatric orthopedic fellowship at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego. He strives to provide the best care possible and pays extra attention to communicating with his patients and families, so they feel comfortable, even though

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june 2018 / fortworthchild

they may be injured or scared. Dr. Capelo lives in Colleyville with his wife and three children. He enjoys family time, reading, traveling, running and cooking.

2020 W. State Hwy. 114, Ste. 110 Grapevine, TX 76051 817-865-6950 • www.pediatricsportsandspine.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Kathryn Mandal, MD, FAAP

2-TIME

WINNER

Pediatrics After graduating from high school at age 14, Dr. Kathryn Mandal attended prestigious Smith College in Massachusetts. She then attended medical school in San Antonio and completed her residency training in pediatrics in New York. She has been a board-certified pediatrician since 2002. Dr. Mandal started Continuum Pediatrics in 2016 to provide a unique place where patients can get same-day appointments and see the

same doctor every time. As the mother of an ex-preemie with health issues, she understands how difficult it can be and works hard to make convenient access to health care a priority.

9509 N. Beach St., Ste. 102 Fort Worth, TX 76244 817-617-8600 • www.continuumtx.com

2-TIME

Nana Mireku, MD

WINNER

Allergy & Immunology Dr. Mireku is a board-certified pediatric allergist/immunologist who has been serving allergic patients in the DFW Metroplex for 10 years. As an allergy sufferer herself and being the parent of a food-allergic child, she is passionate about providing relief for her allergic patients. She believes in empowering her patients and their families through education of their diseases. In her spare time, she continues her passion for children and education through her role

as chief operating officer of the Little Medical School of Dallas/Fort Worth. This is an educational program that brings medicine, science and the importance of health to children in an entertaining and fun way. USMD Allergy/Immunology 6750 N. MacArthur Blvd., Ste. 350 Irving, TX 75039 972-996-5735 • www.usmdinc.com www.littlemedicalschool.com/dallasfortworth  1-833-DOC-KIDS

Christine Quatro, DO, FAOAO Orthopedic Surgeon Ever since my first pediatric rotation in residency, I knew I belonged working with children. Being board certified and fellowship trained in pediatrics orthopedics means little if you cannot listen to the child and hear their needs. My speciality interests are in the areas for the last 22 years are: • Fractures and scoliosis

• Wrist, finger, knee, ankle, hip, spine injuries • Sport injuries: cheerleading, football, volleyball, gymnastics, basketball and baseball 501 W. Harwood Rd. Hurst, TX 76054 817-268-2758 www.varsityorthopedics.com

mom-approved | P E D I AT R I C I A N S

2018

WHEN YOUR CHILD IS SICK OR HURT, little else matters. Check out our Mom-Approved Doctors directory at dfwchild.com/doctors to find doctors and health care professionals to fit your family’s needs. Each Mom-Approved Doctor is nominated by local moms, just like you.

fortworthchild / june 2018

27


o t y a w a t Ge

MAKE THE KEMAH BOARDWALK YOUR FAVORITE DESTINATION

Waterfront Restaurants • Boutique Hotel • Amusement Rides Stingray Reef & Exhibits • Boardwalk FantaSea Yacht Dinner Cruises Live Entertainment • Speedboat Thrill Ride • Banquet Rooms Iron Eagle Zipline • Unique Retail Stores • Midway Games Arcade • Special Events • Marina

Stay the weekend! 281.334.9880

2018 C A L E N D A R O F EV E N T S O N LIN E

$5 OFF ALL DAY ALL RIDES PASS Clip out and present this coupon to receive $5.00 off an All Day All Rides Pass. Coupon valid for up to five (5) people/five (5) passes. Includes unlimited access to the rides at the Kemah Boardwalk. Does NOT include the Boardwalk Beast, Stingray Reef or Iron Eagle. Coupon must be exchanged at the amusements ticket booth for actual dated wristband. Wristband is valid for day of redemption only. Not valid with any other promotions or offers. No cash value. Tax not included. Must present coupon at ticket booth to be valid. Expires 8/31/18 DC

! s u o r u t n e v d A

e B

215 KIPP AVENUE

KEMAH, TX 77565 281-535-8100 KEMAHBOARDWALK.COM Just minutes from Houston on Galveston Bay.

• 16 Amusement Rides • Midway Games • Shopping • Live Music • Kiddie Big Top Area • Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. • Lt. Dan’s hideaway • Pier Party Zone • Group Events & Packages • Chick-Fil-a express • 5D THEATER RIDE • Much More!

$5 OFF ALL DAY ALL RIDES PASS Clip out and present this coupon to receive $5.00 off an All Day All Rides Pass. Coupon valid for up to five (5) people/ five (5) passes. Includes unlimited access to the rides at the Pleasure Pier. Coupon must be exchanged at the amusements ticket booth for actual dated wristband. Wristband is valid for day of redemption only. Not valid with any other promotions or offers. No cash value. Tax not included. Must present coupon at ticket booth to be valid. Expires 8/31/18 DC TM

2501 Seawall Blvd • Galveston Island, TX 77550 409.766.4950 • 855.789.7437 • pleasurepier.com


kid culture. ACT O R

Sorry kid, no Minions, but KIDS WHO CARE hits all the right notes with their International Musical Theatre Camp.Youngsters in first through 12th grades from around the world are welcome at this three“I want to week, full-day camp. All be a movie star or campers will learn actplay a Minion ing exercises and stage on TV.” presence techniques to —Rainn, 5 prepare for their roles in an original show. Daily cultural immersions about each country represented at the camp—think German dance classes and an Aussie-approved Vegemite tasting—will show young performers that indeed, all the world’s a stage. WHEN: July 8–July 29 COST: $900 WHERE: 1300 Gendy St., Fort Worth; 817/737-5437; kidswhocare.org

SUMMER OF DREAMS 11 summer camps and activities to match your kids’ future ambitions

WORDS ALEXIS MANRODT & LISA SALINAS PHOTOGRAPHY CINDY JAMES

W

hat do your children want to be when they grow up? Maybe a movie star, a scientist, a singer or Spiderman—the possibilities are as endless as their imaginations, and Fort Worth has got kid-approved activities to match. We asked kids from our 2018 Model Search what they want to be when they’re older and rounded up the best summer camps, museums and other local destinations to help them achieve their dreams. Read on to find summer suggestions for your own budding banker or aspiring artist.

“I want to be a banker during the week and a dance instructor on the weekend.” —Jake, 9

BANKER

Youngsters who want to get an early start on their finances can see where more than half the country’s money is printed at the BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING. Learn all about money and its history through interactive exhibits and even take a peek at the moneyprinting process. June 26–29 and July 24–27, the Bureau hosts its annual Employee Craftsmanship Demonstrations, where kiddos can make their own currency. COST: Free WHERE: 9000 Blue Mound Road Fort Worth; 817/231-4000; moneyfactory.gov

“I want to be an artist because I’m a good artist here, right? That’s why I want to be an artist.” —Madeline, 5

ARTIST

Find your inner artist and cowgirl at the SID RICHARDSON MUSEUM. In addition to a very wild wild West art collection, the museum boasts free family activities. Watch a kid-friendly flick followed by a hands-on gallery activity on select Mondays in June. Or enjoy Sid’s Story Time for ages 3–8—again followed by an art activity—every Thursday at 11am. COST: Free admission and activities WHERE: 309 Main St., Fort Worth; 817/332-6554; sidrichardsonmuseum.org

“I want to be a basketball star and play for the San Antonio Spurs.” —Armando, 5

BASKETBALLER

Nowitzki wannabes with hometown pride (fine—and Spurs fans too) can chase their NBA dreams at DALLAS MAVERICKS HOOP CAMP. In each weeklong camp, campers ages 8–18 learn drills used by the pros and practice their passing, defense and shooting skills— fortworthchild / june 2018

29


kid culture / S U M M E R they’ll even have the chance to show off their moves to a real Mavs player. At the end of each week, coaches hold an awards ceremony to celebrate the session’s MVPs. Email basketballacademy@dallasmavs.com for more information. WHEN: June 4–Aug. 10 COST: $250 per week WHERE: Multiple locations; 214/747-6287; mavs.com/hoopcamp Younger kiddos who want to take the court can visit any of the community centers in Fort Worth this summer for CAMP FORT WORTH. Campers ages 5–13 will play basketball, golf and tennis and take field trips to museums, water parks and swimming pools. Visit your local community center for further details. WHEN: June 11–Aug. 10 (except July 4) COST: $270 for nine weeks WHERE: Multiple locations; fortworthtexas.gov

“I want to be a brain surgeon so that I can help people get better.” —Andrew, 8

DOCTOR

The Doogie Howser in your life can put their stethoscope skills to the test at LITTLE MEDICAL SCHOOL. Weeklong camps for kids in kindergarten to sixth grade teach the importance of overall health, medicine and science through interactive crafts and activities, like a good game of pin the organ on the body. And forget camp T-shirts—campers don white coats and even receive a diploma at the end of the program. The Fort Worth camp is held at Fort Worth Country Day; register online. WHEN: June 4–July 27 COST: $175–$300 per week WHERE: 200 Country Day Lane, Fort Worth; 817/732-7718 littlemedicalschool.com 30

june 2018 / fortworthchild

OF DREAMS “I want to be a scientist so I can create formulas and figure out how to make my own gum.” —Zion, 6

“I want to be a girl pilot so that I can fly high in the sky.” —Claudette, 4

PILOT

When she’s old enough, take her to DFW ADVENTURE PARK’s four zip lines, where kids 10 and older can soar high (35–40 feet in the air, to be exact) through the trees. While there, check out the laser tag and paintball attractions too—the perfect regimen for a fun-filled weekend. COST: $40 per person; reservations required WHERE: 13055 Cleveland Gibbs Road, Northlake; 817/854-0085; dfwap.com Future pilots of any age can practice their paper airplane-making skills or build water rockets for blast-off at the FORT WORTH AVIATION MUSEUM. In addition to the hands-on activities, the museum has a “petting zoo” of real military aircraft dating from 1943 to present day, plus a cockpit simulator and two computerized flight simulators to satisfy your kiddo’s need for speed. COST: $5 adults, $1 ages 6–16; free for children under 6 WHERE: 3300 Ross Ave., Fort Worth; 855/733-9627; fortworthaviationmuseum.com

SCIENTIST

We can’t promise you’ll make your own gum, but every weeklong DESTINATION SCIENCE camp will have kids 5–11 making something—from robots and Rube Goldberg machines to a working roller coaster or the next SpaceX spacecraft. Each week, campers work on different scientific experiments, so your kiddos can sign up for all four themed sessions and never get bored with their discoveries. Register online.

WHEN: July 2–Aug. 3 COST: From $309 per week WHERE: Multiple locations; desti-

nationscience.org

“I want to be a singer.” —Holland, 8

SINGER

If your kid already has the rock star attitude, SCHOOL OF ROCK’s weeklong camps will give them a backstage pass to studio recording sessions, one-on-one instruction and a full rock ’n’ roll education, from the Beatles to Aretha. Campers will learn songs from legendary artists and put on a concert for their adoring fans (that’s you!) at the end of each camp. WHEN: June 4–Aug. 17 COST: $495 per week for full-day sessions; $395 for half-day; multiweek discounts available WHERE: 3220 W. Southlake Blvd., Southlake; 682/593-0990; schoolofrock.com

“I want to be a zookeeper so I can drive the tour bus around to show people the animals and feed the kangaroos.” —Sydney, 8

ZOOKEEPER

Until she’s old enough to get her license, you can do the driving to spot bison, cheetahs, zebras, rhinos and more at FOSSIL RIM WILDLIFE CENTER. Take a selfguided safari or board a guided tour bus decorated with giraffe spots. For an extra-special treat, reserve spots on a behind-thescenes tour. Purchase tickets online; book guided tours three days in advance. COST: Self-guided admission starts at $21.95 for adults and $15.95 for ages 3–11; guided tours start at $30.95 per person WHERE: 2299 County Road 2008, Glen Rose; 254/897-2960; fossilrim.org


FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS GOAT YOGA

JUNE 13 • 6-8 PM

SIPPIN’ AND SHOPPIN’ JUNE 21 • 6-8 PM

MARKET ON EXCHANGE

EVERY FRIDAY-SUNDAY • 11 AM-6 PM IN THE HISTORIC FORT WORTH STOCKYARDS

www.fortworthstockyards.com | 817.625.9715 130 E. Exchange Ave. | Fort Worth, Texas

fortworthchild / june 2018

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BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BESTSummer EVER EPIC SUMMER PLANNING STARTS HERE

All Saints’ Episcopal School 9700 Saints Circle Fort Worth, TX 76108 www.aseschool.org/SummerUniversity

Impacting Students for Christ in North Richland Hills since 1958! At Fort Worth Christian School, parents experience a Christ-centered community focused on the formation of their students for the future! In this rigorous academic setting, PK3 to 12th grade students are taught excellence in and out of the classroom. Coming up on our 60th anniversary since opening in northeast Tarrant County, FWC graduates have gone on to great success and lives of service at the university level and beyond!

6200 Holiday Lane North Richland Hills, TX 76180 817-520-6200 www.fwc.org/camps

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Summer University at All Saints’ offers more than 140 classes to encourage academic growth, stimulate imagination and keep students active. Students ages 3 through high school seniors can participate in classes including (varies by age) Robot Transformer Creation, Equestrian, Art, Sky Ranch Launch Camp, Field Hockey, ACT/SAT Prep, Golf, LEGO® Engineering, Choir, Sailing, Chess, College Application Essay Writing, Cooking and many more. Come join the summer fun!

june 2018 / fortworthchild

During our FWC Summer Program, our campus remains constantly busy! Camps are operated by our FWC staff who love Jesus! These Godhonoring men and women seek to provide the most engaging camp experience in the context of a loving, safe environment where your children will be known, loved and valued, just as if they are fulltime FWC students during the school year. Our camp offerings challenge students in the areas of athletics, STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math), fine arts and creative academic programs to continue sharpening the minds of students while enjoying a fun, relaxed atmosphere. We have a variety of camps for all ages, so check out fwc.org/camps and fill up your child’s summer with fun activities that help form them for success in the future!


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

The Children’s Courtyard

575 Hyatt Lost Pines Rd. Lost Pines, TX 78612 512-308-1234 lostpines.regency.hyatt.com

2430 Hwy. 39, Hunt, TX 78024 830-238-4650 • 830-238-4670 jane@hohcamp.com • conor@campstewart.com www.hohcamp.com • www.campstewart.com

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

30 DFW area locations 877-701-4908 www.ChildrensCourtyard.com/summer

Make this summer exceptional. Enjoy a wide variety of weekly themed experiences (exploring interesting subjects such as science, art, animals, history, fitness, world cultures and games), engaging activities, fun field trips, and healthy meals and snacks. Choose your favorite weekly camp themes, or spend the whole summer here. Plus, campers get a new T-shirt, water bottle, and drawstring bag for all their summer adventures! Sounds great, right? Then what are you waiting for? Sign up now for our Summer to Discover Camp, only at The Children’s Courtyard®. Call 877-701-4908 or visit ChildrensCourtyard.com/summer to learn more and find your local school.

Take the ultimate getaway to Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort & Spa this summer. Whether you’re looking for an action-packed vacation or some time to reconnect with one another, Hyatt Regency Lost Pines has it all. From taking Colorado River excursions or horseback rides through the Loblolly Pines to visiting the nearby Zip Lost Pines attraction and floating the lazy river at the resort’s Crooked River Water Park, families can beat the summer heat with an assortment of fun-filled experiences.   The resort also features Camp Hyatt in which children enjoy activities while their parents take time away at the resort’s Spa Django or experience world-class golf at Wolfdancer Golf Club. 

Separate boy/girl camps owned and operated by Ragsdale family, Camp Stewart for boys 6–16, and Heart O’ the Hills Camp for Girls 6–16. Worldwide, limited enrollment, personable and fun! Instruction-oriented, offering more than 50 activities—including English and western riding, Red Cross swimming instruction, sports, canoeing, archery, tennis, climbing and rappelling, survival skills and crafts. Stewart has a unique Trail of Advancement for all boys; older boys specialize in equestrian, ranchman, outdoorsman, sportsman, or campmaster. The Heart has a tradition of etiquette. Also intangibles—self-confidence, teamwork, leadership, individual identity and dealing with challenges. New one-week term (Stewart only), two- and four-week terms.

Camp Clayton 5/29–8/10 Day camp locations in Keller ISD: Eagle Ridge Elem., Independence Elem., Ridgeview Elem., Shady Grove Elem., Sunset Valley Elem. Downtown Fort Worth: Lily B. Clayton Elem. Crowley Area:  Woodway Elem. Keller & Fort Worth — $140/wk Crowley area   — $115/wk Fort Worth and Keller 817-923-9888 www.claytonyouth.org

Sibling discounts and financial assistance available. Register by May 4 and receive 50% off registration fee. Registration fee: $50 one child / $90 family  Ask about our specialty camps! Science, Art, Cooking and Travel. $195/wk for select weeks and locations.

DESTINATION SCIENCE

Multiple Locations in Dallas Fort Worth Area Colleyville, Coppell, Dallas, Fort Worth, Frisco, Keller, Plano 888-909-2922 • destinationscience.org

The fun science day camp where kids ages 5–11 get to have “Aha!” moments of creativity and discovery while building and experimenting with unique take-home toys, astonishing gadgets and fantastic gizmos. Our top-notch, enthusiastic educators make STEM learning an adventure! 2018 topics include Science Makers & Inventors Camp, Amusement Park Science Camp, Transforming Robots Camp and Rovers Rocketing to Space Camp! Enroll in 3 weeks and save an additional $10/wk. fortworthchild / june 2018

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We’ve Got The Inside Track On Fun AIR-CONDITIONED FIRST CLASS COACHES

STEP ABOARD the Grapevine Vintage Railroad and ride between Grapevine’s Cotton Belt Depot and the Fort Worth Stockyards, or on the Trinity River One-Hour Train Excursion.* Travel in authentic 1920s Victorian-era coaches. Treat dad to a special day out aboard the Father’s Day Train on June 17! For tickets, schedules and train information visit www.GVRR.com or call 817.410.3185. *Trinity River One-Hour Train Excursion departs from Fort Worth Stockyards Station.

28329_GCVB_Child_Mags_June_2018_train_ad_v1.indd 1

4/30/18 2:02 PM

Open all summer! Cool off and chill out at Safari Splash! Our 14,000-square-foot splash park is a great way for you and your kids to beat the heat this summer. Equipped with four slides, a water dump tower, animal-shaped water cannons and a designated toddler area, Safari Splash is only $5 with Zoo admission.

$5 with Zoo admission 34

june 2018 / fortworthchild

fortworthzoo.org


kid culture

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WORDS ELIZABETH SMITH

2 4 F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY E V E N T S Y O U C A N ’ T M I S S I N

JUNE across the runway, check out the vendor booths for musthave mommy swag and top local resources for new and expecting parents. Free expo admission. $45 day-of registration for model search. 6121 W. Park Blvd., Plano; 972/447-9188 dfwchild.com/events

TAKASHI MURAKAMI, KLEIN’S POT A, 1994-97, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS MOUNTED ON BOARD IN PLEXIGLASS PHOTO COURTESEY OF THE MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH; ©ISTOCK.COM/MARIGO 20

COMEDIC DAREDEVIL BELLO NOCK

JUNE 13 // INTRODUCE KIDS TO TAKASHI MURAKAMI—THE OCTOPUS EATS ITS OWN LEG AT THE MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH.

PLAZA PALOOZA

S U N DA N C E S Q UA R E June 1–2 Witness the creation of 3D street art this weekend when 16 professional chalk artists beautify Sundance Square Plaza with scenes, portraits and optical illusions. The two-day festival includes a lineup of live music Friday evening and all day Saturday and more entertainment under the umbrellas. FREE 420 Main St., Fort Worth; 817/255-5700 sundancesquare.com

CONCERTS IN THE GARDEN

F O RT WO RT H B O TA N I C G A R D E N June 1–July 4 This weekend concert series features the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, tribute bands and grand finale fireworks shows each night at the botanic garden. Don’t miss the Star Wars music plus laser

light shows June 15–17 for the best dress-up opportunity (and people watching). Pack your own picnic or preorder a Central Market Picnic Pack ($8 each for kids’ meals) and bring a blanket or chairs to settle into the lawn. $25 adults; free for children 10 and younger. Table seating from $35 for adults and $19 for children. 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/665-6000 fwsymphony.org

THE BABY EVENT

T H E S H O P S AT WILLOW BEND June 2 Want to see your child on the cover of Dallas-Fort Worth Baby magazine? Don’t miss our 21st annual cover model search, open to babies 12 months and younger. Reps from our magazine and the Kim Dawson Agency will be waiting in the Plano mall’s Grand Court to meet your child. After your child’s walk

L O N E S TA R PA R K June 2–3 Watch from behind the rails as this tall-haired clownturned-daredevil attempts to shoot himself from a cannon over a helicopter with rotating blades, a feat he hasn’t performed live since he was on NBC’s America’s Got Talent. Don’t be late for the 2:30pm stunt. Come early or stay after to enjoy the bounce houses and a petting zoo both days. Admission from $5 for adults; $3 for children ages 4–12; free for age 3 and younger. 1000 Lone Star Parkway, Grand Prairie; 972/263-7223 lonestarpark.com

FAMILY FESTIVAL – PASSPORT TO ASIA

K I M B E L L A RT M U SE UM June 3 Enjoy free admission to the Kimbell’s special exhibition From the Lands of Asia (saving you $14 for adults and $10 for the kids) on view in the Renzo Piano Pavilion and head outside onto the lawn for kid-friendly fun. Craft demos, art activities and cultural performances run from noon–5pm. FREE 3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/332-8451 kimbellart.org

VOCAL TRASH CHILDREN’S CONCERT

L E V I T T PAV I L I O N June 3 The Stomp-style rock stars

of Vocal Trash are on a mission to make music and teach their young audiences to “think before you throw it away.” Jam along to the band during this live family-friendly concert performed with instruments made of repurposed materials like garbage cans, car mufflers and hubcaps. FREE 100 W. Abram St. Arlington; 817/543-4301 levittpavilionarlington.org

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHTS

L E V I T T PAV I L I O N June 7–July 5 Skip the pricey movie theater and relax outdoors when Levitt Pavilion in downtown Arlington screens familyfriendly films each Thursday this month: Frozen sing-along on June 7, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 on June 14, the new Jumanji on June 21, and Early Man on June 28. Lawn chairs, blankets and coolers (no glass) are welcome. FREE 100 W. Abram St., Arlington; 817/543-4301 levittpavilionarlington.org

KIDS YOGA ON THE PLAZA

T H E S H O P S AT CLEARFORK June 8–29 On select Friday mornings this summer, PoserKids Yoga leads littles through a tailor-made fitness program outdoors at the green space (look for the windmill). RSVP through Eventbrite online and bring your own mat and water bottle for yoga sessions on June 8, 15 and 29. FREE 5188 Monahans Ave., Fort

Worth; 817/985-3773 theshopsatclearfork.com

DAIRY DAY

NA S H FA R M June 9 June is National Dairy Month— aka a great excuse to eat ice cream and experience the Southwest Dairy Farmers’ mobile milking parlor when it stops by Nash Farm. Learn about both the old and new ways of producing milk, butter and cheese, put some elbow grease into the butter churner, and visit the farm’s sheep, chickens, turkeys and rabbits during this all-ages educational day. Registration is required. $3 per person. 626 Ball St., Grapevine; 817/410-3185 nashfarm.org

ALMOST CAMPOUT

A L L IA N C E T O W N CENTER June 9 Want to “camp out” with the kids but don’t want to go without the comforts of home for too long? Get the best of both worlds when Alliance Town Center hosts this summer kickoff on Saturday night. Families are invited to set up their tents and enjoy s’mores, tug of war and craft stations from 6–9pm. FREE 9550 Sage Meadow Trail, Fort Worth; 817/224-6000 alliancetowncenter.com

THE AMAZING RACE – FATHER-SON EDITION

PA R R PA R K June 9 Reality TV Amazing Race contestant and Fort Worth local Tanner Kloven hosts this friendly competition for dads and their sons age 5 and older. For some pre-Father’s Day fun, team up as a family to complete challenges and bypass road blocks, all the while learning about different countries and the tasks

fortworthchild / june 2018

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indigenous to that country. $15 per person by June 3; $20 beginning June 4. Tickets will not be sold at the door. Fathers are allowed to participate with up to three sons. 3010 Parr Lane, Grapevine; 817/410-3450 gograpevine.com/fatherson

DISNEY’S PETER PAN, JR.

A RT I S A N C H I L D R E N ’ S T H E AT E R June 9–July 14 It’s the “second star to the right and straight on till morning” to Neverland for local kids performing in the Hurst theater production each Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Watch the live adventures of the Lost Boys, mermaids and Captain Hook in this hourlong musical based on the 1953 animated film and J.M. Barrie’s original play. $11 adults; $7 children age 12 and younger. 444 E. Pipeline Road, Hurst; 817/284-1200 artisanct.com

WONDERFUL WEDNESDAY

THE MODE R N A RT MUSEUM O F F O RT WO RT H June 13 Venture out to the Fort Worth Cultural District for a kid-friendly introduction to the Modern’s latest exhibit, Takashi Murakami—The Octopus Eats Its Own Leg (opening June 10) during this program for ages 5–12. A docent leads them on a tour and gallery project that focuses on the 50-work retrospective for the Japanese artist, known for his vibrant anime-inspired characters and collaborations with Kanye West and fashion house Louis Vuitton. The program begins at 4pm and space is limited. Sign-up opens at the front desk the day of the program. FREE 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth; 817/738-9215 themodern.org

INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET

Passport Project booth. Kids earn a treat after collecting stamps in a special market passport. Admission from $10 online; free for youth age 16 and younger. Free for all from noon–2pm on Saturday. 700 S. Center St., Arlington; 817/271-5809 folkartmarket.org/arlington

PAPAPALOOZA

H E R I TAG E PA R K A M P H I T H E AT E R June 17 For an adventurous Father’s Day Sunday, head west to Weatherford (about 30 miles outside Fort Worth) for this actionpacked festival with everything from an obstacle course, field day games and SWAT team simulators to an exotic petting zoo and a dunking booth. $10; $5 children ages 3–12; free for under 3. Proceeds benefit the Chandor Gardens Expansion Project. 378 Jack Borden Way, Weatherford; 817/913-7300 tinyurl.com/papapalooza

TRINITY SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

TEXAS C H R I S T IA N U N I V E RSIT Y June 19–July 8 Theater students at Texas Christian University bring on the dramatics for the 10th anniversary season of the Trinity Shakespeare Festival. Bring your theaterloving kids to experience the period costumes and the poetic verse of the Bard’s comedy Twelfth Night and his best-known tragedy Romeo and Juliet. Tickets from $20. 2800 S. University Drive; Fort Worth; 817/257-8080 trinityshakes.org

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT

F O RT WO RT H C O M M U N I T Y A RT S CENTER June 21–24 Musical legends Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice

UT ARLINGTON CAMPUS June 14–16 Experience the cultures of 30 countries through the lens of artisan crafts when this second annual international market brings global folk art, cuisine and live entertainment to The Green at College Park. Plan to go on Family Day Saturday and stop by the 36

AGENDA

june 2018 / fortworthchild

dreamed up this biblical pop musical 50 years ago, and in honor of the musical’s golden anniversary, the young actors of Kids Who Care Musical Theatre present the laughout-loud story of Joseph’s coat of many colors on the W.E. Scott Theatre stage. $20 adults; $17 children age 15 and younger. 1300 Gendy St., Fort Worth; 817/7375437 kidswhocare.org

GET WET

Cool off this summer with these wet and wild, and even foamy, events around Fort Worth. You’ll need your swimsuits for floating the wave pool and wading in the Trinity River and possibly a snorkel for one whimsical run through a wall of bubbles. DIVE-IN MOVIES

N R H 2 O FA M I LY WAT E R PA R K June 22 Beginning with the 1939 original movie The Wizard of Oz, the water park screens a different film over the wave pool after dusk each Friday through August 3, except June 29. Grab a tube and float in the wave pool (turned off during the movie) or lounge on the beach. Come as early as 10am to play all day and stay through the evening for no additional charge: $28.99 for those taller than 48 inches; $21.99 for those shorter; free for kids 2 and younger. Half off admission after 5pm. 9001 Blvd. 26, North Richland Hills; 817/427-6500 nrh2o.com

BUBBLE RUN

LEGO MINI BRICKFACTOR BUILD-OFF

L E G O L A N D D I S C O VE RY C E N T E R June 21 Long before Lego Batman swooped in, did you know the 1978 Police Officer was one of the first modern Lego Minifigures? Legoland Discovery Center celebrates the 40th anniversary of their beloved mini-people with a building competition for kids ages 5–15. Preregister online by June 11 and participate for a chance to win a one-day apprenticeship with the master model builder. See the brand-new collection of Minifigures and enjoy more 40th birthday surprises June 23–24 and June 30–July 1. Competition is free. Other activities included with admission: $21.95 for age 3 and older. 3000 Grapevine Mills Parkway, Grapevine; 877/818-1677 dallasfw.legolanddiscoverycenter.com

SUMMER DANCE CONCERT

T H E H E A RT O F T H E R A NCH AT CLE A RFORK June 22–24 Fort Worth dance company Ballet Concerto pays tribute to its Spanish dance heritage and to its guest choreographer and noted flamenco dancer Luis Montero with a weekend of outdoor performances at this wooded event space near The Shops at Clearfork. Pack your own blankets and chairs, or rent chairs at the event, and settle in to watch the evening concerts. Free for lawn seating; reserved table seating from $50. 5000 Clearfork Main St., Fort Worth; 817/738-7915 balletconcerto.com

T E X A S M O T O R S P E E D WAY June 23 Picture this: a bubble bath you can run through! This weirdly relaxing 5K features a “foam bog” of colorful, 100 percent safe bubbles. Stroll or dance through the bogs at the starting line and at each mile mark, plus through the foam cannons at the finish line. Bring a towel, a change of clothes, and sunglasses or swim goggles for the kids to help keep the bubbles out of their eyes. Jogging strollers and wagons welcome. $50 for the noncompetitive run and a swag bag; $65 VIP. Free for kids 4 and younger with adult registration. Proceeds benefit the nonprofit A-T Children’s Project. 3545 Lone Star Circle, Fort Worth bubblerun.com

SUNDAY FUNDAYS

PA N T H E R I S L A N D PAV I L I O N Opens June 24 Through September 2, spend your lazy Sunday afternoons at a beach party on the shores of Panther Island Pavilion. Float the Trinity River in inner tubes ($5 to rent) or check out the other watersports including kayaks, canoes and pedal boats. Admission, PoserKids Yoga on select Sundays and activities such as giant Jenga are all free. On June 24, buy one get one free tube rental with a food donation for the Tarrant Area Food Bank. 395 Purcey St., Fort Worth; 817/698-0700 sundayfundayfw.com

CURRENCY CRAFTSMANSHIP DEMONSTRATIONS

WESTERN CURRENCY FAC I L I T Y June 26–29 Assigning extra chores around the house this summer? Show your kids where their allowance comes from by visiting the Bureau of Engraving and Printing facility that produces over half of the nation’s paper money. All week, select employees lead educational activities, including Intaglio engraving demonstrations and a create-your-owncurrency craft station for age 8 and older. FREE 9000 Blue Mound Road, Fort Worth; 817/231-4000 moneyfactory. gov/fortworthtxtours.html

ARLINGCON

U TA U N I V E R S I T Y CENTER June 30 Go all out and dress up yourselves and the kids as your favorite characters and cavort with other enthusiastic cosplayers, pro and amateur alike, at the Arlington Public Library’s free and familyfriendly comic convention. Explore the exhibit halls and game room for maximum entertainment from 10am– 6pm. The all-ages Cosplay Runway begins at 1pm in The Plaza, and the contest is at 5pm. FREE 300 W. First St., Arlington; 817/4596900 arlingtonlibrary.org/ arlingcon

F O R M O R E F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY F U N T H I S M O N T H , C H E C K O U R O N L I N E C A L E N DA R AT D F W C H I L D.CO M/C A L E N DA R.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DAVID MOORE; NATHAN KEAY; ©ISTOCK.COM

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confessions

“My gut begins rumbling while standing in line at Disney. After the ride, I sprint to the bathrooms. During my bathroom break, I hear my son tell my daughter, ‘NO!!!! Don’t lick the trash can!’”

MOMMY FAILS

—BECKY, ALEDO

ILLUSTRATION MARY DUNN

IT WAS I was planning RAINING WHEN I the perfect first ARRIVED HOME WITH MY SON. birthday party for my son, with custom plates. Didn’t notice I misspelled his name… I GRABBED MY Happy Birthday Natheniel.” USUAL LOAD TO BRING “My husband routinely “My kids were INSIDE AND and playfully slaps me arguing and I just on the butt, saying, PUT SLEEPING didn’t have patience ‘Hey, Boo.’ As we were BABY ON MY visiting him at his job, to respond calmly. SHOULDER. MY my son DJ walks up In anger, I picked up FOOT SLIPPED behind my husband’s a wooden stool and AND I FELL. boss, slaps her on slammed it several the butt and LUCKILY, I WAS says, ‘Hey, Boo!’” times on the floor STILL HOLDING while screaming HIM PERFECTLY at them to stop. AND ONLY I broke one of MOMMY WAS Got a parenting fail you’d SOAKED.” the stool’s legs.” like to share? We’d love to —MARIA, DALLAS

—KELLINY, CEDAR HILL

—ELIZABETH, CARROLLTON

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june 2018 / fortworthchild

hear from you. Send it to editorial@dfwchild.com.

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I’M AT TARGET AND MY 3-YEAR-OLD TELLS ME HE NEEDS TO GO POTTY. I FIGURE I MIGHT AS WELL USE IT WHILE I’M THERE TOO. AS SOON AS I SIT DOWN, MY SON YELLS, ‘MOMMY, ARE YOU MAKING POO-POO TOO?! ARE YOU GOING TO HAVE BAD POOPS LIKE ME?!’ THE WOMEN IN THE OTHER STALLS BURST INTO LAUGHTER.” —ANGELA, LAS COLINAS


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FortWorthChild June 2018  

The magazine parents live by in Tarrant County

FortWorthChild June 2018  

The magazine parents live by in Tarrant County